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RAJIV GANDHI UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES

BANGALORE, KARNATAKA
PROFOMA FOR REGISTRATION OF SUBJECT FOR
DISSERTATION
1 NAME OF THE
CANDIDATE AND
ADDRESS
MRS.ASHLEYBABITH
A MASCARENHAS,
COLUMBIA COLLEGE
OF NURSING, BANASWADI
BANGALORE.

2 NAME OF THE
INSTITUTION
COLUMBIA COLLEGE
OF NURSING, BANGALORE.

3 COURSE OF STUDY AND
SUBJECT
M.SC.NURSING 1 YEAR
OBSTETRICS &
GYNAECOLOGICAL NURSING
4 DATE OF ADMISSION
TO THE COURSE
2.4.2!11
1
TITLE OF THE TOPIC "EFFECTIVENESS OF
STRUCTURED TEACHING
PROGRAMME ON
KNOWLEDGE OF
PRIMIGRAVIDA MOTHERS
REGARDING PERINATAL
PERIOD IN SELECTED
MATERNITY HOSPITALS AT
BANGALORE.
2
INTRODUCTION
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Perinatal care plays a vital role in both mother and child life.Each
and every individual is important ,specially women during pregnancy.It is
interesting to note that about 80 of maternal deaths are to direct causes i.e.
obstetric complications of pregnancy, labour and pueperium to interventions
or incorrect treatment. !ost maternal deaths are preventable.1"he low status
of women in the society coupled with their low literacy levels prevents the
women from ta#ing postnatal care even if services are available. $ence the
woman%s #nowledge regarding postnatal care and complication of neglected
postnatal care can prevent the maternal mortality rate.
!ost women who deliver vaginally at hospital usually go home
within 2&'&8 hours after delivery. "his challenge the nurse caring for the
woman in the early postpartum period to do through assessment to pic# up
on any complications that might be developing and to use every available
opportunity to do teaching regarding self and newborn care
2
. !idwife
therefore need towards changes in the system of care provision. (hich
would facilitate them in providing care which is satisfying for themselves,
the woman and the community they care for) "his time of transition is an
*
important point of contact when woman are e+periencing enormous changes
and #in to receive support and information in order to mange it well.

(omen need not die in childbirth. (e must give a young woman the
information and support regarding her needs to control her reproductive
health, help her through a pregnancy and care for her and her newborn well
into childhood. "he vast ma,ority of maternal deaths could be prevented if
the women have necessary #nowledge - s#ill regarding the care during
pregnancy, childbirth and the first month after delivery. "hus the researcher
would li#e to assess the #nowledge of primigravida mothers regarding the
immediate postnatal care in order to help in the prevention of maternity
death
*
.
:.1 NEED FOR THE STUDY
Perinatal care, according to the Perinatal .oundation, is care that is
relating to childbirth, from three months before pregnancy to one year after
birth. It is crucial to receive proper care for you and your new baby in all
aspects of pregnancy to ensure he or she has the very best start possible
&
.
/efore conceiving your baby, it is important to see your doctor to discuss
your plans to get pregnant and any ris# factors or health conditions you or
your partner may have. /eing proactive about these ris#s early can prevent
preterm birth and health problems for your baby later on. 0our doctor can
&
recommend medical tests and lifestyle changes to give your baby the
optimal conditions to develop and grow. 1ome recommendations include
ta#ing a folic acid supplement to lower the ris# of certain birth defects,
smo#ing cessation, stopping alcohol use, having any health conditions under
control, listing any over'the'counter or prescription medications you may be
ta#ing and having up'to'date vaccinations
2
.
Prenatal care during your pregnancy is a must to ma#e sure you and
your baby stay healthy. 0our doctor could speciali3e in obstetrics and
gynecology, be a general practitioner or be a midwife. "hroughout your
pregnancy, your doctor monitors your health and the health of your baby,
and manages any ris#s that appear. 4hec#'ups are generally scheduled once
per month through the last month of pregnancy when your appointments will
be more fre5uent '' usually once per wee#. 0our doctor also manages any
prenatal or maternal testing you may have, such as ultrasounds, blood wor#
or amniocentesis
6
.
4hildbirth classes are an e+cellent way to prepare for labor and
delivery. "hese classes cover all aspects of what goes on once labor begins
through the postpartum hospital stay. 0ou learn your options for managing
labor pains, different childbirth methods and e+periences, and any
interventions that may need to ta#e place in an emergency, such as a
cesarean section. "he classes may also include a tour of your hospital7s
maternity ward, labor and delivery rooms, and nursery. (hen you arrive at
the hospital in labor, it is important to be prepared. 0our hospital bag should
be ready in advance and contain any items to ma#e you more comfortable
during your stay, such as your birth plan, comfortable sleepwear, slippers,
snac#s, toiletries and a going'home outfit
8
.
2
9uring pregnancy, need to interview and choose a health provider for
new baby. : pediatrician speciali3es in children7s health care, or may choose
to see a family practitioner and #eep family7s medical care in the same
practice. /oth options are e5ually viable and a matter of preference. (hile
in the hospital after the birth of baby, will be given tutorials in basic child
care. "hese classes are usually mandatory for first'time parents and offer a
wealth of useful information. 9uring this perinatal period learning newborn
care, including diapering, bathing and feeding are important. 1o the
investigator has found #nowledge about perinatal care is important to
prevent maternal and newborn mortality rate
8
.
:.2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE
: review of literature related research and theory on a topic has
become a standard and virtually essential activity of scientific research
pro,ects "L45-3'5%3- 3-14-+ 4& ' .3454.'/ &%,,'32 $* 3-&-'3.# $( ' 5$84.
$* 4(5-3-&5, $*5-( 83-8'3-) 5$ 8%5 ' 3-&-'3.# 83$0/-, 4( .$(5'.5 $3 '& 5#-
0'&4& *$3 '( 4,8/-,-(5'54$( 83$;-.5.9 ;eview of literature was underta#en
to gain in depth #nowledge on various aspects of the problem under study.
;eview of literature for the present study has been recogni3ed under
the following headings.
SECTION A< 1tudy related to #nowledge regarding perinatal period
among primigravida mothers.
6
SECTION B< 1tudy related to #nowledge regarding antenatal period
among primigravida mothers.
SECTION C< 1tudy related to #nowledge regarding postnatal period
among primigravida mothers.
SECTION A< 1tudy related to #nowledge regarding perinatal period
among primigravida mothers
!adu#a(.E. <2000= : study was conducted to determine the
#nowledge pregnant mothers have on the monitoring of foetal movement
and its effect on perinatal outcome. "he findings of the study were used to
develop the content of a health education programme that is conte+tual and
relevant to the needs of pregnant mothers. : 5uantitative research survey
design was used to obtain information from pregnant mothers. 1imple
random probability sampling was used. >inety'seven <?8= pregnant mothers
agreed to participate in the study. "he results indicated that pregnant women
who were able to perceive foetal movement during pregnancy regarded it as
important
?
.
$eins $4. <200*=.the study was conducted to
improves perinatal outcome through social support. ;esource !others are
nonprofessional women who combine warmth, parenting e+perience,
and #nowledge of their local community services to reduce the ha3ards
associated with rural adolescent pregnancy
10
. Each ;esource !other is
assigned to a pregnant teenage primigravida and serves as part of her support
system throughout pregnancy and until the infant7s first birthday. (e studied
262 matched pairs <case@control= of rural teenage primigravidas with single
8
pregnancies with and without the social support of the ;esource !other.
"here were significantly more patients with ade5uate prenatal care in the
program group <P less than .000001=. "he fre5uency of low birth weight
infants was significantly less <P A .006=, as was the small'for'gestational'age
rate <P A .002=.
SECTION B< 1tudy related to #nowledge regarding perinatal period
among antenatal mothers
>ancy.(.".et al,.<1???=.a study was conducted to assess the
women%s awareness of minor disorders of pregnancy and danger sings of
obstetric complication in a rural district in "an3ania <200?=. : total 1118
women were interviewed, result reveals that more than ?8 of women
attend antenatal care at least once half of the women #new about at least one
obstetric danger sign and few women #new one or two minor disorders. It
shows that the women had low awareness of danger signs of obstetric
complication and antenatal care
12
.
/ondas ".<200?= conducted a study to e+plore and describe women7s
e+periences of antenatal care. 1emi'structured interviews, dialogical
interviews and non'participant observation in two phases both during and
after pregnancy were analysed according to 4olai33i7s phenomenological
method. : purposive sample of nine women was interviewed at *6 wee#s
gestation, three wee#s, three months and two and a half years after birth. In
the second phase, data were collected for further breadth and depth and *1
women, who were going through different stages of pregnancy, delivery and
the puerperium, participated. "he findings challenge the antenatal care that
so far has been focused on the physical health, the needs of
8
the primigravida and a blurred family perspective
1*
. "he family perspective
implies #nowing both the pregnant woman and her partner in terms of the
pregnancy, the birth and a new parenthood. $umane, scientifically
based perinatal care can be developed by innovations from these findings,
especially considering the multidimensional role of the parent groups.

!utihir B.".et al,.<1???= conducted a 5ualitative study to e+amine
the e+periences of first'time mothers following discharge from the hospital
after vaginal delivery was done. Participants were primipara within 18 to *2
years of age from an urban location in the northeastern Cnited 1tates.
.ollowing the dramatic changes of pregnancy and delivery, the women
returned home feeling unprepared to care for themselves and their babies.
/ecause of their lac# of preparedness at a time of increased responsibility
and vulnerability, they were overwhelmed. E+hausted, feeling unwell and
isolated, they struggled to adapt to new role e+pectations. Propelled into
information see#ing by their lac# of #nowledge, they were further hampered
by conflicting and fragmented advice
1&
. .amily and friends were the primary
sources for information for the ma,ority of these new mothers, not healthcare
professionals or services. Insight into the e+periences of first'time mothers
provides a framewor# for additional research and the development of
programs and resources that will address their uni5ue needs
12
.
?
SECTION C< 1tudy related to #nowledge regarding perinatal period among
postnatal mothers.
>ance >.( <1?88= : phenomenological follow'up study on new
mother%s e+perience of postpartum care was conducted. >ine women were
interviewed. "hree challenges in postpartum care emerge from this study
16
.
"hese are to understand the meaning of caring, to involve family and other
new mothers more consciously, and to see the woman as a new mother who
needs both to care and be cared for both by her family and friends and by
professional career
18
.
.erguson B.E. <2002= descriptive study was conducted to identify
the most important content areas to include when teaching postpartum
women, either in the hospital or at home, from the perspective of both nurses
and postpartum women. 1eventy'one registered nurses who provided in'
hospital maternity nursing careD 2* registered nurses who provided
postpartum follow'up home care visitsD and 10* low'ris# postpartum
mothers from the hospital within 2& hours after delivery were ta#en for
study. "he responses of nurses and new mothers regarding teaching topics
related to care of mothers and their newborns suggest that new mothers have
opinions that differ from those of nurses. >urses give priority to teaching
about infant care, whereas new mothers give priority to their own care
18
.
10
Ehosh E.a.et al,.<2006=a study was done to describe the
factors that influenced first'time mothers7 choice of and e+periences during
the first postnatal wee#, after early discharge without a domiciliary visit by
the midwife. Participants were recruited from the maternity hospital -
belong to both urban and rural population. /ased on interview one main
category and three subcategories emerged. "he main category was a feeling
of confidence and security and the subcategories were being able to meet the
needs of the baby, feeling 7bac# to normal7 and receiving support. .actors
that influenced first'time mothers7 choice and e+perience of early discharge
were their sense of confidence and security that they had support from their
partner and that they could trust the follow'up organi3ation
1?
.
:bdel'$amid $.1. <2006= a 5ualitative study done to e+plore
mothers7 e+periences of the support they received from community health
professionals. 4onsent of nine mothers was ta#en for the interview. "he
findings e+plore the concepts of trust, e+pertise and understanding within
the wor#ing partnership. It states the mothers7 need for reliability, and a
preference for professionals who understood women7s beliefs about what it
means to be a 7good mother7. "he results and recommendations are pertinent
to those community health professionals who wor# in the area of early
childhood intervention
20
.
:.3 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
FEffectiveness of 1tructured "eaching Programme on #nowledge of
primigravida mothers regarding perinatal period in selected !aternity
$ospitals at /angalore.G
11
:.4 OBJECTIVES
1. "o determine the e+isting level of #nowledge of primigravida
mothers regarding perinatal period.
2. "o give 1tructured "eaching Programme regarding perinatal period
among primigravida mothers.
*. "o determine the post test #nowledge level of primigravida mothers
regarding perinatal period.
&. "o associate the pre - post test level of #nowledge of primigravida
mothers regarding perinatal period with selected demographic
variables.
6.5OPERATOIONAL DEFINITIONS
1= E**-.541-(-&&< It refers to the outcome of self instructional modules in
increasing the #nowledge of primigravida mothers regarding
significant of perinatal care during the pregnancy period.
2= S53%.5%3-) T-'.#4(7 P3$73',,-< ;efers to a planned instruction to
impart #nowledge, using relevant teaching methods which provide
information regarding perinatal period.
3= K($+/-)7-< It refers to the level of understanding and the ability to
answer on the perinatal care during the perinatal period by the
primigravida mothers as elicited through structured 5uestionnaire.
4= P-34('5'/ C'3-< "he care management of the foetus and newborn
infant in the perinatal that is before, during and after delivery.
12
= P34,473'14)' ,$5#-3&< In this study primigravida mothers are those
who have conceived with 28
th
wee#s and above for the 1
st
time and
e+pecting for delivery.
:.: RESEARCH HYPOTHESIS
$
1<
"here will be significant increase in the level of #nowledge of the
primigravida mothers following the administration of 1tructured
"eaching Programme
$
2
< "here will be significant association with the post test level of
#nowledge of the primigravida mothers regarding perinatal care during
perinatal period with selected demographic variables.
:.> RESEARCH VARIABLES
INDEPENDENT VARIABLES< Hnowledge of primigravida mothers
9EPE>9E>" I:;I:/JE1 K 1tructured "eaching Programme
:.? ASSUMPTIONS

1= "he primigravida mothers will not have proper #nowledge regarding the
perinatal care during the primigravida period.
2= :dministering the 1tructured "eaching Programme will help in improving
the #nowledge level of primigravida mothers on perinatal care during the
perinatal period
*= 4reating awareness on perinatal care during the early perinatal period so
as to improve the maternal and child health.
:.@ DELIMITATIONS<
1. "his study is limited to primigravida mothers.
1*
2. "his study is limited only the selected maternity hospitals at
/angalore.
>. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF STUDY
>.1 SOURCES OF DATA
"he data will be collected from the primigravida mothers in the selected
!aternity $ospitals at /angalore.
>.2 METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION<
R-&-'3.# )-&47( K ;esearch design is pre e+perimental design <Lne
group pre test and post test= will be used for data collection.
R-&-'3.# &-554(7& K "he study will be conducted in selected !aternity
$ospitals at /angalore.
P$8%/'54$( K "he population of the study will be the primigravida
mothers those who attend maternity LP9 in selected !aternity $ospitals at
/angalore.
S',8/- &4A- K "he sample consists of 20 primigravida mothers who
attend maternity LP9 in selected !aternity $ospitals at /angalore.
S',8/4(7 5-.#(4B%- K 4onvenient sampling techni5ue will be used for
collecting the samples.
>.3. C345-34' *$3 &',8/- &-/-.54$(<
>.3.1 I(./%&4$( .345-34'
1&
:ll the primigravida mothers available at the time of data
collection in maternity LP9 in the selected !aternity $ospitals
at /angalore.
"he primigravida mothers who can read and write Hannada.

>.3.2 EC./%&41- .345-34'
"he primigravida mothers who can read and write Hannada.
Primigravida mothers who are not willing to participate in the study.
Primigravida mothers who are deaf and dumb
>.4. TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION

"he tool for data collection in this study to assess the level of
#nowledge will be structured 5uestionnaire.


>..METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION
:fter obtaining permission from the concerned authority and
informed concerned from the samples. "he investigator will
collect the data pertaining to demographic variable. It may be
conducted in the month of Buly.
>.: PLAN FOR DATA ANALYSIS
12
"he data collected will be analy3ed by using descriptive and inferential
statistics.

D-&.348541- &5'54&54.&
!ean, Percentage distribution and 1tandard deviation will be used.

I(*-3-(54'/ &5'54&54.&
Paired FtG test and chi's5uare test will be use.
>.>. PROJECTED OUTCOME
:fter administering the structured teaching programme there will be
increase in the level of #nowledge of the primigravida mothers regarding
perinatal care during the early perinatal period and this will enhance the
primigravida mothers to improve the perinatal care during the
pregnancy.
>.? DOES THE STUDY REDUIRE ANY INVESTIGATIONS OR
INTERVENTIONS E
0es, structured teaching programme will be administered as intervention
for the primigravida mothers.

>.@. HAS ETHICAL CLEARANCE BEEN OBTAINED E

Permission will be obtained from the institutional ethical research
committee of 4olumbia 4ollege of nursing at /angalore.
16
Permission will be obtained from the concerned authorities in the
selected maternity hospital at /angalore.
Informed consent will be obtained from primigravida mothers those
who are willing to participate in the study.
4onfidentiality and anonymity of the sub,ect will be maintained.
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Pediatric >ursing.% PhiladelphiaD Jippincott (illiams - (il#insD
2006K 288.
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1*
th
ed. PhiladelphiaD 4hurchill Jivingstone companyD 2001K22&'2&1.
*. Hrishna Humari Eulani. M4ommunity $ealth >ursing.%
a. 1
st
ed. >ew 9elhiK Humar Publishing houseD 2006K*&8'20.
&. ($L. (hy do so many women still die in pregnancy or child birth.
>>", Ban 2006D10<1=K 62.
2. !inistry of $ealth and .amily (elfare Eovt. of India. :ctivities In
>orth'East ;egion.>>", ,uly 2008 D<*=28'*2.
6. 9utta 94. M"e+tboo# of obstetrics%. 2
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ed. 4alcuttaD new central boo#
agency ltdD2001K212'2*1.
8. Par#. Par#Ns M"e+tboo# of Preventive and 1ocial !edicine.% 16
th
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BabalpurK /anarsidas bhanot companyD 2000K*80'81
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8. !inistry of $ealth and .amily (elfare Eovt. of India. !aternal
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?. Jesley :nn Page, ;ona !c 4andlish. "he new midwife. 2
nd
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PhiladelphiaK 4hurchill Jivingstone companyD 2006K66'68.
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!4> :m B !atern 4hild >urs. 2002 Bul':ugD*0<&=K221'2. :vailable
from georgeOrmu.edu
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outcomes of new mothers. B :dv >urs. 200& !arD&2<2=K&62'8&.
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1*.!aunders $, et al.%Perceptions of community health professional
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boo# of Lbstetrical and Eynaecology, *
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16..erguson.B.E, et al., Fperinatal resource programmeG, Pp no.268'80.
18.:bo academic university department of Perinatal science and women
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18.1herbini.:... et al., Fassessment of #nowledge of mothers in antenatal
careGPp 111'*0.
1?.Hhoia.".et al., Fportion of antenatal visits in gestational ageG 11?&<*=D
Pp 116'18.
20.E#wempu.44. et al., Fthe influence of antenatal care on pregnancy
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1?
2?.www.medscane.com

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