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Book SmJU
11
o
n
An Exact Reprint
From an old copy now owned by Mrs,
George W. Harlan, (nee Martha
Ann Glaybrook Kennedy)
Farmington, Missouri
PUBLISHED BY
Mrs. Robert Burett Oliver, (nee Marie
Elizabeth Watkins)
Gape Girardeau, Missouri
1907
Printed by Republican
J.
MANUAL
<t
FOR
Or
>
THE MEMBERS OF
THE
BRIERY PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH.
VIRGINIA.
COMPILED BY
JAMES W. DOUGLAS.
PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SESSION.
RICHMOND:
PRINTED BY J. MACFARLAN, MAIN STREET.
Dec, 1828.
TV. Z?.
It is requested that all errors and omis-
sions, noticed in this Manual, may be reported to
the Session of the Church.
SKETCH OF THE HISTORY
OF
BRIERY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
The
first Presbyterian Minister who ever preached
in the counties of Charlotte and Prince Edward, was,
probably, the Rev. William Robinson, of the Presby-
tery of New Brunswick, in the year 174i3.
In 17 5i5, the Presbytery of Hanover was organized,
with six
ministers, viz: (Messrs Samuel Davies, John
Todd, Alexander Craghead, Robert Henry, John
Wright, and John Brown. There was then no Presby-
tery South or West of Virginia.
Between
17'5i5
and 1760, most probably, the church
of Briery was organized by the Rev. Robert Henry.
The number and names of the first members are not
known. The first ruling Elders were Joseph Morton,
and George and Sherwood, Walton.
The congregation was irregularly supplied with
monthly preaching, by Messrs Henry, Patillo, David
Rice, Leak and others until 1775. In the absence of
a preacher, it was the custom, for a number of years,
to have a sermon read, accompanied with the usual
exercises of public worship, by Mr Morton, or Mr
George Walton.
In 1766, a plan was adopted for establishing a per-
manent fund for the support of the gospel. About
three hundred pounds was obtained by subscription
and appropriated to the purchase of servants.
4 HISTORY.
In the appropriation of their funds many will think
they erred; but it was the error of the age in which
they lived, and their 'names and motives should be
respected by their descendants. Their names are as
follows:
s. d.
50 00-
00
-
- - 25 00 00
15 00. O'O
12 00 00
George Walton,
Joseph Morton,
- -
-
John Pettus,
-
-
-
Henry Watkins,
-
James Venable, Hezekiah Jackson, Josiah
Morton, Matthias Flournoy, Sherwood
Walton, Clement Read and William
Watkins, each 10,
James Wimbisb,
-
- -
-
Christopher Billups, Henry Isbell, Benja^
min Wimbish, Robert Walton, Thomas
Flournoy, Samuel Cobbs, Baker De
Graffanreid and Samuel Taylor, each
5 pounds,
~
Joshua Blanton,
-
Bryan Ferguson, William Booker, Thom-
as Read, John Sullivan, 3 each,
Obadiah Claybrook, Isaac Read, Thomas
Bedford, Samuel Comer, Philip Brew-
er, John Crenshaw, Adam Calhoon,
John Williams, John Foster, 2, 10s.
each,
William Jameson,
-
Sion Spencer, William Purnal, William
^
.Dabbs, Henry Cox, Warsham Easly, Al-
|
exander Kean, William Russell, Thos.
Carter, James Speed, James Cole, Jo-
seph Friend, 2 each,
j
\
70 00 00
7 10 00
\
4
0-
00
0*0
4 00 00
12 00 00
1
22 10 00
2 05 00
\
22 O'O 00
Carried up, 282 05 00
HISTORY.
5
4 10 00
s. d.
Brought up, 282 05 00
William Baily, Robert Williams, Thomas
Murrell, 1 10s. each,
John Popham, James Foster, Thomas
Blackstock, Samuel White, William
Barksdale, John Mullin, Nathaniel
Williams, A. Cunison, William Rivers,
Robert Breedlove, John Morton, Thos.
Green, William Nowlet, James Zacka-
ry, Elizabeth Rowlet, Richard Rivers,
William Martin, Benjamin Watkins, 1
each,
John Lunderman, Little Joe Morton, Mat-
thew J. Williams, each 15s.
Sherwood Pierson and Richard Hill, each
10is.
18 00 00
2 05 00
1 00 00
308 0'0. 00
The first Trustees of the church were Joseph Mor-
ton, George Walton and Henry Watkins.
The first installed Pastor of Briery, was the Rev.
Samuel S. Smith, D.D. His installation took place at
Prince Edward C. H. Nov. 9th, 1775. He had been
ordained on the 2 7th Oct. previous, -at Rockfish, Am-
herst Co. Mt Smith resided at the Seminary, since
Hampden Sydney, of which he was the first President,
and preached at Briery,
half-monthly,
for 4 years. In
1779, he accepted the professorship of Moral Philoso-
phy, in Princeton College, and on the 28th Oct. of that
year, his pastoral connexion was dissolved.
Mr John B. Smith, who had been ordained at
Hamp-
den Sydney, the day before, Oct. 27th 1779, immedi-
ately succeeded his brother, and preached at Briery,
half
-monthly for 12 years. In 17861788 the con-
gregation enjoyed, what may be denominated,
the
FIRST REVIVAL OF RELIGION IN BRIERY.
6 HISTORY.
This interesting work of grace commenced in Cum-
berland, and soon after in Briery, and was extended to
most of the Presbyterian churches in Virginia. The
number adtded, as the fruits of this revival, was about
60, almost all of whom evinced the reality of their con-
version by a life of consistent and growing piety.
In 1791, Mr iSmith accepted a call to the third Pres-
byterian Church of Philadelphia, and, on the 2 9th Oc-
tober, his .pastoral union with the Briery church was
dissolved.
In 1792 and
'9
3 the church was partially supplied
by the Rev. Drury Lacy, pastor of Cumberland.
In 17 93, Mr Archibald Alexander preached, in con-
nexion with Mr Lacy, and in 17 9 4, June 7th was or-
dained at Briery Church. The Ordination Sermon by
Mr Lacy. The charge by Mr McRoberts.
In the same year, Mir Mathew Lyle began to preach
statedly at Briery and Buffalo. His ordination fol-
lowed, at Buffalo, Feb. 13th 1795. The sermon by
Mr Alexander. The charge by Mr Lacy.
Mr Alexander, and Mr Lyle continued collegiate
p-astors of Briery. Mr Alexander preaching monthly,
and Mr Lyle half-monthly, for 12 years.
In 1806, Mr Alexander was called, as Mr Smith had
been before, to the third Presbyterian Church of Phila-
delphia. He accepted the call and, on the 13th No-
vember, was released from his obligations to Briery.
In 1807, the Rev. William S. Reid succeeded Mr
Alexander, as a supply for 6 months.
In 1808, Mr Reid was succeeded by the Rev. Moses
Hoge, who preached in connexion with Mir Lyle, until
182 0,
when he resigned. He died about six months
afterwards whilst on a visit at Philadelphia.
From the resignation of Dr. Hoge to the year 1827,
Mr Lyle was the sole pastor.
In 1822 and 1823 the church enjoyed
the second
REVIVAL OF RELIGION.
HISTORY 7
It commenced, visibly, at Charlotte Courthouse, dur-
ing the Sessions of the Hanover Presbytery at that
place, and extended to this and other surrounding
neighborhoods. The number added to the church, in
those two years, was 313 , all oif whom, thus far, it is
believed, "have proved their faith sincere."
In March 1 8<2
7,
after an illness of some months, Mr
Lyle was removed, by death, from a stewardship which
he had held for thirty-three years. He was a man of
strong feelings, great energy O'f character, a sound the-
ologian, an interesting preacher, and so conscien-
tiously observant of his engagements as scarcely ever
to have disappointed a congregation. He was remark-
ably attached to the "doctrines
of
grace
"
"He sowed
good seed in 'his field," as was proved by tihe character
of the accessions to the church, during his life-time,
and, very soon after his decease, this seed "sprang up
and brought forth
plentifully
Occasional supplies filled up the year (1.8?2 7.
In January 1&2
8,
Mr James W. Douglas began to
preach, as a stated supply, engaged for six months.
In this year the church was blessed with
the third
REVIVAL OF RELIGION.
The first case of decided awakening was on the 13th
of January. Conversion followed, as it is hoped, in
the same week. Instances of hopeful conversion mul-
tiplied, and the hand of God became more visible. Nor
was it soon withdrawn. The spirit blew gently, and
continued gently and steadily to blow through his
garden, until now, at the close of the year, 128 per-
sons have been added to the church on examination,
and 4 on certificate. Of these 52 received adult bap-
tism and 56 were heads of families.
The church now, Dec. 3*1
st, 18;2
8,
numbers in h.ei
communion 198 members.
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P.
<1
FORM OF
COVENANT
USED AT THE ADMISSION OF MEMBERS TO THE COMMU-
NION OF THE CHURCH.
After intoduring the subject in such way as he may
think best, the minister addresses himself to the candi-
dates standing before hi?n, as follows
:
Do you believe in the only living and true God, infi-
nitely excellent and glorious; and that there is a trinity
of persons, the Father, the -Son, and the Holy Ghost, m
this divine essence?
Do you believe in the Scriptures of the- Old and New
Testaments, as the word of God, the only infallible rule
of faith and practice?
Do you believe that you are sinners, and as such de-
serve the wrath of God forever?
Do you believe in Jesus Christ as the Savior of sin-
ners, the only Mediator between God and man?
Do you believe in the necessity of the renewing and
sanctifying operations of the Holy Spirit; and that you
must be holy in order to be happy?
Do you believe in the resurrection of the dead; and
in a general judgment? Do you believe these things?
{Here the candidates bow assent,)
And, now, do you take this God the Father, to be
your Father, the Son to be your Saviour, and the Holy
Spirit to be; your sanctifier; and to this glorious Trin-
ity, one God, do you heartily and wholly give your-
selves away, and all you have?
Do you receive these scriptures as the rule of your
faith and practice?
Do you as far as you know your own heart, unfeign-
cdly repent of all your sins; and, especially your enmi-
5
50
ty to God, and your rejection of the Savior so long;
and do you now look ,and trust for salvation to the
righteousness of Christ, received by faith in him?
Do you engage to walk with God in the ways of new
obedience, and to strive after eminent attainments m.
christian knowledge, piety and usefulness? And :n
order to this, do you engage to be diligent in the use
of ' the means of grace, such as reading the scriptures,
prayer, self-examination, and attendance on the public
worship and ordinance of God's house?
Do you promise subjection in
the
Lord to the consti-
tuted authority of the Church to which you belong,
and to walk in brotherly love, with its members?
And thus, through the grace of God strengthening
you, you engage -to act until death?
{Here again the candidates bow assent.)
The minister then says.
In consequence of the pro-
fessions which you have now made:, and the engage-
ments into which you have now entered, I do, in the
name of the Lord Jesus, receive you to the communi m
of this church, and give you a right to all its privileges.
This is followed by a suitable exhortation to the new
members, and the congregation. The above form
should
be read by the com?nunicants frequently and with care-
ful self-examination, particularly before every sacramefi-
tal occasion.
Nature of the covenant entered into at the
Baptism of Children. Addressed to Parents.
Baptism was instituted by 'the Lord Jesus Christ, to
be a seal of the covenant of grace, and the ordinance of
admission to a visible standing in his church; and in
presenting your children for baptism, you do publicly
give them away to God, and to his church, and you
bind yourselves to bring them up accordingly. The
51
water, in this ordinance implies guilt and pollution,
and represents to us justification by the blood of
Christ, and regeneration and sanotification by his
spirit. But remember "No outward forms
can make
you clean." The procuring the efficient, and the in-
strumental cause of sanctification, can be nothing
else than the blood, the spirit and the word of Christ:
and to him you must ever look for your own salvation,
and for the salvation of your children. As soon as
your children are capable of receiving instruction, it
becomes your duty to have them taught to read God's
Holy Word; to instruct them in the principles of the
Christian religion, of which there is an excellent sum-
mary in the Confession of Faith, and Catechisms of
our Church; to pray for them and with them; to set an
example,' of piety and godliness before them; and, by
all the means of God's appointment, to bring them
up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord.
These duties, and whatever others you may discover
from the word of God, to be; binding on you, as Christ-
ian parents, you do promise and covenant, in the pres-
ence of God and his church, that you will endeavor to
perform and do.
is recommended to parents, who have
offered
chil-
dren to God in baptism, frequently
,
and with careful
self-examination, to peruse the above explanation
of
their
baptismal engagement.
NOTES.
1. It is a rule of the session of Briery, that Presby-
terians from other churches, on removing into our
bounds, may commune with us for one year; but, that
after the expiration of a year, they must either produce
a certificate from the church to which they have be-
longed, and connect themselves with this church, or
give to the pastor or session a reason why they do not.
2. Members removing within the bounds of other
churches, ought to procure certificates of dismission,
and connect themselves with the church within the
bounds of which they reside. The neglect of this duty
deranges the order of Christ's house; is sometimes
greatly injurious to the members so acting; and almost
always prevents the church, into whose neighborhood
they have gone, from enjoying the full benefit of their
influence, counsel and support.
3. Members dismissed are always considered under
the watch, and subject to the discipline of the church
dismissing them, until they are actually received by
the church to which they are dismissed. See Confes-
sion of Faith, under the head of Discipline, chap. 10,
sec. 1.
4. "No certificate of church membership shall be
considered valid testimony of the good standing of the
beiarer, if it be more than one year old, except where
there has been no opportunity of presenting it to a
church." 'See Discipline, chap, ii, sec. 2.
5. Children should, ordinarily, be baptized in the
congregation to which they belong. When they are
not, the parents should carry a certificate of their bap-
tism to their own .pastor or -session, that the proper
record may be made in the church book.
6. Good order requires that candidates for church
membership should offer themselves to the session of
Notes.
53
heir own church, and not to a session at a distance,
hen, however, for any special reason, they have been
dmitted to the communion of a church, which is not
properly their own, they should immediately carry a
certificate of the fact to their own session, and have
their names recorded at home.
7. The session meets statedly, in the session house,
on the first Sabbath of every month, at
10'
o'clock,
A. M. Persons wishing to be received into the church,
or having other business, should be present at that
hour.
8. The Lord's Supper is administered on the second
Sabbath in March, June, September and December.
The services commence at half-past 10 o'clock. Ser-
mon on the Saturday preceding at eleven.
9. The Sabbaths immediately succeeding the com-
munion Sabbaths, are appropriated for the administra-
tion of Baptism. Parents should present their child-
ren on those days, if possible.
10. On communion occasions contributions are
made.
(1)
In
March for the Commissioners Fund,
and for the Missionary Society of Briery Congregation.
The first named is established, by an assessment on the
congregations, to defray the expenses of commission-
ers to the General Assembly. The Missionary Society
assists in sending the gospel to feeble churches, and
destitute places, within the bounds of Hanover Pres-
bytery. Ten dollars are given to the Commissioners
Fund, and the rest to the Missionary Society.
(2)
In
September,
for the education of pious young
men, who have not funds of their own, for the gospel
ministry.
At other times according to notice.
11. Public worship throughout the year commences
at 11 o'clock, A. M. except in December and January,
when the services is half an hour later.
MEMENTOS.
"My first great business upon earth is thl
sanctification of my own soul."
Henry Martyn.
"Whenever we become unwatchful, and self-
confident, WE are near some humiliating fall."
Dr Scott.
QUESTIONS
FOR SELF-EXAMINATION.
1. iDo you sincerely desire to know and to do your
duty, and how do you evince your sincerity?
2. Do you endeavor to keep the Sabbath? Do you
regularly and seasonably attend on the public worship
of the congregation? Do you endeavor to
be stii,i,;
to be attentive; frequently to lift up your heart to God
during the service; to sing with the spirit, and the un-
derstanding, making melody in your heart?
3. Are you always in your place at the Lord's table?
Have all your children been baptized? How are you
fulfilling your covenant engagements?
4. Do you daily worship God in your family?
5. Have you a OBible of your own? Do you daily
read it? How often have you read it through? Do
you assent to every >part that it is good?
6. Do you statedly pray in 'private? Why do you
pray? For what? What is the general character of
your prayers?
7. What good book are you reading? What is your
object? Have you thought of the influence of the
press upon public morals? Do you support the relig-
ious press?
8. What are you doing to support and spread the
Gospel? W.hat is the state of religion in different
parts of the world?
9. -Do you speak evil of none? Do you suppress
evil reports? Do you promote peace and friendly
feelings in your neighborhood? Do you speak the
truth? Do you keep your word? Do you pay your
debts? Are you strictly honest? Do you relieve the
poor? Do you vote at elections, and for good men?
56 Questions.
In all companies and
1
places do you give and get all the
benefit you can?
10. Do you pray for your brethren in
the church?
Do you rejoice in their spiritual and temporal wel-
fare? Do you give and accept christian reproof? Do
you wish to correct your faults?
11. What station do you hold in the family? How
do you discharge the duties of your station?
12. Do you guard against pride, selfishness, covet-
ousness, anger, moroseness, levity, discouragement?
Against a contentious, censorious, unforgiving, discon-
tented temper? Against improper companions, books,
songs, sights, amusements? Against intemperance,
idleness, impurity? Would .fasting assist you in mor-
tifying the flesh? How have you profited by afflic-
tions? How do you bear prosperity?
13. What value do you put upon time? What is
the great end of life? What is the great end of
3
r
our's? For what will any fellow creature have rea-
son to bless you in eternity? How would you, a hun-
dred years hence, wish you had spent your present
life?
14. Are you doing any thing, of the lawfulness of
which you are not satisfied?
15. In conclusion, what evidence have you that
you are a christian? Do you love all christians? Do
you desire to requite evil with good? When you see
others transgressing the divine law, does it give you
pain? Are you more afraid of displeasing God than
man? Would you rather suffer than sin? Does your
sorrow for sin continue even after you hope you have
been forgiven? Are you willing to have your sancti-
fication promoted
by any means?
16. How do you know that you are growing in
grace? Do you feel more deeply your need of Christ?
Do you confide in him? Have you more of a child-
like spirit? Do you live near to God? Do you feel
Questio?is.
57
an increasing interest in the prosperity of his church?
Do you find a
growing thirst for d'ivine truth? Have
you a greater longing after holiness? Do you groan
more painfully under the burden of indwelling sin?
Is your devotion to God more fixed and entire? Are
you conscious of an increasing willingness to sacrifice
even the dearest things to his will?
A PRAYER,
For a church member after reading the foregoing
Covenant, and Questions.
Most Holy and ever blessed God. With all humility
and reverence would I approach thee, through Jesus
Christ. Compose and' prepare my heart, that I may
worship thee with acceptance and profit.
To thee I have devoted
1
"myself a living sacrifice."
I have chosen thee for my portion: and I have resolved
in the strength of the Lord Jesus, that I would en-
deavor henceforward, to keep all thy commandments.
I thank thee for putting the resolution into my heart.
But alas! when I would search and try my ways, I
find that in all things I come short. I am not filled
with the knowledge
of thy will; and often when I
have known my duty,
I
did it not; or I did it not in a
right manner, or from a right motive. Have mercy
upon me, O God, according to thy loving kindness;
according to the multitude of thy tender mercies blot
out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from
mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin. Lord be
gracious unto me. Lift up thy, countenance upon me,
and give me peace.
iAgainst my will, my sins prevail;
O iSaviour! purge away their stain.
And now, for the time to come, I would
go
and sin
no more.
But my springs are in thee. Lord, teach
me thy statutes, and enable me to keep them. Re-
strain and remove the evils of my heart, and influence
me, by the most speedy and effectual means, to a life
of holiness. Help me to remember that to
glorify
thee is the great end of my existence; that to save my
soul from sin and hell is my most important business
Hymn.
59
on earth; that to spend and be spent for Christ, is my
highest duty, honor and privilege; and that I have no
more time, no more health and strength, no more
substance, influence or talents than are demanded
fo
r
this service. Make it on
e
of my daily reflections that
I have but one life to live; that my eternal destiny is
taking its character from my present every day course
of conduct, and that the destiny of many others may
depend on mine. May I, therefore be habitually so-
licitous that every day do its full part towards fitting
me, and all, whom I can influence, for a holy heaven.
Help me to lay aside every hindrance, whether it be
in my business, my habits, my companions, or what-
ever else, and to labor for eternity with my whole
might.
And in order to this, do thou daily increase my
faith, elevate my affections, and excite my desires
after christian knowledge, holiness, and usefulness,
until I shall have finished my work in thy vineyard,
and am myself prepared unto glory, and presented,
faultless in thy presence.
HYMN.
MAY I resolve with all my heart,
With all my pow'rs to serve the Lord;
Nor from his precepts e'er depart,
Whose service is a rich reward.
Oh, be his service all my joy!
Around let my example shine,
'Till others love the best employ,
And join in labors so divine.
Hymn.
Be this the purpose of my soul,
My solemn, my determin'd choice,
To yield to his supreme control,
And in his kind command rejoice.
Oh, may I never faint, nor tire,
Xor wand'ring leave his sacred ways;
Great God
r
accept my soul's desire,
And give me strength to live thy praise.
I