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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


Cameroon, the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and Bimbia the Apertura:
Research Findings of 166 Slave Ship Voyages
And Their Disembarkations*

By
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 28, 2014


It is a gross understatement to argue that the central African country of Cameroon was insignificant in
the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Quite to the contrary, the territory which was demarcated Cameroon in
the 1884 European Scramble for Africa was a hotbed for the enslavement, capture, and transport of
human beings of various African ethnic origins into mainly the Americas and the Caribbean, and other
points in Africa and Europe as well. The Transatlantic Slave Trade on the Cameroon coast raged from the
mid-17
th
century to the late 19
th
century.
What the data reveals from researching various secondary sources, but from mainly primary sources, is
that several European countries plied the Cameroon coast in a roving trade for human beings in
exchange for petty goods secured by European merchants from Europe and Asia. That is, thousands
from ethnic groups of the Cameroon territory were traded for whiskey, beads, cloth and clothing, guns,
gun powder, iron bars, brandy, jars, basins, writing implements, cowries, ornaments and figurines, and
other petty goods. Those European countries, in a melee of slave ships that were both government
sanctioned and privately owned, included the Netherlands, Britain, Spain (sometimes under the guise of
Uruguay), Portugal (sometimes under the guise of Brazil), France, and the United States of America.
What the data from my research also tells us is that some Africans lost their lives resisting their capture,
and that the European slave traders in some instances particularly feared African women. Some slave
ship captains and crews referred to African women as “riotous” as they would use any methods and
means necessary to resist, including pelting with rocks, fish, sand and anything else within their reach.
They, women like men, would also physically attack European enslavers. Moreover, in some instances,
Africans, under attack, would seize slave ships as a way to resist capture, enslavement, and transport to
foreign lands.
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


The available data on Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave trade also reveals that too many times,
however, those not old enough or strong enough to defend themselves and resist were enslaved and
transported. Approximately, one-third of all the slave ship voyages that I have located thus far that
embarked from the Cameroon territory enslaved and transported children, both boys and girls. In some
instances, children were barely weaned from their mothers. In one related instance, records show that
a young baby was killed as the European slave traders demanded that the mother be enslaved, but
without the child. Hence, the child, torn from the mother’s bosom, was murdered to facilitate the
mother’s enslavement and transport. The distraught and mourning mother was chained and placed
aboard the slave ship. This happened on the shores of Bimbia in Southwest Cameroon.
Bimbia, the site of this murder and others, as well the site of thousands of forced captures,
enslavements, and other horrific torture and tragedies meted out by European enslavers against
Africans, was recognized by the Cameroon government in May 2013 as a National Cultural Heritage
site. Denoted as a slave trade site, Bimbia represents countless physical deaths of the many who fought
against the slave trade, as well as the thousands who were taken into the realm of the unknown to
become the backbone of European capitalism and imperialism. The enslaved were treated as sub-
human and chattel, referred to as “black ivory” by European slave traders; and, and were stripped of
their identity.
Those Africans enslaved and transported from the Cameroon territory would come to be the
progenitors of the African Slavery Historic Diaspora carrying African DNA of Cameroon ethnicities with
them. Concomitantly, they would also remain the lost family members of Cameroon ethnic groups and
families who would carry the sorrow of their loss for generations, with the heaviness of heart of never
being able to touch their loved ones again. The enslaved would concomitantly be the link, even in their
physical invisibility, that binds Cameroon and its Historic Diaspora. The same genetic makeup would
continue to be born in them and their progeny into perpetuity.
That the Cameroon government would recognize Bimbia as a National Cultural Heritage Site is one
major step toward recognizing the human tragedy, universally known as the Transatlantic Slave Trade
that took place on the shores of the country that today we call Cameroon. The Minister of Arts and
Culture Ama Tutu Muna mentioned Bimbia at the United Nations 68
th
General Assembly Plenary 77
th

Meeting on March 25, 2014 Commemorating Transatlantic Slave Trade’s Victims. Stretching back to
Portuguese claims of founding Cameroon as the Rios dos Camaroes as she briefly discussed Cameroon’s
history, the Minister called for more intensive research on Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade,
which would further justify and qualify Bimbia for inclusion on UNESCO’s World Heritage List.
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


My research is demonstrating that while Bimbia is extremely significant, it is the apertura. It is one site
at which African ethnicities in Cameroon were forcibly and cruelly whisked away from their homeland,
or killed. Bimbia is opening the door for broader research. There are other sites of enslavement, and
forced embarkation and transport as well, according to data I have found and validated. They include
the Wouri River and Rio Del Rey, where it is logical to assume that similar egregious acts against Africans
unfolded as Europeans attempted to pull thousands into the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Slave ship
accounts also validate this.
For example, from the Wouri River, there is a case in which European enslavers who loaded a slave ship
attempted to recoup financial compensation for the loss of 75% of enslaved Africans—their “human
cargo” they called the enslaved—who perished on a voyage from the Wouri River. Their intended
disembarkation was Grenada, but they instead disembarked in Barbardos which was closer. The slave
ship owner argued that inclement weather on the seas had prolonged the voyage beyond its scheduled
arrival. He specifically argued that the weather-induced delay rendered the food supply for the enslaved
insufficient, thereby causing their starvation and death. On those bases, the slave ship owner sued for
compensation from the insurers of his slave ship and its contents, as it was commonplace among
Europeans for slave ship cargo, material and human, to be insured during the Transatlantic Slave Trade.
Slave ship owners wanted to protect their financial investments, as the African enslaved were
considered chattel and investments to be sold to earn them profit.
Other slave ships from the Cameroon territory for which I have calculated mortality rates, when I have
been able to secure and validate the requisite data, have also shown that, at times, half of the Africans
enslaved and embarked perished before disembarkation.
It is quizzical that so many historians to date have not recognized the significance of Cameroon in the
Transatlantic Slave Trade. Conventional recounts of history generally tell us that Cameroon was affected
in only a minor way in the Transatlantic Slave Trade. This academic assessment about Cameroon to date
has been made vis-à-vis other countries such as Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Ghana, and Angola that were
considered central to Africa’s “slave coasts” and affected in a major way in the Transatlantic Slave Trade,
not like Cameroon. It is fair to say that what has been widely believed and taught is that only a relatively
small number of persons from Cameroon ethnic groups were enslaved and transported in the
Transatlantic Slave Trade. As we are now learning however, this may not be the case. In fact, it may be
the opposite. My research is suggesting that the numbers are likely significantly higher than the latest
estimates of 68,000 that Cameroonian experts purported in 1999, and more than the approximated
76,000 in 2002.
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


Some historians, however, have left the door open for further research by arguing that it has been
difficult, at best, to find numbers of the Cameroonian enslaved. They have further argued that DNA
technology may take history to new frontiers. This may indeed be the case for Cameroon.
It is advances in DNA technology, that is Deoxyribonucleic Acid technology, since the last decade of the
20
th
century that began to turn on its head the belief that Cameroon was not a major victim in the
Transatlantic Slave Trade. It was a major victim.

DNA test results, which reveal the origins of the descendants of the African enslaved from the African
Slavery Historic Diaspora who voluntarily take the test, suggest that it is not only that Cameroonians
were enslaved, but also it was specifically persons from ethnic groups that populate the interior of the
country today that were the most vulnerable. Specifically and in descending order, according to the
DNA testing company, African Ancestry in Washington, DC which houses the largest African DNA
database with 30,000 lineages and which serves a vast global Black community, the most frequent test
results with links to Cameroon ethnicities trace those who take the test back to the Tikar, then the
Bamileke, then the Hausa, followed by many other Cameroonian ethnic groups. This is based on
reported data from 2010.
My historical research, from secondary and primary source data, including a cursory analysis of names of
the enslaved, supports that many of those captured, enslaved, and transported, in fact, came from the
interior of Cameroon. They were shoved in the belly of the slave ship with other ethnic groups from the
Cameroon coast, albeit the latter in significantly smaller numbers. This gives us some idea of who was
on the slave ships, what ethnic groups lost members to the Transatlantic Slave trade, what families
suffered unimaginable loss and grief, and who was taken into the Diaspora.
I, with my undergraduate student volunteer research team, from late September 2010 to date July 2014
have been able to locate and validate the following 166 slave ship voyages that left the Cameroon
territory. Included in the charts below, divided by points of embarkation in Cameroon, are the
following: ship names, year of sail with the African enslaved, national flag depicting origin of slave ships,
and disembarkations points of the slave ships and enslaved. This information gives us an idea of the
diasporization scope of the Cameroonian enslaved, and pinpoints places and countries in which the
Cameroon Diaspora exists today.
Of the slave ships, 9 sailed in the 1600s; 98 sailed in the 1700s; and, 59 sailed in the 1800s. Fifteen
embarked the enslaved at Bimbia; 9 embarked the enslaved at Rio del Rey, 32 embarked the enslaved at
Wouri, and 110 embarked the enslaved at locations that will hopefully be determined through our
continued research.
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


The national origin of the slave ships and the number of their ships among the 166 follow in this
numerically ascending order: USA 1; France 1; Undetermined 1; Netherlands 6; Spain/Uruguay 8;
Portugal/Brazil 30; Britain 119. Britain’s volume of slave ships constitutes over 70% of the slave ships
that I have located that embarked, enslaved, and transported the African enslaved from the Cameroon
territory.
I have located other ships, in addition to the 166, in which we are in the process of validating. One ship
is named Bimbia. Its nation origin is Denmark. It sailed it 1802, and disembarked 143 enslaved Africans
in St. Croix, of the 158 it embarked. The “Bimbia” embarkation location in Africa in not yet determined.
Would we be surprised if it embarked at Bimbia in Southwest, Cameroon?
There are likely other slave ship voyages from the Cameroon territory that we are yet to unearth. We
continue to dig deep to recover the history of Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Our speed is
heavily influenced by having access the necessary human, financial, and material resources needed to
proceed with the research. Bimbia is the apertura. It leads us to the Cameroon Diaspora, and our African
continental-Diaspora reconnection.

Dr. Lisa Aubrey and Student Research Team Findings
BIMBIA: Point of Embarkation
SLAVE SHIP NAME YEAR SLAVE SHIP NATIONAL FLAG DISEMBARKATION POINT(S)
ANT 1784 Britain Grenada
ANT 1786 Britain Grenada
BEATRICE 1790 Britain Jamaica
COBRA da AFRICA 1837 Portugal/Brazil Freetown
COMET 1788 Britain St. Vincent
CONCEICAO de MARIA SANTISSIMA 1813 Portugal/Brazil Brazil
CONCEICAO de MARIA SANTISSIMA 1814 Portugal/Brazil Brazil
GABRIEL (a) DOIS AMIGOS 1838 Portugal/Brazil Cuba
GALEAO 1811 Portugal/Brazil Brazil
MARIA 1790 Britain Martinique
MARIA 1787 Britain St. Vincent
SEARLE 1787 Britain Grenada
VIBORA de CABO VERDE 1837 Spain/Uruguay Sierra Leone
ANTONINA 1836 N/A Cuba
NINFA (a) MANTANZERA** 1835 Spain/Uruguay Cuba
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014







RIO DEL REY: Point of Embarkation
SLAVE SHIP NAME YEAR SLAVE SHIP NATIONAL FLAG DISEMBARKATION POINT(S)
NIEUW ENKHUIZEN 1644 Netherlands Brazil
RAPHAEL 1645 Britain Bardados
SALAMANDER 1645 Britain N/A
RODE LEEUW 1654 Netherlands Martinique
EMPLOYMENT 1656 Britain N/A
EENDRACHT 1657 Netherlands Spain
HOOP (a) ESPERANZA 1659 Netherlands Argentina
ZWARTE AREND 1659 Netherlands Panama
NEPTUNE 1773 Britain Dominica




WOURI RIVER: Point of Embarkation
SLAVE SHIP NAME YEAR
SLAVE SHIP NATIONAL
FLAG
DISEMBARKATION
POINT(S)
JONGE PRINS 1658 Netherlands Guyana
FOX 1773 Britain Barbados
KING OF PRUSSIA 1774 Britain Barbados
BADGER 1777 Britain Dominica
ANN 1778 Britain Barbados, Grenada
HAWKE 1780 Britain Jamaica
HAWKE 1781 Britain St. Lucia
SARAH 1790 Britain Jamaica
SAINT ANNA 1803 Britain Grenada
NS da CONCEICAO da
Maria Santissima 1810 Portugal/ Brazil N/A
DIDO 1812 Portugal/ Brazil Brazil
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


S JOAQUIM AUGUSTO 1812 Portugal/ Brazil Brazil
DIDO 1814 Portugal/ Brazil Brazil
S JOSE ARLEQUIM 1814 Portugal/ Brazil Brazil
DIDO 1815 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
EMILIA 1821 Portugal/ Brazil Brazil
COMERCIANTE 1822 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
NS da CONCEICAO 1822 Portugal/ Brazil SIerra Leone
POLIFEMO 1823 Portugal/ Brazil Brazil
HYPPOLITE 1826 France Cuba, Bahamas
INVENCIVEL 1827 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
ARSENIA 1828 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
CLEMENTINA 1828 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
ESTRELA do MAR 1828 Portugal/ Brazil N/A
JOSEFINA 1828 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
VOADORA 1828 Portugal/ Brazil Fernando Po, Sierra Leone
CERES 1829 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
DOS AMIGOS 1830 Spain/Uruguay Sierra Leone
PLANETA 1832 Spain/Uruguay Cuba
PEPITA 1834 Spain/Uruguay Sierra Leone
MINDELO 1836 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone
OLIMPIA 1836 Portugal/ Brazil Sierra Leone

CAMEROON: Point of Embarkation To Be Determined in Continued Research
SLAVE SHIP NAME YEAR
SLAVE SHIP NATIONAL
FLAG DISEMBARKATION POINT(S)
POLLY 1755 USA
USA (South Carolina/New
York)
RACOON 1756 Britain N/A
CALVELEY 1758 Britain Windward Coast
SALISBURY 1758 Britain Guadeloupe
UNION 1761 Britain Barbados, Guadeloupe
HENRY 1763 Britain Grenada
UNION 1764 Britain St. Kitts
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


HENRY 1766 Britain Grenada
UNION 1766 Britain St. Kitts
CATHERINE 1767 Britain N/A
EDWARD 1767 Britain St. Kitts
FANNY 1767 Britain Barbados
WILLIAM 1767 Britain Antigua
KING OF PRUSSIA 1768 Britain Grenada
UNION 1768 Britain Antigua
BELLA 1769 Britain Barbados
HENRY 1769 Britain Grenada
UNION 1769 Britain Barbados
WILLIAM 1769 Britain Barbados
CHARLES 1770 Britain Dominica
KING OF PRUSSIA 1770 Britain Barbados
WILLIAM 1770 Britain Barbados
BELLA 1771 Britain Dominica
CAMBRIDGE 1771 Britain USA (Virginia)
FERRET 1771 Britain Grenada
UNION 1771 Britain Barbados
WHIM 1771 Britain St. Vincent
BELLA 1772 Britain Jamaica
CHARLES 1772 Britain Grenada
FOX 1772 Britain USA (Virginia)
KING OF PRUSSIA 1772 Britain St. Vincent
PEGGY 1772 Britain Dominica
SURRY 1772 Britain Grenada
KING OF PRUSSIA 1773 Britain Grenada
PEGGY 1773 Britain Jamaica
BADGER 1774 Britain Barbados
BELLA 1774 Britain Dominica
BELLA 1774 Britain Grenada, Dominica
FAVOURITE 1774 Britain Grenada
FAVOURITE 1774 Britain Grenada
FOX 1774 Britain Dominica
SAM 1774 Britain St. Kitts
BADGER 1775 Britain Dominica
BELLA 1775 Britain Jamaica
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


HOPE 1775 Britain Jamaica
KING OF PRUSSIA 1775 Britain Dominica
KITTY 1775 Britain Jamaica
FAVOURITE 1776 Britain Jamaica
FOX 1776 Britain N/A
SAM 1776 Britain Barbados
KING OF PRUSSIA 1777 Britain Dominica
PRESTON 1780 Britain St. Kitts
PRESTON 1782 Britain Antigua
HORNET 1783 Britain Tortola
ADVENTURE 1784 Britain St. Lucia
PRESTON 1784 Britain Antigua
WILL 1785 Britain Dominica
FANNY 1787 Britain Barbados
LORD STANLEY 1787 Britain Barbados
SWALLOW 1787 Britain Dominica
ELLEN 1788 Britain Grenada
MOLLY 1788 Britain Dominica
OTHELLO 1788 Britain Dominica
BETSEY 1789 Britain Dominica
FANNY 1789 Britain Dominica
JOHN 1789 Britain Jamaica
MARS 1789 Britain Grenada
PRESIDENT 1789 Britain Jamaica
VIPER 1789 Britain Taken in African Resistance
GIPSEY 1790 Britain Grenada
ELIZA 1791 Britain Grenada
GIPSEY 1791 Britain Grenada
HALL 1791 Britain Jamaica
PRESIDENT 1791 Britain Grenada
ARIEL 1792 Britain Grenada
GIPSEY 1792 Britain Grenada
HAZARD 1792 Britain Jamaica
LORD HOWE 1793 Britain Grenada
TOM 1793 Britain Barbados
BRIDGET 1796 Britain Martinique
MARY 1797 Britain St. Croix
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


GOVERNOR PARRY 1798 Britain Martinique
ALEXANDER 1799 Britain Martinique
JOHN BULL 1801 Britain N/A, not America or Europe
ARTHUR HOWE 1802 Britain Trinidad
LADY HOBART 1802 Britain Trinidad
BLANCHE 1803 Britain St. Thomas
EXPEDITION 1803 Britain Dominica
KING BELL 1803 Britain Surinam
LADY HOBART 1803 Britain Barbados
MARY 1803 Britain Surinam
STORK 1803 Britain Cuba
EMERALD 1804 Britain Tortola, Guyana
OTTER 1804 Britain Guyana
SARAH 1804 Britain Jamaica
EMERALD 1806 Britain Tortola
RACHAEL 1806 Britain St. Thomas
EAGLE 1807 Britain Jamaica
EMERALD 1807 Britain Grenada, Trinidad
RACHAEL 1807 Britain Barbados
ROBERT 1808 Britain Martinique
S ANTONIO DILIGENTE 1810 Portugal/Brazil N/A
SANTANA FLOR de AFRICA (A)
ALERTA 1810 Portugal/Brazil Brazil
MARIA 1811 Portugal/Brazil N/A
PENA 1811 Portugal/Brazil N/A
S ISABEL 1811 Spain/Uruguay Cuba, Bahamas
S ANTONIO DILIGENTE** 1812 Portugal/Brazil N/A
S ANTONIO MILAGROSO 1816 Portugal/Brazil Sierra Leone
TRIUNFANTE 1816 SpaIn/Uruguay Sierra Leone
ANA 1825 Spain/Uruguay Sierra Leone


So WHERE is the Cameroon Diaspora?
The Cameroon Slavery Historic Diaspora begins with those aboard the slave ship voyages from the
Cameroon territory. The places that the slave ships disembarked with the enslaved, as afore-listed, are
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


forever stamped with an indelible mark of the enslaved that were taken from the Cameroon territory
and sold as slaves. Many of their descendants remain in those places today, and their Africanity and
ethnicities have remained in their DNA across generations.
Below I have listed the frequencies of the disembarkations of the 166 slave ship voyages from various
points of embarkation in Cameroon. From Grenada, a country of 110,000 people of African descent in
the Caribbean where 26 slave ship disembarked enslaved Africans from the Cameroon territory; to
Dominica a county of 73,000 people of African descent where 18 slave ships disembarked; to St.
Vincent, the spiritual homeland of the dispersed Garifuna nation (people of African and Native American
descent), where 4 slave ships from the Cameroon territory disembarked; to Sierra Leone, where the
British hypocritically claimed to be liberating Africans empowered by the British Slave Trade Act of 1807;
to the USA of which we speak little of slave ships sailing to Africa for capture and enslavement of human
beings; to Argentina, to Spain to Guyana and numerous other locations across 4 continents, the
Cameroon Slavery Historic Diaspora lives.

Dr. Lisa Aubrey and Student Research Team Findings
SLAVE SHIP DISEMBARKATIONS FROM BIMBIA
Grenada 3
St. Vincent 2
Jamaica 1
Martinique 1
Brazil 3
Cuba 3
Sierra Leone 2 (1 specifies Freetown)
TOTAL VOYAGES 15
SIX DIFFERENT COUNTRIES OF DISEMBARKATION OUTSIDE OF CONTINENTAL AFRICA
ONE COUNTRY OF DISEMBARKATION WITHIN CONTINENTAL AFRICA


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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014



SLAVE SHIP DISEMBARKATIONS FROM RIO DEL REY
Brazil 1
Barbados 1
Martinique 1
Spain 1
Argentina 1
Panama 1
Dominica 1
N/A 2
TOTAL VOYAGES 9

AT LEAST 7 DIFFERENT COU NTRIES OF DISEMBARKATIONS OUTSIDE OF CONTINENTAL AFRICA
NO KNOWN DISEMBARKATIONS WITHIN CONTINENTAL AFRICA



SLAVE SHIP DISEMBARKATIONS FROM WOURI

Guyana 1
Barbados 3
Dominica 1
Grenada 2
Jamaica 2
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


St. Lucia 1
Brazil 6
Sierra Leone 13
Cuba 2
Bahamas 1
Equatorial Guinea 1 (Fernando Po specified)

TOTAL VOYAGES 32, WITH 2 VOYAGES HAVING MULTIPLE DISEMBARKATIONS
NINE DIFFERENT COUNTRIES OF DISEMBARKATION OUTSIDE OF CONTINENTAL AFRICA
TWO COUNTRIES OF DISEMBARKATION WITHIN CONTINENTAL AFRICA



SLAVE SHIP DISEMBARKATIONS FROM POINTS YET TO BE DETERMINED

St. Lucia 1
Martinique 4
Sierra Leone 3
Grenada 21
Trinidad 3
Barbados 15
Dominica 16
Jamaica 12
St. Thomas 2
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Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


Windward Coast 1 (present day Liberia and Ivory Coast)
USA 3 (2 specify Virginia, 1 South Carolina, 1 New York)
St. Kitts 5
Antigua 4
Tortola 3
Guyana 2
Surinam 2
St. Croix 1
Cuba 2
Bahamas 1
Guadeloupe 2
Taken in African Resistance 1
St. Vincent 2
N/A 8
TOTAL VOYAGES 114, WITH 5 VOYAGES HAVING MULTIPLE DISEMBARKATIONS
AT LEAST TWENTY-ONE DIFFERENT COUNTRIES OF DISEMBARKATION OUTSIDE OF CONTINENTAL
AFRICA
AT LEAST THREE COUNTRIES OF DISEMBARKATION WITHIN CONTINENTAL AFRICA


So WHO is the Cameroon Diaspora?
I have also located over 2,000 names of the enslaved, who were boarded on some of the slave ships
from the Cameroon territory afore-listed. Cursory analysis and consultations with colleagues and
communities have confirmed that the names carry a high probability of identifying regions, villages, and
perhaps even families of the enslaved who were taken away in the Transatlantic Slave Trade. My
students and I continue to research to unearth and trace more names.

15
Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade:
A List of 166 Slave Voyages
Dr. Lisa Aubrey
Arizona State University, USA
University of Yaounde 1, Cameroon
exposingbimbia@gmail.com
July 27, 2014


Respectful of loss and generations of suffering, and with the recognition of the importance and sanctity
of funeral rites, I shall deliver the names to various ethnic communities in the proper environment and
with the proper protocol before publishing them.

For more information on Cameroon and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, please see
http://exposingbimbia.blogspot.com/ and my article “Exposing Cameroon’s Connection to the
Transatlantic Slave Trade Via Its Slavery Diaspora and Bimbia: Research Impetus, Methodology, and
Initial Findings” in Universite de Yaounde I ANNALS De La Faculte Des Arts, Lettres, Et Sciences
Humaines, Culture and Developpment, No 15, Nouvelle serie 2013, Premier Semestre . Also available on
http://www.scribd.com/doc/179985731/Exposing-Cameroon-s-Connection-to-the-Transatlantic-Slave-
Trade





*I wish to thank my team of student volunteer researchers at Arizona State University who have worked
with me diligently, and who never cease to give of their time, interest, insight, and encouragement. I
could not do this research without them, or without the academic support of the School of School of
Social Transformation, Professor Mary Margaret Fonow, Director; African and American American
Studies, Professor Arna Bontemps, Head; and the School of Politics and Global Studies. I also wish to
thank Professor Richard Omgba, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Letters, and Social Sciences of University of
Yaounde I and my colleagues on his faculty, especially Professor Stephen Fomin, for continued support
of my work and for impending collaborations as I spend a Fulbright academic year 2014-2015 in
Cameroon. Our work continues. I can be reached at exposingbimbia@gmail.com