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SCHOOL DISTRICT WELCOMES NEW PRINCIPALS /PAGES 14, 16

Friday, September 5, 2014 u One dollar


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Claremont
claremont-courier.com
LETTERS/ PAGE 2, 7
CALENDAR/ PAGE 18
All Claremont news, all the time.
Visit claremont-courier.com.
POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4
Pixley/ PAGE 6
t
t
Bright lights,
Big Bridges/
COURIERphotos/Steven Felschundneff
Claremonter Dorothy Finerty poses for a photo
with Dodgers slugger Matt Kemp as her son
Tom Finerty snaps a pic on Wednesday before
the start of the game against the Washington
Nationals at Dodger Stadium. Dot, who will
celebrate her 100th birthday on September 29,
was selected to throw out the first pitch on
Senior Day at Chavez Ravine.
A true BLUE
Dodger dream
come true/PAGE 12
PAGE 3
Water is not a commodity
Dear Editor:
Why should Claremont have control
of its water supply?
As a community, we are responsible
for preserving our life-sustaining envi-
ronment. Not just for ourselves, but also
for those who will live here after us, and
for the wildlife, trees and plants that
make Claremont a wondrous place.
Thats why Claremont residents
should vote YES on Measure W. All of
us should support the city council, which
is acting responsibly on our behalf in
seeking public control of the Claremont
water system.
Corporations claim that private owner-
ship and management of water resources
will be more efficient and less costly than
public control. Yet, paying high returns to
stockholders and sky-high compensation
to executives confirms that corporate
ownership of water is all about profit.
Corporations that sell commodities,
such as cars and coffee, provide a public
service even as they make a profit. Com-
peting with other commodity sellers en-
courages efficiency and keeps the price
down.
But a corporation with exclusive
rights to a communitys water supply
lacks the competition that keeps costs
and prices low. And without competition,
theres no incentive to be more efficient.
A corporation with exclusive rights to a
communitys water can simply claim
that rising costs justify higher rates.
Private ownership of a communitys
water supply is wrong, because water is
not a commodity. Water is natures price-
less gift and the life-sustaining pulse of a
community. Public control of the Clare-
mont water system will allow us to con-
serve and share this treasure responsibly.
Robert Traer
Claremont
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 2
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont
Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of
California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage
is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about sub-
scriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Tele-
phone: 909-621-4761. Copyright 2014 Claremont Courier
one hundred and sixth year, number 35
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4761
Office hours: Monday-Friday
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Publisher and Owner
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Newsroom
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Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Education Reporter/Obituaries
Sarah Torribio
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Sports Reporter
sports@claremont-courier.com
Photo Editor/Staff Photographer
Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com
Reporter At Large
Pat Yarborough
Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch
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Production
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Page Layout
Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch
Website
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Legal Notices
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ADVENTURES
I N HAI KU
Black and yellow swarms
Fuzzy little bumble bees
Ouchy, they stung me
Jessica Gustin Pfahler
Haiku submissions should reflect upon life
or events in Claremont. Please email entries
to editor@claremont-courier.com.
Agendas for city meetings are avail-
able at www.ci.claremont.ca.us
GOVERNING
OURSELVES
Tuesday, September 9
City Council
Council Chamber, 6:30 pm
Wednesday, September 10
Architectural Commission
Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
READERS COMMENTS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 3
CITY NEWS
S
ustainability planning is a global
concern and Pomona Colleges ef-
forts toward becoming a more sus-
tainable campus continue to inspire.
Projects such as the Solar Rover, a mobile solar sta-
tion used to power campus events and activities as
well as programs like Clean Sweep/ReCoopwhich
involves collecting unwanted items at the end of the
school year and reselling them at discounted prices
aim to promote responsible living within the Pomona
College community.
Over the course of the summer, that green sensibil-
ity was expanded with a much-needed renovation to
the 40-year-old lighting system at the Mabel Shaw
Bridges Auditorium.
The process began a little over a year ago, ex-
plains Kurt Beardsley, production manager at Bridges
Auditorium. We needed to replace a $5 piece on our
dimmer and we started talking about how hard it is
find the parts to replace it. That one conversation set
off a chain of conversations that turned into a million
dollar renovation.
Built in 1931 at a cost of $600,000, the more than
60,000-square-foot auditorium was designed by archi-
tect William Templeton Johnson and its stage has
hosted the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Benny Goodman
and President Bill Clinton. Now, gone are the out-
dated house lights, replaced by energy-efficient LED
lights and tape light systems that not only showcase
the beauty of this architectural gem but will save the
institution that envelopes it thousands of dollars per
year.
Pomona College puts green effort into overdrive at Bridges Auditorium
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
Bridges Auditorium Production Manager Kurt Beardsley oversaw the transformation of the electric lighting at
the historic theater from incandescent to LED over the last year. He estimates that the switch will save Pomona
College thousands of dollars a year in energy bills.
BIG BRIDGES/continues on page 5
Wednesday, August 27
Homebuilder DR Horton became the
victim of grand theft when more than
$5,600 in framing materials were taken
from the Serrano construction site. The
unknown suspects forced their way into
the gated lot located on the 2000 block
of Mountain Avenue. Thieves comman-
deered a forklift, moving large concrete
pillars for better access to the 4-by-8 and
2-by-4-foot pallets. The suspects made
off with the goods undetected.
Thursday, August 28
Home burglars continue to target
Claremonters, and residents continue to
help them by leaving their windows and
doors unlocked. Unknown suspects en-
tered a home on San Benito Court
through an unlocked bedroom window
and made off with various items includ-
ing a television, laptop, jewelry, clothes
and books as well as other items totaling
more than $10,000. The suspects remain
at large.
* * * *
Chino resident Kandee Lewis was ar-
rested after she was spotted driving a U-
Haul reported stolen out of Pomona on
August 22. A traffic stop was conducted
around 11 p.m. and the 51-year-old
woman was arrested without incident.
According to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek,
officers conducted a search of the vehi-
cles cab and discovered a locked safe. A
key to the safe was found in the suspects
wallet and, once opened, stolen property
including personal mail, bank statements
and a crack pipe were found. Ms. Lewis
was placed in a jail cell where she pro-
ceeded to vomit on the bed and floor,
telling officers she was going to have a
stroke. She was later released on $25,000
bail and transported to Pomona Valley
Hospital to be treated.
Friday, August 29
An elderly driver caused minor dam-
age at the Joslyn Center when his vehicle
unexpectedly drove onto a grassy em-
bankment. The 82-year-old man told of-
ficers that something was wrong with the
cars accelerator, however, neither the of-
ficers nor the tow truck driver could find
anything wrong with the car. The driver
was given a DMV re-examination form
and released.
* * * *
Thieves with a serious case of the late-
night munchies raided Claremont High
School and left quite a mess in their
wake. The unknown suspects entered the
campus and forced their way into the
water polo snack shack by prying open a
security shutter on the west side of the
shed. Once inside, the sneaky snackers
helped themselves to $40 worth of vari-
ous food items and sodas and then ran-
sacked the place before fleeing over the
south fence.
* * * *
Pianos werent the only things dueling
at a favorite Claremont hangout when a
verbal altercation between siblings esca-
lated into a bloody battle between
friends. Suspect Christian Deleon, 24,
was drinking with his sister and some
buddies at PianoPiano around 11:15 p.m.
when he wanted to leave the location and
the others didnt. The West Covina man
began arguing with his party in the Dou-
bleTree parking lot when things turned
physical. During the course of the fight,
Mr. Deleon allegedly picked up a rock
and struck a male friend of his sister. The
victim suffered two half-inch lacerations
to the head. Mr. Deleon was arrested for
assault causing great bodily injury and
released on $30,000 bail.
Saturday, August 30
A big, red sign with the words
STOP just wasnt enough to deter
thieves from taking it. Around 11:30
p.m., unknown suspects broke a wooden
post displaying the reflectorized stop
sign on the corner of Bucknell and
Doane Avenues. The cost to repair the
post and replace the sign is $300.
Monday, September 1
A Claremont resident was arrested
after his stepdaughter alerted police that
he had been video recording her nude
without her permission. The 20-year-old
victim had just taken a shower and re-
turned to her bedroom when she found a
hidden cell phone, belonging to her step-
father, recording her every move. She
went through the phone and discovered
prior videos taken in her room, showing
the man setting up the camera. The 46-
year-old suspect was arrested and re-
leased on $25,000 bail.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 4
CITY NEWS
POLICE BLOTTER
Claremont Kids defend Disney
villains, impress COURIER staff
Congratulations to Julia Lopez, who won first place
in a COURIER newspaper contest in which kids were
asked to defend a Disney villain.
For her eloquent defense of Jafar from Aladdin,
she has won a 4-pack of tickets to go see "Disney
Live! Mickey's Music Festival" with her family on
Friday, September 19 at the Dolby Theatre in Holly-
wood. Her essay and accompanying drawing will be
featured in the October 17 installment of the paper's
monthly Claremont Kids section.
Kudos also go to the runners-up, Tatyana Lacklin
defending Sharp from High School Musical 2 and
Gabriella Ayala defending Ursula from The Little
Mermaid. Tatyana's and Gabriella's essays will also
run in October's kids pages.
Each of the girls is in fifth grade at Vista del Valle
Elementary School. In acknowledgement of their fine
efforts, the newspaper will also be presenting
COURIER T-shirts to the students.
Congratulations to all three talented Claremont
Kids. And thanks to their teacher, Danita Slaughter,
for encouraging them to enter the contest!
Police promotions, public art
master plan highlight Tuesdays
council meeting
Its back to business for Claremonts city council
members as meetings resume on Tuesday, September
9 at 6:30 p.m.
Among the items listed on the agenda are the intro-
duction of new commissioners and promotions within
the Claremont Police Department as well as public
hearings on the Public Art Master Plan and the Ser-
rano II residential project.
The city council meets the second and fourth Tues-
day of each month in the council chamber, located at
225 Second St. An agenda for the meeting is posted
72 hours in advance of the meeting on the citys web-
site. A public comment period is held at the beginning
of each meeting for the public to discuss any item not
on the agenda.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
City participates in pre-hearing
conference at PUC for water
rate increases
The city of Claremont has filed a protest in the
2016-2018 Golden State Water General Rate Case,
according to a release posted on the citys website.
As a party in the case, Claremonts legal counsel at-
tended a pre-hearing conference on September 2 be-
fore the Public Utilities Commission in San
Francisco. Also attending the pre-hearing conference
were representatives from Golden State Water Com-
pany and the Office of Ratepayer Advocates.
At the pre-hearing conference, city representatives
requested a public participation hearing to be held in
Claremont, to which the administrative law judge
agreed. The city of Ojai has also requested a public par-
ticipation hearing and filed a notice of protest in the
General Rate Case proceedings, which typically take at
least 18 months before a decision is made.
Claremont staff and legal counsel will participate in
the rate case proceedings, according to the press re-
lease, which states they will represent Claremont
residents, businesses and educational institutions,
which depend on Golden State Water for water serv-
ice. The city has filed protest letters in the last five
rate cases filed by Golden State Water.
City approves demolition permit
for residential development
The city of Claremont issued a demolition permit
this week for the residential development planned by
William Lyon Homes, at the southwest corner of Base
Line Road and Towne Avenue.
The demolition will include the removal of an ex-
isting abandoned concrete and stone water tank lo-
cated towards the easterly side of the site, fencing
south of the tank, a chain link fence along the western
edge of the property along Towne Avenue, several or-
namental trees on the eastern portion of the site and
pavement leading to the former location of the straw-
berry shed. The strawberry shed has already been re-
moved.
No grading or other construction will take place
until after the remaining elements of the project are
approved by the citys architectural commission, who
will review the plan at their meeting on Wednesday,
September 10. Until then, construction fencing will
be installed to secure the site, control dust and deter
potential on-site dumping, according to city staff.
Residents with questions or comments or those seek-
ing additional information should contact Luke Seibert
by email at lseibert@ci.claremont.ca.us or by calling
(909) 399-5483.
Last chance to play it cool in
statewide challenge
The 2014 CoolCalifornia City Challenge is coming
to a close at the end of the month and your contribution
has never been more important. The City of Trees has
slipped into second place behind Riverside, yet again,
but theres still time on the clock to take the lead.
Claremonters have until Monday, September 29 at
11:59 p.m. to log on and earn points towards winning
a portion of the $50,000 to be distributed between
cities based on the number of points accumulated.
This is the last opportunity to enter energy and vehi-
cle data for August.
As of Thursday, September 4, Claremont residents
participating in the challenge have racked up
1,597,368 points, gaining almost 90,000 points in the
six days since our last update. As previously reported
on August 29, Riverside had taken the lead last week
and continues to lead the pack with 1,692,861 points.
Second place isnt bad, but first place is definitely
better. Claremont has traded the top spot with River-
side several times over the course of the challenge de-
spite the fact that Riverside has almost twice the
number of residents participating in the program.
With its 381 participants, Claremont took the lead
from the city of Riverside in July after logging more
than 45,000 points in four days.
The city with the most points at the end of the five-
month challenge period will be crowned the Coolest
California City for 2014 at an awards ceremony at
the Air Resources Board meeting in October. In addi-
tion, two runner-up cities will each earn the title of
Cool California City, and be awarded second and
third place prizes. All cities will receive prize money
based on the percentage of overall points earned by
participants in their city during the competition.
For details, visit www.coolclimate.berkeley.edu/
challenge.
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 5
The last time the lights were replaced was in
1971, explains Mr. Beardsley. By swapping out the
175 incandescent for LED, were dropping from
42,800 watts to about 12,000 watts, which will save
us about $10,000 a year on our electrical bill.
In addition to the house lights, 16 new LED stage
lights were recently installed, all of which will be op-
erated by a new state-of-the-art touch screen dimming
and lighting control system.
We went from 60 dimmers to 384 dimmers, says
Mr. Beardsley. Replacing the control system from the
1970s gives us much more control over the lighting.
Not only is the new system cost-effective, it also
enhances the aesthetics throughout the auditorium
more so than incandescent lighting could ever do.
A demonstration of just how much control is af-
forded by the new lighting system was displayed on
Big Bridges ceiling, which depicts the signs of the
zodiac in blue, silver and gold. With a mere touch of a
button, Giovanni Smeraldis 22,000-square-foot
mural was instantly transformed into a breathtaking
nighttime sky.
What LED can afford you is the red, green and
blue light. Were playing with some blue and making
the gold and silver dome almost come to life; they re-
ally showcase the architectural detail, says Mr.
Beardsley.
Installed by ANC Productions located in Burbank,
the LED lighting project will provide better and more
flexible lighting options for productions and events in
the auditorium. The new dimmers will also allow for
more varied lighting options and will require less out-
side equipment to be brought in for major concerts
such as the taping of Taylor Swifts VH1 Story-
tellers special in 2012.
Once you go down the road of creating sustainabil-
ity in a building constructed in the early 1930s, its
easy to look ahead to future projects. Everyone is
aware of the lack of air conditioning in Bridges, so
wed like to tackle that one day. Perhaps a new sound
system to meet the needs of all the different con-
certsnew drapes for the stage. The list could go
on, says Mr. Beardsley.
According to Mark Kendall of Pomona Colleges
Department of Communications, the $858,000 up-
grade at Bridges Auditorium is part of the colleges
ongoing effort to install more energy-efficient lighting
and promote sustainability. Newly-installed LED
lights and a dimming control station in Lyman Hall
will reduce lighting wattage use to less than 20 per-
cent of what it was previously. Pendleton Dance Cen-
ter will also be receiving new LED lights in the near
future.
In a testament to the colleges investment and com-
mitment to sustainability, Pomona has taken its quest
outdoors as well.
Last summer, the college removed a parking lot just
outside Bridges and replaced it with primarily native
and drought-tolerant landscaping, adding special per-
meable pathways that still allow rainwater to reach
the soil. In what was once the paved Bridges parking
area, theres also a 50-foot deep drywell for storm
water reclamation, allowing rainwater that doesnt
soak into the soil to flow into the well to reach the
aquifer.
Green building also plays a significant role in
Pomona Colleges sustainability plan.
In 2005, the college began implementing green
building standards, requiring all new construction and
major renovations be built to at least LEED silver or
equivalent standards. In 2006, those standards were
updated to require all new construction to be built to
at least LEED Gold standards.
LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design) is a set of rating systems for the design, con-
struction, operation, and maintenance of green build-
ings, homes and neighborhoods. Developed by the
US Green Building Council, LEED is intended to
help building owners and operators be environmen-
tally responsible and use resources efficiently.
To date, Pomona College has eight buildings certi-
fied under LEED guidelines:Pomona Hall and Son-
tag Hall (LEED Platinum), Lincoln Hall and
Edmunds Hall plus three in the Buildings and
Grounds complex on First Street (LEED Gold) and
Richard C. Seaver Biology Building (LEED Silver).
Their dedication to green building continues with
the upcoming addition of the Studio Art Hall and Mil-
likan Science Hall, which are currently under con-
struction. Both projects have been designed to a meet
at least LEED Gold standards.
If youd like to take a Sustainability Tour of
Pomona Colleges campus and see its achievements
firsthand, log on to: www.pomona.edu/administra-
tion/sustainability/resources/publications/susttour.pdf
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
BIG BRIDGES/continued from page 3
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
The majestic interior of the historic 1931 Bridges Auditorium has retained all of its grandeur, even with the trans-
formation from incandescent to new low-energy LED lights. Almost all of the lighting at the theater has been
converted to LED with the exception of the spotlights, which will be changed as the technology advances.
Claremont Lincoln University gains two new masters programs
T
he Western Association
of Schools and Col-
leges has granted full
approval to Claremont Lincoln
Universitys new masters de-
gree program in interfaith ac-
tion as well as its masters
degree program in social im-
pact, the university announced
this week.
Final approval for the two programs
was granted by the WASC Senior Col-
lege and University Commission last
Friday. Claremont Lincoln Universitys
masters degree program in ethical
leadership was approved earlier.
This is great news for the university
and for our students, said Eileen
Aranda, who was named president of
Claremont Lincoln University in Au-
gust. The WASC committee reviewed
and examined each degree program
carefully and put its full institutional
support behind them. It proves that
these are rich, rigorous graduate-level
programs on par with any other WASC-
approved program in the nation.
The Master of Arts in interfaith ac-
tion is a 30-unit graduate degree pro-
gram designed to equip participants
with the knowledge and skills neces-
sary to succeed as leaders in religiously
diverse, multi-cultural contexts.
Coursework leading to completion of
this degree is offered entirely online
through the universitys learning man-
agement system. Curriculum consists
of graduate-level studies in religious lit-
eracy and awareness, civic engagement,
interfaith entrepreneurship, public life
and research models and methodolo-
gies taught by top scholars and practi-
tioners in these fields.
The Master of Arts in social impact
equips emerging entrepreneurial leaders
with the knowledge and skills neces-
sary to implement change in a dynamic
world. Coursework involves a unique
series of 10 rigorous online courses
taught by thought-leaders and expert
practitioners in their respective fields.
Students integrate the foundational ca-
pacities taught in the Claremont Core
aimed at helping students develop
awareness of self and others, engage in
dialog and collaboration across differ-
ences and craft effective strategies for
organizational and community transfor-
mationwith graduate-level studies in
foundational practices, action-oriented
strategies, resource models, personal
development and storytelling to com-
municate vision and inspire change.
In addition to these two new pro-
grams, Claremont Lincoln University
also offers a Master of Arts in ethical
leadership. The MEL program offers an
integrated approach to leadership de-
velopment that teaches working profes-
sionals to approach challenges as more
ethical leaders in a diverse, globalized
world. The program includes a unique
series of online courses that integrate
personal awareness, professional profi-
ciencies and global consciousness for
more mindful, compassionate leader-
ship in any organizational context.
Visit www.claremontlincoln.org for
more information
T
here were lots of choices. Red.
Blue. Green. Purple. Purple, I
said.
Then I thought for a minute. Would purple go with
most of what I wear? I do wear mismatched high-
tops, not to mention rainbow laces, but I can and do
change them everyday.
Green. I changed my mind. Green would still be
colorful and interesting, not boring, but it would fit in
with more of my outfits. Green goes with both blue
and brown, right? After all, I wasnt picking out a
shirt or some pants or another pair of high tops. No,
Id be stuck with this for a while.
Who knew that casts were now a fashion accessory,
coming in a variety of bright, exciting colors? I re-
member when they were all white, except when
friends painted and signed them. And who knew I
would be having a cast put on my right foot, much
less being asked what color I wanted it to be? (It actu-
ally turned out that my cast is more of a nice, cool
coral.)
Maybe this was appropriate, with summer ending
and all that. Im sure there are a few students in Clare-
mont returning to school with a broken foot or arm.
Summer is all about adventure, at least for students,
and broken bones sometimes come with adventure.
Breaking a bone is almost a rite of passage when
growing up.
But I have never broken or fractured a bone, and
Im a long way from being a student. Maybe I still
have some growing up to do, even now.
And I wasnt on an adventure when I brokeactu-
ally fracturedmy right foot. Whats more, I didnt
know for a while that my foot had a fracture.
I was just out, as usual, and barely a block from my
house, when I hit my right foot as I was going up a
curb. So much for adventure. My foot hurt for a day
or two and then was fine. I thought I had sprained it,
as I have more than enough in the past, and that it had
gotten better nice and quickly, just in time for a camp-
ing trip (now, theres some adventure, especially since
it was the weekend of the freak rain storm). It was not
until two weeks later that I found I couldnt handle
pressure on my foot, and it swelled up like a Macys
Thanksgiving Day parade float.
It was a few days before I could get this lovely
green coral cast put on. Its much more comfortable
and really just more of an inconvenience than any-
thing. Imagine dragging around a five-pound weight.
But, although this is probably something a good num-
ber of people know about and dont have to imagine,
even if it might not be an unusual part of the end-of-
summer/back-to-school experience, breaking (or frac-
turing) a bone isnt something Id recommend. I
would rather have lived my life without this experi-
ence.
I never thought Id see school in Claremont start in
late August in my lifetime and have returning to
school be old news by early September. And even
Claremonts start was late, with schools in Pomona
and Los Angeles beginning two weeks earlier. Sure,
this has been the case for several years, but this is still
a strange new world where Labor Day is just another
holiday (and an odd one, with school just underway)
and not the last blast of summer vacation.
Labor Day no longer means that it is time to get
ready for school to start. And what about white shoes?
Is it now okay to wear them before Labor Day? Or
does anyone still wear white shoes?
It also turns out that my palate has changed. Either
that or school food is still school food. Which is the
case is tough to say. I have remarked before that the
college students menus on the campuses here is
worlds away from what I had to choose from in the
dormitory dining hall when I was at UC Riverside.
Not only is the range of choices eye-popping, with at-
tractive vegetarian and vegan options, the food is not
bad. A long way from mystery meat.
Still, when I went to the school food tasting fair at
El Roble Junior High a few weeks ago this was be-
fore I found out my foot was fracturedI was re-
minded that, sometimes, things stay the same even as
they change. I had heard in previous years about this
annual opportunity to taste and rate the food to be
served in Claremonts schools and decided to check it
out.
It was exciting, at least at first, to see the line up of
vendors around the school auditorium. But I have to
say that the potato tacos tasted not unlike the burritos
served when I was a kid in school, and the mac and
cheese was just mac and cheese. Some of the granola
bars were better than others but yogurt is yogurt. And,
no, I wasnt interested in the Round Table Pizza.
Jaded palate? Mature palate? I dont know but, as I
said, it was still school food. As if I was expecting
something else.
No, the thing the struck me about the Wednesday
morning event was how festive it was, with families
on an outing and costumed characters and face paint-
ing in the mix. Two weeks before classes started, it
was a nice, gentle nudge for going back to school.
Perhaps its the new Labor Day. Its certainly easier
than a fractured foot.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 6
observer
observer
Back to school and a young mans game
by John Pixley
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 7
Check your own bill
Dear Editor:
I recently assigned myself a chal-
lenge: eview my Golden State water
bill and see if I can make sense of all of
the various charges. In other words, see
if I can come up with the same bill total
as Golden State.
First off, theres a Service Charge.
Well, thats pretty self-explanatory.
Then, the water usage by tier. So, I
multiplied my usages by the listed tier
rates. Okay, that checks out.
And now its on to that ever-mysteri-
ous grouping Surcharges, Fees &
Credits, which includes such well-
known line items as CARW,
WRAM, MCBA, and the ever-
ubiquitous-and-not-to-be-overlooked
Other.
Fortunately(?), on their website,
Golden State furnishes a guide to help
us called Surcharges and Surcredits
(yes, you read that correctly)all 14
pages of it. So, I launched into it, confi-
dent that I could unscramble this whole
mish-mash.
Alright, CARW, usage times the
rate. Thats okay.
WRAM/MCBA? Yes, MCBA, the
old Modified Cost Balancing Account,
how could I forget? The calculation for
WRAM checks out, but Im still $5.08
short of the total for this line, and un-
able to find any help in the 14 pages
online.
And last but not least, $5.18 in
Other surcharges/credits. For this
item as well, I found no aid or guidance
in the 14 pages online.
So, in total, that's $10.26 that I cant
explain or verify, which leaves me with
the thought that if Golden State is going
to screw us, the least they could do is
explain the detailsfor the sake of
transparency, dont you know. Or, then
again, perhaps they just dont want to,
so I cant find mistakes or figure out
what is keeping my water bill is so
high.
Douglas Lyon
Claremont
Too many unknowns
Dear Editor:
I want to thank Marilee Scaff for her
reply (Inaccurate Assumptions, Au-
gust 29) to my earlier letter, in which I
had outlined a number of significant
obstacles to the citys takeover of the
water system via eminent domain.
I believe that Claremont is long over-
due for a serious discussion that fo-
cuses in detail on the particular costs
and risks of this venture.
Ms. Scaff is incorrect in her con-
tention that the city has the right to take
over the water system merely by ap-
proving a resolution of necessity. Un-
like ordinary eminent domain seizures,
where the resolution is a mere formal-
ity, the proposed taking of utility prop-
erty can be challenged in court. I am
sure that the city attorney would be
pleased to verify this for anyone who
cares to ask.
As I mentioned in my letter, there is
no precedent for such a legal challenge.
In the Felton case, the utility waived its
trial rights and voluntarily agreed to sell
the system to the local water district.
Golden State has made it clear that it
will oppose Claremonts resolution of
necessity in court, and neither Ms.
Scaff nor anyone else can predict the
outcome.
Ms. Scaff is undoubtedly correct that
any figures of value are merely guess-
work, which was the point of my let-
ter. The bond measure is on the ballot
precisely because our city officials un-
derstand that the ultimate price can and
probably will be much higher than the
citys $55 million appraisaland quite
possibly more than we can afford to
pay. The only thing we can say with
certainty is that it will cost us millions
of dollars just to find out how high the
jurys verdict will be.
As to Ms. Scaffs assertion that in-
vestors will be eager to buy our revenue
bonds, I would note that the Casitas
Municipal Water District (which is try-
ing to take over the Ojai water system
from Golden State) decided not to use
revenue bonds due to cost, timing and
tax issues, all of which are equally ap-
plicable to our situation.
The acquisition attempt will fail if in-
vestors refuse to buy our bonds on fa-
vorable terms, but so far the city has
not even bothered to seek the opinion
of qualified underwriters and rating
agencies as to their prospective mar-
ketability.
Having said all that, I have no doubt
that Ms. Scaff sincerely believes, as she
said in her letter, that we cannot af-
ford not to own our water system. But
according to the citys own projections,
the status quo would actually be a far
more favorable outcome for resi-
dentsas the immense cost of repaying
$135 million of debt will immediately
and significantly raise our rates for the
next 30 years.
I am not affiliated with or supported
by Golden State or any other group or
organization. I am simply a longtime
resident who appreciates the unique
charms of Claremont and cares deeply
about its future.
For the past two years, I have pa-
tiently and persistently urged the coun-
cil and staff to take a hard look at all of
the things that can go wrong with this
venture, and the serious consequences
if they do. Unfortunately, this hasnt
been done. In fact, at the town hall
meeting last November, the city staff
explicitly warned the council that we
cannot afford to spend millions of dol-
lars from the general fund to pursue this
venture. They went ahead and did it
anyway.
There is not a single example of a
California city that has successfully
consummated a hostile takeover of a
water utility, but there is a long list of
cities that have blown up their budgets
and credit ratings pursuing poorly
thought-out schemes. I dont think we
should take the chance of that happen-
ing here.
Jim Belna
Claremont
READERS COMMENTS/next page
READERS COMMENTS
CORRECTION
In an August 22 article about
CUSDs new Service Center, dis-
trict locksmith Brian Howland was
misidentified in a caption. The
COURIER apologizes for the
error.
Water is life
Dear Editor:
The Pomona Valley Chapter of Pro-
gressive Christians Uniting (PCU) voted
unanimously at its June meeting to sup-
port the effort of the citizens of Clare-
mont to take ownership of their water
system. For those of us representing dif-
ferent expressions of the faith commu-
nity, water has significant and
multifaceted meanings.
Through the water of the womb we
all come into this life. Water is the out-
ward and visible sign of new life as in
the sacrament of baptism and rites of
purification. In the desert wilderness,
water used in the act of foot washing is
a sign of hospitality. Indeed, water is a
metaphor for life itself in the sacred
texts and practices of many of our reli-
gious traditions.
Water is a part of the commons we all
share. Like the village green of a New
England community, water belongs to
all. Water, like grace, is freely given
from the heavens, flowing pure and
clear, bringing the verdant spring and the
autumn harvest. Like the air we breathe,
it ought not to be owned for profit by
anyone.
Now, the city of Claremont seeks to
reclaim this vital resource from a private
concern whose major responsibility is to
benefit a select group of stock owners
and fund an outrageously overpaid man-
agement. We wish to say unequivocally
that we stand with the people of Clare-
mont as they seek to reclaim this public
resource for the commons. Water ought
not to be treated as a commodity to be
sold to the highest bidder.
We of the Pomona Valley Chapter of
Progressive Christians Uniting wish to
go on record as supporting the represen-
tatives of Claremonts City Council in
their efforts to secure this vital resource
for the future generations of their citi-
zens. We wish them Godspeed. And we
urge a yes vote on Measure W on No-
vember 4.
Karen Sapio
Pomona Valley Chapter Convener, PCU
John C. Forney
Pomona Valley Chapter Organizer, PCU
As the wells run dry
Dear Editor:
In the city of Claremont, immigrant
gardners and landscapers weave in and
out of city streets unnoticed as water
ratepayers and the city council pound the
drums of a November election battle in a
takeover effort of Golden State Water
Company while the rest of California is
in a severe drought. Once the battle is
over, perhaps things can get back to
being normal in affluent Claremont.
The superintendents in Los Angeles
took drastic measures to deal with the
water crisis in California and on July 22
took steps to impose mandates handed
down from water officials in Sacra-
mento. Fines of $500 will be enforced
for those caught red-handed using ex-
cess water. Its a step being taken to get
things back to normal after being misin-
formed by Metropoltan Water District
and member agencies that water conser-
vation efforts were a sucesss these past
two years but turned out to be a
pompous lie.
In the LA region, where there are
more water districts then Jimmy Carter
has peanuts, there is a water shortage of
a different kind. Water agency board
seats are not being challenged, while a
watered down water bond measure set
for November has caught the deaf ear of
Governor Jerry Brown.
Meanwhile, back in affluent city of
Claremont, the city council pinched the
citys general fund $1 million for cam-
paign purposes in a water takeover of
Golden State Water Company as the
wells in the hills run dry.
John Mendoza
Pomona
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 8
READERS COMMENTS
With nearly eight in 10 California voters supporting im-
provements to the states initiative process that increases
clarity and provides voters more information, SB 1253
(Steinberg) was approved by the California senate.
SB 1253, the Ballot Initiative Transparency Act
(BITA), will create clearer initiatives, simpler ballots and
better information for California voters. Introduced by
Senate Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, BITA is supported by
a broad and diverse group of organizations that includes
the League of Women Voters of California, California
Common Cause, California NAACP and the California
AARP, among others. These organizations, with more
than 60 civic groups, spent the past year sharing ideas and
opinions for changes to determine what would make the
greatest improvements and enjoy the most support.
Although voters greatly value the voice that the initia-
tive process provides them, increasingly they also feel like
it no longer works as well as it should and that too often
special interests highjack the process.
BITA keeps what voters like most about the process
based on polls and focus groups, as well as PPICs polling
and discussions with dozens of civic organizations
while making improvements to the parts they feel work
least well.
What BITA will ensure is that the information voters
receive will be better, Helen Hutchison, president of the
League of Women Voters of California said. Voters de-
serve clear and straight-forward information about what
initiatives do. This bill creates guidelines to ensure that
the information voters receive is written in clear and
straightforward language.
The main elements of BITA would:
Give voters more useful information about initiatives
so they can make informed decisions;
Enhance the Secretary of States website and use of
digital channels, giving voters one-stop access to infor-
mation about individuals and groups behind each initiative
and exposing the sources of funding;
Allow voters to request an email version of the voter
guide, reducing the costs of printing and mailing the
guides;
Create ballot materials that are drafted in clear and
straight-forward language. Voters overwhelmingly want
voter-friendly, understandable ballot statements and ar-
guments.
Require ballot statements to make it clear if they raise
or impose a tax or repeal an existing law and avoid tech-
nical jargon;
Identify and correct mistakes in an initiative before it
appears on the ballot. Now, initiative backers have few
options to correct or withdraw initiative language, even
when legal flaws are identified. This law would give vot-
ers an opportunity to comment on initiatives before they
are circulated for signature;
Require the legislature to hold earlier public hearings
to review initiatives;
Allow the authors of an initiative to withdraw it after
petitions and signatures are certified, but before ballots
are printed, simplifying the ballot.
BITA would address California voters greatest con-
cerns about the current initiative process. According to a
recent PPIC survey, 83 percent of Californians agree that
initiative wording is too complicated and confusing, 84
percent favor increasing public disclosure of funding
sources for both signature-gathering and initiative cam-
paigns. Almost as many, 77 percent, support a review
process to help avoid legal problems and drafting errors.
BITA attempts to alter the opinion of most Californians
that the initiative process has been dominated by big-
money special interests that are able to spend more than
$10 million and rely heavily on paid signature gathering
firms. Californias initiative process began in 1911 by then
Governor Hiram Johnson in order to bring issues to the
people rather than have special interests make the laws. In
short, BITA will return voting power to the people.
Proponents of the act believe potential voters will take
a renewed interest in participating in the initiative process
as complicated language that leads to voter apathy will be
clarified. This will support a more participatory demo-
cratic process and enable the voters of California to be
empowered so our system of democracy can function ef-
fectively. Voters will receive more information so that they
can make informed decisions. It will also advance mean-
ingful reform by allowing initiative backers to make
changes to their proposals.
Under the proposal, backers of an initiative would lose
no power and have nothing taken away from themin
fact, they would gain added power. Currently, initiative
backers cant make corrections and changes and cant
work out a better proposal with the Legislature that would
potentially save themselves money and taxpayers money
down the road.
VIEWPOINT
Changes to the initiative process moving forward in Sacramento
By Ellen Taylor, VP for Advocacy, League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 9
I
love church. I absolutely
love Sunday morning wor-
ship services, Tuesday
evening city council meetings,
even the annual budget
process, which continues to
surprise me.
For years and years, I was deeply bit-
ter about church, angry at people in my
faith tradition. I was suspicious of peo-
ple who spoke in the name of God, ever
waiting for judgment and a fight. As a
gay person, even just as a woman, there
seemed to be no room for me, let alone
affirmation, in Christianity. Which
didnt stop God.
Christianity as a religion, a literally
man-made system, could not control ho-
liness. To borrow Dorothy Days im-
agery, I fell in love with God. God
courted me in my heart and soul and I
fell in love outside of any institution and
with a lifesaving passion. Unbelievably,
I found myself on my knees praying,
reading scripture, shyly asking friends
of faith how they reconciled their faith
with the troubles of religion.
Eventually, I found my way back into
Christian worship, the language I was
most familiar with, and ordained parish
ministry in the United Church of Christ
(UCC). And I am back as all of who I
am, all of who I am before God: a gay
married woman, a white American con-
stantly engaging my unearned advan-
tages, a critical reader of scripture. In
the UCC, God and I found a community
to weather the inevitable ups and downs
of our love, a community of support and
constant learning.
And it is because of those values of
support and constant learning that my
local church, Claremont UCC, asks me
to serve on the Claremont Interfaith
Council.
A core value of the UCC is that God
is still speaking (which is why our pri-
mary logo is a comma). Meaning, just
as I experienced in my own life, God is
bound neither by scripture nor contem-
porary cultural practices. We affirm
many Christian testimonies to faith like
the Apostles Creed, the Nicene Creed,
and our own formal faith statement. But
we do not use them as tests. Professing
any one of them is not required for entry
or standing before God.
Engaging with seekers and believers
of other faith traditions, then, comes
naturally to us. How is God speaking
through other scriptures, hymns and lan-
guages? How do other forms of dia-
logue with the divine reveal Gods
nature? How have our Jewish cousins,
whose scripture we adopted/co-opted,
understand that shared scripture?
Which isnt to say that in answering
those questions everything goes. Our
posture of engagement and curiosity is
always grounded in our location as
Christians. We are intentional followers
of Jesus Christ. But interfaith engage-
ment helps us to clarify our position(s)
and how we come to adopt them, with
integrity.
Interfaith relationships help us under-
stand what characteristics of God we
take for granted and what we have ig-
nored so that we can be clearer and
stronger in our Christian confession.
And, along the way, be better Christians
for actively practicing genuine and re-
spectful love of our neighbors.
A colleague recently commented,
after spending a Sunday leading wor-
ship with me, that you really put it out
there for each and every person you
meet. Meaning, when I am in the re-
ceiving line or just standing around, she
saw me genuinely greet each person,
hopefully by name and with some men-
tion of events or people in their lives. I
have often had people also comment on
how much energy I have when I am on
our campus, how happy I seem.
We live in a saturated marketplace.
The opportunities for how to spend our
non-working hours (if we are fortunate
to be able to be employed) are vast.
And, frankly, video games, movies,
swimming pools, coffee shops and
theme parks are a whole lot more com-
pelling than worship services, commit-
tee meetings and budget spreadsheets.
We also live in a polarizing era in
which issues and positions are consis-
tently framed as either/or and black or
white. Inundated by data, room to be
thoughtfully in the grey is drowned and
crowded out.
So how could I be anything but de-
lighted when people show up on a Sun-
day morning? How could I not be
energized when I am in love?
For as much as I love church, my true
adoration and affection is for the sa-
cred more-than that sought me out be-
yond church. The holiness that freed me
of my pain and anger at the human insti-
tutions constructed in Gods name that
then allowed me to return to that same
institution and find an unending source
of resilience and joy. It is that deep
source, speaking through chaos and dis-
traction, that drives me to honor all
seekers and all traditions, while living
with my own with spiritual and reli-
gious integrity.
Maybe you dont love church. Maybe
you really loathe or disdain it or are
simply uninterested. But are you driven
to address inequalities? Have you expe-
rienced burn out or bitterness toward
others? If so, I invite you to explore
Claremonts many faith-based commu-
nities. God is calling out to you
maybe you just need to find the right
language for your own hearts response.
Eileen Gebbie is the Senior Pastor at
Claremont United Church of Christ.
Her previous experience includes teach-
ing, community organizing and non-
profit administration at a low-income
housing agency.
Inter-Faithfully SPEAKING
Exploring spirituality in a faith-based community
by Eileen Gebbie, Senior Pastor at Claremont United Church of Christ
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff
by Eileen Gebbie, Senior Pastor at
Claremont United Church of Christ
architect
WOOTTON + HARDYMAN
ARCHITECTURE
595 Clarion Place
Claremont, CA 91711
(626) 536-9699
www.wharchitecture.com
Client-conscience, Design-conscience,
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 10
MIKE F. OBRIEN
Attorney at Law
212 Yale Avenue
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
www.facebook.com/moblawoffices
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful
death cases. Se habla espaol.
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation
414 Yale Avenue, Suite K
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law,
Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning,
Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.
architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com
Building a better Claremont
since 1985
attorney
attorney
attorney
WILKINSON &
WILKINSON
341 W. First Street
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 482-1555
Certified Specialists in Trusts, Probate
and Estate Planning. Litigation of same
attorney
Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA
140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E
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www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa
Specialize in small business accounting
and tax planning since 1962.
accounting
Kendall &Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law
134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont
since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation
with Children, Property Division, Alimony,
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PROFESSIONAL
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HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD
100 West Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com
Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic
restorations, and custom home building
architect/contractor
Call Mary Rose at (909) 621-4761 for information.
counseling
JOHN B. REID, PhD
(909) 646-0798
Individual and relationship
counseling.
Grief recovery issues.
www.stmcounseling.com
real estate broker
Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI,
E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty
Phone: (909) 621-0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
#1 in Claremont sales &listings since 1988
Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time
Meticulous care and attention to detail
tax preparation/EA
D. PROFFITT, EA
Claremont, CA 91711
Phone: (909) 445-1379
dee@dproffittea.com
Visit my website at
www.dproffittea.com
Income Tax Specialist since 1981
Payroll Service Accounting
SRS GENERAL
CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
www.srsgeneralcontractor.com
Practical design, tastefully executed.
Residential Remodel
Restoration of Unique & Vintage
homes Room additions.
design/build
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S.
D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
Cosmetic & General Dentistry
615 W. Foothill Blvd.
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 624-6815
1 Hour In-Office Bleaching, Veneers,
White Fillings, Dental Implants, Dentures.
LIGHTFOOT RALLS
& LIGHTFOOT LLP
Certified Public Accountants
675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300
Claremont, CA 91711
(909) 626-2623
Tax Planning & Preparation Accounting
c.p.a. financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER
Professional Securities offered through
LPL Financial
Member of FINRA/SIPC
419 Yale Ave. Claremont
(909) 625-1052
Your financial security is my priority
Ann M. Johannsen, O.D.
Brad A. Baggarly, O.D.
OPTOMETRY
695 W. Foothill Blvd.
Established 1972
(909) 625-7861
www.claremontoptometry.com
Eyemed - VSP - MES - Medicare
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DR.MARTINS. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.
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(909) 621-1208
Joint &Muscle Pain Headache
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Most Insurance accepted
Personal injury
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dentist
NEW CAR GUIDE
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Don McDonald, Pharmacist
Health insurance
333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
(909) 635-8933
RXDonald@gmail.com
New to the Golden Age? New to the area?
Leaving your employer or union coverage?
Need extra help paying for prescriptions?
We focus on your health and your healthcare
healthcare
CHS grad completes Air Force
basic military training
Air Force Airman Jonathan T. Baldwin graduated
from basic military training at Joint Base San Anto-
nio-Lackland in San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an intensive, eight-week
program that included training in military discipline
and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness
and basic warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic training earn four
credits toward an associate in applied science degree
through the Community College of the Air Force.
Mr. Baldwin is a 2010 graduate of Claremont High
School.
Abrolat earns scholarship to
attend University of the Pacific
Jessica Abrolat, a Claremont High School graduate
and standout girls basketball player, has been selected
as one of ten freshman Powell Scholars at University
of the Pacific in Stockton. Established in 1851, the
University of the Pacific is the states first university.
This program, named in honor of two former uni-
versity regents, comes with a $35,000 yearly scholar-
ship, extensive enrichment and career preparation
opportunities, and funding for undergraduate research
projects and study abroad.
Ms. Abrolat, who plans to pursue a major in engi-
neering physics, was selected out of hundreds of ap-
plicants from around the world for this extremely
competitive program.
Project Series 49: Sam Falls
presented by Pomona College
Museum of Art
Project Series 49: Sam Falls will be on view
through December 19 at the Pomona College Mu-
seum of Art, 330 N. College Ave., Claremont. The ex-
hibition represents the first solo museum exhibition of
the Los Angeles and New York-based artist. The artist
will present new work, including several of his signa-
ture weather-driven paintings and a new site-specific
outdoor sculpture composed of an altered pickup
truck filled with succulents.
A public reception will be held tomorrow, Satur-
day, September 6 from 5 to 7 p.m. and an artists talk
will be held Tuesday, September 9 at 1:30 p.m. Both
events will take place at the museum and are open to
the public. There is no cost to attend.
In his work, Mr. Falls investigates the mutability of
perception, examining entropy, the artistic process,
and the natural processes of decomposition and dete-
rioration, particularly the long-term effects of sunlight
and weather. His newest rain-works, on display in the
exhibition, expand his exploration of the shifting ter-
rain between nature, place, and duration. By using
sun and rain instead of a paintbrush or camera, the
works echo Mr. Fallss interests in process art and the
dialogue between abstraction and representation.
While influenced by 1970s art historical move-
ments, including Minimalism, Earth art, Process art,
and Los Angeles-centric Finish Fetish and Light and
Space, Mr. Falls also embraces the very contemporary
intersection of the digital, historical and natural. His
study of various photographic processes has guided
his thinking about light, time, place, and elements.
The Sam Falls exhibition is the 49th in the Pomona
College Museum of Arts Project Series, which pres-
ents southern California artists in focused exhibitions
and is curated by Rebecca McGrew. A catalogue, de-
signed by Nicholas Gottlund, accompanies the exhibi-
tion and includes essays by Ms. McGrew and writer
David Pagel. The Project Series is supported in part by
the Pasadena Art Alliance.
The Pomona College Museum of Art is open to the
public, free of charge, Tuesday through Sunday from
noon to 5 p.m., and Thursday from noon to 11 p.m. For
more information, call (909) 621-8283 or visit the mu-
seums website at www.pomona.edu/museum.
Pomona Valley Hospital Med-
ical Center receives high marks
Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center (PVHMC)
has been ranked as one of the best hospitals for 2014-
15 in the Los Angeles metro area by US News & World
Report. The annual US News Best Hospitals rankings,
now in their 25th year, recognize hospitals that excel in
treating the most challenging patients.
PVHMC ranked 32nd in California and 17th in the
Los Angeles metro area. Additionally, the hospital was
recognized as high-performing in cancer, nephrology,
pulmonology and urology.
The rankings are available at
www.health.usnews.com/best-hospitals and will appear
in the US News Best Hospitals 2015 guidebook,
which is available now.
Claremont resident named to
board of end-of-life advocacy
organization
Rev. Dr. Ignacio Castuera, a Mexican-American
civil and human rights leader, has joined the board of
directors and southern California advisory board for
the nations leading end-of-life choice organization,
Compassion & Choices.
A resident of Claremont, Rev. Castuera will advo-
cate for the recently launched Compassion &
Choices campaign to allow death with dignity for ter-
minally ill, mentally competent adults in California.
A dedicated activist, Rev. Castuera has championed
numerous causes that have grown quickly into wider
acceptance. He was the national chaplain for Planned
Parenthood for six years, married gay couples on na-
tional and international television, and has been a
strong voice in the movement to legalize the medical
practice of aid in dying for terminally ill adults. Five
states currently allow it: Oregon, Washington, Mon-
tana, Vermont and New Mexico.
I am very excited for this opportunity to get more
deeply involved in the end-of-life choice movement
during this critical moment in its history, said Rev.
Castuera. As a co-author of Oregons first in the na-
tion death-with-dignity law, Compassion & Choices
President Barbara Coombs Lee is a leader on this
issue. I know we will make a great team because I can
help this great organization with outreach to the His-
panic, religious, civil and human rights communi-
ties.
Born and raised in Puebla, Mexico, Rev. Castuera
has been a pastor in Mexico, Hawaii and California.
Currently, he is the director of the Latin America Proj-
ect of the Center for Process Studies at the Claremont
School of Theology. He also holds a doctor of reli-
gion degree from Claremont School of Theology and
taught Contemporary Theology at Southern
Methodist Universitys Perkins School of Theology
for 25 years.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 11
OUR TOWN
Liberia
Josephine
Setlich
Liberia Josephine Setlich, a former Claremont
resident, died on August 25, 2014 in Mission
Viejo.
A visitation will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Fri-
day, September 5 at Funeraria del angel Pierce
Brothers Griffith, located at 13002 S. Central Ave.
in Chino. A funeral mass will be held Saturday,
September 6 at 9 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes
(10191 Central Ave. in Montclair), followed by in-
terment at Bellevue Cemetery in Ontario.
C
laremont resident and
soon-to-be centenarian
Dorothy Dot Finerty
set out on a sunny Wednesday
afternoon to check off another
item on her bucket list. After
weeks of preparation, the life-
long Dodger fan got called up
from the bullpen to throw out
the first pitch at Dodger Sta-
dium on Senior Day.
My son asked what I wanted for my
birthday, and I wondered if itd be pos-
sible to throw out the first pitch at a
game, Dorothy said. It looks like
thats going to happen.
Making Mrs. Finertys wish come
true was no small feat, but with the help
of some truly caring friends with one
common goal, Finerty was on the
team roster for the Dodgers vs. Nation-
als game on September 3. Team Dot
was finally born.
I had no idea if it would be possi-
ble, Dorothys son Tom said. But how
do you turn down that kind of request?
We needed to make it happen and we
did. Its really exciting!
From Brooklyn to Los Angeles
Dots affinity for the Dodgers started
at an early age and has spanned over
nine decades. In that time, the team has
seen a lot of changesincluding a
move from Brooklyn to Los Angeles
but for this die-hard fan, little else has
changed.
I dont think the game of baseball
has changed that much, she says. Just
that new rule about instant replay.
As a child growing up in New York
in the 1920s, Dorothy and her six
younger siblings would sit, huddled
around their father A.J., as he called the
live action during the Brooklyn
Dodgers games. My dad built a crys-
tal set with earphones, it had no speaker.
This was before most people had ra-
dios, she says. He would listen to the
game and give the play-by-play to us
kids. That was my introduction to the
Dodgers.
In 1941 and fresh out of nursing
school, Dot and her friend loaded up the
Ford and made the move across the
country to Los Angeles where she later
met the love of her life, utilities man-
ager Fred Finerty. The couple married
in 1943, started a family and built their
life together in southern California.
Roughly 10 years later, the Brooklyn
Dodgers followed her out to Los Ange-
les and Dots love affair with Dodger
blue was solidified. Even Fred, an Okla-
homa native, became a Dodger fan.
When the Dodgers moved out here,
I was just thrilled because I could go to
the games, says Dorothy. We would
go and meet up with friends at the top
with a view of the beautiful city. And
after the game wed take our folding
chairs, sit back and enjoy the lights.
The moon would be out and wed drive
off with no problems. Everyone would
be gone.
Although the Finerty family lived in
several cities throughout the Los Ange-
les area, in their later years Mr. and Mrs.
Finerty settled in Claremont. Their old-
est daughter, Molly, now a special edu-
cation teacher at Claremont High
School, attended Pomona College and
the City of Trees left an impression on
the couple.
We always thought this was a lovely
town and when we retired we thought
wed look into it. Look into it they did,
and when they found a house to rent on
the corner of 12th and College Avenue
they were hooked. We liked it so well
we just stayed there.
After 59 years of marriage, Mr. Fin-
erty passed away in 2001 and Dorothy
remained in Claremont where she con-
tinues to live independently in an apart-
ment near the Village. I live here by
myself with a little help a few hours a
week, and I think thats keeping me
going, Dot says. Two years ago, I
fractured my hip so that keeps me on a
walker, but otherwise I get along fine.
Pre-game training
With her pitching debut fast ap-
proaching, Dot recruited longtime
friend and former Stanford University
pitcher Maurice Coach Mo Leblanc
to help work on her technique. Wearing
her Dodger ball cap and with a MLB
ball in hand, the pair worked together
every week for a month, perfecting
Dots right-handed pitch for the big day.
Im going to throw overhand be-
cause most everyone throws under-
hand, Dot said during a final practice
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 12
Claremonter shows true colors as longtime Dodger fan
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Thirty-year Claremont resident Dorothy Finerty chats with the COURIERstaff during her last day of training before she headed
to Dodger Stadium for the first pitch ceremony. Below, Mrs. Finerty practices her toss with her coach Maurice Leblanc at
Claremonts Village Green senior apartment complex.
DODGER BLUE/next page
session Tuesday afternoon. Im nerv-
ous about the pitchthat I wont make
it right, that it will go on the ground.
You know what, Mom, even Ker-
shaw warms up. Youre better today
than you were yesterday, said her son
Tom, cheering her on from the sideline.
She doesnt want to quit until she
works up a sweat.
Game day
On Wednesday morning, Team
Dotincluding friend Patricia Dillon,
Coach Mo, son Tom and Dorothy
decked themselves out in Dodger blue
and hopped in the car to caravan to
Chavez Ravine.
Upon their arrival, Team Dot was
greeted by a dozen friends and a mem-
ber of the Dodger Blue Crew escorted
Dot and her Doterage down to the
field. But not before presenting her with
her official uniform: a Dodger jersey
with Finerty emblazoned across the
back, followed by the number 100.
Well, isnt that something, said Dot
with a smile as she put on the jersey.
Isnt that just something!
On the field, Dot was the star, posing
for photos and giving interviews to
news stations interested in her major
league journey. I cant believe Im
here, she said. Ive seen it on TV, I
watch every game, and Ive sat in the
seats, but Ive never been down here.
She even met one of her favorite
players, Matt Kemp, who took a few
moments to introduce himself prior to
the game and wish Dot luck on her cere-
monial pitch.
At 12:07 p.m., Dot took to the mound
and, with Drew Butera behind home
plate, she threw the first pitch like a big
league closer. The crowd in the stands
went wild with cheers and Dots Dodger
dream was realized.
It was a good pitch, said Coach Mo
with his contagious smile. Sometimes
pitchers, they throw underhand and to
the side, but not Dot. Practice makes
perfect.
I wasnt as nervous as I thought I
would be, said Dot, leaving the
field.Even Butera said it was a good
pitch.
After the pitch, Dot made her way up
to section 134 where she would join her
Team Dot rooting section of more than
30 family members and friends who
came out to support her. Fans stopped
her mid-path, asking for autographs.
Im really impressed by her, said
Hilary Vongerlech, who asked Dot to
sign her Dodgers jersey. She has a true
love of the game and to see her out there
on the field today was just really inspir-
ing.
Dot is a remarkable woman, says
longtime friend and former backdoor
neighbor Patricia Dillon. Shes a natu-
ral athlete, completely without preten-
sions, and loves everything. Shes just
happy. The older I get, I have a greater
appreciation for our friendship and all
that she has accomplished. Shes a won-
der.
Post-game agenda
With her big Dodger day behind her,
Dot looks forward to finishing out the
season with her boys in blue.
It is my daily routine. I watch every
game, from Spring Training through the
end of the season, says Dot. I pour
myself a glass of wine and enjoy the
game. I just love Vin Scully. I hope I
survive another year so I can listen to
him next year.
Asked who her favorite players are,
I think I have two favorites, Kershaw
and A.J. Ellis, because my Dads name
was Arthur Julius (A.J.) I dont think
Ellis gets enough notoriety.
When shes not watching Dodger
baseball, Dot keeps herself busy with
various activities including a knitting
group at the Joslyn Center and a weekly
game of Skip-Bo.
That also keeps me young. We put
in a quarter each time. Weve never
done thatwe just started this year. It
will make it a little more interesting,
she says with a giggle.
On September 27, Dot will be cele-
brating her 100th birthday with a big
bash, including family and friends who
will be traveling from as far away as
Korea and Rome to celebrate the mile-
stone.
My 97-year-old little sister will be
there, and I have a lot of friends com-
ing, says Dorothy. Im looking for-
ward to it.
Dots longevity may very well be
summed up in her description of Skip-
Bo. A lot of it is the luck of the cards
and a lot of it is strategy.
Heres to a hand well-played, Dot.
Happy 100th!
Angela Bailey
news@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 13
DODGER BLUE/from previous page
COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff
Television crews interview Dorothy Finerty just before she takes the mound to throw out the first pitch on Wednesday at
Dodger Stadium. Mrs. Finerty, who turns 100 later this month, has become quite the media darling since she was selected
to throw the ceremonial first pitch on Dodger Senior Day.
Dot Finerty gets some last-minute tips from her pitching coach Maurice Leblanc
following their practice session on Tuesday in Claremont. Mr. Leblanc, who was a
collegiate baseball player, has been getting Mrs. Finerty ready for her big day at
Dodger Stadium.
Dot celebrates with her friends and family after returning to the stands following
her successful toss to Dodger catcher Drew Butera. She had a large group of fans
including her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 14
N
atalie Taylor stepped in as Moun-
tain Views interim principal last
February after the schools former
head, Clara Dehmer, moved on to a post
as assistant principal of student services
at Claremont High School.
This year, its official.
As Ms. Taylor becomes Mountain Views perma-
nent principal, she will likely have less of an adjust-
ment period than most new administrators. Its not
just because she had several months last year to get
her feet wet. Ms. Taylors previous post was a
decade-long stint as a classroom teacher at Oakmont
Elementary School.
We often resist following in our parents footsteps,
and Ms. Taylor is no exception. When she enrolled at
Claremont Graduate University after earning her bach-
elors degree at Azusa Pacific University, she was ini-
tially focusing on womens studies and religion.
I didnt want to teach, because my mom was a
teacher, she said.
She began substitute teaching on days she didnt
have class, thoughexclusively in the Claremont Uni-
fied School Districtand was immediately smitten.
I loved it, she said.
Things fell into place quickly for Ms. Taylor, who
switched courses and got a teaching credential. While
she was a substitute, she covered Kevin Wards class
at Oakmont Elementary School. Mr. Ward was im-
pressed with the way she handled his students and so
the next year, when he became Oakmonts principal,
Ms. Taylor was one of the first teachers he hired.
She was a teacher at Oakmont for several years
under the leadership of Mr. Ward. After Mr. Ward be-
came CUSDs assistant superintendent of human
services, Ms. Taylor taught for three years under the
guidance of current Oakmont principal Stacey Stew-
art. She feels fortunate to have worked with both ad-
ministrators, whom she considers mentors.
Mr. Ward is the consummate relationship-builder,
Ms. Taylor said. She has learned from his example
how important it is to connect with every stakeholder
at a school, from teachers to students to parents. Her
time with Ms. Stewart brought other lessons.
Stacy is the most intense instructional leader. She
is so knowledgeable when it comes to instructional
leadership, Ms. Taylor said. I learned so much
about good teaching from her. Between what I
learned from Kevin and what I learned from Stacey, I
like to think Ive become a pretty good balance of the
two.
She has not only become good friends with Ms.
Stewart but also with her husband Dave Stewart, the
principal at Vista del Valle Elementary School. One
reason she feels a connection with the Stewarts is they
all have a keen interest in outdoor activities.
Ms. Taylors family includes her husband Heath,
her 3-year-old daughter Clare and her 6-year-old son
Max (who just happens to be best friends with his
Oakmont classmate, the Stewarts son Matthew).
The Taylors spend as much of their time outdoors
as possible, snowboarding, waterskiing, wakeboard-
ing and racing cars in the desert. Ms. Taylor, who
grew up in Alta Loma, has enjoyed racing since she
was a kid because her dad builds racecars for a living.
She has already begun to emulate the way the
Stewarts incorporate athletics into their schools. Last
year, she instituted lunchtime leagues where students
got to compete in sports like soccer and basketball
during their break, and she plans to do that again this
year. Ms. Taylor will also be following the example of
Oakmont and Vista in bringing Project Championa
program where students of all ages log miles of run-
ning during the school yearto Mountain View.
Ms. Taylor is also an advocate for taking care of the
outdoors. She began the recycling program at Oak-
mont years ago and worked diligently with Mr. Ward
to transform the campus into the Oakmont Outdoor
School.
I was always known as the green teacher, she
said.
This year, Ms. Taylor will initiate the Grades of
Green program at the school, where students work to
reduce lunchtime trash and engage in recycling and
composting. Last year, Vista del Valle won the organi-
zations Trash Free Lunch Challenge and an accompa-
nying $1,000 prize by reducing the schools waste by
95 percent. Now, Mountain View students will be em-
bracing the less-is-more environmental philosophy.
Ms. Taylor is looking forward to serving as princi-
pal for a school with a remarkable amount of diver-
sity. Students come from a wide variety of
socio-economic backgrounds, their parents have
vastly differing education levels and the schools
many English language learners speak everything
from Spanish to Arabic at their homes.
For Ms. Taylor, understanding Mountain Views di-
versity includes having expectations for the student
that are not cookie-cutter but relate to their circum-
stances. She also firmly believes that it takes team-
work to help everyone reach their best. With this in
mind, Ms. Taylor, along with her staff, have crafted a
new, streamlined mission statement: Mountain View
believes all learners can reach individual academic
success through critical thinking and collaboration.
We want kids to understand we want them to
reach THEIR best, Ms. Taylor explained.
Even as she moves into administration, Ms. Taylor
considers herself foremost a teacher.
Anytime anyone needs someone to cover a class,
Im like, Ill do it! Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
CUSD veteran brings enthusiasm as Mountain View principal
COURIERphoto/Steven Felschundneff
CUSD has named Natalie Taylor the next principal at Mountain View Elementary School. Ms. Taylor, who taught
for 10 years at Oakmont, has been the interim principal at Mountain View since February.
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COURIER HOMEPAGE
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 15
Claremont Colleges events offer artistic, intellectual stimulation
L
ast month, Princeton Re-
view put out Best 379
Colleges for 2015, its
annual publication ranking in-
stitutions in categories ranging
from academic rigor to the rich-
ness of their extracurricular of-
ferings.
Schools across the nation vie for recog-
nition in the Princeton Review listings,
which are based on surveys of 130,000
college students, because they are hugely
influential in the college selection process.
Claremont McKenna College is proud
to have ranked second this year in a par-
ticularly telling category: Happiest Stu-
dents.
According to students polled, CMCs
recipe for satisfaction includes phenom-
enal academics, brilliant professors, an
amazing career services center and
perfect weather.
It also doesnt hurt that the college is
home to a venue that garners top-notch
speakers, allowing students and faculty to
gather for intellectual discourse in an in-
timate and relaxed setting and integrate
their social lives.
From Monday through Thursday dur-
ing the school year, CMCs Marian Miner
Cook Athenaeum (385 E. 8th St. in Clare-
mont) hosts a variety of fascinating and
distinguished speakers. This falls lineup
is no exception, with guest speakers ex-
pounding on topics ranging from trans-
gender issues to institutionalized racism.
The following is just a selection of talks
slated for the coming weeks. All presen-
tations start at 6:45 p.m. unless otherwise
noted, and are free and open to the public.
For more information, call (909) 621-
8244 or visit the CMC website.
LGBT rights
Transgender activist Janet Mock will
speak at the Athenaeum on Monday, Sep-
tember 15. She is a contributing writer for
Marie Claire, the former editor of Peo-
ple.com and an advocate for LGBT rights
and social justice.
In 2011, Ms. Mock came out as trans-
gender in an article in Marie Claire, shar-
ing what it is like to be born in the body of
a boy but feel female from the beginning.
As a teen, I felt I was given the wrong
cocktail of hormones during puberty
happy hour. she wrote in Marie Claire.
I wanted to hold hands with a boy, to
wear a miniskirt without being called into
the principals office, and go on with my
days without worrying about the gender
stuff.
Throughout it all, Ms. Mock main-
tained an unwavering certainty that her
true gender was female. She began hor-
mone replacement therapy at 15 and trav-
eled to Thailand for sex reassignment
surgery at age 18 in the middle of her
freshman year in college.
In February, Ms. Mock released her
memoirs, Redefining Realness: My
Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love &
So Much More, which became a New
York Times bestseller. Among her many
efforts to help empower trans women, she
has launched a social movement called
#GirlsLikeUs.
Looming election
On Tuesday, September 23, CMC pro-
fessor of politics John J. Pitney, Jr. will ap-
pear at the Athenaeum to discuss Whats
at Stake in the Mid-Term Election?
Mr. Pitney, a leading expert on Ameri-
can politics, will weigh in on the upcom-
ing elections that will determine control
of Congress. Mr. Pitneys talk is particu-
larly timely because, with the rampant
growth in absentee ballots, an estimated
third of all votes will be cast before the
November 4 election day, according to a
recent New York Times article.
Mr. Pitney has published myriad schol-
arly papers and essays and contributed to
numerous newspapers and magazines as
well as being routinely featured on news
programs such as NPR. He is the author
or co-author of many books on American
politics, including After Hope and
Change: The 2013 Elections and Amer-
ican Politics, The Art of Political War-
fare, Congress Permanent Minority?,
Republicans in the US House and
American Government: Deliberation,
Democracy and Citizenship.
Along with having taught government
at Claremont McKenna for nearly three
decades, Mr. Pitney was acting director
for the Research Department of the Re-
publican National Committee from 1990
to 1991 and has served as the senior do-
mestic policy analyst for the US House
Republican Research Committee.
Slam poetry sensation
On Wednesday, September 24, Anis
Mojgani, spoken word poet, visual artist
and musician, will take his torrent of
words to the Athenaeum podium.
The audience should expect some ver-
bal fireworks, because he is arguably the
best-known slam-poet of his generation,
whose works mark him as heir to poetry
pioneers such as Alan Ginsberg.
In poems like Shake the Dust, Mr.
Mojgani seeks to remind the misfits of the
worldthe fat girl, the milk-crate
ballplayer, the retired elderly Walmart
store front door greeter and the men
who have to hold down three jobs simply
to hold up their children of their vast
potential: Do not let one moment go by
that doesnt remind you that there are
enough gallons of blood to make every
one of you an ocean.
Among his many achievements, Mr.
Mojgani is the two-time winner of the Na-
tional Individual Poetry Slam and Inter-
national World Cup Poetry Slam.
He has also put words to the page with
three noted collections, Songs From
Under The River, The Feather Roomand
Over the Anvil We Stretch and has been
featured in a variety of poetry anthologies.
Mr. Mojgani has taught at Dartmouth
College as the Guest Writing Workshop
Facilitator and, along with poets Derrick
Brown and Buddy Wakefield, is founder
of a touring theater experience called The
Poetry Revival.
In 2013, Mojgani partnered with the
depression awareness nonprofit,
TWLOHA, for his nationwide Heavy and
Light tour dedicated to raising awareness
for depression, suicide, self-harm and ad-
diction.
A voice for justice
On Thursday, September 25, Charles
Ogletree, one of the countrys leading ac-
ademic voices on race, justice and the law,
will speak at the Athenaeum on Race,
Racism and Discrimination in America.
Mr. Ogletree is a professor of law at
Harvard Law School, where he served as
an instructor for both Barack and
Michelle Obama. He has remained close
to President Obama throughout his polit-
ical career.
Over the years, Mr. Ogletree has been a
go-to media commentator on issues rang-
ing from the O.J. Simpson trial to Stand
Your Ground laws and the killing of
Trayvon Martin, as well as on the protests
that took place this summer in Ferguson,
Missouri after the fatal shooting of
Michael Brown.
He is the author of a variety of books,
including The Presumption of Guilt:
The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
and Race, Class and Crime in America,
and All Deliberate Speed: Reflections
on the First Half-Century of Brown v.
Board of Education.
Classical theater
On Friday, September 5, Saturday, Sep-
tember 6 and Sunday, September 7, the
Pomona College Department of Theatre
and Dance will collaborate with the Clare-
mont-based theater company Ophelias
Jump to present Moises Kaufmans 33
Variations. The play, which debuted on
Broadway in 2009, was inspired by Lud-
wig van Beethovens eponymous work.
Performances will also be held on Friday,
September 12, Saturday, September 13
and Sunday, September 14.
Show times are 8 p.m. on Fridays, 3
and 8 p.m. on Saturdays and 4 p.m. on
Sundays in the Allen Studio Center at
Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave. in
Claremont. Tickets are $25 general ad-
mission and $22 for students and seniors.
They can be purchased online at
www.opheliasjump.org. For more infor-
mation, call (909) 624-1464.
Sweet music
Music will be resounding at the Clare-
mont Colleges this month during several
free performances.
These include an outdoor gig by the
indie artists SHEL set for Friday, Septem-
ber 19 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Bowling
Green at Scripps College, 1030 Columbia
Ave. SHEL features siblings Sarah, Han-
nah, Eva and Liza, who have formed a
sister act that is described as a vocal
group with outstanding instrumental ca-
pabilities and an instrumental group with
a thrilling vocal attack.
The performance is part of Scripps
Levitt on the Lawn concert series. Snacks
and desserts will be available for purchase
from a variety of local Claremont restau-
rants beginning at 6 p.m. and picnic din-
ners are also welcomed.
The Los Angeles Quartet will present
an evening of global guitars on Friday,
September 19 at 8 p.m. in Bridges Hall of
Music at Pomona College (150 E. Fourth
St. in Claremont). The quartet will per-
form works by William Count Basie,
John Coltrane, Aaron Copland and others.
Bridges Hall will host the Mojave Trio
on Saturday, September 27 at 8 p.m. The
triowhich includes violinist Sara
Parkins, cellist Margaret Parkins and pi-
anist Genevieve Feiwin Leewill perform
music by Beethoven, Brahms and Flaherty.
On Sunday, September 28, violinist
Rachel V. Huang and pianist Tatiana Thi-
bodeaux will present a concert of music
by 20th century Russian composers, in-
cluding Kapustin, Prokofiev and War-
shauer. The performance will take place
at 3 p.m. in the Boone Recital Hall in the
Scripps College Performing Arts Center
at Scripps College, 241 E. 10th St.
And on Sunday, September 28 at 3
p.m., keyboard artists Genevieve Feiwen
Lee and Nadia Shpacheno-Gottesman
will present a program called Music for a
New Baktun, also at Bridges Hall. The
women will perform selections by Tom
Flaherty, James Matheson, Adam
Schoenberg and Peter Yates.
These are just a sampling of happen-
ings scheduled at the Claremont Colleges.
To learn more, visit www.collegescalen-
dar.org. Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
COURIERphoto/Steven Felschundneff
Orientation Adventure counselors cheer the incoming class of freshmen as they
run down College Avenue during orientation week at Pomona College. The event
is intended to officially welcome the new students to Pomona.
T
he Claremont Uni-
fied School District
is pleased to wel-
come Lisa Yamashita as
the new principal of Chap-
arral Elementary School.
Ms. Yamashita spent the last
school year as an adjunct faculty
member at Cal
State Northridge,
teaching English
Language Devel-
opment standards and supervising
multiple subject student teachers.
Previously, she spent five years as
an elementary school teacher in
Oregon.
Before that, Ms. Yamashita
who graduated from USC and
earned her masters degree in
reading and language arts from
Cal State Los Angeleswas an
elementary school teacher with
the Glendale Unified School Dis-
trict for eight years. She also spent
two years as assistant principal at
an elementary school in the Los
Angeles Unified School District,
with the supervision of special ed-
ucation students as one of her primary
responsibilities.
Kevin Ward, assistant superintendent
of human resources, noted that Ms. Ya-
mashitas strength at working with spe-
cial education students and English
learners was a key reason for her hir-
ing. It also didnt hurt that her refer-
ences were top-notch.
Each reference spoke of her strong,
compassionate interpersonal abilities
and her strength as an instructional
leader. They spoke of her adept ability
to be both a teacher and a strong
teacher advocate, as well as a manager
of all those responsibilities principals
have, Mr. Ward noted at a recent
school board meeting. They spoke of
her gift in working with parents, from
the very strong to the ones that do not
get engaged.
Engagement is not usually a problem
at Chaparral, Ms. Yamashita has dis-
covered.
Claremont schools are really effec-
tive in that the students are really high
achieving, she said. And the entire
Chaparral communitythe parents and
the staffhave high expectations for
students. Everyone here is an over-
achiever in the best sense.
Chaparrals emphasis on academics
dovetails nicely with Ms. Yamashitas
modus operandi.
One of my core values is that every
child deserves to be successful at
school every day, she said. Schools
need to provide a learning environment
that is full of joy and rigor.
Ms. Yamashita didnt always know
she would be an educator. When she
began college, she was a chemical en-
gineering major. But she took one
course that involved volunteering in
classrooms. The days at schools were
her favorite, so she switched her focus
to education and hasnt looked back.
Ms. Yamashita is impressed with the
support that the Claremont community
and local organizations like the Clare-
mont Educational Foundation have
shown for whole-child development.
This is the first district Ive worked
in thats been able to maintain physical
education instructors for elementary
age students as well as instrumental and
choral music programs, she said.
She has also formed a strong admira-
tion for the staff at Chaparral.
They are really dedicated profes-
sionals with a vast number of years of
experience, she said. Everyone has
been very quick to help get me settled
and acquainted with the community.
The staffs efforts have included a
personal tour of the Claremont Village
by second grade teacher Margaret Rus-
sel, who is a member of Claremont
Heritage.
When Ms. Yamashita isnt at
work, her first priority is her fam-
ily, which includes her husband
Matt, their 3-year-old daughter
Sarah, and an Australian Cattle
Dog mix named Maisey.
Ms. Yamashita loves traveling,
with Paris being a favorite desti-
nation. She also delights in play-
ing golf after getting turned on to
the sport in college. Though shes
only made it onto the greens a
few times in the past couple of
years, she is looking forward to
November 13, when the school
will host its annual fundraiser, the
Road Runner Golf Classic and
Dinner Auction, at the Via Verde
Country Club in San Dimas.
Ms. Yamashita is a reader, es-
pecially of mystery novels and
nonfiction books on spiritual top-
ics like Buddhism. And she
knows her way around the oven,
having delved into pie-baking in
the last few years. Her specialty is
Double Crust Mixed Berry. Un-
surprisingly, the I Like Pie dessert
shop has become one of her fa-
vorite destinations in the Clare-
mont Village.
Securing a principal that is a great fit
for Chaparral and for the district as a
whole is sweet, indeed, according to
Mr. Ward.
We believe she will be a great fit for
the Claremont community and bring
new strengths and gifts, he said. Her
ability to work in collaboration with
staff and families will ensure Chapar-
rals continued growth.
Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 16
COURIERphoto/Steven Felschundneff
New Chaparral Elementary School Principal Lisa Yamashita helps to direct traffic as the school
day ends on Tuesday in Claremont. CUSD welcomes two new principals this semester, Ms. Ya-
mashita and Natalie Taylor at Mountain View Elementary School.
New Chaparral principal ready to rally Roadrunners
EDUCATION
CUSD
NEWS
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 17
* The following tribute was published on the Clare-
mont McKenna website and is reprinted here with
permission from CMC.
T
he Claremont McKenna College
community joins the rest of the
world in mourning the loss of actor
and comedian Robin Williams, who died
last month.
Mr. Williams spent the 1969-70 academic year as a
freshman at what was then Claremont Mens College,
where he played soccer and demonstrated his trade-
mark lightning-fast humor for the delight of his class-
mates.
That humor, in fact, was on abundant display dur-
ing a student comedy show held in McKenna Audito-
rium in the spring semester of 1970.
Mr. Williams performance is described in the latest
collection of alumni anecdotes, Myths, Legends and
Tall Tales, in a story by Dick Gale 71.
Mr. Gale quotes Al Dauber 71, who organized the
event and ran a full-page advertisement in The Clare-
mont Collegian, the main newspaper reporting on
events at all of the Claremont Colleges.
Both Mr. Gale and Mr. Dauber said Mr. Williams
stunned everyone at rehearsal with his powers of im-
prov. According to Gales anecdote:
The next thing I knew Mr. Dauber recalled,
he was being challenged by one of us after another to
do the most off-the-wall characters and accents. OK,
do a Russian fisherman lost at sea Rob, do a Bul-
garian farmer trying to revive his crops after a
storm Robin, can you do a South American priest
trying to convert an orthodox rabbi to Catholicism?
I had never seen anything like it, Mr. Dauber
continued. With every outlandish request we made,
he would not only switch dialects in mid-sentence,
butwithout missing a beathe would have us in
stitches. It was as though he had rehearsed for weeks,
when in reality he was making this material up on the
spot.
In a recent email exchange for this article, Mr.
Dauber added that he believes their comedy show at
McKenna served as the catalyst for Robins launch-
ing of an incredible career in comedy.
Along with the standard general course require-
ments for all freshmen, Mr. Williams also took a class
on improvisational theatre at Scripps, which is men-
tioned in a 2011 profile in CMC Magazine of Fr.
Patrick Conroy 72, chaplain of the US House of Rep-
resentatives. In that article, Fr. Conroy recalls that he
and Mr. Williams were enrolled in the same class at
Scripps. Mr. Williams also belonged to the mens soc-
cer team, which Coach Steve Davis led to an SCIAC
championship that season.
After leaving CMC, Mr. Williams would go on to
study acting on a full scholarship at the Juilliard
School before achieving international success as an
actor and comedian. He was also a tireless supporter
of many charities and on behalf of many causes, in-
cluding his visits to US troops posted at military bases
around the world.
In another CMC connection, Mr. Williams also par-
ticipated with other celebrities and public figures in
honoring Augie Nieto 80 at the 2007 IDEA World
Fitness Convention for Nietos efforts to find a cure
for ALS.
Robin Williams: CMC mourns former student, comedian and actor
Image courtesy of Claremont McKenna College
This advertisement, which ran in The Claremont Col-
legian in 1970, promotes a student comedy show held
at CMC co-starring Robin Williams, who attended the
college as a freshman in 1969.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 18
CALENDAR
Art Walk
See our Claremont Art Walk map
of this months participants.
Page 21
Friday, September 5 through Saturday, September 13
ART WALK Visit Claremont art gal-
leries between 6 and 9 p.m. for artist
opening receptions featuring music and
refreshments.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Public
Plaza, the chamber and city hall.
EXHIBITION Claremont Heritage
presents Gallery 8, featuring a look
back at the seminal gallery that Barbara
Beretich ran in Claremont in the 1970s. 6
to 8 p.m. Ginger Elliott Exhibition Venter
at the Garner House in Memorial Park.
MONTE CARLO NIGHT A Monte
Carlo Night to support an annual med-
ical mission to rural Haiti will be hosted
by the Jeff C. Domond Foundation at
Our Lady of the Assumption Church. A
donation of $30 per person includes ap-
petizers, a free drink and $100 in play
money. The foundation brings a team
of doctors, dentists, oral surgeons and
physical therapists to Haitians with no
other access to medical care, as well as
supporting an orphanage and school.
Adults only. 7 to 11 p.m. Our Lady of
the Assumption Church, 435 Berkeley
Ave., Claremont. (909) 816-7207.
EYES ON AFRICA INITIATIVE
Free music, dancing, food, drink and re-
gional arts from Africa kicking off
Pomona Colleges Eyes on Africa Initia-
tive. 7 p.m. Smith Campus Center, 170
E. Sixth St., Claremont. (909) 607-8580.
OPHELIAS JUMP The Pomona Col-
lege Department of Theatre and Dance
Claremont-based professional theatre
company Ophelias Jump presents Moi-
ses Kaufmans 33 Variations. 8 p.m.
Allen Studio Theatre, 300 E. Bonita
Ave., Claremont. (909) 607-3181.
STREET FAIRE The 7th annual
KGNH Crime Watch Street Faire and
Car Show will be held at 5 p.m. at 2200
N. Villa Maria Road, Claremont. This is
a family friendly event featuring food
trucks, live music, beer and beverage
garden, kids corner, raffle, silent auction
and public safety partners that
service Claremont will be on hand. This
will include Claremont PD, LA County
Sheriffs Dept., CHP and LA County
Fire Dept. Walking and biking are en-
couraged. A bike valet will be avail-
able. KGNH7 proceeds will go to the
purchase of a K9 unit for Claremont
PD. Suggested family donation is $25,
which will include 2 KGNH shirts,
goodie bag and 10 raffle tickets. Please
note this is per family suggested, not per
person. Cash, check and credit cards will
be accepted at KGNH7.
CALIFORNIA BEER FESTIVAL
The California Beer Festival (CBF) is
coming back to Bonelli Park, bigger and
better. This lakeside craft beer festival
features over 60 craft brews on tap, food
trucks, live music and bikini Bocce Ball.
This is a chance to expand your mind
and educate yourself on new and old
styles of craft beer! Situated on the
shady shores of the parks 250-acre
reservoir, the event is guaranteed to be
refreshing in more ways than one. You
must be 21 year of age or older with a
valid ID to enter the festival. Beer sam-
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS
9-DAY CALENDAR
continues on the next page
Performing arts
Ophelias Jump presents 33
Variations in Claremont.
Page 23
COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch
Habes performs at Hip Kitty Jazz and Fondue in the Claremont Packing House last week.
September
Friday 5
September
Saturday 6
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 19
pling: 1 to 4:30 p.m. VIP tickets are $70,
Craft Beer Heaven tickets are $45 and
designated driver tickets are $25. 12:30
to 5 p.m. Frank G. Bonelli Park. (909)
599-8411. Check out californiabeerfes-
tival.com for more information.
FARMERS MARKET Shop local in
this Village street fair between 8 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Organic produce, farm-fresh
cheeses, plants, crafts and more.
LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue
Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd.,
Claremont. (909) 946-1398.
BEGINNING BANJO WORKSHOP
In this workshop, guests will be intro-
duced to the clawhammer style of banjo
(for old-timey music) and the 3-finger
style (for bluegrass). Along with basic
chords, strum patterns and rolls, students
will also learn some great banjo songs
to play with friends or at the next jam or
picking session. Bring a banjo or borrow
one from venue. 4:30 to 6 p.m. The Folk
Music Center, 220 Yale Ave., Clare-
mont. Email info@folkmusiccenter.com
for tuition information.
FLAPPERS COMEDY PRESENTS
Dana Carvey live from 6:30 to 9 p.m.
$23, two item minimum per person.
Flappers Comedy Club, 532 W. First St.
#218, Claremont. (818) 845-9721.
ISRAELI FOLK DANCE Join in for
dance and music in a friendly environ-
ment. Beginners teaching starts at 7 p.m.
followed by open dancing. $6. Masonic
Lodge, 272 W. Eighth St., Claremont.
FLAPPERS COMEDY PRESENTS
Ladies Night at 8 p.m. $20, two item
minimum per person. Flappers Comedy
Club, 532 W. First St. #218, Claremont.
(818) 845-9721.
UNIVERSITY CLUB Richard Caines
will talk about new programs to help
veterans. All ages are welcome. 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Buffet lunch for $13
or dessert and coffee for $6. Hughes
Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd.,
Claremont. (909) 594-3111.
ARTIST TALK Sam Falls gives an
artist talk at the Pomona College Mu-
seum of Art in conjunction with Project
Series 49: Sam Falls. 1:30 p.m. 330 N.
College Ave., Claremont.
OPEN HOUSE McAlister Center of
Religious Activities invites guests to
meet the chaplains and community serv-
ice coordinator. Ice cream and refresh-
ments will be served. 4 to 5:30 p.m. 919
Columbia, Claremont.
COMPUTER CLUB Transitioning
between Windows XP, 7, 8, and 8.1,
presented by Lloyd Gastineau. 7 p.m.
Hughes Community Center, 1700 Dan-
bury Road, Claremont.
KING TRIVIA NIGHT Bring your
friends. Bring your brain. Bring your
friends brains for trivia at The Press.
Starts at 9:30 p.m. but get there early be-
cause seats fill up fast. 129 Harvard
Ave., Claremont.
GARDENING Sustainable Claremont
Garden Club presents Get the Dirt on
Dirt! Soils, Plants & Water Relation-
ships. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Pilgrim Place
Napier Center, 660 Avery Road, Clare-
mont. (909) 621-6381.
ART AFTER HOURS Live music and
other programming accompany exhibi-
tions on view at the Pomona College
Museum of Art. 5 to 11 p.m. Pomona
College Museum of Art, 330 N. College
Ave., Claremont. (909) 607-7543.
HUMANITIES Scripps College lec-
ture series featuring a screening by
Tahani Salah, poet, educator and ac-
tivist. 6 p.m. Scripps College Humani-
ties Auditorium. (909) 621-8237.
FILM SCREENING Claremont Her-
itage presents Contemporary Days:
The Designs of Robin and Lucienne
Day. 7 to 9 p.m. Claremont School of
Theologys Mudd Theater, 1325 N. Col-
lege Ave., Claremont.
SCOTCH CLASS AND TASTING
$35. 7 to 9:30 p.m. Vom Fass, 101 N. In-
dian Hill Blvd., Claremont.
DEMOCRATIC CLUB LUNCH-
EON Assemblyman Chris Holden will
speak at Septembers Democratic Club
luncheon. He has just finished his first
term and will report on the past legisla-
tive term and prospects for the upcom-
ing session. Mr. Holden was appointed
Majority Whip in his first term and has
had a number of legislative successes.
Noon to 2 p.m. at Casa de Salsa, 415 W.
Foothill Blvd., Claremont.
POMONA VALLEY AMATEUR AS-
TRONOMERS JPLs Mission System
Manager for the Europa Clipper pre-pro-
ject, Laureano Alberto Cangahuala will
speak on Interplanetary Navigation.
7:30 p.m. Shanahan Building, Basement
Room B460 at Harvey Mudd College,
1250 Dartmouth Ave., Claremont.
FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Stroll
through the Village and listen to free,
live music from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Pub-
lic Plaza, the chamber and city hall.
WINE WALK 38 businesses will serve
wine and food tastings between 4 and 8
p.m. Tickets are $40. Visit claremon-
twinewalk.com for more information.
9-DAY CALENDAR
continued from the previous page
September
Sunday 7
September
Monday 8
September
Tuesday 9
September
Wednesday 10
September
Thursday 11
September
Friday 12
September
Saturday 13
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 20
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM:
134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily
from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. bud-
dhamouse.com. (909) 626-3322.
September 5 though 31: Sacred
Space Works on Paper by Christopher
and acrylic and mixed media works by
Sequoia. Sequoia is now eleven and has
worked with her father in his studio and
has taken art classes to improve her style.
Though born in New York City, Christo-
pher Cousins was raised in Oklahoma
where he was greatly influenced by the
various artistic expressions of American
Indian cultures. He graduated with a
BFA from Boston University and is cur-
rently working as an actor in Los Ange-
les. He kept up with his drawing and the
need to paint gnawed at him for years.
He started showing his work in 2000 in
the Los Angeles area. In 2004, he joined
Pharmaka a group of like-minded LA
based artists. In 2005, he participated in
his first international exhibition in
Venice, Italy. Cousins works with Bert
Green Fine Art in LA, The Lowe Gallery
in Atlanta GA, and with the Foster.
BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 254
W. Bonita Ave., Claremont. Tuesday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Satur-
day, noon to 6 p.m. (909) 624-7238.
September 5 through 30: Dee Marcel-
lus Cole and John Nieuber exhibit three-
dimensional artwork. Opening reception:
Friday, September 5 from 6 to 9 p.m.
CLAREMONT COMMUNITY
FOUNDATION ART GALLERY:
205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of
Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. (909) 398-1060.
September 5 though 30: Aban-
doned Fabric: Flow by Sumi Foley.
Opening reception: Friday, Septem-
ber 5 from 6 to 8 p.m.
CLAREMONT FORUM BOOK-
SHOP & GALLERY: 586 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday
through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday
and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sun-
day, noon to 7 p.m. (909) 626-3066.
September 5 though 30: Paintings by
Donna Brand. Opening reception: Fri-
day, September 5 from 6 to 8 p.m.
THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532
W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing
House. Open Wednesday through Satur-
day, 1 to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the
first Friday of the month for Claremont
Art Walk until 9 p.m. Visit loft204.com.
Email info@loft204.com for informa-
tion about purchasing monthly wall
space for artwork display or to inquire
about event rental of gallery space. Call
Vicki at (626) 224-7915 or (626) 963-
4238 for one-on-one art instruction for
junior high and high school age students.
September 5 through 27: 1960s abstract
paintings by Edward
D. Herrington. The
late Mr. Herrington
graduated in 1968
with a masters de-
gree in art at Califor-
nia State University
Fullerton and was a
teacher at Montvue
Elementary School in Pomona. Three of
his large-scale paintingssome over six
feet tallwere given to close friends and
have never been on view to the public
until now. For the first time ever, Mr. Her-
ringtons private collection pieces will be
available to the public. These colorful and
impressive pieces are an interior de-
signers dream. Opening reception: Fri-
day, September 5 from 6 to 9 p.m.
featuring refreshments and music.
GALLERIES
GALLERIES
continues on the next page
Image courtesy of Sumi Foley
Abandoned Fabric: Flow by Sumi Foley will be on display at Claremont Community
Foundation Art Gallery through the end of September.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 21
FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250
W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Fri-
day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (909) 626-5455.
Through October 3: Title Show 2014 Featuring Vi-
cente Siso. The 24th Annual Tile Show continues to
build on the traditions of community exchange and in-
clusion that have made the Tile Show such a unique
and successful event. This years iteration features new
ceramic sculpture by Vicente Siso, a native of Argentina
who creates whimsical vessels adorned with animals
and flowers. His paintings and drawings will also be
for sale in the studio.
GALERIA DE PROLAS: 532 W. First St. #211,
Claremont Packing House. Open by appointment.
Tuesdays: Tribe Tuesday, an open studio session
for artists to share the space and work on their pieces.
Open to artists of all levels from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Space
is limited to 10 people per session. Call (909) 236-
1562 or visit facebook.com/galeriadeperolas.
Friday, September 5: A showcase of new and upcom-
ing artists from all over southern California. 8 to 10 p.m.
SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Clare-
mont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or
by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait
Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks.
Call (909) 621-9091 or email info@squareigallery.com.
September 5 though 30: Estate Sale featuring
artwork by Millford Zornes, Karl Benjamin, Millard
Sheets, Jim Strombotne and Susan Hertel. Art Walk:
Friday, September 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. Opening re-
ception: Saturday, September 6 from 5 to 8 p.m.
VICTORIOUS GALLERY TATTOO: 1420 N.
Claremont Blvd. Suite 102B, Claremont. (909) 924-
0324 or (626) 347-1425.
Friday, September 5: Diana Lopez considers herself
to be a Black and Grey Realism artist but also possess
strong skills in color. She began her artistic career draw-
ing/sketching at an early age. Refreshments, appetizers,
live music and great friendly people. 6 to 9 p.m.
GALLERIES
continued from the previous page
First Street
Second Street
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d
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a
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e
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Bonita Avenue
1
8
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3
2
Claremont Art Walk:
Friday, September 5
Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each
month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine
art. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this months
participating galleries.
1. Buddhamouse Emporium
6 to 8 p.m. 134 Yale Ave., Claremont
Sacred Space, works of paper by Christo-
pher Cousins and acrylic and mixed-media
works by Sequoia.
2. Bunny Gunner Gallery
6 to 9 p.m. 254 W. Bonita Ave., Claremont
Dee Marcellus Cole and John Nieuber exhibit
three-dimensional artwork.
3. Claremont Community Foundation
6 to 8 p.m. 205 Yale Ave., Claremont
Abandoned Fabric: Flow by Sumi Foley.
4. Claremont Forum Bookshop & Gallery
6 to 8 p.m. 586 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House
Paintings by Donna Brand.
5. The Colony at Loft 204
6 to 9 p.m. 532 W. First St., #204,
Claremont Packing House
1960s abstract paintings by the late Edward
D. Herrington.
6. First Street Gallery Art Center
6 to 8 p.m. 250 W. First St., #120, Claremont
Title Show 2014 Featuring Vicente Siso.
7. Galeria de Prolas
8 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #211,
Claremont Packing House
A showcase of new and upcoming artists
from all over southern California.
8. Square i Gallery
5 to 8 p.m. 110 Harvard Pl, Claremont
Estate Sale featuring works by Millford
Zornes, Karl Benjamin, Millard SHeets, Jim
Strombotne and Susan Hertel.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 22
COURIER CROSSWORD
Across
1. Belfry denizen
4. Alexander II, e.g.
8. Cheese village in Holland
12. Low life?
15. Daughter of Cronus
16. Fountain order
17. Screen letters
18. Be a good dog
19. Secret plan
20. Charity event held in May at the
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
22. Yule gift for grandpa
23. Bathroom in London
24. Steamed
27. Make another blueprint
32. Naval rank, for short
33. Teacup handle
34. Deplaning gift in Maui
35. Japanese condiment
39. Cover, in a way
42. Shepherd's locale
44. Series opener?
45. Ahead
47. Claremont group that
celebrated its 25th year of
charitable giving, abbr,
49. Mustard, e.g. (abbr.)
50. French wine
51. Disease origin
54. Namby-pamby
58. Fellow
59. Dwarf buffalo of Indonesia
60. Surviving without oxygen
66. Block up
67. "Black and White and
"___" all over"
68. Kind of lyric poem
69. Destroy
70. Ground surrounding a house
71. Matt of "We Bought a Zoo"
72. Was in debt
73. Pulls the plug on
74. Deli item
Down
1. Protest singer
2. BBs, e.g.
3. Mets, Jets or Nets
4. Norse god of thunder
5. Indian beast of burden
6. Concert site
7. Jamie Foxx role in film
8. Italian dark-roast coffee
9. Sorrow
10. Hut material
11. Won at chess
13. Religious book
14. Jennifer Garner show
21. Comedic doctor
25. Green, in a way
26. Vex, with at
27. Get a makeover
28. Have coming
29. Word before back or bridge
30. Hair application
31. Heiress, perhaps
36. Chevron competitor
37. Virtual opinion
38. Sans purpose
40. Bundled
41. Muffs
43. Emulate a movie star
46. Batman and Robin, e.g.
48. Smooth
52. Furnished with paddles
53. Antiparkinsonian agent
54. Computer user's timesaver
55. Acquired relative
56. Free from restraint
57. Hymn of joy
61. Novelist Jones
62. Tacks on
63. Long pass
64. Pagan symbol
65. Penny
67. White alternative
Crossword by Myles
Mellor. Puzzle #279
Answers to last weeks puzzle #278
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is
a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment.
(909) 445-1200.
Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m.
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist
Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m.
Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Clare-
mont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through
Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday.
Hoppy Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. (909) 445-8875.
Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros.
Brewery pints.
Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass.
Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the
week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every
month.
Thursdays: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off and
Eureka Thursday Night Music.
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave.,
Claremont Village.
Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month.
Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from
6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. (909) 624-2928 or
folkmusiccenter.com.
FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Clare-
mont Packing House. 18 and over. Show times: Fri-
day at 8 and 10 p.m., Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m.
and Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased on-
line or at the door.
Friday, September 5: Flappy Fourth B-Day Week-
end Free Admission featuring Deven and Joel. 7 and
9:30 p.m.
Saturday, September 6: Flappy Fourth B-Day Week-
end Free Admission featuring Deven and Joel. 7 and
9:30 p.m.
HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St.,
Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sun-
day, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Ad-
mission: Two-drink minimum. Info: (909)
447-6700 or hipkittyjazz.com.
Friday, September 5: Flattop Tom and his Jump
Cats. 8 p.m. $5 cover charge.
Saturday, September 6: Rumble King. 8 p.m. $5
cover charge.
Sunday, September 7: Brother David. 7 p.m.
Tuesday, September 9: Bodegas. 10 p.m.
Wednesday, September 10: Jazz Jam with Genos
Standard Band. 8 p.m.
Thursday, September 11: Coleslaw. 7 p.m.
Friday, September 12: The Outta Sites. 8 p.m. $5
cover charge.
Saturday, September 13: Rumble King. 8 p.m. $5
cover charge.
THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave.,
Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday
until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21
and over after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30
p.m. No cover. (909) 625-4808.
Friday, September 5: Mechanical Beast and Miss
Chief. 10 p.m.
Saturday, September 6: Claremont Voodoo Soci-
ety (rock/blues). 10 p.m.
Sunday, September 7: Piano Sunday with Amy
Rowe at 6 p.m. and Super Awesome Open Mic
Night with Drew at 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, September 9: King Trivia Night. 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 10: Wine Wednesday with
piano music performed by Joe Atman at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, September 11: Tony Palkovic Trio.
8:30 p.m. DJ Good Nuff at 11 p.m.
Friday, September 12: Jetpacks and Lazerguns.
10 p.m.
PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Clare-
mont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday
and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Satur-
day, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21 and over. $5 cover charge
on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover
charge with student ID). (909) 547-4266.
Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coro-
nas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with
the band.
Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic
or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka
Rockstars. 9 p.m.
NIGHTLIFE
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 23
RESTAURANT ROW
CALL MARYTODAY: 621-4761
ALLEN THEATRE: Pomona Col-
leges Seaver Theatre Complex, 300
E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. (909)
607-4375.
Through September 14: Ophelias
Jump presents 33 Variations. A
mother coming to terms with her
daughter, a composer coming to terms
with his genius. And even though
theyre separated by 200 years, these
two people share an obsession that
might, even just for a moment, make
time stand still. Music by Beethoven.
Fridays at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 3 and 8
p.m. and Sundays at 4 p.m.
CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455
W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday evening
shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance
at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows:
dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15
p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees:
lunch at 11 a.m., performance at
12:45 p.m. (909) 626-1254, ext.1 or
candlelightpavilion.com.
Through September 14: The Long
Run present Dark Desert Highway, a
fully produced concert celebrating the
music and influence of The Eagles. Per-
formed on an atmospheric stage and set
to visual media, this show shares the sto-
ries behind the songs and delivers The
Eagles greatest hits with unparalleled
musical accuracy and The Long Runs
engaging, live concert personality.
PERFORMING ARTS
Image courtesy of Ophelias Jump
Ophelias Jump presents 33 VARIATIONS written by Moiss Kaufman and directed
by Caitlin Lopez. Pictured (l-r) William Gillean as Ludwig van Beethoven, Vicki Irvine
as Dr. Katherine Brandt, Pianist Vernon Snyder, Max Herzfeld as Anton Schindler.
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar,
arts and entertainment. Deadline:
Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before
publication. Include date, time, ad-
dress, a contact phone number and fee
for admission (if applicable). Email:
calendar@claremont-courier.com.
There is NO guarantee that items sub-
mitted will be published.
33 Variations explores Beethoven, family dynamics
Wine Walk returns to Claremont Village
COURIERfile photo/Jenelle Rensch
A Shop Called Quest serves up some science fiction-like frozen wine cocktails
using a dry ice method at last years Wine Walk. This years event takes place on
Saturday, September 13 between 4 and 8 p.m. and features 38 wine/beverage and
food tasting sites plus live music throughout the Village. Tickets are nearly sold
out. Visit claremontwinewalk.com or call (909) 626-7422 for information.
T
he Pomona College
Department of Theatre
and Dance will collab-
orate with Claremont-based
professional theatre company
Ophelia's Jump to present Moi-
ses Kaufman's 33 Variations.
The play, which made its debut on
Broadway in 2009, centers on musi-
cologist Dr. Katherine Brandt, who
has been offered the chance of a life-
time to travel to Bonn, Germany to
study Beethoven's manuscripts first-
hand. She attempts to answer the
question that has fascinated musi-
cians, musicologists and fans for cen-
turies: Why did Beethoven spend so
much time in the last decade of his
life writing variations on a simple
waltz by Anton Diabelli? The result
is a fascinating journey through
Beethoven's 33 brilliant variations.
Ophelias Jump co-founder Caitlin
Lopez is delighted to serve as direc-
tor for the local production of 33
Variations.
Its not so much about what makes
this play special, but rather what it
reminds us of those things that we
deem ordinary, Ms. Lopez explains.
Beethoven takes what most consider
a simplistic waltz and breaks it into a
multifaceted body of work that
shows the underlying vigor and po-
tential of the original piece.
In the same way, the character of
Katherine Brandt finds herself on a
journey that forces her to analyze her
own relationship with a daughter she
fears is mediocre, but perhaps just
hasnt been given time to be under-
stood, she continued. In the end,
special is relative, and I think it is up
to the audience to decide what spe-
cial means, both in art and in life.
Performances will be held Friday
through Sunday, September 5-7, and
Friday through Sunday, September
12-14. Performance times are Fridays
at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 3 and 8 p.m.
and Sundays at 4 p.m. Tickets are
$25 general admission and $22 for
students and seniors and can be pur-
chased online at: opheliasjump.org.
Its party time on Route 66 with
Claremont Kiwanis
The Claremont Kiwanis Club is hosting its sixth an-
nual Route 66 Party on Friday, September 19 at the
DoubleTree by Hilton in Claremont starting at 6 p.m.
Tickets to the event are $40 pre-sale or $45 at the door.
The evening includes a buffet dinner and dancing to
music by The Ravelers, as well as a casino, silent auc-
tion, a photo booth and bingo. Opportunity tickets are
$10, or three for $25, giving participants the chance to
win $1,500 or $500 or $200.
Funds raised from the event go toward helping the
Claremont Kiwanis Club to continue to support many
local community services such as the Read Me Pro-
gram, Senior Food Bank, Best Bet, Claremont Educa-
tional Foundation, scholarships, the citys Monday
concerts in the park and so much more.
Please come and help support the community while
enjoying a fun evening. To purchase tickets in ad-
vance, visit www.claremontkiwanis.org and click the
Route 66 icon.
A century through the life of
Harrison McIntosh
The American Museum of Ceramic Art (AMOCA),
in conjunction with the Claremont Museum of Art,
will host HM100: A Century through the Life of Harri-
son McIntosh. To honor Mr. McIntoshs 100th birth-
day, HM100 will feature 100 ceramic artworks that
recount the life and work of this world-renowned
artist. Both AMOCA and Mr. McIntosh share a com-
mon birthday on September 11. The public is invited
to celebrate AMOCAs 10th and Mr. McIntoshs 100th
birthdays on the opening night of the exhibition Satur-
day, September 13 from 6 to 9 p.m.
Considered one of the most talented West Coast ce-
ramic artists, Mr. McIntosh has been working in the
Los Angeles area for over eight decades. Early on, he
focused his ceramic career on producing wheel-
thrown stoneware. Working with humble materials,
Mr. McIntosh created clean, simple and refined pieces,
enhanced by either hand-drawn lines reflective of pat-
terns seen in nature or by intricate brush strokes. His
work stands today as a testimony to his complete mas-
tery of clay, driven by precision and purist ideals.
Mr. McIntosh is recognized as a significant artist in
California modern and the mid-century modern design
movements. Catherine McIntosh wrote about her fa-
thers work, From his modern approach to classical
vessel forms in the 1950s, his work expanded to sculp-
tural spheres floating on geometric chrome forms.
Known for his strong sensual shapes, often enhanced
by distinctive surface decoration of thin sgraffito lines
or rhythmic brush spots, his ceramics are held in nu-
merous museum collections around the world.
Mr. McIntoshs work is represented in more than 40
museum collections including the Smithsonian Mu-
seum in Washington, DC, the Louvre in Paris, France
and the National Museum of Art in Tokyo, Japan. Lo-
cally, Mr. McInstoshs work can be seen at the Los
Angeles County Museum of Art, The Huntington Li-
brary and at AMOCA.
HM100: A Century through the Life of Harrison
McIntosh will also showcase several vignettes of
artwork from his close friends and contemporaries,
Karl Benjamin, Rupert Deese, James Hueter and
Sam Maloof.
Founded in 2001 and opened in September 2004,
AMOCA is one of the few museums in the United
States devoted exclusively to ceramic art and historic
innovations in ceramic technology. Concurrent exhibi-
tions at AMOCA include Framing Images of the
Southwest: Amado Pena and Rich Lopez from Sep-
tember 13 to October 26; Heaven: Rebekah Bogard
from September 13 to November 16.
In celebration of the current exhibitions, AMOCA
will pay tribute to Mr. McIntosh and Mr. Pea at a
Family Day event on Saturday, September 27 from 1
to 4 p.m. The afternoon will include both wheel throw-
ing and tile painting workshops. RSVP via email to
areyes@amoca.org.
AMOCA is open Wednesday through Sunday from
noon to 5 p.m. General admission is $7, student/senior
is $5. Members and guests under 12 years are admitted
free. AMOCA is located at 399 N. Garey Ave,
Pomona. For information, call (909) 865-3146 or visit
www.amoca.org.
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 24
OUR TOWN
Claremont COURIER/Friday, September 5, 2014 25
On the Same Page events ex-
plore, celebrate Ray Bradburys
Fahrenheit 451
On the Same Page committee of the Friends of the
Claremont Library selects Claremonts city-wide
read. This year, with a nod to the Claremont Library
Centennial, and this years theme: Free to Read, the
chosen book was Ray Bradburys Fahrenheit 451, a
1953 speculative fiction classic that leads the reader
to reflect on the changes in the world some 60 years
later.
To engage the community in the discussion, the On
the Same Page committee is sponsoring a series of
free community events. Mark your calendars for the
following programs.
Sunday, October 5 at 2 p.m. in the Library Meeting
Room: Community discussion and commentary on
the contrasting images that Ray Bradbury presents to
the world through his literature and his wide speaking
engagements; led by Wallace Cleaves, professor in
the University Writing Program at UC Riverside.
Take part in his enthusiasm for science fiction.
Sunday, October 12 at 2 p.m. in the Library Meet-
ing Room: The film, Fahrenheit 451, directed by
Francois Truffaut, with commentary and discussion
led by David Allen, columnist for the Inland Valley
Daily Bulletin, author of the recently published
Pomona A to Z and commentator and creator of the
recent film series presented at the Ontario library.
Wednesday, October 29 at 7 p.m. at the Claremont
High School library: Claremont High School Interna-
tional Baccalaureate Student presentations based on
the text and ideas from Mr.
Bradburys Fahrenheit 451,
led by instructor David
Chamberlain, CHS English
teacher, and speech and de-
bate instructor. Expect bril-
liant student performances
this evening.
Sunday, November 9 at 2
p.m. in the Library Meeting
Room: Presentation on Mr.
Bradbury and Fahrenheit
451 by UC Riverside profes-
sor Rob Latham, acclaimed
expert on the fascinating world of science fiction,
whose writing and speaking credits include commen-
tary on such strangely distinctive players as vampires
and cyborgs, Ray Bradbury and Tim Burton. Prepare
yourself.
OUR TOWN
RENTALS
Condo For Rent
QUAIL Creek, one bedroom,
one bathroom, large bright
living room with sliders to
deck and storage. Garage,
pool, spa, tennis, security
gated. No smoking. $1150.
Credit check. 951-741-5032.
AVAILABLE Claremont condo
on Baseline. Three bedrooms,
2.5 bathrooms. $2100 monthly.
Call Kris at 909-568-4742.
Office Space For Rent
EXECUTIVE office. Conven-
ient Claremont address. Newly
remodeled interior/exterior.
Fully furnished. 24/7 access.
Conference room. Phone/in-
ternet. Reserved parking. 909-
670-0600 ext.121.
AVAILABLE Claremont full-
time office space. Prime loca-
tion in Village. $410 monthly.
Call Kris at 909-568-4790.
VILLAGE office spaces. Ex-
ceptional building. Utilities,
waiting room, parking. 419
Yale Ave. Weekdays from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Apartment For Rent
CLAREMONT: Three bed-
room, two bathroom apart-
ment. $1600 monthly. $800
security deposit on approved
credit. 909-624-9958.
House For Rent
Walk to colleges. Foothill,
Mills. Furnished. Hardwood
floors. Large yard. Utilites,
gardener included. $2325
monthly. CCaporal@aol.com.
CLAREMONT, three bed-
room, one bathroom. Walk to
Village, park. Detached
garage, hardwood floors, fire-
place. $1795 monthly. Call
909-624-6547.
REAL ESTATE
Condo For Sale
$235,000-Two bedroom, two
bathroom condo is located on
the top floor. Claremont schools!
Upgrades include wood lami-
nate floors, granite counters and
newer custom cabinetry in
kitchen and bathrooms.
Kitchen appliances including
refrigerator. Geoffhamill.com,
909-621-0500.
RENTALS
Land For Sale
VACANT land for sale in these
areas: Oak Hills, 2.27 acres,
$80,000; Lucern Valley, 1.94
acres, $42,500; Lucern Valley,
10.20 acres, $111,600; Lan-
ders, one acre, $20,000;
Desert Hot Springs, 77.54
acres, $199,000. CBTC, 909-
621-6761.
THIRTY-NINE acre self-suffi-
cient ranch, $193 monthly.
Secluded, quiet 6100-ft. north
Arizona ranch. Evergreen
trees, meadowland blend.
Sweeping ridge mountaintop,
valley views. Borders 640
acres of Federal woodlands.
Free well access, loam gar-
den soil, mild climate, camp-
ing and RV okay. $19,900,
$1990 dn, guaranteed financ-
ing. Pictures, maps, weather,
area information. 1st United
800-966-6690. (Cal-SCAN)
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
MANAGER of reasearch and
development. Martech Medical
Products, leading medical de-
vice manufacturer seeking a
seasoned engineering profes-
sional for the Mexicali, Mexico
facility. Travel between US and
Mexico required. Send resume
and salary requirements to
resumes@martechmedical.com
or fax 215-256-0232. No phone
calls please. (Cal-SCAN)
ATTENTION drivers! New hir-
ing area! Quality home time!
Average $1000 weekly.
BCBS, 401K, pet and rider
programs. CDL-A required.
877-258-8782. www.ad-dri-
vers.com. (Cal-SCAN)
TRUCK drivers, obtain Class A-
CDL in two-and-a-half weeks.
Company sponsored training.
Also hiring recent truck school
graduates, experienced drivers.
Must be 21 or older. Call 866-
275-2349. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
IF you or a loved one suffered
a stroke, heart attack or died
after using testosterone sup-
plements you may be entitled
to monetary damages. Call
877-884-5213. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Announcements
EEOICPA claim denied? Diag-
nosed with cancer or another ill-
ness working for DOE in US
nuclear weapons program? You
may be entitled to $150,000 to
$400,000. Call attorney Hugh
Stephens 855-957-2200. 2495
Main St., Suite 442, Buffalo,
New York. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know 144 million US
adults read a newspaper print
copy each week? Discover the
power of newspaper advertis-
ing. For a free brochure call
916-288-6011 or email ce-
celia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know seven in 10
Americans or 158 million US
adults read content from news-
paper media each week? Dis-
cover the power of newspaper
advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email ce-
celia@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN)
PREGNANT? Considering
adoption? Call us first. Living
expenses, housing, medical
and continued support after-
wards. Choose adoptive fam-
ily of your choice. Call 24/7.
1-877-879-4709. (Cal-SCAN)
DID you know that not only
does newspaper media reach
a huge audience, they also
reach an engaged audience?
Discover the power of news-
paper advertising. For a free
brochure call 916-288-6011
or email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
DID you know newspaper-gen-
erated content is so valuable its
taken and repeated, con-
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discussed, posted, copied, ed-
ited and emailed countless
times throughout the day by oth-
ers? Discover the power of
newspaper advertising. For a
free brochure call 916-288-6011
or email cecelia@cnpa.com.
(Cal-SCAN)
Antiques
A BARN and house full of an-
tiques, furniture and smalls. Re-
finishing too! 909-593-1846. La
Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com.
Donations
DONATE your car, truck or
boat to Heritage for the Blind.
Free three-day vacation, tax
deductible, free towing, all
paperwork taken care of.
888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)
MARKETPLACE
Financial
DO you owe over $10,000 to
the IRS or State in back
taxes? Get tax relief now! Call
BlueTax, the nations full serv-
ice tax solution firm. 800-393-
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REDUCE your past tax bill by
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levies, liens and wage gar-
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now to see if you qualify. 1-
800-498-1067.
IS your identity protected? It is
our promise to provide the
most comprehensive identity
theft prevention and response
products available! Call today
for a 30-day free trial, 1-800-
908-5194. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Business
DIRECTV starting at $24.95
monthly. Free three months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime and
Cinemax. Free receiver up-
grade! 2014 NFL Sunday
ticket included with select
packages. Some exclusions
apply. Call for details 1-800-
385-9017. (Cal-SCAN)
BULLETINS
Business
DISH TV retailer. Starting at
$19.99 a month for 12 months
and high speed internet starting
at $14.95 a month (where
available). Save! Ask about
same day installation! Call now!
1-800-357-0810. (Cal-SCAN)
AVON: Earn extra income
with a new career! Sell from
home, work, online. $15
startup. For information call,
877-830-2916. (Cal-SCAN)
Health
SAFE Step Walk-In Tub alert
for seniors. Bathroom falls can
be fatal. Approved by Arthritis
Foundation. Therapeutic jets.
Less than four-inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors.
American made. Installation in-
cluded. Call 800-799-4811 for
$750 off. (Cal-SCAN)
LOWEST prices on health and
dental insurance. We have the best
rates from top companies! Call
now! 888-989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)
BROKEN power wheelchair or
scooter? We will repair your
power wheelchair onsite. Call
for repair, maintenance or sales
for assistance with your scooter.
888-490-6446. (Cal-SCAN)
Personals
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rentals..............26
services...........29
legals..............27
real estate.......31
CLASSIFIEDS
Friday 09-05-14
909.621.4761
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 26
PRICING
Classified:
1-16 words $20.00,
each additional word $1.25
Display Ad:
$9.50 per column/inch,
3 column minimum
Service Ad:
Please call for pricing.
All new accounts and
Garage Sale ads must be
prepaid. Payment by
cash, check. Credit cards
now accepted.
Sorry no refunds.
DEADLINES
Classified:
Monday & Thursday
by 3:00 pm
Real Estate:
Wednesday by 3:00 pm
Service Pages:
Monday by 3:00 pm
Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice.
The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or
reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error
that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not re-
sponsible for any unreported errors after the first publica-
tion. It is the advertisers obligation to verify the accuracy
of his/her ad.
EMPLOYMENT
Injection Mold Technician
Rialto, CA
Responsible for performing basic setup and operation of
plastic injection molding machines. Troubleshoot and
problem solve injection molding, auxiliary and secondary
operations. Must possess completion of Mold Tech
training or three years equivalent work experience.
Dayton Superior offers a competitive salary and benefits.
Drug testing and background check required.
Apply online at www.daytonsuperior.com
EOE/M/F/D/V
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 5, 2014 27
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE
(Notice pursuant UCC Sec. 6105)
Escrow No. 01180-109938
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is
about to be made.
The name(s) and business address of the seller(s)
is/are: SENTANIEL INC, 4926 BERRYMAN
AVE, CULVER CITY, CA 90230
Doing Business as: BURGER KING #2309
All other business name(s) and address(es) used
by the seller(s) within the past three years, as
stated by the seller(s) is/ are: NONE
The location in California of the chief executive
office of the seller(s): SAME
The name(s) and address(es) of the buyer(s)
is/are: CALIFORNIA FOOD MANAGEMENT,
LLC, 8421 WILSHIRE BLVD #205, BEVERLY
HILLS, CA 90211
The assets being sold are generally described as:
LEASEHOLD INTEREST, FURNITURE, FIX-
TURES (INCLUDING TRADE FIXTURES)
SIGNS, EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY AND
OTHER PHYSICAL ASSETS LOCATED ON
THE PREMISES AND USED IN THE OPERA-
TION OF THE BUSINESS and are located at:
517 E. FOOTHILL BLVD, POMONA, CA
91767
The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at
the office of: STEWART TITLE OF CALIFOR-
NIA, INC 12370 HESPERIA RD, STE 5, VIC-
TORVILLE, CA 92395 and the anticipated sale
date is on or after SEPTEMBER 30, 2014
The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform
Commercial Code Section 6106.2.
[If the sale is subject to Sec 6106.2 the following
information must be provided]
The name and address of the person with whom
claims may be filed is: STEWART TITLE OF
CALIFORNIA, INC, 12370 HESPERIA RD,
STE 5, VICTORVILLE, CA 92395, ATTN:
DIANAPRICE, Escrow No.: 01180-109938, and
the last day for filing claims by any creditor shall
be SEPTEMBER 29, 2014, which is the business
day before the anticipated sale date specified
above.
Dated: AUGUST 5, 2014
CALIFORNIAFOOD MANAGEMENT, LLC, A
CALIFORNIA LIMITED LIABILITY COM-
PANY, Buyer(s)
LA1452285 CLAREMONT COURIER 9/5/14
NOTICE OFPETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OFCHARLES E. HUNTER
CASE NO. BP150731
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent
creditors, and persons who may otherwise be in-
terested in the will or estate, or both, of
CHARLES E. HUNTER:
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by
ELEANOR ARIZMENDI in the Superior Court
of California, County of Los Angeles.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
ELEANOR ARIZMENDI be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
The PETITION requests authority to administer
the estate under the Independent Administration
of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per-
sonal representative to take many actions without
obtaining court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the personal rep-
resentative will be required to give notice to in-
terested persons unless they have waived notice
or consented to the proposed action.) The inde-
pendent administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to
the petition and shows good cause why the court
should not grant the authority.
A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE
HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS:
Date: September 18, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. in
Dept.: 29 Room: located at:
Superior Court Of California,
County Of Los Angeles,
111 North Hill Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Central District
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition,
you should appear at the hearing and state your
objections or file written objections with the court
before the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE ACREDITOR or a CONTINGENT
CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file
your claim with the court and mail a copy to the
personal representative appointed by the court
within the later of either (1) four months from
the date of first issuance of letters to a general per-
sonal representative, as defined in section 58 (b)
of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to
you of a notice under section 9052 of the Califor-
nia Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority
may affect your rights as a creditor. You may
want to consult with an attorney knowledge-
able in California law.
YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY
THE COURT. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a Request
for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of
an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of
any petition or account as provided in Probate
Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice
form is available from the court clerk.
Petitioner:
Eleanor Arizmendi, In Pro Per
3303 South Archibald Ave., #19
Ontario, CA 91761
626-862-1351
Publish: August 29, September 5 and 12, 2014
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER
ESTATE OFESTHER J. RATINOFF
Case No. BP154592
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent cred-
itors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in
the will or estate, or both, of ESTHER J. RATINOFF
APETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Ed-
ward James Ratinoff in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of LOS ANGELES.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Ed-
ward James Ratinoff be appointed as personal repre-
sentative to administer the estate of the decedent.
THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and
codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and
any codicils are available for examination in the file
kept by the court.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer the
estate under the Independent Administration of Estates
Act. (This authority will allow the personal represen-
tative to take many actions without obtaining court ap-
proval. Before taking certain very important actions,
however, the personal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)
The independent administration authority will be
granted unless an interested person files an objection
to the petition and shows good cause why the court
should not grant the authority.
AHEARING on the petition will be held on Sept. 8,
2014 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 9 located at 111 N. Hill
St., Los Angeles, CA90012.
IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition,
you should appear at the hearing and state your ob-
jections or file written objections with the court be-
fore the hearing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE ACREDITOR or a contingent credi-
tor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the
court and mail a copy to the personal representative ap-
pointed by the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of letters to a
general personal representative, as defined in section
58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of
a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate
Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may af-
fect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult
with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.
YOU MAYEXAMINE the file kept by the court. If
you are a person interested in the estate, you may file
with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of es-
tate assets or of any petition or account as provided in
Probate Code section 1250. ARequest for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for petitioner:
JULIETKANE ESQ
SBN274859
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
414 YALE AVE. STE K
CLAREMONTCA91711
CN902577
Publish: August 22, 29 & September 5, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014213889
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
PERSPECTIVE, 299 E. Foothill Blvd., San Dimas,
CA91773. Mailing address: 901 W. Olive Ave., Red-
lands, CA92373. Registrant(s): Margaretann Harri-
son, 901 W. Olive Ave., Redlands, CA92373.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 07/14/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Margaretann Harrison Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
08/05/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally ex-
pires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section
17913 other than a change in the residence address of
a registered owner. Anew Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business Name
Statement must be accompanied by the Affidavit Of
Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 22, 29, September 5 and 12, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014236690
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as SONS OF RECLAIM, 9565 C Ave, Suite F,
Hesperia, CA 92345, San Bernardino County.
Registrant(s): Dimas Macias Jr., 9565 C Ave,
Suite F, Hesperia, CA 92345.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Dimas Macias Jr. Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/20/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 22, 29, September 5 and 12, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014225268
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
FEDERAL LOAN CONSOLIDATION CEN-
TER, 1021 Eclipse Way, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA
91792. Registrant(s): Richard Castaneda, 1021
Eclipse Way, Suite 100, Los Angeles, CA91792.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 08/13/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Richard Castaneda Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/13/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gener-
ally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of sec-
tion 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pur-
suant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. Anew Fic-
titious Business Name Statement must be filed be-
fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 22, 29, September 5 and 12, 2014
TSG No.: 8431633 TS No.: CA1400258693
FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 8322-005-016 Property Ad-
dress: 865 DRAKE AVENUE CLAREMONT, CA
91711 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN
DEFAULT UNDER ADEED OF TRUST, DATED
10/12/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, ITMAYBE SOLD
ATAPUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA-
NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED-
ING AGAINSTYOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACTA
LAWYER. On 09/18/2014 at 10:00 A.M., First Amer-
ican Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee
under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded
10/17/2007, as Instrument No. 20072363677, in book ,
page , , of Official Records in the office of the County
Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of Cali-
fornia. Executed by: FERNANDO FLORES, ASIN-
GLE MAN, AND LORRAINE CALVILLO, A
SINGLE WOMAN, WILLSELLATPUBLIC AUC-
TION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH,
CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENTor other
form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at
time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Be-
hind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400
Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CAAll right, title and in-
terest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed
of Trust in the property situated in said County and State
described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN
THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST
APN# 8322-005-016 The street address and other com-
mon designation, if any, of the real property described
above is purported to be: 865 DRAKE AVENUE,
CLAREMONT, CA91711 he undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness of the street ad-
dress and other common designation, if any, shown
herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or
warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, posses-
sion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal
sumof thenote(s) securedbysaidDeedofTrust, within-
terest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances,
under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and
expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said
Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligation secured by the property to be sold and rea-
sonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$386,291.03. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust
has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations
secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums
secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has
caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell
to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of
Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County
where the real property is located. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding
on this property lien, you should understand that there
are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You
will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Plac-
ing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not auto-
matically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the
property. You should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest
bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for
paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off,
before you can receive clear title to the property. You are
encouragedto investigatetheexistence, priority, andsize
of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorders office or a title insur-
ance company, either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of these resources,
youshouldbeawarethat thesamelender mayholdmore
than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NO-
TICE TO PROPERTYOWNER: The sale date shown
on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court,
pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code.
Thelawrequiresthat informationabout trusteesalepost-
ponements be made available to you and to the public,
as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish
to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and
if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale
of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this
Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/prop-
ertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned
to this case CA1400258693 Information about post-
ponements that are very short in duration or that occur
close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately
be reflected in the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set
aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Pur-
chaser shall have no further recourse against the Mort-
gagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagees attorney. Date:
First American Title Insurance Company 5 First Amer-
ican Way Santa Ana CA 92707 First American Title In-
surance Company MAYBE ACTING AS ADEBT
COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A
DEBT. ANYINFORMATION OBTAINED MAY
BE USED FOR THATPURPOSE FOR TRUSTEES
SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-
0772NPP0235079 To: CLAREMONT COURIER
08/29/2014, 09/05/2014, 09/12/2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014219564
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as BOTTEGA 25, 530 W. First Street, Clare-
mont, CA91711. Registrant(s): Brenda Ricciardi,
2637 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business
under the fictitious business name or names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Brenda Ricciardi Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/08/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section
17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at
the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was
filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as pro-
vided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it ex-
pires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the
statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change
in the residence address of a registered owner. Anew
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed be-
fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Ficti-
tious Business Name Statement must be accompanied
by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
Thefilingof thisstatement doesnot of itself authorizethe
use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in viola-
tion of the rights of another under federal, state, or com-
mon law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 15, 22, 29 and September 5, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014242035
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
PAINT AND PADDLE, 218 Foothill Blvd., Clare-
mont, CA91711. Mailing address: 1746 Vallejo Way,
Upland, CA 91784. Registrant(s): Michelle Flint,
1746 Vallejo Way, Upland, CA91784.
This business is conducted by an Individual.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 08/26/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Michelle Flint Title: Owner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/26/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gen-
erally expires at the end of five (5) years from the
date on which it was filed in the office of the
County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision
(b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days
after any change in the facts set forth in the state-
ment pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered
owner. A new Fictitious Business Name State-
ment must be filed before the expiration. Effec-
tive January 1, 2014, the Fictitious Business
Name Statement must be accompanied by the Af-
fidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Busi-
ness Name in violation of the rights of another
under federal, state, or common law (see Section
14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 29, September 5, 12 and 19, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014227303
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as CALIFORNIADREAMZZZ, 2236 S. Garey
Ave., Pomona, CA 91766. Registrants: Michelle
Zuniga, 22801 Allies Pl. #3, Moreno Valley, CA
92553. Juan Carlos Murga, 1404 N. Euclid Ave.,
Ontario, CA 91762
This business is conducted by a General Partnership.
Registrant has not yet commenced to transact
business under the fictitious business name or
names listed herein.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ Michelle Zuniga Title: Partner
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County
on 08/14/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of
section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement gener-
ally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date
on which it was filed in the office of the County
Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of sec-
tion 17920, where it expires 40 days after any
change in the facts set forth in the statement pur-
suant to section 17913 other than a change in the
residence address of a registered owner. Anew Fic-
titious Business Name Statement must be filed be-
fore the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the
Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself au-
thorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business
Name in violation of the rights of another under fed-
eral, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et
seq., Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 29, September 5, 12 and 19, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014237799
The following person(s) is (are) doing business
as BOON COMPANION, 145 Harvard Avenue,
Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): WORLD
OF TOYS AND HOBBIES INC., 145 Harvard
Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 03/29/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is
true and correct.
/s/ John Peltekci Title: Officer/Vice President
ThisstatementwasfiledwiththeRegistrar-Recorder/County
Clerk of Los Angeles County on 08/21/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally ex-
pires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as
provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it
expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth
in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a
change in the residence address of a registered owner.
Anew Fictitious Business Name Statement must be
filed before the expiration. Effective January 1, 2014,
the Fictitious Business Name Statement must be ac-
companied by the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize
the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in
violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or
common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and
Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 29, September 5, 12 and 19, 2014
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
File No. 2014216886
The following person(s) is (are) doing business as
WFTW, WORD FOR THE WORLD, PETER
POPOFF MINISTRIES, PUFC, WORD FOR
THE WORLD MINISTRIES, 2058 N. Mills Av-
enue, Suite 356, Claremont, CA91711-2812. Mail-
ing address: 2095 W. Arrow Route, Upland, CA
91786. Registrant(s): WORD FOR THE WORLD
COMPASSION CENTER, INC., 2095 W. Arrow
Route, Upland, CA91786.
This business is conducted by a Corporation.
Registrant commenced to transact business under the
fictitious name or names listed above on 04/21/2014.
I declare that all information in this statement is true
and correct.
/s/ Nickolas Popoff Title: Vice President
This statement was filed with the Registrar-
Recorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on
08/06/14.
NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of sec-
tion 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally
expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on
which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk,
except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section
17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in
the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to sec-
tion 17913 other than a change in the residence ad-
dress of a registered owner. A new Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be filed before the
expiration. Effective January 1, 2014, the Fictitious
Business Name Statement must be accompanied by
the Affidavit Of Identity Form.
The filing of this statement does not of itself author-
ize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name
in violation of the rights of another under federal,
state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq.,
Business and Professions Code).
PUBLISH: August 15, 22, 29 and September 5, 2014
Trustee Sale No. 14-001293 CXE Title Order No. 02-
14014159 APN 8701-056-019 NOTICE OF
TRUSTEES SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/12/04.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAYBE SOLD AT APUB-
LIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION
OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A
LAWYER. On 09/25/14 at 9:00 A.M., Aztec Fore-
closure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee
under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in
that certain Deed of Trust executed by Hassan
Ghomashchi and Fatima Eftekhar, Husband and Wife
as Joint Tenants, as Trustor(s), in favor of Mortgage
Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as Nom-
inee for Ibex Networks, Inc., a California Corpora-
tion, as Beneficiary, Recorded on 02/20/04 in
Instrument No. 04 0389566 of official records in the
Office of the county recorder of LOS ANGELES
County, California; Nationstar Mortgage LLC, as the
current Beneficiary, WILLSELLAT PUBLIC AUC-
TION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH
(payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United
States, by cash, a cashiers check drawn by a state or
national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal
credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal
savings and loan association, savings association, or
savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Finan-
cial Code and authorized to do business in this state),
Doubletree Hotel (Vineyard Ballroom) Los Angeles-
Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA
90650, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now
held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property sit-
uated in said County, California described as: 601
CRESTVIEW DRIVE, DIAMOND BAR, CA
91765 The property heretofore described is being sold
as is. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any lia-
bility for any incorrectness of the street address and
other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said
sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty,
expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or
encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of
the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with inter-
est thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if
any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated
fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the
trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit:
$803,573.58 (Estimated) Accrued interest and addi-
tional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior
to sale. The undersigned caused said Notice of De-
fault and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county
where the real property is located and more than three
months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE:
August 21, 2014 Robbie Weaver Assistant Secretary
& Assistant Vice President Aztec Foreclosure Corpo-
ration 20 Pacifica, Suite 1460 Irvine, CA 92618
Phone: (877) 257-0717 or (602) 638-5700 Fax: (602)
638-5748 www.aztectrustee.com NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding
on this property lien, you should understand that there
are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You
will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself.
Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not
automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership
of the property. You should also be aware that the lien
being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the
highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be re-
sponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien
being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title
to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the
existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that
may exist on this property by contacting the county
recorders office or a title insurance company, either
of which may charge you a fee for this information.
If you consult either of these resources, you should
be aware that the same lender may hold more than
one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NO-
TICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date
shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or
more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or
a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California
Civil Code. The law requires that information about
trustee sale postponements be made available to you
and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at
the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date
has been postponed, and, if applicable, the resched-
uled time and date for the sale of this property, you
may call or visit the Internet Web site, using the file
number assigned to this case 14-001293. Information
about postponements that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not
immediately be reflected in the telephone informa-
tion or on the Internet Web site. The best way to ver-
ify postponement information is to attend the
scheduled sale. www.Auction.com or call (800) 280-
2832 Or Aztec Foreclosure Corporation (877) 257-
0717 www.aztectrustee.com P1109747 9/5, 9/12,
09/19/2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 5, 2014 28
DEPARTMENT OF THE
TREASURER AND TAX
COLLECTOR
Notice of Divided Publication
NOTICE OF DIVIDED PUB-
LICATION OF THE PROP-
ERTY TAX DEFAULT
(DELINQUENT) LIST
Made pursuant to Section 3371, Revenue and
Taxation Code
Pursuant to Sections 3381 through 3385, Revenue
and Taxation Code, the Notice of Power to Sell
Tax Defaulted Property in and for Los Angeles
County, State of California, has been divided and
distributed to various newspapers of general cir-
culation published in the County. Aportion of the
list appears in each of such newspapers.
I, Mark J. Saladino, County of Los Angeles Tax
Collector, State of California, certify that:
Notice is hereby given that the real properties
listed below were declared to be in tax default at
12:01 a.m. on July 1, 2012, by operation of law.
The declaration of default was due to non-pay-
ment of the total amount due for the taxes, as-
sessments, and other charges levied in the
2011-2012 tax year that were a lien on the listed
real property. Property upon which a nuisance
abatement lien has been recorded and non-resi-
dential commercial property shall be subject to
sale if the taxes remain unpaid after three years.
If the 2011-2012 taxes remain unpaid after June
30, 2015, the property will be subject to sale at
public auction in 2016. All other property that re-
mains unpaid after June 30, 2017, will be subject
to sale at public auction in 2018. The name of the
assessee and the total tax, which was due on June
30, 2012, for the 2011-12 tax year, is shown op-
posite the parcel number. Tax defaulted real prop-
erty may be redeemed by payment of all unpaid
taxes and assessments, together with the addi-
tional penalties and fees as prescribed by law, or
it may be paid under an installment plan of re-
demption.
All information concerning redemption of tax-de-
faulted property will be furnished, upon request,
by Mark J. Saladino, Treasurer and Tax Collec-
tor, 225 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, California
90012, 1(888) 807-2111 or 1(213) 974-2111.
I certify under penalty of perjury that the forego-
ing is true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles,
California on August 14, 2014.
MARK J. SALADINO
TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR
COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
STATE OF CALIFORNIA
Assessees/taxpayers, who have disposed of real
property since January 1, 2009, may find their
names listed for the reason that a change in owner-
ship has not been reflected on the assessment roll.
ASSESSOR'S IDENTIFICATION NUMBER-
ING SYSTEM EXPLANATION
The Assessor's Parcel Number (APN), when used
to describe property in this list, refers to the Asses-
sor's map book, the map page, the block on the map
(if applicable), and the individual parcel on the
map page or in the block. The Assessor's maps and
further explanation of the parcel numbering sys-
tem are available in the Assessor's Office.
The following property tax defaulted on July 1,
2012, for the taxes, assessments, and other
charges for the fiscal year 2011-12:
LISTED BELOW ARE PROPERTIES THAT
DEFAULTED IN 2012 FOR TAXES, ASSESS-
MENTS AND 0THER CHARGES FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012.
AMOUNT OF DELINQUENCY AS OF THIS
PUBLICATION IS LISTED BELOW.
BARBER,REIGH S AND MANINE F SITUS
20 ALDER DR MOUNT BALDY CA 91759
8675-011-033 $8,442.50
BASSETT,THOMAS M TR THOMAS M BAS-
SETT TRUST SITUS 212 YALE AVE CLARE-
MONT CA 91711-4724 8313-019-005
$13,189.68
BENITEZ,MICHELLE N SITUS 1044 BALSA
CIR LA VERNE CA 91750-3802 8391-026-
055/S2010-030 $321.15
CABRINHA,CAMDEN C AND COLLEEN
SITUS 2232 N VILLA MARIA RD CLARE-
MONT CA 91711-1659 8670-015-025
$11,912.37
CALIRI,JOHN 8673-018-001 $357.00
8673-018-003 $357.00
8673-018-008 $357.39
CALIRI,JOHN AND ELVIRA SITUS 5140
PALMER CANYON RD CLAREMONT CA
91711-1481 8673-017-017 $1,020.95
8673-018-007 $648.32
CALIRI,JOHN S 8673-007-012 $168.02
SITUS 5226 PALMER CANYON RD CLARE-
MONT CA 91711-1483 8673-007-013 $703.93
8673-007-014 $168.02
CALIRI,JOHN S AND ELVIRA A SITUS 5324
PALMER CANYON RD CLAREMONT CA
91711-1485 8673-004-009 $1,576.39
CLARK,ROSS G AND EILEEN F SITUS 807
GLADSTONE ST LA VERNE CA 91750-3835
8391-007-022 $11,346.65
COBOS,MIGUEL J AND KATHERINE B
SITUS 616 GAYVILLE DR CLAREMONT CA
91711-2412 8304-002-027 $20,457.24
CONTRERAS,MARCO AND VERONICA
SITUS 1698 BRIDGEPORT AVE CLARE-
MONT CA 91711-2516 8303-012-037 $410.95
DAWBER,BRIAN AND ALISON 8664-010-
038 $294.18
DIMARK GROUP INC SITUS 4226 NEW
HAMPSHIRE AVE CLAREMONT CA 91711-
5801 8673-037-003/S2011-010 $31,267.70
ENGEL,JOHN A AND THERESA SITUS 3051
N WHITE AVE LA VERNE CA 91750-4612
8375-032-082 $2,669.11
ERDOS,GABRIEL J CO TR ERDOS TRUST
SITUS 4143 ATLANTIC CIR LA VERNE CA
91750-3007 8666-003-045 $68.48
FAHRINGER,EARL J TR FAHRINGER
TRUST SITUS 1720 LEAF ST LA VERNE CA
91750-3921 8381-040-002 $1,478.57
GARANCOVSKY,JOSEPH J SITUS 2409
COLLEGE LN LA VERNE CA 91750-3620
8375-032-035 $770.87
GONZALES,GINA C SITUS 609 HENDRIX
AVE CLAREMONT CA 91711-5443 8316-014-
025 $11,210.62
HA,JOON HO AND JEONG A ET AL
HA,JEANNIE C SITUS 3629 LYNOAK ST
POMONA CA 91767-1232 8304-014-013
$24,376.35
INLAND REAL ESTATE GROUP LLC 8669-
025-038 $3,890.12
8669-025-056 $2,946.72
KLEINMAN,RANDALL TR AGATHA L
KLEINMAN DECD TRUST SITUS 346 YALE
AVE CLAREMONT CA 91711-4726 8313-016-
028 $25,461.57
LANGIE,ALLENA A 8673-007-007 $469.87
LEATHERS,JOEL W AND TONI M SITUS
768 LINDENWOOD DR CLAREMONT CA
91711-2952 8307-020-044 $22,482.47
MCPHERSON,MICHELLE SITUS 3070
KNOLLWOOD AVE LA VERNE CA 91750-
3668 8375-032-123 $2,356.07
MERKLE,PATRICIA O SITUS 325 SAINT
BONAVENTURE ST CLAREMONT CA91711-
5255 8315-005-015 $1,674.61
MT BALDY RANCH LLC 8675-015-002
$267.01
8675-015-005 $23,241.54
NASMYTH,PETER R JR SITUS 434 W
ARROW HWY CLAREMONT CA 91711-4903
8316-001-032 $13,391.54
PARRY,PAUL DECD EST OF SITUS 338
CARLETON AVE CLAREMONT CA 91711-
5106 8316-006-005 $1,780.18
REGALADO,RAUL D AND SHARON L
SITUS 749 FORDLAND AVE LA VERNE CA
91750-3823 8391-006-046 $9,082.40
RODGERS,WILLIAM T AND DIANA SITUS
7161 VISTA DE ORO LA VERNE CA 91750-
2343 8678-066-013 $11,414.72
SCHMITT,JAMES M AND HEATON,DIANE
E SITUS 2660 SAN ANDRES WAY CLARE-
MONT CA 91711-1556 8670-021-016
$21,472.18
SIMON,ANTHONY SITUS 155 LIMESTONE
RD CLAREMONT CA 91711-1843 8671-017-
045 $29,856.09
SOUCIER,PAUL TR SOUCIER FAMILY
TRUST AND MR SAMBO INC 8678-024-022
$27,537.55
TEDDER,DAVID H AND REBECCAASITUS
2227 N LA PAZ DR CLAREMONT CA 91711-
1771 8670-005-019 $15,882.74
VERMA,CATHERINE M AND
VERMA,MARIANNE N SITUS 1979 JUDSON
CT CLAREMONT CA 91711-2829 8306-003-
033 $3,365.22
WHEATLEY,CARROLL A JR AND TONJA E
SITUS 6137 RIDGEMONT CIR LAVERNE CA
91750-1744 8678-067-053 $32,217.40
CN902590
Publish: September 5 and 12, 2014
APN: 8713-018-004 TS No: CA08002726-14-1-
FT TO No: 10-8-235094 NOTICE OF
TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT
UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED April 17,
2001. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD
AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EX-
PLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO-
CEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD
CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 9, 2014 at
09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom, Doubletree Hotel
Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive,
Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC Financial Inc. dba
Trustee Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee,
under and pursuant to the power of sale contained
in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on April
26, 2001 as Instrument No. 01 0711910 of offi-
cial records in the Office of the Recorder of Los
Angeles County, California, executed by
FRANKLYN DELANOR CAMPBELL AND
JOHNETTA CAMPBELL, as Trustor(s), BANK
OF AMERICA, N.A. as Beneficiary, WILL SELL
AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States,
all payable at the time of sale, that certain prop-
erty situated in said County, California describ-
ing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY
DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The
property heretofore described is being sold as
is. The street address and other common desig-
nation, if any, of the real property described above
is purported to be: 2945 STEEPLECHASE
LANE, DIAMOND BAR , CA91765 The under-
signed Trustee disclaims any liability for any in-
correctness of the street address and other
common designation, if any, shown herein. Said
sale will be made without covenant or warranty,
express or implied, regarding title, possession, or
encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal
sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust,
with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s),
advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of
Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the
Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligations secured by the property to be sold
and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and ad-
vances at the time of the initial publication of this
Notice of Trustees Sale is estimated to be
$2,026,002.48 (Estimated). However, prepay-
ment premiums, accrued interest and advances
will increase this figure prior to sale. Benefi-
ciarys bid at said sale may include all or part of
said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will
accept a cashiers check drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or federal
credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal
savings and loan association, savings association
or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the
California Financial Code and authorized to do
business in California, or other such funds as may
be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender
other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may with-
hold the issuance of the Trustees Deed Upon Sale
until funds become available to the payee or en-
dorsee as a matter of right. The property offered
for sale excludes all funds held on account by the
property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is
unable to convey title for any reason, the suc-
cessful bidders sole and exclusive remedy shall
be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the
successful bidder shall have no further recourse.
Notice to Potential Bidders If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you should un-
derstand that there are risks involved in bidding at
a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien,
not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid
at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle
you to free and clear ownership of the property.
You should also be aware that the lien being auc-
tioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the
highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be
responsible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can receive
clear title to the property. You are encouraged to
investigate the existence, priority, and size of out-
standing liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or a title
insurance company, either of which may charge
you a fee for this information. If you consult ei-
ther of these resources, you should be aware that
the same Lender may hold more than one mort-
gage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to
Property Owner The sale date shown on this No-
tice of Sale may be postponed one or more times
by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a
court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Califor-
nia Civil Code. The law requires that information
about Trustee Sale postponements be made avail-
able to you and to the public, as a courtesy to
those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn
whether your sale date has been postponed, and,
if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for
the sale of this property, you may call
Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information re-
garding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web
site address www.Auction.com for information
regarding the sale of this property, using the file
number assigned to this case, CA08002726-14-1-
FT. Information about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close in time
to the scheduled sale may not immediately be re-
flected in the telephone information or on the In-
ternet Web site. The best way to verify
postponement information is to attend the sched-
uled sale. Date: August 28, 2014 MTC Financial
Inc. dba Trustee Corps TS No. CA08002726-14-
1-FT 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 949-
252-8300 Amy Lemus, Authorized Signatory
SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED
ONLINE AT www.Auction.com FOR AUTO-
MATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE
CALL: AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832 MTC
Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps MAY BE ACT-
ING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION
OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PUR-
POSE. P1110593 9/5, 9/12, 09/19/2014
legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
LEGAL TENDER
909-621-5626
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Showroom in Claremont next to Sprouts
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Come see our monthly specials!
SERVICES
HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT
COMPUTERS HEALTH&WELLNESS AUTOMOTIVE
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 29
SERVICES
Friday 09-05-14
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acousti-
cal contractor, specializing in
acoustic removal, texture,
painting, acoustic re-spray
and drywall repairs.
Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.
AC/Heating
STEVES HEATING
& Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over
25 years. Repairs all
makes/models. Free
service call with repair.
Free estimate on new units.
MC/Visa. 100 percent
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Lic.744873
909-985-5254
SAME DAY SERVICE
Free Service Call with Repair
Only $69.50 diagnostic fee
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We repair all brands
SCE Quality Installation
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Great Prices
Friendly Service
909-398-1208
www.novellcustom.com
Lic.958830
Art Lessons
VISUAL artist available for art
and design lessons at our stu-
dio in Upland, CA. Children
and adults. Classes and work-
shops also available. 511 Art
Studio. 909-241-2131.
Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite
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Bathtubs and sinks.
Showers, tile, countertops.
Refinish - Reglaze - Restore
Porcelain, ceramic,
fiberglass.
Quick and affordable.
Please call 909-945-7775.
www.bath-brite.com
Caregiver
EXPERIENCED, mature care-
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Great references. Joann, 909-
568-4635.
Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to
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painting. Lots more! Paul,
909-919-3315.
Cabinet Refacing
Custom Cabinets-
Entertainment Centers-
Fireplace Mantles-
Molding and more.
Lic#900656.
References available.
Free estimates.
909-262-3144
Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service.
Claremont resident serving
Claremont since 1985. Power-
ful truck mounted cleaning
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and stretching. Senior dis-
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water damage service. Please
call 909-621-1182.
ED EY The Carpet Guy. Car-
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Claremont resident. Free es-
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Childcare
YEAR-ROUND program. In-
fant to 12 years. Meals pro-
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day, 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Lic.198017727. 909-477-0930.
Chimney Sweep
Quality Fireplace
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Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace,
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Spark arrestor supply
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Call 909-920-6600
392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney
cleaning. Repairs, chimney
covers, spark arrestors,
masonry and dampers.
BBB. Please call
909-467-9212.
Concrete
JDC CONCRETE
909-624-9000
Driveways/walkways, block
walls, pavers, bricks,
stone veneer,
concrete staining, drainage.
Lic.894245 C8, C29.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
Stamped, broom,
color finishes.
Slate, flagstone, planters,
walls and walkways.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area
30 years!
Lic.323243
Contractor
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New and repairs.
909-599-9530
Serving Claremont
for 30 years!
Lic.323243
WENGER Construction. 25
years experience. Cabinetry,
doors, electrical, drywall, crown
molding. Lic.707381. Compet-
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Contractor
PPS General Contractor.
Kitchen and bathroom remod-
eling. Flooring, windows, elec-
trical and plumbing. Serving
Claremont for 25 years.
Lic.846995. 951-237-1547.
KOGEMAN
CONSTRUCTION
Room additions.
Kitchen/bath remodeling.
Custom cabinets.
Residential/commercial.
909-946-8664
Lic.B710309
Visit us on Facebook!
Cooking
Fresh Healthy Food
Personal Chef
Special Diets
Tasty Party Fare
Cooking Classes
Private Lessons
www.LotsaFlavor.com
Chef Linda Heilpern
909-625-9194
Counseling
"INNER Child Healing" with
Joanne Dinsmore, author of
Pathways to the Healing Arts,
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Arts.com for all other services.
Drywall
THOR McAndrew Construc-
tion. Drywall repair and in-
stallation. Interior plaster re-
pair. Free estimates. CA
Lic.742776. Please call 909-
816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.
Electrician
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
Old home rewiring specialist.
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior Discount *
Lic.359145
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service
changes, repairs, service calls,
outdoor lighting and room addi-
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241-7671, 909-949-8230.
Electrician
SPARKS ELECTRIC
Local electrician for all your
electrician needs!
909-946-8887
Lic.922000
MOR ELECTRIC &
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Free estimates
and senior discounts.
909-989-3454
Residential * Industrial *
Commercial. We do it all.
No job too big or small!
24/7 emergency services.
Reasonable and reliable.
Lic.400-990
30 years experience.
Serving Claremont
Since 1995. Residential,
Commercial.
Recessed lighting and
design, breaker replacement,
service panel upgrades,
ceiling fans, troubleshooting,
landscape lighting, rewires
and LED lighting. Free
estimates. 24-hours emer-
gency service. References.
909-900-8930
909-626-2242
Lic.806149
Fences & Gates
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
New, repairs.
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Business
Name Statement (D.B.A.) is
required if you're in business.
You are required to file and
publish a DBA in the local
newspaper. You must renew
your FBNS every five (5)
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your business is located in LA
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Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com.
Taking the time to care for
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Gardening
THAI'S Gardening Service.
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Lic.919825
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Free estimates.
David, 909-374-1583
Girl Friday
EXPERIENCED pet-sitter
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Yard care, mail pickup and
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Handyman
STRACK Construction. Gen-
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services available. No job too
small. 909-292-5781. CA
Lic#988284.
Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing,
gates, brick block, concrete
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25 years in Claremont. Paul,
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A-HANDYMAN
New and Repairs
Inside, outside, small,
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ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243
30 years experience!
Claremont area.
Claremont
Handyman Service
Carpentry, repairs,
gates, lighting,
small painting projects.
Odd jobs welcome!
Free consultations.
909-921-6334
HOME Repair by Ken. Local
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ODD jobs, small repairs, low
prices. Jim, 951-264-2898.
Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates.
Senior discount!
WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE!
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ADVANCED
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Heath and Healing
"HOUSE Calls for Healing"
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more, owner of the American
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author of Pathways to the
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the Healing Arts.com for in-
formation on this health pro-
gram and other services or
call 909-946-9098.
House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free es-
timates. Excellent references.
Tailored to your individual
needs. Senior care, day or night.
Call Lupe, 909-452-1086.
Established, upbeat,
licensed house cleaning
service. Specializing in
larger homes. Organic
cleaning supplies used.
26 years of experience.
Jeanette 909-224-1180,
909-946-7475.
Shirley's Cleaning Service
28 years in business.
Office/residential
No job too small.
Free estimates.
We do spring cleaning!
909-730-8564
House Cleaning
CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning.
Family owned for 25 years. Li-
censed. Bonded. Senior rates.
Trained professional services
including: baseboards, ovens,
windows. Hauling. Move in/out.
In home care. House/pet sit-
ting. 10 percent discount to
Claremont College faculty.
Robyn, 909-621-3929.
Irrigation
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
No job too big or small!
24-hour emergency
service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS
EXPERT REPAIRS
DRIP SYSTEM
SPECIALISTS
C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151
909-621-5388
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 Now
Cell: 626-428-1691
Expert Repairs
Retrofit Experts
Ask us how to save water.
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the Area
Since 1983
Landscaping
Dale's Tree &
Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting,
irrigation and yard cleanup.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
GREENWOOD
LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for
complete landscaping,
irrigation, drainage,
designing and gardening.
Lic.520496
909-621-7770
Drought Tolerant and Cali-
fornia Native Design
Water Conserving Irrigation
Lighting and Maintenance
Allen Cantrall Landscape
909-224-3327
Lic.861685
Serving the Area
Since 1983
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, refurbish or repair.
Design, drainage, concrete,
slate, flagstone, lighting, irri-
gation, decomposed granite.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and De-
sign. Claremont native spe-
cializing in drought tolerant
landscaping, drip systems
and lighting. Artistic solu-
tions for the future. Over 35
years experience. Call:
909-225-8855, 909-982-
5965. Lic.585007.
DANS GARDENING
SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, re-
paired. Clean-up, hauling.
Sod, seed, planting,
lighting, drainage.
Free written estimates.
Insured. References.
Since 1977. Lic.508671.
Please call 909-989-1515
Eco-friendly landscaping.
We will get you a $3000
grant to remove your lawn!
Why mow when you can
grow? From the creators of
The Pomona College
Organic Farm.
Specializing in native
and edible landscapes.
909-398-1235
www.naturalearthla.com
Lic.919825
*$2 sq. ft. rebate*
Learn Japanese
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani
at the Claremont Forum in
the Packing House. Mon-
day, Tuesday, Wednesday
afternoons/eveni ngs. Al l
l evel s welcome. Excellent
brain exercise for seniors!
909-626-3066.
Martial Arts
KIDS Kung Fu $99/nine
weeks, uniform half-off! Back
to school special. 909-447-
5654. WeiTuoAcademy.com.
Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
BONDED and INSURED
Many references.
Claremont resident.
35 years experience.
Lic.315050
Please call: 909-624-5080,
909-596-4095.
D&D Custom Painting.
Bonded. Lic.423346. Resi-
dential, commercial. Interior
or exterior. Free estimates.
909-982-8024.
Painting
COLLINS Painting & Con-
struction Company, LLC. In-
terior, exterior. Residential
and commercial. Contractors
Lic.384597. 909-985-8484.
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting,
40 years experience!
Competitive rates.
Small repairs.
No job too small.
References available.
We work our own jobs.
Carrie or Ron
909-615-4858
Lic.778506
STEVE LOPEZ
PAINTING
Extensive preparation.
Indoor, outdoor, cabinets.
Offering odorless green
solution. 33-year master.
Lic.542552
Please call
909-989-9786
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or
green options. Custom work.
No job too big or too small. 20
years of Claremont resident
referrals. Free estimates.
Lic.721041. 909-228-4256.
www.vjpaint.com.
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial.
Quality work at reasonable
prices. Free estimates.
Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.
Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair.
Concrete, masonry, lighting,
planters and retaining walls.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years!
Lic.323243
Pet/House Care
EXPERIENCED house/pet
sitter. Will provide loving
care for house/pets in ex-
change for accommoda-
tions. Two week minimum
and long term. Retired for-
mer resident. Email Kather-
ine, pieplace@boreal.org.
Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas.
Stucco and drywall repair
specialist. Licensed home
improvement. Contractor
Lic.614648. 909-984-6161.
www.wall-doctor.com.
Pools
Carr Pools
Family owned/operated
Claremont natives
Over 10 years experience
Dependable Timely Efficient
Tablets/filter
cleans included.
909-624-5648
Plumbing
RENES Plumbing and AC. All
types residential repairs,
HVAC, new installation, re-
pairs. Prices to fit the working
familys budget. Lic.454443.
Insured professional service.
909-593-1175.
EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated.
30 plus years experience.
Expert plumbing repairs and
drain cleaning. Water
heaters, faucets, sinks,
toilets, disposals,
under slab lead detection,
sewer video inspection.
Licensed, bonded and
insured. Lic.917874.
909-945-1995
STEVES PLUMBING
24-hour service* Low cost!
Free estimates.
All plumbing repairs.
Complete drain cleaning,
leak detection,
water heaters.
Your local plumber
for over 25 years.
Senior discounts.
Insured, Lic.744873.
* 909-985-5254 *
Haydens Services Inc.
Since 1978
Bonded * Insured
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR SMALL!
24-hour emergency service.
909-982-8910
* Senior discount *
Lic.359145
Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing.
Reroofing, repairs of all types.
Free estimates. Quality work.
Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.
DOMINICS Roofing. Resi-
dential roofing and repairs.
Free estimates. Lic.732789.
Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.
Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional.
All sprinkler repairs.
Call 909-599-9530 now
Cell: 626-428-1691
DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install,
repair, automate. Since 1982.
Free estimates. Lic.540042.
Call 909-982-1604.
Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER?
Poor Coverage?
Sprinkler repair.
Installations
and modifications.
C.F. Privett
909-621-5388
Lic.557151
Tile
MASTER tile layer. Quick
and clean. Stone and gran-
ite work. Residential, com-
mercial. Lic.830249. Ray,
909-731-3511.
Regrout, clean, seal, color
grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888-
764-7688.
Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years
in Claremont.
Pruning of your small
and medium perennials.
909-624-8238
www.bauertreecare.com
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning
and removals. Landscaping,
corrective and restoration
trimming and yard clean up.
909-982-5794
Lic#753381
MGT Professional Tree Care.
Providing prompt, dependable
service for all your tree care
needs. Certified arborist.
Lic.#836027. Matt Gray-Trask.
Call 946-7444.
TOM Day Tree Service. Fine
pruning of all trees since 1974.
Free estimate. 909-629-6960.
Johnny's Tree Service
Tree trimming
and demolition.
Certified arborist.
Lic.270275, insured.
Please call:
909-946-1123
951-522-0992
Upholstery
PINK UPHOLSTERY
48 years of experience. Up to
30 percent discount on fabric.
Free pickup and delivery.
Please call 909-597-6613.
Weed Abatement
JOHNNY'S Tree Service.
Weed abatement/land clear-
ing. Disking and mowing.
Please call 909-946-1123,
951-522-0992. Lic.270275.
TIRED of dealing with weed
problems on your lot or field?
Help control the problem in
an environmentally safe
manner. To receive loads of
quality wood chips. Please
call 909-214-6773. Tom Day
Tree Service.
ADVANCED
DON DAVIES
Veteran
Weed eating, mowing,
tractor fields,
manual slopes, hauling.
909-599-9530
Cell: 626-428-1691
Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning.
For window washing, call na-
cho, 909-816-2435. Free es-
timates, satisfaction guaran-
teed. Number one in LA
County.
30
Claremont COURIER Classifieds
SERVICES
Friday 09-05-14
tax help antiques house cleaning landscaping
pet care roofing elder care computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the
Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds 31
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
1-4 p.m. 1373 Upland Hills Drive, Upland. Curtis Real Estate.
1-4 p.m. 210 Wagner Drive, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
2-5 p.m. 147 E. Blue Mountain Way, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebys International Realty.
Legal ease We can publish your LA County legal.
C
our er i
Claremont
claremont-courier.com
Of course we cover Claremont news 24/7
Keep it
local
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 6214761
legalads@claremontcourier.com
Call Vickie 621-4761
REAL ESTATE
909.621.4761
Friday 09-05-14
147 E. Blue Mountain Way, Claremont
B
ring your large or extended family to this north Claremont pool and spa
home in the award winning Chaparral Elementary School District. The
master bedroom suite is downstairs, one of the most sought after amenities by
buyers. Other amenities include gazebo, fire pit, fireplace in the living room and
a family room upstairs. View of the mountains. Three-car garage and plenty of
other parking. Many fruit trees. All this priced to sell for under $580,000!
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
Madhu Sengupta
909.260.5560
BRE#00979814
OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2-5 PM
CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711
Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072
classified@claremont-courier.com
Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 5, 2014 32

Mason Prophet, Voted Top Local Realtor


in the COURIERs Best of the Best Contest
Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES
909.447.7708 Mason@MasonProphet.com
www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034
Read what my clients are saying. Visit www.MasonProphet.com
and click on "Testimonials," or find me on www.Yelp.com.
Mason is an excellent realtor. We commend him
for his diligence throughout the entire process of
selecting and purchasing our new property. We're
sure with his thoughtfulness and kindness he will
do very well in his chosen field of endeavor.
Garry & Dorothy L.
Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, September 5, 2014 33
BRE# 01326104 & 01733616
CARLOS, 909-964-7631
PAT, 909-214-1002
www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com
We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, profession-
alism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood
knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know
and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential Investment Historical Green Short Sales
Check out
our reviews!
MALKA RINDE
Broker - Owner
Celebrating Over 25 Years
Selling Real Estate in the Area
Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842
www.malkarinde.com
EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
M MALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711
BRE# 00545647
REAL ESTATE
(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills,
Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese
Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947
107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711
(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com
AFFORDABLE CLAREMONT
Recently updated 2 bedroom, 1
3/4 bathroom unit in Claremont
West Arms, conveniently located
to MetroLink, schools, parks and
colleges. Private patio, 2-car at-
tached carport and community
pool. $244,500. (I633)
1373 UPLAND HILLS DRIVE, UPLAND
Listing Agent: Carol Wiese
Customized, single-story condo in the
prestigious gated community of north
Upland Hills Country Club. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 remodeled bathrooms in 2289 sq. ft.,
located close to the pool and spa. Vault-
ed ceilings, great room with fireplace,
updated kitchen with island opens to
family room. Garage with a golf cart door
and parking. $598,000. (U1373)
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM
New
listing!
Beautiful north Claremont single-level home, with a pool-sized backyard. Completely re-
modeled with new Trane energy efficient air conditioning and heat. Too many upgrades to
mention. Come see pride of ownership. $575,000. Email Diane at dianefox59@gmail.com.
DIANE FOX
(909) 239-4473
BRE # 0196467
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4 P.M. 210 WAGNER DRIVE, CLAREMONT
REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most
widely read real estate
section in the area.
Claremont COURIER
Classifieds
CALL JESSICA
AT 621-4761
Your trusted resource as you transition
through the new stage in your life...
Pamela Bergman-Swartz
REALTOR, Transition Living Consultant,
Seniors Real Estate & Certified Probate Specialist
8311 Haven Ave. Suite #180, Rancho Cucamonga
pamelabergman@ymail.com
(909) 636-2744
BRE#01899295
GEOFF T. HAMILL
GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988
Broker Associate, ABR, CRS, e-PRO, GRI, SRES
Celebrating over 25 years of service 1988-2014
For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500
PRESTIGIOUS PADUA HILLS ESTATE
COLLECTION - $1,100,000
Enjoy picturesque valley, mountain and canyon
views from this beautiful, newer built, Craftsman
style residence quietly nestled among the Clare-
mont foothills. Architectural accents and rich ap-
pointments throughout. Four bedrooms, four bath-
rooms, approximately 3400 sq. ft. of living space.
Enjoy high volume ceilings, granite counter tops
plus plenty of storage throughout. Attached three-
car garage. Over half acre lot in a serene setting
with patio and grassy yard areas. (V4368)
PREMIUM UPSCALE VILLAGE WALK
END-UNIT TOWNHOME - $550,000
Newly built in 2007, best oriented townhome in
the community! Downtown Claremont. Walk to
the Village, theatre, restaurants, shopping, train
station and the Claremont Colleges. Light-filled
floor plan features three bedrooms plus a loft/of-
fice and two-and-a-half bathrooms. Custom
granite counters in kitchen and bathrooms. Pri-
vate patio for your BBQ. Attached two-car
garage. (H120)
PRESTIGIOUS TOWNE RANCH
NEIGHBORHOOD - $625,000
Custom built residence by C. Franz. New custom
drought resistant landscape. One-story floor plan.
Prime locale convenient to park, schools (Condit
School District) and shopping. Spacious living
room with fireplace and separate dining room.
Kitchen with eating nook, eating counter opens to
friendly family room. Newer tile roof. Indoor laundry
room. Beautiful landscaped lot approximately 1/4
acre with pool, patio, block wall fencing and spa-
cious yard areas. (D674)
NORTHEAST CLAREMONT VACANT
ESTATE HOME LOT - $695,000
One of the few lots left to build your custom dream
home in prestigious north Claremont near the
foothills and Wilderness Park. Nearly one rural acre
provides plenty of room to build a large home, pool,
spa, guest house, multi-car garage, sports court and
more. Block walls are already in place on all three
sides of the site. Utilities are brought to the street.
Most coveted locale with panoramic mountain
views, surrounded by million and multi-million dollar
estates. (P3808)
HISTORIC SPANISH STYLE HOME IN PRIME
NORTHEAST CLAREMONT - $495,000
Country setting among tall shade and citrus trees with
mountain views. Thick plaster walls and red Spanish
tiled roof. Formerly part of the Talbott Chicken farm
per the State of California Historic Survey. Converted
garage, storage buildings and barn structures on
premises. Property needs work but has lots of poten-
tial in one of Claremont's most coveted neighbor-
hoods. Buyer to verify with city regarding potential
Mills Act property tax savings and any restrictions on
property. Sold "as-is. (P3450)
LUXURY PENTHOUSE CONDO IN CLAREMONT
SCHOOL DISTRICT - $235,000
This spacious two bedroom, two bathroom condo is
located on the top floor (no neighbor above and no
common walls with other units) overlooking the com-
munity pool and spa plus mountain views. Upgrades
include wood laminate floors, smooth ceilings, ceiling
fans, granite counters and newer custom cabinetry in
kitchen and bathrooms plus clean steel kitchen appli-
ances including refrigerator. Indoor community laun-
dry room. One shared garage and one reserved gat-
ed parking space. (S3636)
"Best Possible
Price Achieved,
Every Time!"
D.R.E. #00997900
Tell a Friend...
COMING SOON:
Newly Built North Claremont Estate - $1,650,000
Claremont Village Colonial - $1,100,000
Commercial/Professional on Euclid
Avenue - $465,000
FOR LEASE:
Northeast One-Story Claremont Estate Home
- $3,500 monthly
Downtown Claremont Village Walk
- $2350 monthly
SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers look-
ing for a Claremont home. Please call today
for a FREE complimentary market analysis
of your property. Thank you!
909.621.0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
NEW LISTING!
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NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING!
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his architecturally stunning 1929 Spanish-style charmer is located on
a tree lined street in the heart of the Claremont Village. Beautifully
remodeled to maintain the period design, but with all the amenities of
modern living. The front porch entry boasts both a custom-fitted front door
and original French doors. Throughout are the original 1929 gleaming
hardwood floors. The expansive living room includes a charming fireplace,
antique wall sconces and coved ceilings, which extend to the formal dining
room with French doors opening to the front porch overlooking the
manicured Italian garden. The kitchen is remarkable, with hand-crafted brick
and Italian stone floors, Carrara marble countertops and Viking appliances
throughout. There are four bedrooms, with two bedrooms and one bathroom
on each floor. Off the upstairs bedrooms is a wraparound balcony shaded by
wisteria vines, elm and sycamore trees, all setting the tone for relaxation. In
addition to its 2188 sq. ft. of living space comes an approximately 400 sq. ft.
detached guest quarters or great room with its own half bathroom. With
brand new copper plumbing and separate A/C units for each floor among its
many upgrades, this property is conveniently located near schools, parks,
hiking trails and shopping. www.1230harvard.com.
President/CEO Haig Barsamian BRE Lic.01012187
877-522-7726 haig@barsaminc.com www.barsaminc.com
Newport Beach | Beverly Hills | San Dimas
CLAREMONT VILLAGE
Your Local
Real Estate Resource
ELEGANT VICTORIAN ESTATE
The Charles E. Harwood house was constructed in 1890 in the Victorian Shingle-style tradition
for the father of Upland, Charles E. Harwood. A grand lawn with circular drive gives the resi-
dence an impressive approach from prestigious Euclid Ave. Magnificent rich woodwork and pe-
riod architectural detailing have been lovingly maintained in this unique, beautiful residence. Find
the spacious parlor entry graced with a handsome staircase and fireplace, there are several fire-
places throughout including the dining room, living room and master suite. A family room is lo-
cated at the top of the stairs and an adjacent library overlooks the front garden. The back garden
and patio is accessible through the den/office. The manicured grounds include a newer saltwa-
ter pool and spa, gazebo, mature trees and a shared north/south tennis court. Call today on this
very special property. $1,998,000. (E1509)
WORLD CLASS RESIDENCE
Experience the majestic presence of this enchanting northeast Claremont custom estate, beauti-
fully laid out in one level. Masterful design unfolds from the elegant entry to the spacious formal
living and dining rooms. Exciting options abound in this spacious floor plan where there is an en-
tire wing that could serve as guest quarters or a home office space without ever needing to access
the main part of the house. The generous family/game room features a fireplace, wet bar and room
for a game or pool table in addition to entertaining space. Feel the ambiance of distinction in the
elegantly paneled library. Outdoors you will find a quiet and serene setting under the newly con-
structed patio that provides the perfect place to enjoy a cool beverage on hot summer days. With
plenty of room for outdoor entertaining, the backyard is a great place to enjoy gatherings with fam-
ily and friends. Hurry, this won't last! $1,485,000. (B1010)
LIVE OAK CANYON
Experience serene privacy and city light views
as you escape to your own private retreat tucked
away in Live Oak Canyon. Feel as though you
have left the city behind as you approach this
beautifully secluded custom built home. Enjoy
the sumptuous master suite with luxurious mas-
ter bathroom. Watch fireworks from the viewing
deck that overlooks the roomy, level yard. 909-
398-1810. $875,000. (L4738)
YOUR OWN PRIVATE RESORT
Relax in luxurious and contemporary style in
this impeccably renovated home! Kitchen with
cherry wood custom cabinetry, professional
grade appliances, custom range hood, farm-
house sink and gleaming granite counters.
Spacious master suite showcases a master
bathroom. Resort-like yard with pool, spa, wa-
terfall, putting green, patios, fireplace and
Viking kitchen. $1,275,000. (E1862)
SPECTACULAR VIEWS!
Stunning hillside estate in Padua Hills is just
minutes to downtown Claremont yet very se-
cluded. Enter to find gleaming wood floors
and walls of windows that provide a seam-
less flow between the indoors and outdoors.
This home was remodeled with plans by
Hartman Baldwin and boasts viewing decks,
which overlook the Wilderness Park.
$855,000. (V4026)
REFLECT YOUR SUCCESS
You deserve a home that reflects your achieve-
ments, find it in this absolutely stunning Com-
pass Rose home. Spacious formal living, dining
rooms and a large open family that adjoins the
remodeled kitchen and nook area creating a true
great room effect. Dramatic features include
granite kitchen counters, family room built-in
bookcases and romantic fireplace in the master
suite. $612,900. (C11081)
NOT JUST ANOTHER HOME
This beautifully upgraded and super clean
home is a dream come true! Enter to find high
ceilings and numerous windows that bring in
streams of natural light. Entertain guests amidst
the gorgeous laminate flooring and quality ren-
ovations throughout. Spacious backyard with
multiple levels of seating and viewing areas set
the stage for outdoor entertaining. Call today!
$445,000. (M11498)
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PLENTY OF ROOM
Experience this gorgeous, entirely renovated
home. Enter from the front courtyard through
double-leaded glass entry doors into this im-
maculate home that is a decorator's delight.
Remodeled kitchen sparkles with newer ap-
pliances and granite counters. There is fresh
paint, new fixtures, updated bathrooms, plan-
tation shutters, tile and wood flooring. 909-
398-1810. $505,000. (M1209)
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TRANQUIL PARADISE
Custom home nestled in the foothills, se-
cluded behind lush foliage and private gates.
Sprawling single-story offers plenty of room
with five bedrooms plus an office or gym.
Floor-to-ceiling fireplace in the family room
with wood beamed ceiling. Over one-half acre
features pool and spa, landscaping plus
plenty of extra room for RV parking, in addi-
tion to a versatile flat pad. $635,000. (E2504)
CHANTECLAIR ESTATE
European-style estate on a quiet cul-de-sac
with mountain views. The foyer overlooks the
living and formal dining rooms with sweeping
staircase. Six bedrooms, six bathrooms plus
bonus room. Kitchen offers two islands with
granite counters and adjoining family room with
cozy fireplace. Master suite includes retreat
area. 2/3-acre yard features a full basketball
court. $1,588,888. (N4238)
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www. c bt c s oc al . c om
The Real Estate Company
2 5 0 We s t Fi r s t St re e t , Sui t e 100 , Cl are mont , CA 1 - 8 7 7 - 3 3 2 - 4 4 4 2
UPLANDBeautifully remodeled three bedroom, two bathroom home located in Upland. Six-
car driveway leads to RV parking and a three-car garage. The front landscaping includes a
lush landscape of gardenias, roses and a shaded entryway. A double-door entry leads to an
open floor plan, illuminated with natural light shining through multiple double-pane windows.
New paint, new carpet and engineered wood throughout the bottom floor. Kitchen has new
granite countertops. Backyard includes newly resurfaced and tiled spa along with a built-in
fire pit. More to offer. $615,000. (O1721)
Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
TOP
Lister
Paul Lazo
August
2014
CLAREMONT Custom home beautifully secluded on one acre.
Three bedrooms, one and 3/4 bathrooms, 2134 sq. ft. Living room
with built-in seating and storage, corner gas fireplace and Saltillo
tile flooring. Spacious family room/artist studio with separate
entrance and beautiful 180 degree views. Energy efficient
FAC/CAC unit. 43,430 sq. ft. lot near Botanic Gardens and College
Field Station. Two-car garage with storage cabinets. Fully fenced
swimming pool. Natural, drought tolerant landscaping with partial
irrigation system. $725,000. (R192)
MENIFEE This six bedroom (plus loft), four bathroom, corner
lot home is located in the Marigold community in Menifee. Large
living room and dining area. Large kitchen complete with island,
breakfast bar, pantry, five-burner stove top and built-in mi-
crowave. Downstairs has its own bedroom and full bathroom,
laundry room and direct access to the three-car garage. Upstairs
has an enormous loft area, additional five bedrooms and three
bathrooms. Master bedroom with two closets, dual sinks, sepa-
rate over-sized tub and shower. The rear yard includes multiple
fruit trees, grape vines and cactus. There is a well manicured
park and views of the mountains nearby. $314,900. (W30154)
RIALTO Beautiful gated Highland Village complex. Three
bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom condo. Approximately
1462 sq. ft., per assessor. Large living room with beautiful
stone fireplace and neutral paint and carpet. Spacious kitchen
with stainless steel gas stove, dishwasher, plenty of cabinetry
and ceramic tile flooring. Cozy breakfast nook with a sliding
door that leads out to patio. Upstairs has a large master bed-
room with master bathroom featuring tiled tub/shower and
double sinks. Direct access to two-car garage. Charming
streams, pool and spa. Move in ready! $132,500. (W156)
CLAREMONT Lovely pool home, move-in condition. Four bedrooms, two bath-
rooms, upgraded with beautiful wood floors and dual-pane windows. Kitchen with
tile counters and flooring, oak cabinets and refrigerator to stay. Master bedroom
with mirrored closet doors and adjoining master bathroom. FAH/CAC system. Large
lot features backyard with pool, covered patio and lovely landscaping, raised
planter, fruit trees and automatic watering system in the front and back. Great lo-
cation near award-winning Chaparral Elementary School and walking distance to
Vons shopping center. $547,900. (B521)
Property Management from a name you already trust.
Call us today for a free market evaluation.
877-332-4442
TOP
Producers
Charlene Bolton
&
Collette Albanese
August
2014
SALEPENDING
UPLAND Excellent single-story home in a highly desirable
Upland area. Home features three bedrooms plus an office
and one and 3/4 bathrooms. Private master suite with remod-
eled 3/4 bathroom. Large living room with a fireplace over-
looking circular driveway. The kitchen has newer corian
countertops and stainless steel appliances. Large family room
for entertaining with a private patio area. This home has been
upgraded with hardwood floors throughout and dual-paned
windows. Perfect home for a growing family. Close to shop-
ping, schools and transportation. $459,000. (C1241)
LAKE ELSINORE Gorgeous two-story home in Lake Elsi-
nore. Spacious open floor plan with tile and carpet throughout.
Formal dining area, updated kitchen with granite counter tops,
large island and a built-in microwave. Great master bedroom with
a huge walk-in closet, his and her sinks and a separate shower
and tub. Three-car garage with direct access. Beautifully land-
scaped backyard. Located in Alberhill Ranch neighborhood with
association pool, playground and clubhouse. Close to shopping,
school and other ammenities. $320,000. (B3312)
SALEPENDING