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EXERCISE 56: Narration/Sequence Popular Culture

In some questions in the Reading Section, you will be asked to recall and relate
inormation and content rom narration or sequence passages about popular culture!
Choose the best answer!
Basketball
"lthough he created the game o basketball at the #$C" in
Springield, $assachusetts, %r! &ames "! Naismith was a Canadian!
'orking as a physical education instructor at the International
Line #$C", now Springield College, %r! Naismith noticed a lack o
5 interest in e(ercise among students during the wintertime! )he New
*ngland winters were ierce, and the students balked at participating
in outdoor acti+ities! Naismith determined that a ast,mo+ing game
that could be played indoors would ill a +oid ater the baseball and
ootball seasons had ended!
10 -irst he attempted to adapt outdoor games such as soccer and
rugby to indoor play, but he soon ound them unsuitable or conined
areas! -inally, he determined that he would ha+e to in+ent a game!
In %ecember o ./0., %r! Naismith hung two old peach baskets
at either end o the gymnasium at the school, and, using a soccer ball
15 and nine players on each side, organi1ed the irst basketball game!
)he early rules allowed three points or each basket and made
running with the ball a +iolation! *+ery time a goal was made,
someone had to climb a ladder to retrie+e the ball!
Ne+ertheless, the game became popular! In less than a year,
20 basketball was being played in both the 2nited States and Canada!
-i+e years later, a championship tournament was staged in New #ork
City, which was won by the 3rooklyn Central #$C"!
)he teams had already been reduced to se+en players, and i+e
became standard in the ./04 season! 'hen basketball was introduced
25 as a demonstration sport in the .056 7lympic 8ames in St! 9ouis, it
quickly spread throughout the world! In .05:, a metal hoop was used
or the irst time to replace the basket, but the name basketball has
remained!
*;*RCIS* <4= %einition/Illustration Popular Culture
Mickey Mouse
$ickey $ouse was not 'alt %isney>s irst successul cartoon
creation, but he is certainly his most amous one! It was on a cross,
country train trip rom New #ork to Caliornia in .0?4 that %isney
Line irst drew the mouse with the big ears! Supposedly, he took his
5 inspiration rom the tame ield mice that used to scamper into his old
studio in @ansas City! No one is quite sure why he dressed the
mouse in the now,amiliar shorts with two buttons and ga+e him the
yellow shoes! 3ut we do know that %isney had intended to call him
$ortimer until his wie 9illian inter+ened and christened him $ickey
10 $ouse!
Capitali1ing on the interest in Charles 9indbergh, %isney planned
$ickey>s debut in the short cartoon Plane Cra1y, with $innie as a
co,star! In the third short cartoon, Steamboat Willie, $ickey was
whistling and singing through the miracle o the modern soundtrack!
15 3y the .0A5s $ickey>s image had circled the globe! Be was a
superstar at the height o his career!
"lthough he has recei+ed a ew minor changes throughout his
lietime, most notably the addition o white glo+es and the alterations
to achie+e the rounder orms o a more childish body, he has
20 remained true to his nature since those irst cartoons! $ickey is
appealing because he is nice! Be may get into trouble, but he takes it
on the chin with a grin! Be is both good,natured and resourceul!
Perhaps that was %isney>s own image o himsel! 'hy else would he
ha+e insisted on doing $ickey>s +oice in all the cartoons or twenty
25 yearsC 'hen inter+iewed, he would say! D)here is a lot o the mouse
in me!E "nd that mouse has remained one o the most per+asi+e
images in "merican popular culture!
*;*RCIS* </= Narration/Sequence Social Sciences
Federal Policies for Native Peoles
-ederal policy toward the Nati+e "mericans has a long history o
inconsistency, re+ersal, and ailure! In the late .455s, the 2nited
States go+ernment owned and operated actories, e(changing
Line manuactured goods or urs and horses with the hope that mutual
5 satisaction with trade would result in peace between Nati+e
"mericans and the rush o settlers who were mo+ing west! "t the
same time, the go+ernment supported missionary groups in their
eorts to build churches, schools, and model arms or those tribes
that permitted them to li+e in their midst!
10 3y the ./55s, ederal negotiators were trying to con+ince many
tribes to sell their land and mo+e out o the line rontier
e(pansion, a policy that culminated in the orced e(pulsion o the
mayor Southeastern tribes to the west! 7+er protests by Congress and
the Supreme Court, President "ndrew &ackson ordered the Nati+e
15 "mericans to be remo+ed to what is now 7klahoma! 7n the orced
march, which the Cherokee Nation reers to as the D )rail o )ears,E
many Nati+e "mericans died o disease, e(posure, and hunger!
3y the end o the ./55s, the go+ernment had disco+ered that
some o the land allocated as permanent reser+ations or the Nati+e
20 "mericans contained +aluable resources! Congress passed the %awes
Se+eralty "ct, and or the ne(t orty years Indian agents
and missionaries attempted to destroy the tribal system by separating the
members! It was during this time that the go+ernment boarding
schools were established to educate Nati+e "merican youth outside
25 o the home en+ironment!
2nder the Indian Reorgani1ation "ct o .0A6, scattered tribes
were encouraged to reorgani1e their tribal go+ernments! "nti,Indian
sentiment resuraced only ten years later, and by the .0<5>s relocation
centers to mo+e Nati+e "mericans rom the reser+ations to urban
30 areas were established!
)oday, go+ernment policies are unclear! $any oicials want to
remo+e the ederal go+ernment completely rom Nati+e "merican
go+ernance! 7thers belie+e that the go+ernment should support
Nati+e "merican eorts to maintain their culture! Not surprisingly,
35 the Nati+e "mericas themsel+es are ambi+alent about the role o the
ederal go+ernment in their aairs!
*;*RCIS* <0= Narration/Sequence, "rts
Eu!e"e #$Neill
2ni+ersally acclaimed as "merica>s greatest playwright, *ugene
7>Neill was born in ./// in the heart o the theater district in New
#ork City! "s the son o an actor he had early e(posure to the world
Line o the theater! Be attended Princeton 2ni+ersity briely in .05:, but
5 returned to New #ork to work in a +ariety o Fobs beore Foining the
crew o a reighter as a seaman! 2pon returning rom +oyages to
South "rica and South "merica, he was hospitali1ed or si( months
to recuperate rom tuberculosis! 'hile he was reco+ering, he
determined to write a play about his ad+entures on the sea!
10 Be went to Bar+ard, where he wrote the one,act Bound East for
Cardiff. It was produced in .0.: on Cape Cod by the Pro+incetown
Players, an e(perimental theater group that was later to settle in the
amous 8reenwich Gillage theater district in New #ork City! )he
Players produced se+eral more o his one,acts in the years between
15 .0.:,.0?5! 'ith the ull,length play Beyond the Horion, produced
on 3roadway in .0?5, 7>Neill>s success was assured! )he play won
the Pulit1er Pri1e or the best play o the year! 7>Neill was to be
awarded the pri1e again in .0??, .0?/, and .0<4 or !nna Christie,
Stran"e #nterlude, and Lon" $ay%s &ourney into 'i"ht! "lthough he
20 did not recei+e the Pulit1er Pri1e or it, (ournin" Be)omes Ele)tra,
produced in .0A., is arguably his most lasting contribution to the
"merican theater! In .0A:, he was awarded the Nobel Pri1e or
literature!
7>Neill>s plays, orty,i+e in all, co+er a wide range o dramatic
25 subFects, but se+eral themes emerge, including the ambi+alence o
amily relationships, the struggle between the se(es, the conlict
between spiritual and material desires, and the +ision o modern man
as a +ictim o uncontrollable circumstances! $ost o 7>Neill>s
characters are seeking meaning in their li+es! "ccording to his
30 biographers, most o the characters were portraits o himsel and his
amily! In a sense, his work chronicled his lie!
*;*RCIS* :?= %einition/Illustration Bumanities
%&e Ca"adia" 'over"(e"t
Canada is a democracy organi1ed as a constitutional monarchy
with a parliamentary system o go+ernment modeled ater that o
8reat 3ritain! )he oicial head o state in Canada is Hueen *li1abeth
Line II o 3ritain, who is also Hueen o Canada! )he go+ernor,general is
5 the queen>s personal representati+e in Canada and the oicial head o
the Canadian parliament, although with +ery limited powers!
)he ederal parliament in Canada consists o the Bouse o
Commons and the Senate! )he actual head o go+ernment is the
prime minister, who is responsible or choosing a cabinet! )he
10 cabinet consists o a group o ministers o +aried e(pertise who ser+e
with support o the Bouse o Commons! )hey are responsible or
most legislation, and ha+e the sole power to prepare and introduce
bills that pro+ide or the e(penditure o public unds or ta(ation! )he
system is reerred to as responsible go+ernment, which means that
15 cabinet members sit in the parliament and are directly responsible to
it, holding power only as long as a maFority o the Bouse o
Commons shows conidence by +oting with them! I a cabinet is
deeated in the Bouse o Commons on a motion o censure or a +ote
o no conidence, the cabinet must either resign, in which case the
20 go+ernor,general will ask the leader o the opposition to orm a new
cabinet, or a new election may be called!
)he Canadian Senate has .56 members, appointed by the go+ernor,
general on the ad+ice o the prime minister! )heir actual unction is
ad+isory, although they may make minor changes in bills and no bill
25 may become a law without being passed by the Senate! Senators hold
oice until age se+enty,i+e unless they are absent rom two
consecuti+e sessions o parliament! )he real power, howe+er, resides in
the Bouse o Commons, the members o which are elected directly by
the +oters! )he seats are allocated on the basis o population, and there
30 are about A55 constituencies! 3y custom, almost all members o the
cabinet must be members o the Bouse o Commons or, i not already
members, must win seats within reasonable time!
8eneral elections must be held at the end o e+ery i+e years, but
they may be conducted whene+er issues require it, and most
35 parliaments are dissol+ed beore the end o the i+e,year term! 'hen
a go+ernment loses its maFority support in a general election, a
change o go+ernment occurs!
"lthough maFor and minor political parties were not created by
law, they are recogni1ed by law in Canada! )he party that wins the
*0 largest number o seats in a general election orms the go+ernment,
and its leader becomes the prime minister! )he second largest party
becomes the oicial opposition, and its leader is recogni1ed as the
leader o opposition! In this way, the people are assured o an
eecti+e alternati+e go+ernment should they become displeased with
*5 the one in power!
*;*RCIS* :A= %einition/Illustration Natural Sciences
)ydro!e"
Bydrogen is the most common element in the uni+erse and was
perhaps the irst to orm! It is among the ten most common elements
on *arth as well and one o the most useul or industrial purposes!
Line 2nder normal conditions o temperature, hydrogen is a gas!
5 %esignated as B, hydrogen is the irst element in the periodic table
because it contains only one proton! Bydrogen can combine with a
large number o other elements, orming more compounds than any
o the others! Pure hydrogen seldom occurs naturally, but it e(ists in
most organic compounds, that is, compounds that contain carbon,
10 which account or a +ery large number o compounds! $oreo+er,
hydrogen is ound in inorganic compounds! -or e(ample, when
hydrogen burns in presence o o(ygen, it orms water!
)he lightest and simplest o the elements, hydrogen has se+eral
properties that make it +aluable or many industries! It releases more
15 heat per unit o weight than any other uel! In rocket engines, tons o
hydrogen and o(ygen are burned, and hydrogen is used with o(ygen
or welding torches that produce temperatures as high as 6,555
degrees - and can be used in cutting steel! -uel cells to generate
electricity operate on hydrogen and o(ygen!
20 Bydrogen also ser+es to pre+ent metals rom tarnishing during
heat treatments by remo+ing the o(ygen rom them! "lthough it
would be diicult to remo+e the o(ygen by itsel, hydrogen readily
combines with o(ygen to orm water, which can be heated to steam
and easily remo+ed! -urthermore, hydrogen is one o the coolest
25 rerigerants! It does not become a liquid until it reaches temperatures
o ,6?< degrees -! Pure hydrogen gas is used in large electric
generators to cool the coils!
-uture uses o hydrogen include uel or cars, boats, planes, and
other orms o transportation that currently require petroleum
30 products! )hese uels would be lighter, a distincti+e ad+antage in the
aerospace industry, and they would also be cleaner, thereby reducing
pollution in the atmosphere!
Bydrogen is also useul in the ood industry or a process know
as hydrogenation! Products such as margarine and cooking oils are
35 changed rom liquids to semisolids by combining hydrogen with their
molecules! Soap manuacturers also use hydrogen or this purpose!
In addition, in the chemical industry, hydrogen is used to produce
ammonia, gasoline, methyl alcohol, and many other important
products!
*;*RCIS* ::= Classiication Bumanities/3usiness
Co(etitio"
Ri+alry among businesses and ser+ice industries is called
competition! )his eature o a market economy encourages
businesses to impro+e their goods and ser+ices, keep their prices
9ine aordable, and oer new products to attract more buyers!
< )here are our basic types o competition in business that orm
a continuum rom +ure )om+etition through mono+olisti)
)om+etition and oli"o+oly to mono+oly! ISee diagramJ! "t one end
o the continuum, pure competition results when e+ery company
has a similar product! Companies that deal in commodities such as
.5 wheat or corn are oten in+ol+ed in pure competition! In +ure
)om+etition, it is oten the ease and eiciency o distribution that
inluences purchase!
In contrast, in mono+olisti) )om+etition, se+eral companies may
compete or the sale o items that may be substituted! )he classic
.< e(ample o monopolistic competition is coee and tea! I the price o
one is percei+ed as too high, consumers may begin to purchase the
other! Coupons and other discounts are oten used as part o a
marketing strategy to inluence sales!
,li"o+oly occurs when a ew companies dominate the sales o a
?5 product or ser+ice! -or e(ample, only i+e airline carriers control
more than 45 percent o all ticket sales in the 2nited Sates! In
oligopoly, serious competition is not considered desirable because it
would result in reduced re+enue or e+ery company in the group!
"lthough price wars do occur, in which all companies oer
?< substantial sa+ings to customers, a somewhat similar tendency to
raise prices simultaneously is also usual!
-inally, mono+oly occurs when only one irm sells the product!
Some monopolies ha+e been tolerated or producers or goods and
ser+ices that ha+e been considered basic or essential, including
A5 electricity and water! In these cases, it is go+ernment control, rather
than competition, that protects and inluences sales! )he ollowing
chart represents the competition continuum!
$ost ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Competition,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 9east
Pure $onopolistic 7ligopoly $onopoly
competition competition
*;*RCIS* <:= Narration/Sequence Popular Culture
.! 'hat does this passage mainly
discussC
aJ )he 7lympic 8ames in St! 9ouis in
.056!
bJ )he de+elopment o basketball!
cJ )he #$C" athletic program!
dJ %r! &ames Naismith!
?! 'hen was the irst demonstration
game o basketball held during the
7lympics!
aJ ./0.
bJ ./0?
cJ ./04
dJ .056
A! )he phrase Dbalked atE in line : could
best be replaced by
aJ resisted
bJ enFoyed
cJ e(celled at
dJ were e(hausted by
6! )he word DierceE in line : is closest
in meaning to
aJ long
bJ boring
cJ e(treme
dJ dark
<! )he word DthemE in line .. reers to
aJ indoors
bJ seasons
cJ games
dJ areas
:! 'here in the passage does the author
discuss the irst basketball
championship tournamentC
aJ 9ines .5,.?
bJ 9ines .A,.<
cJ 9ines ?.,??
dJ 9ines ?6,?:
4! 'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines ?6,?:= D'hen
basketball was introduced as a
demonstration sport in the .056
7lympic 8ames in St! 9ouis, it quickly
spread throughout the world!EC
aJ 3asketball was not considered an
7lympic sport at the St! 9ouis games!
bJ 3asketball became popular
worldwide ater its introduction at the
7lympic 8ames in St! 9ouis!
cJ 3asketball players rom many
countries competed in the 7lympic
8ames in St! 9ouis!
dJ 3asketball was one o the most
popular sports at the 7lympic 8ames in
St! 9ouis!
/!'hy did Naismith decide to in+ent
basketballC
aJ Be did not like soccer or rugby!
bJ Be was tired o baseball and ootball!
cJ Be wanted his students to e(ercise
during the winter!
dJ Be could not con+ince his students to
play indoors!
0! )he author mentions all o the
ollowing as typical o the early game
o baseball *;C*P)
aJ three points were scored or e+ery
basket
bJ running with the ball was not a oul
cJ nine players were on a team
dJ the ball had to be retrie+ed rom the
basket ater each score
.5! It can be inerred rom the passage
that the original baskets
aJ were not placed +ery high
bJ had a metal rim
cJ did not ha+e a hole in the bottom
dJ were hung on the same side
*;*RCIS* <4= %einition/Illustration Popular Culture
.! 'hich o the ollowing is the main
topic o the passageC
aJ )he image o $ickey $ouse
bJ )he lie o 'alt %isney
cJ )he history o cartoons
dJ )he deinition o "merican culture
?! 'hat distinguished Steamboat Willie
rom earlier cartoonsC
aJ 3etter color
bJ " sound track
cJ $innie $ouse as co,star
dJ )he longer ormat
A! )he world Dper+asi+eE in line ?:
could best be replaced by
aJ well lo+ed
bJ widespread
cJ oten copied
dJ e(pensi+e to buy
6! )he word DappealingE in line ?. is
closest in meaning to
aJ attracti+e
bJ amous
cJ e(ceptional
dJ distinguishable
<! )he word DthoseE in line ?5 reers to
aJ cartoons
bJ orms
cJ glo+es
dJ changes
:! 'here in the passage does the author
relate how $ickey got his nameC
aJ 9ines /,.5
bJ 9ines ..,.A
cJ 9ines .<,.:
dJ 9ines .4,?5
4!'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines .4,?5= D"lthough he
has recei+ed a ew minor changes
throughout his lietime, most notably
the addition o white glo+es and the
alterations to achie+e the rounder orms
o a more childish body, he has
remained true to his nature since those
irst cartoonsEC
aJ )he current +ersion o $ickey $ouse
is dierent in e+ery way rom the early
cartoons!
bJ )he original $ickey $ouse was one
o the irst cartoon characters!
cJ In the irst cartoons, $ickey $ouse
looked more like a child!
dJ )he personality o $ickey $ouse
has not changed o+er the years!
/! 'hat did %isney mean when he said
D)here is a lot o the mouse in meCE
aJ Be was proud o the mouse that he
created!
bJ Be knew that the mouse would be a
amous creation!
cJ Be created the mouse with many o
his own qualities!
dJ Be had worked +ery hard to create
the mouse!
0! )he irst image o $ickey $ouse is
described as all o the ollowing
*;C*P)
aJ he was dressed in shorts with two
buttons
bJ he had big ears
cJ he wore yellow shoes
dJ he was wearing white glo+es
.5! )he paragraph ollowing the
passage most probably discusses
aJ the history o cartoons
bJ other images in popular culture
cJ 'alt %isney>s childhood
dJ the +oices o cartoon characters
*;*RCIS* </= Social Sciences
.! 'hat is the author>s main pointC
aJ 8o+ernment policies or Nati+e
"mericans ha+e not changed many times
during the past three hundred years!
bJ )oday go+ernment oicials are in
agreement about their role in
Nati+e, "merican aairs!
cJ )he ederal go+ernment has been
inconsistent and unclear in its policies or
Nati+e "mericans!
dJ )he Indian Reorgani1ation "ct was a
ailure!
?! 'hat was in+ol+ed in the D)rail o
)earsEC
aJ Nati+e "merican children were separated
rom their amilies and sent to boarding
schools!
bJ Nati+e "merican amilies li+ing in the
Southeast were orced to mo+e to
7klahoma!
cJ Nati+e "merican amilies were resettled
on reser+ations!
dJ Nati+e "mericans were mo+ed rom
reser+ations to cities!
A! )he word Dambi+alentE in line A< reers
to
aJ e(hibiting suspicion
bJ e(periencing contradictory eelings
cJ e(pressing concern
dJ demonstrating opposition
6! )he word DculminatedE in line .? is
closest in meaning to
aJ ended
bJ ailed
cJ belonged
dJ caused
<! )he word DthemE in line 0 reers to
aJ missionary groups
bJ eorts
cJ model arms
dJ tribes
:! 'here in the passage does the author
reer to the congressional act that allowed
Nati+e "merican students to be sent to
boarding schoolsC
aJ 9ines :,0
bJ 9ines .A,.<
cJ 9ines ?5,?<
dJ 9ines ?:,A5
4! 'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines .A,.<= D7+er protests by
Congress and the Supreme Court, President
"ndrew &ackson ordered the Nati+e
"mericans to be remo+ed to what now is
7klahomaCE
aJ 7klahoma obFected to the president>s
order to mo+e Nati+e "mericans to their
state!
bJ )he Nati+e "mericans had to mo+e to
7klahoma because Congress and the
Supreme Court obFected to the president>s
order!
cJ )he president ordered the Nati+e
"mericans in 7klahoma to mo+e despite
opposition by Congress and the Supreme
Court!
dJ %espite obFections by Congress and the
Supreme Court, Nati+e "mericans were
orced to mo+e to 7klahoma by the
president!
/! 'hy did Congress pass the %awes
Se+eralty "ctC
aJ 3ecause the go+ernment agencies wanted
to e(ploit the resources on reser+ations!
bJ 3ecause missionaries wanted to con+ert
the Nati+e "mericans to Christianity!
cJ 3ecause teachers wanted to set up
schools or Nati+e "mericans in urban
areas!
dJ 3ecause oicials on the reser+ations
wanted to preser+e Nati+e "merican
culture!
0! Nati+e "merican policies are described
as all o the ollowing *;C*P)
aJ inconsistent
bJ destructi+e
cJ permanent
dJ unclear
.5!)he paragraph ollowing the passage
most probably discusses
aJ the Nati+e "merican point o +iew
regarding go+ernment policies today
bJ the eorts by Nati+e "mericans to
maintain their culture
cJ the results o the reser+ation system
dJ the intertribal councils that Nati+e
"mericans ha+e established
*;*RCIS* <0= "rts
.! )his passage is a summary o
7>Neill>s
aJ work
bJ lie
cJ work and lie
dJ amily
?! Bow many times was 7>Neill
awarded the Pulit1er Pri1eC
aJ 7ne
bJ )hree
cJ -our
dJ -i+e
A! )he word DbrielyE in line 6 is closest
in meaning to
aJ seriously
bJ or a short time
cJ on scholarship
dJ without enthusiasm
6! )he word DstruggleE in line ?: is
closest in meaning to
aJ inluence
bJ conlict
cJ appreciation
dJ denial
<! )he word DitE in line ?5 reers to
aJ Bar+ard
bJ one,act play
cJ theater group
dJ theater district
:! 'here in the passage does the author
indicate the reason or 7>Neill>s
hospitali1ationC
aJ 9ines A,6
bJ 9ines :,/
cJ 9ines .5,.A
dJ 9ines .:,.0
4! 'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines ?0,A.= D"ccording to
his biographers, most o the characters
were portraits o himsel and his
amilyEC
aJ Be used his amily and his own
e(periences in his plays!
bJ Bis biography contained stories
about him and his amily!
cJ Be had paintings o himsel and
members o his amily!
dJ Bis biographers took pictures o him
with his amily!
/! "ccording to the passage, which o
7>Neill>s plays was most important to
the "merican theaterC
aJ !nna Christie
bJ Beyond the Horion
cJ Lon" $ay%s &ourney into 'i"ht
dJ (ournin" Be)omes Ele)tra
0! )he author mentions all o the
ollowing as themes or 7>Neill>s plays
*;C*P)
aJ lie in college
bJ ad+entures at sea
cJ amily lie
dJ relationships between men and
women
.5!'e can iner rom inormation in the
passage that 7>Neill>s plays were not
aJ contro+ersial
bJ autobiographical
cJ optimistic
dJ popular
*;*RCIS* :?= Bumanities
.! 'hat does this passage mainly
discussC
aJ Political parties in Canada
bJ )he Canadian election process
cJ )he Canadian system o go+ernment
dJ )he powers o parliament in Canada
?! 'hen does a change o go+ernment
occur in CanadaC
aJ 'hen the go+ernor,general decides
to appoint a new go+ernment
bJ 'hen the +oters do not return
maFority support or the go+ernment in
a general election
cJ 'hen the prime minister ad+ises the
go+ernor,general to appoint a new
go+ernment
dJ 'hen the Bouse o Commons +otes
or a new go+ernment
A! )he word Ddissol+edE in line A<
could best be replaced by
aJ appro+ed
bJ e+aluated
cJ reorgani1ed
dJ dismissed
6! )he word D+ariedE in line .5 is
closest in meaning to
aJ little
bJ dierent
cJ good
dJ steady
<! )he word DitE in line .: reers to
aJ maFority
bJ parliament
cJ cabinet
dJ system
:! 'here in the passage does the author
indicate whose responsibility it is to
choose the cabinet in CanadaC
aJ 9ines 6,:
bJ 9ines /,0
cJ 9ines ..,.A
dJ 9ines ?4,?0
4! 'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines .,A= DCanada is a
constitutional monarchy with aK
parliamentary system o go+ernment
modeled ater that o 8reat 3ritainEC
aJ 'hereas Canada has a constitutional
orm o go+ernment, 8reat 3ritain has a
parliamentary system!
bJ Canada and 8reat 3ritain both ha+e
model systems o go+ernment!
cJ 8reat 3ritain and Canada ha+e +ery
similar systems o go+ernment!
dJ Canada>s parliament has adopted
8reat 3ritain>s constitution!
/! 'hat is the role o political parties in
CanadaC
aJ 2ntil they become powerul, they are
not legally recogni1ed!
bJ "lthough they ser+e unoicial
unctions, they are not +ery important!
cJ I they win a maFority o seats, their
leader becomes prime minister!
dJ 3ecause they are not elected, they
oer the go+ernment opposing +iews!
0! )he go+ernor,general is described as
all o the ollow in *;C*P)
aJ the oicial head o parliament
bJ the head o go+ernment
cJ the queen>s representati+e in Canada
dJ the oicial who appoint the Senate
.5! It can be inerred rom the passage
that the +oters in Canada
aJ choose the prime minister and the
cabinet
bJ do not usually +ote in general
elections
cJ allow their representati+es to +ote on
their behal
dJ determine when a change o
go+ernment should occur

*;*RCIS* :A= Natural Sciences
.! 'hat is the author>s main purpose in
the passageC
aJ )o e(plain the industrial uses o
hydrogen
bJ )o describe the origin o hydrogen in
the uni+erse
cJ )o discuss the process o
hydrogenation
dJ )o gi+e e(amples o how hydrogen
and o(ygen combine
?! Bow can hydrogen be used to cut
steelC
aJ 3y cooling the steal to a +ery low
temperature
bJ 3y cooling the hydrogen with o(ygen
to a +ery low temperature
cJ 3y heating the steel to a +ery high
temperature
dJ 3y heating the hydrogen with o(ygen
to a +ery high temperature
A! )he word DreadilyE in line ?? could
best be replaced by
aJ completely
bJ slowly
cJ usually
dJ easily
6! )he word DcombiningE in line A< is
closest in meaning to
aJ trying
bJ changing
cJ inding
dJ adding
<! )he word DthemE in line ?. reers to
aJ uel cells
bJ metals
cJ treatments
dJ products
:! 'here in the passage does the author
e(plain why hydrogen is used as a
rerigerantC
aJ 9ines /,.5
bJ 9ines .<,./
cJ 9ines ?5,?.
dJ 9ines ?6,?:
4! 'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines ?.,?6= D"lthough it
would be diicult to remo+e the o(ygen
by itsel, hydrogen readily combines
with o(ygen to orm water, which can
be heated to steam and easily
remo+edEC
aJ It is easy to orm steam by heating
water!
bJ 'ater can be made by combining
hydrogen and o(ygen!
cJ Bydrogen cannot be separated rom
o(ygen because it is too diicult!
dJ 7(ygen is remo+ed by combining it
with hydrogen and heating it!
/! Bow does hydrogen generally occurC
aJ It is reely a+ailable in nature!
bJ It is contained in many compounds!
cJ It is oten ound in pure orm!
dJ It is released during hydrogenation!
0! )he author mentions all o the
ollowing as uses or hydrogen
*;C*P)
aJ to remo+e tarnish rom metals
bJ to produce uels such as gasoline and
methyl alcohol
cJ to operate uel cells that generate
electricity
dJ to change solid oods to liquids
.5! It can be inerred rom the passage
that hydrogen
aJ is too dangerous to be used or
industrial purposes
bJ has many purposes in a +ariety o
industries
cJ has limited industrial uses because o
its dangerous properties
dJ is used in many industries or
basically the same purpose
*;*RCIS* ::= 3usiness
.! 'hich o the ollowing would be a
better title or the passageC
aJ $onopolies
bJ )he Commodity $arket
cJ )he Competition Continuum
dJ )he 3est )ype o Competition
?! "n e(ample o a product in
monopolistic competition is
aJ corn
bJ electricity
cJ airline tickets
dJ coee
A! )he word DtoleratedE in line ?/ could
best be replaced by
aJ permitted
bJ reser+ed
cJ critici1ed
dJ de+ised
6! )he word DdominateE in line .0 is
closet in meaning to
aJ e+aluate
bJ control
cJ modiy
dJ oppose
<! )he word DitE in line ?? reers to
aJ competition
bJ group
cJ company
dJ re+enue
:! 'here in the passage does the author
e(plain pure competitionC
aJ 9ines 4,.?
bJ 9ines .A,.<
cJ 9ines .0,?.
dJ 9ines ?4,A5
4! 'hat does the author mean by the
statement in lines ?6,?:= D"lthough
price wars do occur, in which all
companies oer substantial sa+ings to
customers, a somewhat similar tendency
to raise prices simultaneously is also
usualEC
aJ It is not unusual or all companies to
increase prices at the same time!
bJ It is common or companies to
compete or customers by lowering
prices!
cJ Customers may lose money when
companies ha+e price wars!
dJ Prices are lower during price wars,
but they are usually higher aterward!
/! 'hich type o competition is subFect
to the greatest go+ernment controlC
aJ $onopolies
bJ 7ligopolies
cJ $onopolistic competition
dJ Pure competition
0! )he author mentions all o the
ollowing as characteristic o monopoly
*;C*P)
aJ the use o coupons or other discounts
bJ go+ernment control
cJ basic or essential ser+ices
dJ only one irm
.5! It can be inerred that this passage
was irst printed in
aJ a business te(tbook
bJ a go+ernment document
cJ an airline brochure
dJ a newspaper