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This document gives a detailed overview of the experiments added to EXPERIMEDIA in

the second open call. Experiment goals, runs and results are described.
D1.2.6
Final Experiment Review Report
2014-09-26

Gert Kienast, Sandra Murg (JRS), Gerald Binder (evolaris next level), Lucia
D'Acunto, Omar Niamut, Ray van Brandenburg, Bastiaan Wissingh,
Emmanuel Thomas; Arjen Veenhuizen (TNO), Manuel Vera (RealTrack
Systems), Bertram Mller (3DRSBA), Fredrik Mller (Qualisys), Pablo
Aguirrezabal, Rosa Peral, Ainhoa Prez, Sara Sillaurren (Tecnalia)


www.experimedia.eu
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Project acronym EXPERIMEDIA
Full title Experiments in live social and networked media experiences
Grant agreement number 287966
Funding scheme Large-scale Integrating Project (IP)
Work programme topic Objective ICT-2011.1.6 Future Internet Research and Experimentation
(FIRE)
Project start date 2011-10-01
Project duration 36 months
Activity 1 Project Management
Workpackage 1.2 Management of Experiments
Deliverable lead organisation JOANNEUM RESEARCH
Authors Gert Kienast (JRS), Sandra Murg (JRS), Manuel Vera (RealTrack
Systems), Bertram Mller (3DRSBA), Fredrik Mller (Qualisys), Pablo
Aguirrezabal, Rosa Peral, Ainhoa Prez, Sara Sillaurren (Tecnalia)
Reviewers Stephen Phillips (IT Innovation)
Version 1.0
Status Final
Dissemination level PU: Public
Due date PM19 (2014-06-30)
Delivery date 2014-09-26



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Table of Contents
1. Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................ 5
2. Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 6
3. Overview of second Open Call experiments .................................................................................. 7
3.1. EX10: Smart Ski Goggles ........................................................................................................ 8
3.1.1. Overall Goal .......................................................................................................................... 8
3.1.2. Technical Overview .............................................................................................................. 8
3.1.3. Ethics and Privacy .............................................................................................................. 10
3.1.4. Experiment Runs and Results ........................................................................................... 11
3.1.5. Value Impact Assessment .................................................................................................. 16
3.1.6. Dissemination ...................................................................................................................... 17
3.1.7. Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 18
3.2. EX11: iCaCoT ......................................................................................................................... 19
3.2.1. Overall Goal ........................................................................................................................ 19
3.2.2. Technical Overview ............................................................................................................ 21
3.2.3. Ethics and Privacy .............................................................................................................. 22
3.2.4. Experiment Runs and Results ........................................................................................... 23
3.2.5. Value Impact Assessment .................................................................................................. 24
3.2.6. Dissemination ...................................................................................................................... 24
3.2.7. Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 25
3.3. EX12: CARVIREN ................................................................................................................ 26
3.3.1. Overall Goal ........................................................................................................................ 26
3.3.2. Technical Overview ............................................................................................................ 27
3.3.3. Ethics and Privacy .............................................................................................................. 27
3.3.4. Experiment Runs and Results ........................................................................................... 29
3.3.5. Value Impact Assessment .................................................................................................. 32
3.3.6. Dissemination ...................................................................................................................... 32
3.3.7. Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 33
3.4. EX13: 3DRSBA ...................................................................................................................... 33
3.4.1. Overall Goal ........................................................................................................................ 33
3.4.2. Technical Overview ............................................................................................................ 34
3.4.3. Ethics and Privacy .............................................................................................................. 36
3.4.4. Experiment Runs and Results ........................................................................................... 37
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3.4.5. Value Impact Assessment .................................................................................................. 38
3.4.6. Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 38
3.5. EX14: PlayHist ........................................................................................................................ 39
3.5.1. Overall Goal ........................................................................................................................ 39
3.5.2. Technical Overview ............................................................................................................ 40
3.5.3. Ethics and Privacy .............................................................................................................. 40
3.5.4. Experiment Runs and Results ........................................................................................... 41
3.5.5. Value Impact Assessment .................................................................................................. 44
3.5.6. Dissemination ...................................................................................................................... 44
3.5.7. Conclusions .......................................................................................................................... 45
4. Evaluation .......................................................................................................................................... 46
4.1. Evaluation Results ................................................................................................................... 47
4.1.1. EXPERIMEDIA Facility .................................................................................................. 47
4.1.2. EXPERIMEDIA Approach ............................................................................................. 48
4.1.3. Financial sustainability of the EXPERIMEDIA Facility .............................................. 48
5. Summary and conclusion................................................................................................................. 50


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1. Executive Summary
This report describes the experiments which were included in EXPERIMEDIA through the
second open call. Five new experiments were invited into the project, adding five new partners
to the EXPERIMEDIA consortium.
The experiments were chosen through proposal submissions and a reviewing process using
independent experts. The partners proposing the chosen experiments were invited to join the
consortium in order to conduct their experiments within twelve months.
EX10: Smart Ski Goggles, EVOLARIS, Schladming
The experiment Smart Ski Goggles aims at the experimentation of a real-time
information system implemented into a wearable data goggle (Oakley Airwave). The
displayed information about lifts, slopes, weather, hospitality, community activities and
the resort in general support users with congestion monitoring and basic navigational
hints. Smart Ski Goggles wants to enhance the visitor experience while skiing on the
mountain.

E11: iCaCoT, TNO, Schladming
The iCaCoT experiment focuses on interactive video navigation for camera-based
coaching and training for visitors and sports enthusiasts in Schladming. The goal of this
experiment is to showcase the unique properties of tiled adaptive streaming, a technology
that was developed in the EU FP7 project FascinatE and that allows users to navigate
freely through high resolution video panoramas, while the application reduces bandwidth
requirements by only sending that part of the video a user is interested in.

EX12: CARVIREN, Realtrack Systems, CAR
The goal of the CARVIREN experiment is to create a virtual area for the CAR
environment where information generated by CAR facilities and machines are available
for helping the athletes, couches and staff to improve the performance, the quality of
training and develop the concept of Smart Venue. This virtual area is used to synchronize
and save information generated by the athlete. This information needs to be available in
real time and remotely.

EX13: 3DRSBA, Qualisys, CAR
The 3DRSBA (3D Remote Sports Biomechanic Analysis) experiment aims to combine
the power of 3D motion capture in biomechanical laboratories (CAR) with the
necessities in sports analysis to provide reality-close surroundings in measuring (training
sites at CAR).

EX14: Playhist, Tecnalia, FHW
The PLAYHIST experiment lays its focus on the creation of an engaging learning
experience at the Foundation of the Hellenic World through the use of gamification
technologies.
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2. Introduction
This deliverable provides a summary of the experiments that have used the facility from the
second open call. The document provides the EC and the community with high-level
information about what was done, a summary of results and the value of the facility.
The deliverable reflects the entire process of the experimentation phase and as such the
document describes each of the second open call experiments with their concept, information
about test runs and their final results.
In addition to this high-level view each of the experiments has produced an individual report on
Experiment Results and Evaluation (D4.X.3). For in-depth detailed information on the each
experiment the reader is referred to these five Deliverables.
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3. Overview of second Open Call experiments
In EXPERIMEDIA the experiments testing the facility and baseline components developed in
the project are the most important asset. To find promising experiments which would use the
facility and advance the FMI while creating innovative user experiences a process of Open Calls
was defined and used. These calls are used to get interested parties to submit proposals for
experiments, which are reviewed by experts and after determining use and feasibility for the
cause were chosen to become integrated parts of EXPERIMEDIA. The organisations proposing
and subsequently conducting the experiments are added to the project consortium for the
remaining project run time. The process of finding the experiments was as follows:
Defining open call text in the consortium
EC reviewing the text
Advertising the call in various media
Managing proposal submissions
Managing the review process
Choosing the experiments and new partners
After consultation with partners, the call text was created detailing the types of experiment
requested along with the constraints imposed by the technologies and venues. The call was
published in three national newspapers and on the Computer Weekly website as well as the
EXPERIMEDIA and Commission web sites.
Further guidelines were made available on the EXPERIMEDIA website along with answers to
frequently asked questions (FAQs) and a series of venue-specific open call information
teleconferences were held with 50 organisations attending along with a further webinar targeting
SMEs in particular, organised through the FUSION project.
Twenty-five proposals were received before the call deadline and were efficiently evaluated over
the space of two weeks by a pool of 8 independent experts. The contract amendments were
quickly made in time for the 5 new partners who formally joined EXPERIMEDIA at the
beginning of October 2013.
Experiment Partner Venue
EX10: Digital Schladming Evolaris Schladming
EX11: iCaCoT TNO Schladming
EX12: CARVIREN Realtrack Systems CAR
EX13: 3DRSBA Qualisys CAR
EX14: PlayHist Tecnalia FHW
Table 1: 1st Open Call Experiments
In the following sections the experiments are explained in detail.
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3.1. EX10: Smart Ski Goggles
3.1.1. Overall Goal
The experiment Smart Ski Goggles aimed at the experimentation of a real-time information
system implemented into a wearable data goggle (Oakley Airwave). The displayed information
about lifts, slopes, weather, hospitality, community activities and the resort in general support
users with congestion monitoring and basic navigational hints. Through the use of Smart Ski
Goggles the visitor experience while skiing on the mountain should be enhanced.
A field study conducted during the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2013 by the
competence centre for mobile communication and innovation evolaris served as the basis for
this experiment. The experimentation implemented an application for the Oakley Airwave digital
data goggle displaying and processing information, which was found most useful by skiers in a
real-life test. Thus the Smart Ski Goggles app integrates real-time information about current load
of lifts and basic navigation for slopes, lifts and hospitality points of interest in the ski area, as
well as social media features. Current temperature, actual weather forecasts and avalanche
warnings have been implemented in the app to keep the users informed about the current
conditions on the slopes of the Schladming ski resort.
3.1.2. Technical Overview
The Smart Ski Goggles system consists of three components. First, the Oakley Airwave is
defined as the frontend. It is used to display real-time information, which is gathered from the
integrated sensors and from the attached smartphone. The application running on the Oakley
Airwave is referred to as the Client Application.
The Bluetooth-connected smartphone runs the Smart Ski Goggles Gateway App. The Gateway
App is responsible for connecting to the EXPERIMEDIA components and exchange data from
the client application to the Smart Ski Goggles Backend.
The Smart Ski Goggles backend processes information from a number of different external
sources such as weather service, social analytics dashboard, resort information service, and
navigation information provider. In addition, it receives lift utilization statistics from external
components video cameras and embedded IR-beams sensors. The lift utilization statistics is
analysed and used for providing lift capacity information to the clients. Furthermore, the Smart
Ski Goggles backend also receives turnstile usage information from each. Finally, the Smart Ski
Goggles backend is used for pushing notifications to the client. Examples are urgent weather
warnings, social updates like new tweets, hospitality offers, or unplanned lift open/close events.
The Smart Ski Goggles backend also provides an interface for administration. This is labelled as
the admin cockpit. In the admin cockpit, the administrators can configure send broadcast
notifications to all connected users. These notifications can be weather warnings, hospitality
notifications, event notifications, and tweet notification. Unplanned lift open / close events are
automatically propagated to all connected clients.
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Component Interaction
Bluetooth is used to connect the Oakley Airwave with the attached smartphone. A custom
developed message protocol requests information and receives the related responses. The
gateway application also communicates with the EXPERIMEDIA components and the Smart
Ski Goggles Backend server over 3G cellular networks.
The Smart Ski Goggles Backend server is connected via high speed internet connection
(100mbit/s) to the internet.

Figure 1: Overall system architecture for Smart Ski Goggles
Based on the general goal to provide real-time information to the user the following features
were implemented:
Expected lift waiting time
Navigation to huts and lifts
Weather: current conditions and forecast
Notifications, e.g. warnings
Hospitality, e.g. special offers from huts
Filtered Twitter stream
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Individual information like speed and distance
3.1.3. Ethics and Privacy
For achieving our research goals we have to analyse the usage data during the experiment runs
done during pilots 1 and 2 (e.g. which functionalities are used in which context?). Thus, we have
to log which functionalities the testers use. Furthermore, to analyse the location context of the
usage behaviour we have to log the users GPS position on the slopes. The GPS position is of
special importance for the integrated navigation feature.
Of course, the participation as tester is voluntary. We acquired the participants with the help of
our venue partner, through an open call for testers and the use of our Living Lab database,
where we have stored hundreds of contacts to potential test persons.
In general, the participants for the pilot runs are random skiers, but have to be 18 years or above
and they are selected to fit to the target group we identified through our online panel. Every
tester has to sign a written consent, in which we explain how the data collected during the
experiment will be used. Only participants who sign this consent are allowed to take part in the
experiment.
We collect only as much personal data (name, gender, age) and contact details (telephone
number, e-mail address) as we need to organize the experiment runs during pilot 1 and 2 and to
have a basic level of security that the ski goggles are not being stolen. The participants return the
goggles after the end of every test run. The conditions for participating in the experiment are
that the participants should ski on the slopes one time per year minimum, possess an Android
smartphone and have already downloaded some apps.
The collected data is stored anonymously. This means in the collected data there is only be a
tester ID like e.g. 'sgg-pilot1-tester01'. The real name of the participant is not part of stored and
analysed data. The collected data is stored in real-time on the data goggles and after the pilot
conduction be transferred to the project server of Smart Ski Goggles which is located in our
headquarters in Graz/Austria. Some of the collected data are transferred to the backend server
for the purpose of real-time monitoring of the experiment (through ECC). The processed data
contains all functionality calls through the tester together with a timestamp and location
information (GPS).
The analysis of the collected data is only done by evolaris. No data is given to any third party.
The recorded data was deleted after the experiment has ended and all necessary analytics for
related dissemination activities (e.g. publications) were finished.
To analyze the amount of people waiting at the lift entrance we use video cameras to capture a
real-time view of the queue. This real-time video is instantly analyzed by a computer at the lift
entrance. No video material is stored. Furthermore we use data from the turnstiles and light
barriers at the lift entrances. Both sources provide completely non-personal data.
A notification to the Austria DPA was filed due to the processing of personal data (like names
and GPS location) and that the DP law of Austria was complied with.
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3.1.4. Experiment Runs and Results
3.1.4.1. Pilot 1
The focus for Pilot 1 was on usability aspects. At the same time the test runs during Pilot 1 were
also used to evaluate whether the implemented features were considered to be as useful as the
results of the focus groups and the online survey suggested.
Pilot 1 was conducted in Schladming on two days with a total of 15 participants. We used the
Thinking-Aloud method combined with observation and interviews. The total duration of the
test for one participant was around three hours. At the beginning the participants were briefed
about the system setup und provided features, see Figure 2.

Figure 2: Briefing of participants (Pilot 1)
It was not necessary to install the Gateway App on the participants' smartphones as we used our
own companys smartphones. After the briefing the participants were equipped with the ski
goggles and could use it freely for the whole test run, see Figure 3. At the end of the pilot run the
users were interviewed to gather qualitative feedback.

Figure 3: Test run on the slopes (Pilot 1)
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Results
The results of the focus groups and the online survey regarding the feature set were basically
confirmed. As expected the features lift waiting time, weather (current and forecast), information
about huts and navigation were rated as most useful. The notification feature could not be tested
extensively due to technical reasons. So, only one message could be sent to the participants
(drink voucher), but this was rated as a positive feature.
The feature lift waiting time could only be tested usability-wise in Pilot 1, as the installation and
integration of the video cameras and the access to turnstile usage date could not be finished in
time due to organizational and resource reasons. However, the feature was rated as very useful.
The weather feature was rated as making the impression of a completely finished feature and
should be kept like it was. The Twitter stream feature was not rated that good, as it was not clear
for many participants at all, that this would be a filtered Twitter stream and what the difference
to the notification feature was. It was suggested to use the Twitter logo at least.
The most interesting feature was the navigation, because on the one hand the participants found
it very useful and liked it very much. On the other hand there were still many routing errors in
the navigation (which made a lot of navigation results useless) and also the visual representation
of the routing information was not good enough to clearly give helpful navigation hints. The first
point is out of control of the software Smart Ski Goggles, but we informed the owner of the
navigation algorithm and data about errors we found and some of them were fixed. We the
second point for Pilot 2 with many improvements in the visual presentation of routing
information, e.g. with using static arrows and automatic photographic hints.
From a usability perspective we got a lot of useful feedback from the participants. Most of the
feedback was related to contrast (see Figure 4), used colours, font sizes, where GUI elements are
placed and how the interaction in lists should work.

Figure 4: Low contrast for selected list element
The Pilot test showed that usability aspects even more crucial in smart glasses software than in
conventional desktop software. The reasons for this are manifold.
The display size and resolution is limited. This leads to necessary reductions of labels,
which in consequence makes it harder for the user to understand the displayed data.
The interaction possibilities are limited. On the remote there are only six buttons: left,
right, up, down, enter, back. Actually, this makes the work on an interaction concept
harder and some useful interaction principles could not be implemented (e.g. free
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selection of menu item). But, on the other hand due to these limitations the final
interaction concept was easy and clear to the participants.
The frame conditions when using the smart ski goggle has to be considered. The display
has to be readable also with bright sunlight and even during moving on the slope.
Especially the second case is important. The user must not be forced to focus his eye
longer than a fraction of a second onto the display and away from the slope. So the
displayed information must be very easy recognizable. Another idea would be to fully
switch off the display as soon as the user is moving faster than a defined speed.
Figure 5 shows an overview of recommendations to improve the usability of Smart Ski Goggles
resulting from the insights we could gain during Pilot 1. Many of them were implemented into
the software for Pilot 2.

Figure 5: Recommendations to increase usability (German)
For example, the one item with high priority was discussed in detail, because the term
'navigation' was interpreted by many participants as describing the same functionality as the
navigation in cars. However, lacking a better term it was decided to stick with 'navigation'.
3.1.4.2. Pilot 2
User experience aspects were the focus for the second Pilot. To get feedback from as many
participants as possible we used self-administered questionnaires before and after the test run. So
the participants had to fill out the questionnaires, from which we could analyse quantitative data.
Additionally, short interviews with all participants and one focus group (n=5) were conducted to
get more qualitative data.
Pilot 2 was conducted on five consecutive days in which 54 participants tested the software
during a timeframe of 2-5 hours. During this timeframe they had to fulfil two navigation tasks.
Apart from the quantitative data measured via the logfile and ECC, there will be a lot of
qualitative feedback from the participants as well.
Priority Effort Recommendations
Mittel Niedrig
nderung Kontrast Listenelement
Mittel Niedrig
nderung Kontrast Farbehinterlegung und Symbol
Mittel Niedrig
nderung Gelbton / Gelb-Wei-Kontrast bei Navigationslistenelement
Niedrig Niedrig
Testen des Farbkonzepts bzgl. Fehlsichtigkeiten
Niedrig Mittel
Bei Farbschema-nderung: Testing auf existente Designrichtlinien
Mittel Mittel
Reihung der Menpunkte bzw. Menhierarchie berdenken (Twitter vs. Nachrichten)
Niedrig Niedrig
Durchscrollen in der App ermglichen
Mittel Niedrig
berschrift fr den Startpunkt der Navigation integrieren
Hoch Hoch
Entscheidung berarbeitung Navigation oder Umbenennung der Funktion
Niedrig Hoch
Integration Liftausfall in Navigation
Niedrig Niedrig
Verstrkung der roten Umrandung bei ungelesenen Nachrichten
Niedrig Mittel
Andere Darstellungsform der Durchschnittsgeschwindigkeit, z.B. Durchschnittszeichen
Mittel Hoch
Community-Funktion berdenken bzw. berarbeiten
Niedrig Mittel
Symbol im Hauptmen ndern, Httensymbol oder Messer&Gabel-Symbol verwenden
Mittel Niedrig
Anzeige fr Liftfahrdauer als solche betiteln

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After a discussion about methodology the General Assembly in January in Graz, we decided to
integrate instant feedback. The participants had to give feedback (good / not good) about the
quality of the displayed lift waiting time.

Figure 6: Instant feedback screen for lift waiting time
Results
As the participants had to fulfil two navigation tasks we got the most feedback about this
feature. To fulfil the navigation tasks the participants had to go to a specific start point and select
the target of the navigation. After that the route was calculated and displayed on the screen, see
Figure 7.

Figure 7: Route list in the navigation feature
Basically, the navigation feature was improved a lot compared to the version tested at Pilot 1.
But still the participants missed some functionality like the usage of a completely free starting
point (at the moment a specific POI must be used) and the re-calculation of the route in case
someone drives in wrong direction. It can clearly be seen that such expectations come from the
fact that many people are already very much used to the navigation features of cars and
smartphones. The qualitative feedback of the participants showed that it was not clear to them
that a slope is by far not as structured as streets and that the movement on a slope is very
different to that on a street. A functionality which was evaluated as very positive was the
automatic display of a photo with an arrow in it to indicate the direction at an important point
on the slope, see Figure 8.
In average each participant performed 5 navigation tasks, so the participants not only tried to
fulfil the navigation tasks but also used the navigation with their own start and target points. For
75 % of these navigations the route could be loaded. This means, that in one of four cases the
mobile network connection was not available. Furthermore, from the loaded routes 49 % were
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finished, i.e. the selected target was reached. 39 % of the navigations were cancelled by the user
and the remaining 12 % were not finished (e.g. because the test run ended before). The
usefulness of the navigation feature was rated with 3.2 (1 very useful, 5 not useful at all). This
value underlines the need for improvement if this feature should be further developed.

Figure 8: Automatic navigation hint with photo and arrow
The testing of lift waiting time turned out to be difficult, because not so many people were on
the slopes. This has to be taken into consideration when analysing the very positive value of the
instant feedback for the lift waiting time. 214 of 238 feedbacks (90%) confirmed a correct
waiting time.
The notifications sent were considered to be useful and not too frequent. During the test runs
we sent 4 notifications in total (every 30 mins) to the skiers. The contents of the notifications
were a voucher for a drink, a hint to use the instant feedback for lift waiting time, the
announcement of an event (Musikanten WM) and an advertisement for a hut. Especially the
notifications about huts turned out to be very interesting for the participants. 75 % of all send
messages were read by the participants. The usefulness of this feature was rated with 2.3 (1 very
useful, 5 not useful at all).
The weather feature was again considered to be the feature which made the most impression of
being finished. Also the information about huts, their services and photos of the huts very found
useful by the participants. This feature was used in average 7 times per test run. The usefulness
of this feature was rated with 2.2 (1 very useful, 5 not useful at all).
The filtered Twitter stream was, like in Pilot 1, a feature not to be considered interesting. One
reason is the missing interactivity they know from Twitter, as it was not possible to reply to a
tweet or to retweet. This leads to the general topic of personalisation. Many participants wished
to be able to have more personalised content, e.g. posting from social networks like Facebook.
This is a little bit surprising as the focus groups and online survey showed a different picture. On
the other hand many participants had IT background and so have more affinity to social
networks. In average 12 tweets were received per test-run, 40 % of them were read by the
participants. The usefulness of this feature was rated with 3.9 (1 very useful, 5 not useful at all).
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In summary Pilot 2 showed that the most qualitative feedbacks from participants can be
clustered into three areas:
security aspects,
technical problems, and
the smart factor.
Regarding the security aspects the major concerns are centred around the fact that moving your
eyes away from the slope to the display is a potential risk. Unfortunately, there were many
different technical problems which influenced the test result. This was especially a problem,
when participants very skiing together, because the problem of one goggle was transparent to the
other test persons as well.
The Bluetooth connection problems can be divided into a lost pairing between remote control
and the goggle or between the smartphone and the goggle. Some participants then
unintentionally triggered a factory reset which deleted our software. Furthermore, the GPS signal
was harder to catch on some devices than on others. As this was no problem in earlier tests and
in Pilot 1, it seems a firmware update might be the reason for that. Another problem was the
sometimes not working connection to the mobile network (this was limited and provoked by
some used smartphone models). Finally, the connectivity problems with the ECC were not
directly visible to the participants, but the so induced stress at the test team also influenced the
participants.
The last of the three areas concerns the smart factor of the goggles. Obviously, many
participants had higher expectations about the display (projected directly into the glasses) and the
feature set (e.g. map-based navigation like in a car). A reason for that might be that many of the
participants had an IT background. Another reason might be that the media coverage of the
project was extensive and the software was thus more considered to be market-ready than being
a prototype (what it was).
Apart from the above, we have learned from a Quality of Service (QoS) perspective that the
energy consumption of our app the goggles is comparable to that of the original software. We
couldn't discover significant lower run times with Smart Ski Goggles. This means, it was no
problem to run the software 5 hours without any break. However, we have seen, that due to a
firmware problem the recharging of the battery must be done with the software running,
otherwise the battery is not being fully loaded.
In very cold conditions (below 10C) the battery life is much shorter, it is recommended to use
an additional external battery back in this case. The average roundtrip time (time between user
acquire data from the backend and the requested data arrives at the client) was approx. 2 sec,
whereas the acquisition of a navigation route data needed more time compared to all the other
data, as the routing server had to calculate the route in real-time.
3.1.5. Value Impact Assessment
The results from the two pilot runs show, that the information displayed in the Smart Ski
Goggles turns out to be very useful for skiers and a skiing resort. This information can enhance
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the experience and guide the tourists to places of interests, be it special offers at huts, events or
to lifts which currently feature short waiting times. The latter point can also balance the load
between the lifts in a bigger skiing area.
From a business perspective the difficulty is that the market for these devices has yet to be
developed. As long as there are no useful apps available many people won't buy such goggles.
On the other hand as long as not so many devices are used no one wants to invest in developing
such apps.
This chicken-egg-problem is typical for the very early stage of new products and can only be
solved by brave entrepreneurs. This experiment has contributed to this in providing deep
insights into technological, organizational, economic and social aspects of such services.
3.1.6. Dissemination
A press announcement on the Smart Ski Goggles was issued in November 2013 and got some
very good press articles in Austrian print and online media.
During the Pilot 1 another press announcement was made by our project partner Schladming-
Dachstein, which resulted in many articles (more than 30!) in the Austrian and German press and
online media, e.g. Figure 9. There was even a radio report in Austrias largest radio station (3),
see Figure 10, and one in TV (Puls 4).

Figure 9: One of multiple press articles about Smart Ski Goggles
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Figure 10: Radio interview with test persons
Due to the fact that we have huge interest by the media a special test day for media people was
conducted. During this day the journalists could test the "Smart Ski Goggles" by themselves and
they had the opportunity to ask detailed questions about the service.
The huge media coverage led to an extensive publicity of the project. This was good in the sense
of making the research efforts in this EU funded project public. During Pilot 2 we learned that
this publicity also had a disadvantage. Many of the participants already knew about the project
and the features of "Smart Ski Goggles". Obviously, they had the impression that the software is
already market-ready and some of them even thought that the displayed information would be
shown directly on the goggles glasses. For the Pilot 2 this meant that these high expectations for
sure influenced the user's evaluation of the tested prototype.
The project was submitted to two competitions in Austria: First, it was submitted to the "Fast
Forward Award" (where it reached the final round of the top three projects) and later on to the
"Steirischer Tourismusinnovationspreis".
3.1.7. Conclusions
In summary the experiment showed that in general there is a huge potential for using data ski
goggles with apps like "Smart Ski Goggles". People are basically open to use data googles if they
offer an added-value to them. Though, security and privacy aspects have to be taken seriously.
The approach to follow a multi-step co-creation methodology proved to make sense, as the
concept could be developed in a very agile way, always close to the potential customers' needs
and concerns. Another important point was the inclusion of many stakeholders from the
beginning of the experiment to the very end. Only with these experts from different areas like ski
resort operations, retail, tourism and marketing a holistic view of the service could be reached.
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Technology-wise the operation of a service like "Smart Ski Goggles" is feasible, all technologies
needed are in place and more or less conventional. The integration of available EXPERIMEDIA
components like e.g. the video analysis module (AVCC) made it during the experimentation
easier to implement certain functionalities. Though, strong support by local stakeholders is
needed (depending on type of data).
From a user's point of view it is crucial to have an easy and clear UI as well as an intuitive
interaction concept. On top of that other user experience factors like the form factor, weight,
battery life, price, etc. have to be taken into account if the service should be developed further to
marketability.
In terms of exploitation the next steps should be to discuss the results of the experiment with
interested stakeholders (hardware manufacturers, ski resorts, retailers, etc.) and to further
develop the business model scenarios.
3.2. EX11: iCaCoT
3.2.1. Overall Goal
The (iCaCoT) interactive Camera-based Coaching and Training concept described in
EXPERIMEDIA deliverable D4.11.1 makes use of the tiled adaptive streaming technology
developed at TNO
1
. This technology, created within the context of the FascinatE project
2
, allows
users to interact with and navigate within a recorded video using pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ)
commands.

Figure 11: Interactive Camera-based Coaching and Training using tiled streaming for video navigation.

1
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6081064
2
http://www.fascinate-project.eu/
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To apply the TNO tiled streaming technology within the context of the EXPERIMEDIA
project as a tool for training and coaching and as a novel way for Schladming visitors to record
themselves coming down the mountain and sharing their experiences with friends and family, we
have built a number of additional components/features in the following areas:
support for live streaming
additional app functionalities
integration with existing EXPERIMEDIA components
a monitoring platform that oversees the overall functioning of the iCaCoT components.
In addition, a questionnaire has been developed, with the aim of capturing user feedback in a
direct manner.
One scenario focusses on young ski athletes, training for their participation in large and national
events. The Schladming venue partner, Schladming2030
3
had arranged for coaches / trainers to
participate in the experiment, along with their students, to use the app in their training approach
and to provide direct feedback to students. A second scenario focusses on visitors of a
Schladming fun park, interested in a mix of training and entertainment. Important features here
are the possibilities of social sharing and ease-of-use.
While both scenarios have been pursued during the preparation of the experiments, only the
training and coaching scenario has been fully tested during both experiment runs. This is because
when discussing the fun park and tourist scenario with visitors on the skiing slopes, they referred
to the popularity of GoPro helmet cameras, which provide the ability to film up close, resulting
in better quality footage than a statically mounted camera on the edge of the slope. In addition,
detailed analysis of skiing performance, which is the focus of the iCaCoT app, is of less interest
to recreational skiers.
The experiments have been conducted with the aim of fulfilling the following three main
objectives:
1. Capture the user experience when interacting with the tiled streaming application:
In particular, our focus has been on evaluating the user experience from a Quality of
Service (QoS) and a Quality of Experience (QoE) perspective, to allow for further
improvement of both the application and the underlying streaming technology.
2. Test the feasibility of tiled adaptive streaming as a tool for training and coaching activities:
Here the focus has been on investigating how trainers used the system, and whether the
tiled streaming concept is helpful in their instruction activities.

3
http://www.schladming2030.at/
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3. Leveraging information obtained through large-scale user tests to improve tiled adaptive streaming
bandwidth efficiency:
In order to reach this objective, we have collected a large amount of data concerning the
usage of the iCaCoT app and the associated video streams during all the experiments.
3.2.2. Technical Overview
In order to process and render a video feed in real time, the following chain of components has
been developed:
Ingestion node, which captures the raw video data and encodes it using Motion JPEG
codec;
Processing node, which takes the input encoded in Motion JPEG received from the
Ingestion node and produces the final watchable video files; this step includes the tiling,
encoding (in H.264/AVC) and multiplexing (MPEG-TS container) of the content;
Segmenter, which produces the temporal segmentation of the content.
The output of the Segmenter is then distributed to the different instances of the iCaCoT app via a
webserver.
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The high-level architecture that was used in the iCaCoT experiments are shown in Figure 12
below:

Figure 12: High-level system architecture for the iCaCoT experiments within Experimedia. Green
indicates functional components as implemented during run 01. Orange indicates functional components
additionally implemented for run 02.
3.2.3. Ethics and Privacy
As described in D4.11.1, with the iCaCoT experiment we aimed to adhere to the following
principles with respect to ethics and privacy:
Transparency through notification screen to explain nature and purpose of experiment;
Obtain explicit informed consent through 'I agree' button in the application;
Observational research in situations where those observed would expect to be observed;
Collected data will only be used for purposes of experiment and shared with participants.
During both experiment runs, these principles have been upheld in the following ways:
At the experiment venue, a notification sign was shown to inform all participants and
people on the slopes about the video recordings;
Informed consent by the experiment participants (trainers / coaches) was explicitly
obtained through signed consent forms. These forms also explained the nature and
purpose of the experiment;
Observational research has been conducted through video recordings;
The collected data is only used for the purpose of the experiments. Some specific
recordings have been made for demonstration purposes.
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Note that the experiment involved minors; in fact most of the students that participated in the
experiment were minors. Consent was asked via the trainers who also monitored the process.
The students did not need to download the application and were not involved in any data
measurements.
3.2.4. Experiment Runs and Results
Each experiment period was accompanied by a "day-to-day script", which aided the
experimenters to ensure an efficient and correct execution of the experiments. Relevant details
of the execution for both experiments are reported in the following paragraphs.
3.2.4.1. First experiment run
The first experiment period took place in week 8 of 2014. Together with the venue partner, the
team spent the first 2 days setting up the necessary infrastructure to support the architecture in
Figure 12. Furthermore, a smoke test was performed to check that the complete ecosystem
worked. Finally, the selection of the participants was carried out.
GoPro Hero 3+ cameras
4
where installed on the Reiteralm slope, with 520m UTP and HD-SDI
cables running along the slopes all the way to the control room. During the experiment, one
GoPro was changed for a JVC Handycam which yielded a better image quality due to better
optics.
After having introduced the experiment to the participants in the ski school on the morning of
the third day, the first experiment was performed in the afternoon of the same day. During this
day, two trainers took part in the experiment, with a group of 7-8 students in total. On the next
day, another experiment was performed with two trainers, each having a group of 7-8 students
(Figure 13, 3 examples).


Figure 13: Ski trainers using the iCaCoT app with their students.

4
http://gopro.com/cameras/hd-hero3-black-edition
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3.2.4.2. Second experiment run
The second experimental run was executed in week 13 of 2014.Based on the experience from the
first run, the team spent only half a day for experimental setup. The experimental setup was
similar to the first run, except that this time one GoPro was replaced by a Blackmagic Design 4K
camera
5
.
The second experiment run was performed within three days. In addition to the ski trainers, this
time also a snowboarder trainer with his student participated in the morning of the first day.
Other four sessions have been performed in the subsequent days, with the ski trainers and
groups of students of up to 10 individuals until Saturday morning.
3.2.5. Value Impact Assessment
In general, we find that the iCaCoT application could reduce the amount of training runs in
order to achieve a certain training objective. Students get additional information and an external
view of their performance and it is easier to determine the origins of faults. A trainer can focus
his or her attention on corrections and can report on direct visible progress of the athletes. While
a trainer might not need video feedback after every single run, one could use it as additional
support for coaching.
A significant advantage of the tiled streaming-based training and coaching application is that is
separates the recording aspect from the interactive training aspect. Previously, trainers would
have focus on recording during training sessions, and would be able to give feedback only after
analysis of the recorded training sessions. With the iCaCoT application, trainers can focus on the
training itself and can give faster feedback.
3.2.6. Dissemination
Intermediate and final results of the iCaCoT experiment have been disseminated via several
channels:
Several Austrian online news sites, including the largest online tabloid site
o News.at - http://www.news.at/a/video-unterstuetztes-ski-training
o Sciene.apa.at - https://science.apa.at/rubrik/natur_und_technik/Innovative_Ski-
Trainings-App_im_Test/SCI_20140227_SCI39391351417222740
o Meine Woche - http://www.meinbezirk.at/bad-mitterndorf/wirtschaft/innovation-
auf-der-reiteralm-d858501.html
A contribution to the 108th MPEG meeting. This meeting was held in week 14 of 2014
(a week after the second experiment run) in Valencia, Spain. We presented preliminary
results of the iCaCoT experiments within the context of EXPERIMEDIA, in support of
enabling tiled streaming support in the MPEG DASH standard
6
.

5
http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/blackmagicproductioncamera4k
6
http://mpeg.chiariglione.org/standards/mpeg-dash
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A presentation at Immovator Cross Media Caf: Sports and New Media
7
. Immovator is
the Dutch SME cluster for ICT and media.
An abstract for a paper presentation at IBC2014, Europe's largest conference on
broadcast media. The paper will discuss tiled streaming and will highlight some of the
iCaCoT results within EXPERIMEDIA.
3.2.7. Conclusions
The iCaCoT was very useful in the training of skiing athletes. To achieve the training objective
the training runs can be reduced because instant visual feedback can be given to the athlete.
From a workflow point of view an advantage of the tiled streaming-based training and
coaching application is that is separates the recording aspect from the interactive training aspect,
hence the coach does not need to focus on managing the recording properly during the training
runs.
Considering the initial objectives of the experiment, the following conclusions can be drawn
based on the results of the test runs:
1. Capture the user experience when interacting with the tiled streaming application:
Our evaluation of the user experience from a Quality of Service (QoS) and a Quality of
Experience (QoE) perspective has allowed us to further improve both the iCaCot
application and the underlying streaming technology.
2. Test the feasibility of tiled adaptive streaming as a tool for training and coaching activities:
Our investigation of how trainers used the system showed us that the tiled streaming
concept is helpful in their instruction activities.
3. Leveraging information obtained through large-scale user tests to improve tiled adaptive streaming
bandwidth efficiency:
Our collection and analysis of a large amount of data concerning the usage of the
iCaCoT app and the associated video streams during all the experiments has enabled us
to identify aspects to improve and modify.

7
http://www.immovator.nl/agenda/cross-media-cafe-sport-en-nieuwe-media
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3.3. EX12: CARVIREN
3.3.1. Overall Goal
The CAR Virtual Environment (CARVIREN) experiment goal is to development of a Virtual
Community for the CAR Venue. Through a browser-based interface, cinematic and physiological
parameters with high definition recordings (from every Training Session) will be accessible in real
time and/or remotely (if needed). The overall aim is to provide rapid feedback to athletes during
training to improve their performances. The CARVIREN experiment is conducted by Realtrack
Systems.
The main tool for the CARVIREN experiment is the so-called WIMU. The WIMU is a device
developed by Realtrack Systems. WIMU is a small (11 by 9 by 5.5cm) and light smart device with
Microprocessor, RAM memory, 3D accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, barometer,
microUSB and an SD memory. It has built-in Bluetooth, Ant+ and Wi-Fi support. WIMU
develops the concept of virtual sensors. Virtual sensors allow WIMU to deal with data generated
by other devices like self-generated data.
But WIMU is more than a hub. It also serves as a whole Mobile Transmission Unit (MTU).
WIMUs microprocessor can process the collected data without being connected to the server.
Internal and external memory (32GB maximum) can store the collected and processed
information.

Figure 14: WIMU: RTS Hub and Data Collector Device
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3.3.2. Technical Overview
For the CARVIREN experiment, three EXPERIMEDIA Baseline Components were integrated;
a few more components have been developed. The following block diagram (Figure 15) shows
the components involved and its relations

Figure 15: Components and relations.
The individual components have already been described in detail in the initial CARVIREN
Deliverable 4.12.1.
3.3.3. Ethics and Privacy
According to detailed ethical guidelines in EXPERIMEDIA deliverable D5.1.2, all
EXPERIMEDIA experiments need to be conducted in accordance with certain ethical oversight
procedures. Those principles were integrated in an adequate way into the design of the
CARVIREN experiment as follows:
Transparency: Before participants are asked to join CARVIREN experiment, they are informed
of all goals of the research that might reasonably be expected to influence. Not all participants
have reached the age of majority (18 years old), so special care will be taken. Concern from their
parents or legal tutors is required.
Personal data: Personal data of the athletes is processed. For the experiment, and because one
of the goals is the Rapid feedback, we specially need to identify Athletes, Coaches and Technical
SENSORS
HUBS
DAPS
ECC
WEB SERVER
DATABASE
AVCC
AVCC-SCC
WEBSITE
Baseline
Components
RealTrack
Components
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Staff from the CAR. In no case, sensitive data such as racial, ethnic origin, political opinions,
religious, philosophical beliefs, trade union membership or sexual life is used.
There is, however, sensitive data regarding health. We measure Heart Rate and oxygen in the
muscles during the exercise. In the context of EXPERIMEDIA it is related to athletic
performance but this kind of information is considered health data, therefore it receives such
treatment in the CARVIREN experiment.
Data collection: The experimenter stores only the user data necessary for the CARVIREN. The
users are informed about what data is being stored and how it is being used in the experiment.
User data is anonymised in aspects where personalisation is not needed. There is no commercial
usage of user data. Realtrack Systems processes data from the venue for experiment purposes
only. CAR has their agreements and consents with their athletes. In any case, and because the
use of personal data, RTS has signed a controller-processor agreement with the CAR where CAR
is acting as Controller and RTS as Processor.
Data analysis: The software developed by RTS solely analyses the raw data. This data is not
interpreted by RTS. Especially, no medical analysis of the health state of the participants is
performed. Such interpretation is left to professionals (couches, technical staff).
Access to data: Part of the experiment is to assign roles to the participants (e.g. athletes,
coaches, technical staff) and define their access permissions based on the role. Members of one
group (role) will be able to view only specified content, e.g. couches can see performance of the
athletes in their discipline, athletes can view their own performance only (or of their team,
depending on the nature of the discipline, e.g. in synchronized swimming they need to see the
whole routine and not solely one swimmer). It should be clarified to the participants who can see
their videos. Moreover, participants are asked not to share information with people outside the
experiment or with different roles (Non-disclosure agreements are signed).The role of parents, in
case of minors, could be also considered.
Withdrawal from investigation: Participants are informed about their rights to withdraw from
the experiment at any time and to require the destruction of generated data collected with their
contribution.
Data Protection Regulation: The CARVIREN experiment uses the components provided by
the EXPERIMEDIA project to store user data, thus ensuring accordance with EU directives and
Spanish Regulations: Ley Orgnica 15/1999 - Proteccin de Datos de CarcterPersonal (Organic
Law 15/1999, December, 13th, Personal Data Protection).The entire text can be found in the
Spanish for Official Bulletin of the State number 298, disposition 23750.
Non-Disclosure Agreement: For the social media part of the experiment, actors not involved
with the Consortium will have to sign and accept an NDA.
Privacy Policy in Social Media Networks: For the social media part of the experiment (to test
how CARVIREN could help promotion), users have to accept the Privacy Policy of Facebook.
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We also elaborate a privacy policy informing users of the use we are going to do with the
information generate inside the experiment group. In any case, RTS only collects usage data.
Exclusivity: The experiment is aimed at a very special group professional athletes. The
experiment, at the current stage, is not aimed at recreational sport performance.
Formal requirements: The CARVIREN experiment intends to record actual motion and
sensible data from real athletes in the CAR Venue. This situation was discussed during the
EXPERIMEDIA General Assembly held in Madrid in October 2013 and in Leuven in
December 2013. It was agreed that we will sign a Controller-Processor Agreement under the
current Data Protection Act (DPA) used at CAR.
3.3.4. Experiment Runs and Results
Each experiment period was accompanied by a "day-to-day script", which aided the
experimenters to ensure an efficient and correct execution of the experiments. Relevant details
of the execution for both experiments are reported in the following paragraphs.
3.3.4.1. First experiment run
We were testing functionality for trampoline and oxygen in muscle saturation. We used the ECC
to collect data (QoS) from the baseline components and our system.
System set-up involved various tasks:
1) Connection of WIMU to the Network
2) Configuration of the right setup with the correct amount of signal and fluency (not too
much, but not too low). The reason is simple, if the signal is too strong, WIMU wont
connect to a different AP when changing Area, and it could cause delay.
3) Set up all the components for the workout (HR Belt/Moxy; fabric belt, instructions, etc.)
4) Creation of a new training in the CARVIREN system
5) Start the workout
6) Run the workout
7) Stop the training
8) Review of the training in delay mode:
9) Verbal feedback

Figure 16: Left: Josep Escoda with Clara Bozzo (Trampoline Coach). Right: after training analysis in
the CARVIREN Website
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3.3.4.2. Second experiment run
The second run was conducted during the second week of August. It helped us to solve some
problems with the ANT+ connection by updating the firmware of the WIMU. There was a
session scheduled for Tuesday, where we did a Pommel Horse Session. We measured oxygen
saturation in the muscle:
Two scenarios were tested in the second run:
Scenario 1: WIMU outside the CAR, connected to a WiFi network with internet access.
Podcasting in real-time from Almera:

Figure 16: MTU test. Scenario 1 (outside the CAR connected to a network with internet access)
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Scenario 2: WIMU outside the CAR with without network or internet connection.
In the second scenario we have used two Moxys, cadence, speed sensor, a heart rate belt and a
GPS tracker.

Figure 17: preparation for the remote test


Figure 18 review of Victors workout
During the experiment the following functionalities of CARVIREN were used:
Live and delayed recording of trainings
Users role manager
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Sportwis: Moxy, heart rate (max, min and average), trampoline flight time, maximum
jump acceleration in Gs and angular speeds for the three axes, cadence, speed and track
in Google Maps.
Video recording with AVCC camera
Notifications on Facebook Event Page of each recorded AVCC video.
Remote training loading
3.3.5. Value Impact Assessment
In High Performance Centers, elaborated information is highly important. Information can come
from multiple devices: Wearables, machines, cam-recorders or information stored in the
database. All these devices produce a lot of raw data that can now to be processed in order to be
useful. This was previously one of the big problems: due to the different communication
protocols and because each one used its own system.
Thanks to the integration of Baseline Components, external sensors, sport widgets and Wimu,
the users (trainer, athlete) are given access to a whole new experience in trainings methodology.
CARVIREN allows to record training with video, synchronizes data with the videos and boost
social network relations between participants.
3.3.6. Dissemination
Intermediate and final results of the CARVIREN experiment have been disseminated via several
channels, mostly social networks:
Three articles in the blog of Realtrack Systems:
o Car Virtual Network: http://blog.realtracksystems.com/2013/12/11/experimedia-
2013-car-virtual-network-by-realtrack-systems/ (more than 1,000 visitors)
o CARVIREN Demonstration
http://blog.realtracksystems.com/2014/06/02/experimedia-2014-carviren-
demonstration/ (more than 2,500 visitor)
o First Run of Carviren: http://blog.realtracksystems.com/2014/08/01/first-run-of-
carviren/ (in two weeks, it had 1,893 unique visitors)
Case of Study (Spanish and English): This ebook will be available in Amazon and other
platforms when the Experiment ends and with the approbation of the Consortium
Members)
Social hashtags: #carviren and Twitter campaign.
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3.3.7. Conclusions
As a social private network for the CAR, focused on sport improvement, CARVIREN on
average is used for a longer time than any other public network.
The most important part was being able to record videos and training sessions, which according
to the QoS and the QoE was a moderate-high result.
Of course, there are still open issues in the system, mostly due to the lack of friendly use. But as
any other platform, improvements come with use and suggestions, so the margin to achieve a
more user-friendly platform is still good.
There are many areas to achieve improvements yet, such as more widgets and more cameras on
different rooms. So, if the service goes commercial (not anymore an Experiment), the experience
this year told us that it could be possible to scale it. Some changes would be needed, but we
cannot forget that it will never be as big as a public social network, so the people that could use
the network are not going to be a large sample, maybe 30-40 users.
EXPERIMEDIA Components have turned to be great assets. They worked just fine and the
support for each component was really quick and efficient. As commercial services, the
component could be a very competitive solution.
3.4. EX13: 3DRSBA
3.4.1. Overall Goal
3DRSBA stands for 3D Remote Sports Biomechanics Analysis, the experiments goal is to
bring biomechanical analysis to the athlete in order to facilitate screening for possible risk of
lesions.
The structured analysis of motion has become a very important tool in sports analysis. Using
new video technology, tactics and performance studies in team sports increases the performance
and general success. Besides the general motion studies, biomechanics intends to measure the
motion and relates it to the underlying musculoskeletal function. This provides information for
the performance of a single athlete, but can also provide information about the health status of
the individual regarding the musculoskeletal system. A very wide range of technologies for
motion capture are available, hence the outcome differs significantly with each system.
Additionally, the technique and analysis differs widely, depending on the methodology used. For
example, animation needs a continuously and steady signal, but does not need a physiological
precision of the individual. The latter would be essential for clinical science, where motion
capture needs to be complemented with other systems, such as force measurements and
electromyography. This is needed in order to not just measure motion, but to analyse and
comprehend the reason for the motion. This complexity is not just related to the technology
applied, but also to the methodology behind the analytics. This is known as the biomechanical
model.
Whilst general motion analysis is used in the field, clinical motion analysis is more restricted to
specialised laboratories, which consist of complex technology and specialised professionals to
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handle it. Currently, the professional education of such professionals is extensive and requires
many years of experience; hence the availability of such experts is limited. This results in one of
the main obstacles: the limited availability of biomechanically literate technical staff in addition to
trainers; more so during busy periods of multiple training sessions in different locations at CAR.
The experiment focuses on bringing biomechanical screening techniques directly to the training
site of the athlete at CAR. The high number of athletes at CAR does not allow monitoring and
testing all of them and general biomedical services are limited. Notwithstanding these concerns,
the screening of musculo-skeletal performance has been widely suggested in sports science and
yet, other than in a few exceptional cases, there is no widespread provision. By bringing together
these powerful technologies the motion tracker by Qualisys, control remote technologies as
well as the communication interface established at CAR under the auspices of the
EXPERIMEDIA project, one can expect a direct payoff in the Quality of Service (QoS)
provided by the institution, as well as Quality of Experience (QoE) for the athlete.
3.4.2. Technical Overview
The experiment has to be divided into two different approaches being investigated: The first one
is the scientific question of feasibility of the 3D ACL screening, which has followed a clear
development path of the time of the experiment. The second one is the investigation about
quality measurements for service and users. This was a very dynamic development which
changed approaches over the time of the project. Whilst the scientific question was well
established from the beginning, the implementation of the core components of
EXPERIMEDIA had a more open status, as the details and possible implementations had to be
established at the experiment itself, not prior. Additionally, the core components itself
underwent further development over time. A third aspect of the project was the circumstance
that the complexity of the project would need implementation of 3rd party products in order to
maximise the efforts for the general project. The inclusion of the Teamviewer software
(Teamviewer GmbH/Germany) and Visual 3D software (C-Motion Inc./USA) had relieved the
experimenters on aspects of the project, but were dependent on software changes from both.
The final structure (Figure 17) is the result of the development process. This included the
development and programming of a virtual machine (Qualisys Virtual Machine - QVM), which is
integrating all aspects of the ECC. It has been developed with the ability to be machine
independent, meaning that it has not to be installed or run from the biomechanical capture
machine. It is operating system independent and able to pull or push data to all clients or servers.
The extra development of this ECC structure was needed, as the orientation of the original core
components were addressed to a wide population with parallel use of the application as well as
being shared to other participants in social media. The aim of this specific experiment was
interested to use the concepts presented for future internet in multimedia, but with a focus on
sequential application as well as the lesser interest of an individual athlete to share clinical data
within a social network. Sharing such experience would definitely be of use for dissemination of
the screening technique. However, other communication methods such as Twitter, Facebook
etc. are already fulfilling this task.
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Figure 17: Final structure for implementation.
The technology use for technical aspects is based on the 3D motion capture system seen in
Figure 18.

Figure 18: A set of IR cameras (upper right) are capturing markers (upper left). The control programme is
transferring the 3D data of a single marker included in a biomechanical model to 3D motion information
as seen at the bottom.
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3.4.3. Ethics and Privacy
The project aims to increase access to a service already installed at CAR, which is the
biomechanical laboratory, related to the health and science service provided. This service has
been established using the guidance of ethical committees and regulated by Spanish and
European law.
Ethical concerns might be raised by the intention to move outside the laboratory to the training
field, as this might increase exposure of individual health data to other professionals in the
vicinity and a health screening mechanism is performed at the training side. This includes the
amount of clinical data necessary for the test itself and the general data management.
Therefore, even as the project aims to provide an additional and improved service to the
individual, each athlete is asked for agreement to participate in this study, without any kind of
further implication to the rest of services provided by CAR. This includes the opt-out possibility
at any stage for the athlete.
The possibility of an increased health risk to the athlete is considered. The experimental design
included scientifically-established biomedical models. Those tests are evaluated and accepted at
CAR. The methods intended for the experiment are running at sub-maximal performance level
of the athletes, therefore should not reach any critical point. As in all exercises performed, there
is always the possibility of non-contact lesions. In order to minimise this effect, only athletes
having performed a prior warm-up are tested.
There are three personal data types involved in this study:
Biomechanical data measured with the systems used in the project. 3D motion data often
includes video data
Clinical data necessary for the study includes anthropometric data of each participant as
well as data coming from physical exploration, consisting in data related to range of
motion for joint, muscle force and contraction test and structural data, such as joint
positions and rotations.
For the best clinical analysis, information about former injuries and issues related to
musculoskeletal system needs to be included.
Additionally, further data types are used for separating between different usage forms, such as:
Information transmitted in a remote form from the field location to the expert location.
Expert location includes clinical, performance and scientific experts.
QoS/QoE measurements within the EXPERIMEDIA project. Those data are for
statistical analysis of the project without any link to personal information.
Data which might be used for dissemination of the project by any participant.
All data is stored at CAR, which is subject to current legislation stated in BOE 15/1999 of 13
December and registered with the Spanish Data Protection Agency (DPA). This is agreed and
consented by athletes when entering the service of CAR. This includes PA to PC. Special
conditions apply to opt-out situations for training data from athletes, as they are used for general
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improvements in service at CAR. CAR and PE will sign an agreement for confidentiality
prepared within the legal frame of EXPERIMEDIA. Data at PE is protected against 3rd parties
by using encryption (AES-256; Based on TrueCrypt, freely available at
http://www.truecrypt.org/)
CAR is acting as data controller and Qualisys as data processor, hence a controllerprocessor
agreement is signed between CAR, Qualisys and Bertram Mueller who is a scientific consultant
for Qualisys. This process will be guided by KU Leuven.
3.4.4. Experiment Runs and Results
This motion capture system provides the spatial position of reflective markers in a 3D space.
When these markers are placed on defined position of the human body, a general reference
frame to the underlying anatomy is established (Figure 19). When anthropometric data are
introduced into this frame, personalised information about the motion can be obtained.
The methodology of the process from capturing single marker data to anatomical motion is
called biomechanical model. As this is a very complex process, no single model can express all
possible aspects of motion capture. Therefore, a clear relationship needs to be established. Once
such model is established and the quality of the information is confirmed the captured data
needs interpretation. This analysis needs to be performed by highly trained experts with
backgrounds in technology as well as sports and/or health.


For the 3D biomechanical analyses the following procedures had to be followed during the
experiments.
1) Remote control
o Getting familiar with the 3D system and the biomechanical software packages
necessary to treat the data.
o Testing the remote control protocol relating to the amount of data transmitted and
the effects of transmission delays on the experiment.
Figure 19: Shows the full 3D workflow processing the 3D data from image to analysis.
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o Setting up single and multiple sites to test the effect of such approach on the
biomechanical expert.
2) Biomechanical Model
o Evaluation of current screening methods available.
o Evaluation of existing protocols for the use in the screening process.
o Initial test with hardware.
o Developing the screening routine.
o Establish a baseline with existing clinical data.
o In-laboratory tests with the routine.
o On-site evaluation.
3) Visualisation
o Once the model (including marker placement is fixed), a visualisation protocol will be
established. This includes the visualisation details for the avatar, the amount and type
of additional data and presentation.
o Establishing initial design.
o Developing system and testing.
3.4.5. Value Impact Assessment
The results of this experiment have a direct and positive impact on the biomechanical services
applied at CAR. The developed concept of ACL screening is viable and together with the
different remote tools can be more widely applied.
In the current configuration, it already has become not just a screening tool, but an application
which will help to increase the performance of the athlete.
It has to be stated, that the immediate analysis and the rapid feedback that can be given with the
system were not possible a few years before in a sports training environment.
In this respect, both coaches and athletes benefit greatly from the system. It supports a
significantly more efficient training process. Coaches and doctors are enabled to spot critical
movements (e.g. due to a relieving posture after injuries) by the athlete easier and faster.
Due to the success of the experiment it might also be considered to be used by professional
football teams.
3.4.6. Conclusions
By investigating the different components of the EXPERIMEDIA ECC, the first interesting
outcome is the usability of this concept in sequential application of biomedical services, as the
performance of such services can be monitored and optimised. The data gathered in this
experiment also showed the need to careful analysis the numerical values. The full possibilities of
the ECC system will be further investigated by Qualisys.
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Whilst the Project Automated Framework performed precise and rapid, the transmission of
those data still needs further development. Even if personal is further trained with this kind of
application, the best conclusions were established when communicating with coaches and
medical personal. The direct and remote contact supported strongly the usability in a high
performance centre such as CAR.
Further investigation is needed for the aspect of reporting the findings, such as motion viewers.
In order to establish such criteria, some more application time has to be given to professionals in
order to dismiss the training effect in the given software.
3.5. EX14: PlayHist
3.5.1. Overall Goal
The goal of the PLAYHIST experiment is to enhance visitor experience in history learning by
using gamification technology combined with 3D avatars. This is achieved by developing a 3D
interactive and collaborative serious game that will take advantage of the documentation,
exhibitions and 3D content already developed at the FHW (Foundation for the Hellenic World)
and the technological features provided by the EXPERIMEDIA facility as the 3DCC module
for avatar creation.
Through the use of state-of-the-art technology like the Tholos, the semi-spherical Virtual Reality
theatre where FHW's digital productions are presented, the examination of Hellenic history
becomes a truly remarkable experience. Audiovisual and interactive media provide a new way for
the dissemination of historical information, where the audience participates actively. In the
virtual Reality projection, the museum educator controls the system, thus specifying what the
Tholos system will render and project to the visitors, while at the same time commenting on it.
As a sole exception to this, visitors are able to participate in electronic polls which determine the
path that the Educator will follow altering in this way the flow of the presentation in real time
The objective of the PLAYHIST experiment is to assess the effects of using gamification in
Quality of Learning (QoL) and QoE. The hypothesis that will be tested is that learning by
playing provides a better understanding of an historical subject.
Additionally, the experiment aimed to carry out the experiment was to investigate three feasibility
issues:
Using games to communicate historical information along with the improvement on the Quality
of Learning (QoL) for the visitors of a history museum as FHW. The analysis of the QoL could
provide the feasibility of using a gaming model to improve the learning experience of the FHW
visitors.
Connecting the EXPERIMEDIA modules with Unity 3D engine including the avatar creation
and real time animation modules. ECC and 3DCC could be used them for future game and
interactive application development with new and rich functionalities.
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Cluster rendering with Unity in a cutting edge facility like the Tholos. This is the most difficult of
the objectives as it involves a lot of programming work.
3.5.2. Technical Overview
The following diagram depicts the different components involved in the PLAYHIST
experiment:

Figure 20: PLAYHIST components
This architecture implies the development of different parts of the game for being displayed on
different screens.
3.5.3. Ethics and Privacy
The experiment has been conducted in accordance with EXPERIMEDIAs ethical and data
protection procedures and will follow the measures defined by the EXPERIMEDIAs Ethical
Issues Coordinator and Data Protection Coordinator. In this sense, the design and execution of
the experiment will respect the ethical principles and guidelines - defined in the
EXPERIMEDIA deliverables D5.1.1 EAB and DPB Operating Procedures" and D5.1.2
Ethical and regulatory framework for social and networked media".
During the experiment runs held in the FHW in Athens, the following personal data has been
registered:
Name and personal identification number
Participant image for avatar creation (not related to name or personal number)
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Before starting the experiment, all participants signed a consent form with personal data purpose
explanation.
The processing of personal data comprises the following actions:
1) Spanish DPA was notified before the experiment runs and personal data file was
registered as medium level type.
2) Consent form signed kept until experiment assessment finishes.
3) Participants images for avatar creation, is not finally kept in the tablets but in the Avatar
creation server. It will also be erased after experiment assessment.
3.5.4. Experiment Runs and Results
3.5.4.1. Time plan
The following time plan shoes the final schedule of the experiment. No major changes have
occurred apart from the experiment runs in the FHW that had to be done in September instead
of July or August due to agenda problems.

3.5.4.2. Internal Runs
In Tecnalia (Spain) there have been two runs previous to the definitive one in the Hellenic
Cosmos to analyze the game mechanic.
The first round was at the end of July, and the second one at medium August. The participants
were voluntary employees from Tecnalia. They were from different departments and with
distinct technological skills.
At execution time in the first run, some issues were detected, for example:
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Accessibility and usability issues, in the sense people didn't see very well the box
dedicated to fulfil the nickname.
Games difficulties. In the first mini-game (the one for the boat cargo) participants didnt
know how to drive the goods to the correspondent box. It was very difficult for them
because the container box were located on both sides on the screen. At last, we decided
to locate the boxes on the bottom part of the screen and slow the speed of the falling
goods, so the participants could find the game more pleasant.
People complained there was too much text to read before beginning each game.
In the second run of August, most of the first round's issues were corrected. Tecnalia had not
much to do respecting to the length of the text as it is necessary to understand the game and the
History to be learnt, for the purpose of the experiment. In general, the experiment process was
much more fluid the experiment, the participant could complete the game almost without help.
And summarizing, the participants enjoyed and learnt playing the PLAYHIST game.
3.5.4.3. FHW Runs
It has been a unique run on the 2nd September. People from Tecnalia were on Hellenic Cosmos
on 1st September in order to fix all the equipment and configure the architecture.
The participant recruitment has been done by FHW. There were four groups (two for the
interactive film and two for the game) of four people each. Most of the people were Greek, and
directly recruited by FHW among their contacts (12 people). The rest (4 people) were tourists
visiting the Hellenic Cosmos, recruited directly on site.
There were three rounds in the final execution:
First round: 4 Greek people playing the PLAYHIST game. After finishing the game, they
completed both questionnaires in Lime Survey (QoE) and Kahoot (QoL)
Second round: 8 people, divided in two groups, 4 Greek people and 4 museum visitors.
Both groups saw the video together because of the lack of time, due to the quantity of
shows in the Tholos that day. After seeing the interactive film, they completed the
Kahoot questionnaire (QoL), so the results can be compared with the other groups
Third round: 4 Greek people playing the PLAYHIST game. After finishing the game,
they completed both questionnaires in Lime Survey (QoE) and Kahoot (QoL)
The mechanics for the experiment is the following:
The visitors configured their character in the game before entering the Tholos. They had
to choose between a standard character and a personalized one. If they decided to
personalize the character, they were taken a picture of their face and through the
application get their own character with their face.
The visitors entered the Tholos with the tablets and were presented the main objective of
the game, a brief historical introduction to the game and the steps or mini-games to get
the final objective.
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For each mini-game, there is an initial brief presentation of the specific challenge, and
immediately, the visitors began to play the mini-game. The end of each mini-game was
defined both by time ending assigned to each mini-game or by all the visitors finishing
and reaching the objective, the first of both events. Depending on the level of
achievement on each mini-game, the visitor were assigned punctuation and ranked in a
general list (visible on the general screen of Tholos for all the visitors).
Once all the visitors passed through all the mini-games, they were asked to fulfil two
questionnaires, one for measuring the QoE through the Lime Survey and the other for
measuring the QoL, through the Kahoot tool.
Below are a few impression of the PLAYHIST experiment in the Hellenic Cosmos:

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3.5.5. Value Impact Assessment
The results of the experiment PLAYHIST have shown that games and gamification have a great
potential for making the teaching (and of course learning) of historical knowledge more
attractive to the audience. The current users of the system have seen it as a very entertaining
and engaging tool to improve the experience.
The learning results look very look very promising and hence can be a very important part of
future exhibitions.
3.5.6. Dissemination
Tecnalia has been very active in the dissemination of the PLAYHIST experiment and
EXPERIMEDIA project. The dissemination actions are listed below:
Laval Virtual Congress
8
on April 2014 (France). Paper "Designing history learning games
for Museums. An alternative approach for visitors engagement" accepted and a 30
presentation in the congress by Pablo Aguirrezabal.
A presentation entitled "Diseo de juegos histricos para el aprendizaje en museos
visitas de exterior" given at 2nd 3D Cultural Heritage Documentation and Musealization
Seminar (Spanish National School V-Must) on September 2014 (Madrid, Spain) by Sara
Sillaurren.
Tecnalia is organizing a workshop at the Reproductions Museum (Bilbao, Spain): New
technologies for the cultural contents dissemination for the end of September 2014.
The paper entitled " PLAYHIST: Jugando con la Historia. Transformacin de pelcula
interactiva en juego histrico para el aprendizaje" confirmed - has been accepted in the
Arqueologica 2.0
9
congress for October 2014 (Ciudad Real, Spain).

8
http://www.laval-virtual.org/en/scientific-conferences/vric-2014.html

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A short paper is confirmed at EUROMED congress
10
that will be held on November
2014 (Lemessos, Cyprus). The presentation is entitled ""
Additionally, an article has been sent for its publication in the EuroVR association
newsletter entitled " PLAYHIST: Playing with history".
3.5.7. Conclusions
In summary, PLAYHIST experiment showed the great potential and interest that games have for
historical content dissemination. They became and engaging tool and also, even text in a game,
created for learning purposes, may seem too long, the Quality of Learning results obtained
during the experimental runs look promising.
When considering the learning objectives of the experiment for Tecnalia, we can say that all of
them have been achieved.
The feasibility of using games to communicate historical information along with the
improvement on the Quality of Learning (QoL) for the visitors of a history museum as
FHW.
The feasibility of connecting the EXPERIMEDIA modules with Unity 3D engine
including the avatar creation and real time animation modules. ECC and 3DCC.
The feasibility of cluster rendering with Unity in a cutting edge facility as the Tholos.
This was the most difficult of the objectives as a lot of programming was involved.
From the FHW technicians' point of view, the methodology and software used for creating the
PLAYHIST game, open a new way of generating their productions for the Tholos, which
requires at this moment a lot of effort of programming, and also, for getting new products and
services like multiuser web based games.
From the visitors' point of view, a game is presented as something challenging and entertaining,
so the game must fulfil these expectations. It must not be too difficult and also, usability matters
must be taken into account. Responsive design must be used to get a game that can be played in
any device. It has been noticeable the success of using Kahoot platform for measuring Quality of
Learning.

9
http://www.arqueologiavirtual.com/arqueo/

10
http://www.culturalheritage2014.eu/

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4. Evaluation
In order to evaluate benefit the EXPERIMEDIA facility to the experimenters, a detailed
questionnaire was designed. This questionnaire had to be completed by the teams running the
experiments after the experiments were finished.

Figure 21: The first page of the EXPERIMEDIA questionnaire served to experimenters
The questionnaire collected feedback from experimenters on the following topics
The EXPERIMEDIA Facility as a whole
The baseline components (ECC, SCC, AVCC, PCC, 3DCC)
Venues
The EXPERIMEDIA Approach
Possible financial sustainability of the EXPERIMEDIA Facility
Experiments from both Open Calls (OC1 and OC2) were asked to complete the questionnaire;
hence feedback was collected from the following set of experiments.
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Experiment Partner Venue
EX4: Digital Schladming OC1 IN2 Schladming
EX5: MediaConnect OC1 TUG, STI Schladming
EX6: CONFetti OC1 PSNC CAR
EX7: 3D Acrobatic Sports OC1 STT CAR
EX8: BLUE OC1 UoP, TUDOR FHW
EX9: REENACT OC1 UVIGO FHW
EX10: Smart Ski Goggles OC2 Evolaris Schladming
EX11: iCaCoT OC2 TNO Schladming
EX12: CARVIREN OC2 Realtrack Systems CAR
EX13: 3DRSBA OC2 Qualisys CAR
EX14: PlayHist OC2 Tecnalia FHW
4.1. Evaluation Results
This section offers an extract of the questionnaire results. Answers could be chosen on a five-
step scale from Very satisfied to very dissatisfied or yes/no. The highest numbers in the accumulated
results have been highlighted in bold in the tables below.
4.1.1. EXPERIMEDIA Facility
How satisfied were you
V
e
r
y

S
a
t
i
s
f
i
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d

S
a
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i
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f
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N
e
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r
a
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D
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s
s
a
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f
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d

V
e
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y

d
i
s
s
a
t
i
f
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overall with the EXPERIMEDIA facility 27% 55% 0% 18% 0%
with the results of your experiment? 36% 55% 9% 0% 0%
with the introduction and training offered? 0% 82% 18% 0% 0%
The majority of experimenters gave positive feedback on the EXPERIMEDIA facility and the
training they received. Also, most experimenters were very content with the outcome of their
experiment.
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4.1.2. EXPERIMEDIA Approach
How satisfied were you
V
e
r
y

S
a
t
i
s
f
i
e
d

S
a
t
i
s
f
i
e
d

N
e
u
t
r
a
l

D
i
s
s
a
t
i
s
f
i
e
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V
e
r
y

d
i
s
s
a
t
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f
i
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with the privacy and ethics approach 36% 55% 9% 0% 0%
with the value impact approach 18% 45% 27% 9% 0%
with the QoS data modelling approach 20% 30% 50% 0% 0%
with the QoE data modelling approach 10% 40% 50% 0% 0%
with the EXPERIMEDIA platform approach (use of baseline
components to provide capabilities to experiments)
30% 70% 0% 0% 0%
with the overall approach for conducting technology
experiments and trials
55% 45% 0% 0% 0%
When asked more specific questions about the EXPERIMEDIA approach the feedback was on
the positive side. The most appreciated aspects of the EXPERIMEDIA approach were the
privacy and ethics approach and the general approach for conduction experiments.
4.1.3. Financial Sustainability of the EXPERIMEDIA Facility
Would you pay for EXPERIMEDIA services? Yes No
Software and services of the EXPERIMEDIA platform 50% 50%
Access to venues and live events 80% 20%
Recruitment of users 70% 30%
Consultancy in experimentation and innovation approaches 50% 50%
Consultancy in new media technologies 30% 70%
Consultancy in market sector challenges (tourism, sports science,
culture and heritage)
60% 40%
Access to venues and event and recruitments of users seem to be the most attractive service that
experimenters might be willing to pay for.
Consultancy in market sector challenges also generates interest, while consultancy on new media
technology does significantly less so. This may be the case, because institutions willing to
perform a certain experiment might already have this expertise themselves.
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And half of the experimenters stated, that they we interested to use the software services of
EXPERIMEDIA for a fee.
We recognize of course, that it is easier to click yes in a survey than actually paying for a service,
but the positive numbers show that there is an interest in the market to use a number of services
provided by the EXPERIMEDIA facility. We see this as a promising sign for the future
sustainability of EXPERIMEDIA.
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5. Summary and Conclusion
The five experiments from the second open call of EXPERIMEDIA were generally completed
successfully. Two of the experiments were already concluded in spring 2014 due to seasonal
requirements. The other three experiments used the full timeframe until the summer..
As with the experiments from the first open call the results provided valuable insights into the
possibilities offered by FMI technologies and were an important indicator of the feasibility of
such integrations.
The evaluation questionnaire that was completed by OC1 and OC2 experiments showed positive
results of the satisfaction with the EXPERIMEDIA facility as well indicated that there is interest
in the market to use the EXPERIMEDIA services for a fee to perform future experiments after
the end of the project