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OPITO APPROVED STANDARD

Offshore Oil & Gas Industry



Minimum Industry

Safety Training Standard


OPITO Standard Code: 5301
OPITO Approved Standard
Minimum Industry Safety Training Standard
O OP PI IT TO O


Revision 0 (27-Oct 2008); Amendment 13 (Jan 2013) Page 2 of 28

The content of this document was developed by an industry work group co-ordinated by
OPITO. Members of the work group included:

Major offshore oil & gas employers
Step Change in Safety Task Group

Guidance and advice on this training standard is available by contacting:

OPITO
Minerva House
Bruntland Road
Portlethen
Aberdeen
AB12 4QL

Tel: 01224 787800
OPITO

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced; stored in a retrieval or
information storage system or transmitted, in any form or by any means (mechanical,
photocopying, recording or otherwise), without prior permission in writing from the
publishers.

AMENDMENTS
AMENDMENT & DATE PAGES CHANGES
MADE BY
CHECKED BY APPROVED
BY
1 Provided details of two delivery
options in Section A.6
27-10-08
22 & 23 T. Wilson J. Cameron J. Cameron
2 Added information on Step Change
in Safety/HSE PTW guidance
HSG 250 15-Dec 2008
14 T. Wilson P. Crowther M. Duncan

3 Changed footer to reflect
amendment numbering scheme
15-Dec 2008
All except
title page
T. Wilson J. Cameron

M. Duncan

4 Removed Training Outcome 1.1
and Element 1.1 Offshore
Operations 11-Dec 2009
6, 8 T. Wilson C. Williams J. Cameron
5 Changed course duration to 13.5
hours and the delivery time for
Module 1 to 30 mins to reflect the
removal of Element 1.1
22-Dec 2009
21, 22 T. Wilson J. Cameron J. Cameron
6 Changed Delivery Through CBT
timing to 9.5 hours to reflect the
removal of Element 1.1
22-Dec 2009
22 T. Wilson J. Cameron J. Cameron
7 Removed SCBA from Glossary as
not used in text
09-Feb 2010
4 T. Wilson I. Emslie J. Cameron
8 Added Give an overview of: to
Module 2, Element 2.4 and
corrected numbering
09-Feb 2010
11 T. Wilson P. Lammiman J. Cameron

Continued



OPITO Approved Standard
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AMENDMENTS
AMENDMENT & DATE PAGES CHANGES
MADE BY
CHECKED BY APPROVED
BY
9 Modified references to breathing
apparatus to reflect that they are
collectively called RPE (respiratory
protective equipment)
09-Feb 2010
18, 26 T. Wilson I. Emslie J. Cameron
10 Corrected numbering of Element
8.1 09-Feb 2010
19 T. Wilson P. Lammiman J. Cameron
11 Replaced the registered term
Scafftag with scaffold tagging
system 09-Feb 2010
19 T. Wilson C. Williams J. Cameron
12 Added expiry date to certificate list.
12/9/2011
27 M. Carr M. Foo P. Lammiman
13 Replaced Course Code with
Standard Code in Title Page and
amended wording under section
C.1 Certification, inserted Appendix
1 - to align with other OPITO
standards

Revision 0 Amendment 13
10-January 2013
Title page,
27
M.Foo M. Carr P. Lammiman

Any amendments made to this standard by OPITO will be recorded above.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION 4

GLOSSARY 4

SECTION A TRAINING PROGRAMME

A.1 Target Group 5
A.2 Delegate Prior Achievement 5
A.3 Medical & Health Requirements 5
A.4 Learning Outcomes 6-7
A.5 Training Programme 8-20
A.6 Duration of Training and Delivery Options 21-22
A.7 Delivery through CBT 22
A.8 Assessment 23
A.9 Further Training & Periodicity 23

SECTION B RESOURCES

B.1 Staff 24
B.2 Trainer/Delegate Ratio 24
B.3 Facilities & Location of Training 25
B.4 Equipment 26

SECTION C OUTCOME

C.1 Certification & Recording 27

APPENDIX 1 OPITO INFORMATION 28
OPITO Approved Standard
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INTRODUCTION


The offshore oil & gas industry operates in some of the most dangerous environments in the
world. Hazards are expected in this setting and must be controlled.

Improvements in technology, workforce involvement, infrastructure care and rig operations
have led to recent reductions in injuries and incidents but, it is recognised, more still needs
to be done. It is believed that improved base line safety training is likely to improve the
situation by ensuring that all personnel have the necessary safety awareness and basic
skills training to recognise and avoid risk.

To address this need, companies in the UK North Sea, along with Step Change in Safety,
agreed to develop an introductory training programme that would introduce the key safety
elements required by all employees offshore.

The course can be offered at an OPITO approved training establishment or be employer led
(OPITO approval required).

The OPITO Offshore Oil & Gas Industry Minimum Industry Safety Training (MIST) is highly
recommended for all inexperienced employees.




GLOSSARY

ACOP Approved Code of Practice
ALARP As low as reasonably practicable
BOSIET/FOET Basic Offshore Safety Induction & Emergency Training/Further
Offshore Emergency Training
FPSO Floating Production & Storage Vessel
H
2
S Hydrogen Sulphide
HASAWA Health & Safety at Work Etc. Act
HAVS Hand & Arm Vibration Syndrome
LOLER Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations
MEWP Mobile Elevated Work Platform
MSDS Material Safety Data Sheets
NORM Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material
PRfS Personal Responsibility for Safety
PTW Permit to Work
PUWER Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations
SSOW Safe Systems of Work
WAH Working at Height
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SECTION A TRAINING PROGRAMME

A.1 Target Group

This introductory safety training programme is designed to introduce the fundamental
safety elements of the offshore oil & gas industry to new starts, giving an
appreciation of the potential hazards and controls that might be encountered by
personnel offshore. Each unit has been designed to focus the delegates attention
on their personal responsibility for safety thus influencing their behaviour and attitude
towards their co-workers, the installation and the environment.


The following modules are included:


Module 1 Introduction to the Hazardous Offshore Environment

Module 2 Working Safely including Safety Observations Systems

Module 3 Understanding the Risk Assessment Process

Module 4 Tasks that Require Permit to Work

Module 5 Personal Responsibility in Maintaining Asset Integrity

Module 6 Using Manual Handling Techniques Every Day

Module 7 Controlling the Use of Hazardous Substances Offshore

Module 8 Knowledge and Practices of Working at Height

Module 9 Being Aware of Mechanical Lifting Activities


The responsibility for delivering and assessing this programme rests with OPITO
approved training providers and employers.


A.2 Delegate Prior Achievement

There are no prior achievements required. It is expected that this programme will be
taken after the OPITO approved BOSIET course so training providers can build on
the material gained previously. However, if this is not the case then the BOSIET
course will be required prior to travelling offshore and the delegate should expect a
small proportion of repeat information.


A.3 Medical and Health Requirements

There are no specific medical requirements, although personnel must have a current
offshore medical certificate before being allowed to work offshore.


A.4 Learning Outcomes

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During the introductory safety training programme candidates will gain an awareness
of the variety of tasks and the safety risks to be found on offshore installations. They
will be required to demonstrate a sufficient level of knowledge and understanding of
the following key areas:


At the end of each module the delegate must be able to explain:

MODULE 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE HAZARDOUS OFFSHORE ENVIRONMENT

1.1 Major hazards that could occur in the offshore environment
1.2 Daily hazards associated with living and working offshore


MODULE 2 WORKING SAFELY INCLUDING SAFETY OBSERVATION SYSTEMS

2.1 The legislative framework surrounding the offshore environment
2.2 Significant safety practices that have arisen with common regulations
2.3 The significance of an installations Safety Case and personal access to the
document
2.4 The role of safety committees, safety meetings and safety representatives offshore
2.5 Toolbox Talks what they include and where and when they should be held
2.6 The function of a Safety Observation System and how to carry out an intervention
2.7 Understanding how personal actions might influence safety


MODULE 3 UNDERSTANDING THE RISK ASSESSMENT PROCESS

3.1 The difference between hazard, risk and controls
3.2 The steps of a risk assessment and the use of a risk matrix
3.3 Applying controls to bring the risk down to ALARP
3.4 The need for continuous risk assessment


MODULE 4 TASKS THAT REQUIRE PERMIT TO WORK

4.1 Objectives of a PTW system and how permits are generated
4.2 Using a PTW and how to re-instate the permits after breaks
4.3 Personal responsibility in the PTW system


MODULE 5 PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MAINTAINING ASSET INTEGRITY

5.1 The concept of asset integrity
5.2 Why some items and systems are safety critical
5.3 Employer responsibility for asset integrity
5.4 Personal responsibilities for asset integrity


Continued

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A.4 Learning Outcomes continued

MODULE 6 USING MANUAL HANDLING TECHNIQUES EVERY DAY

6.1 The source of MH hazards offshore and the types of injuries that might be sustained
6.2 Factors contributing to manual handling incidents
6.3 The importance of ergonomic design and the best methods for manually lifting
objects
6.4 Team operations and communication methods
6.5 How mechanical aids reduce MH incidents


MODULE 7 CONTROLLING THE USE OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES OFFSHORE

7.1 Regulations and guidelines dealing with chemical hazards offshore
7.2 The sources of offshore chemical hazards
7.3 How personnel come into contact with hazardous substances
7.4 Sensitisation and the difficulties of monitoring its effect
7.5 Hazard symbols and common offshore examples
7.6 Employers duties under COSHH
7.7 Employees duties with COSHH
7.8 Reading labels on chemicals and using MSDS
7.9 Monitoring workers exposure
7.10 PPE specific to chemical applications


MODULE 8 KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICES OF WORKING AT HEIGHT

8.1 What is meant by working at height and factors to consider before commencing work
8.2 WAH hazards and how they can be controlled
8.3 Basic use of ladders, scaffolding and MEWPS
8.4 Signing for and being responsible for tools aloft


MODULE 9 BEING AWARE OF MECHANICAL LIFTING ACTIVITIES

9.1 The magnitude of objects to be lifted offshore and why lifting hazards need to be
controlled
9.2 Roles of the LOLER focal point, the banksman, slinger and rigger
9.3 Personal responsibility such as obeying area restrictions and keeping clear of lifting
operations


At the end of the following modules the delegate should be able to demonstrate:

MODULE 2 WORKING SAFELY INCLUDING SAFETY OBSERVATION SYSTEMS
A. How to complete a Safety Observation Card in an appropriate style

MODULE 3 UNDERSTANDING THE RISK ASSESSMENT PROCESS
B. How to prepare a risk assessment using a risk matrix

MODULE 4 TASKS THAT REQUIRE PERMIT TO WORK
C. Completion of the key elements of PTW documentation

MODULE 6 USING MANUAL HANDLING TECHNIQUES EVERY DAY
D. The elements of a good individual lift, a team lift with appropriate communications and
correct loading/unloading methods for using a trolley

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A.5 Training Programme

The training programme outlined below will assist delegates to meet the stated
learning outcomes.

In order to make efficient use of time and ensure effective learning, the three phases
of instruction, demonstration and practice should be integrated wherever practical.
Full use should also be made of visual/audio-visual aids, computer based
training, case studies, videos and course hand-out materials. Contents in
Appendix 1 must be covered prior to course commencement.


MODULE 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE HAZARDOUS OFFSHORE ENVIRONMENT


Element 1.1 Hazard Awareness

Give an overview of:

a) Possible major hazards while working in the hostile offshore environment including:

Fire
Explosion
High pressure release of gas
H
2
S creation
Structural failure
Adverse weather damage

b) Possible hazards associated with living and working offshore such as:

Suspended loads on cranes including man-riding
The use of helicopters and supply vessels for transportation
Working on high pressure systems
Handling heavy equipment
Working with chemicals & other hazardous substances
Working at height activities
Slips, trips & falls requirements to maintain good housekeeping
Noise
Vibration hazards (HAVS & exposure limits)




Training providers: Reinforce the idea that the hazard list is not comprehensive and other
potential hazards will be discussed during the course and, indeed, when they go offshore.


Module 1 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).

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MODULE 2 WORKING SAFELY INCLUDING SAFETY OBSERVATIONS SYSTEMS

Element 2.1 The Offshore Safety Structure

Give an overview of:

The Legislative Framework
a) Complying with regulations, acts, legislation, industry guidance and ACOPs and the
significant outcome of each, including:

The Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (Suitable
and sufficient assessment of risk)
The Health & Safety at Work Etc. Act 1974 (ALARP concept)
Provision & Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER)
(Equipment fit for purpose, safe for use, maintained in safe
condition and used by properly trained workers)
Safety Case Regulations 2005 (identifies the threats to an installation and
its personnel)

b) The fact that it is a criminal offence not to comply with acts of parliament and
regulations


The Safety Case of an Installation
c) The Safety Case being the overarching safety document for an installation
d) A history of the document including links to the Piper Alpha disaster (excerpts from
two DVDs could be used The Lessons of Piper Alpha (Oil & Gas UK) or Spiral to
Disaster (BBC))
e) Why a Safety Case is submitted for each field from early development through to
decommissioning
f) How the Safety Case allows an installation to run by proving that a company
recognises any hazards, has done suitable risk assessments and looked at controls
g) The availability of the Safety Case to all employees
h) The recent use of summary documents to increase general understanding and
awareness


The Safety Management System
i) The Safety Management System for the effective and proactive management of
safety
j) The required comprehensive health and safety policies which show control, co-
operation, communication and competence
k) The fact that the Safety Management System is not inert i.e. when a problem is
identified the system should be capable of responding
l) The role of safety committees and safety meetings in the Safety Management
System
m) The role of the safety representative why he/she has functions and powers, but not
duties
n) Contacting the safety representative to make representation to an area supervisor,
OIM or HSE
o) An individuals responsibility to follow company procedures for the collective learning
experience

Continued
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MODULE 2 Working Safely including Safety Observation Systems continued

Element 2.2 Safe Systems of Work (SSOW)

Give an overview of:

a) How work is planned safely across an installation by considering:

Risk assessments (see Module 3)
Permit to Work (see Module 4)
Task clarification
Equipment requirements
Work schedules & rest periods
Safety alerts
Level of supervision

b) Toolbox Talks in which the task-based risk assessments are discussed when and
how they should be held
c) Safety activities and documentation such as drills & exercises, work instructions and
installation incident records
d) Shift handover procedures


Element 2.3 Safety Observation Systems

Give an explanation of:

a) Company specific Safety Observation Systems
b) The employees right & duty to intervene (calling time out to address a safety
concern there and then)
c) Designed to change attitudes and behaviours; not another form of supervision or to
punish workers
d) Controls in place so personnel work that way all the time not just under direct
supervision
e) How to carry out an intervention:

Ensure the person (or team) is in a safe position
Keep the conversation positive
Find out why they are not working safely
Discuss what could go wrong
Get agreement to change behaviour
Record the observations with a No name, no blame approach

f) Reporting the incident to appropriate personnel


Module 2 Demonstration: Illustrate key elements of a Safety Observation System with the
trainers role playing successful and unsuccessful encounters with personnel. The delegates
should discuss the differences and agree with the best approach to deliver unsolicited safety
guidance.

Module 2 Practical Exercise: The delegates should complete a Safety Observation Card
in the No name, no blame style for one of the role play situations performed above. A
sample of the completed Safety Observation Cards should be discussed with the class.


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MODULE 2 Working safely including Safety Observation Systems continued


Element 2.4 Personal Contributions and Responsibility for Safety

Give an overview of:

a) Selecting the appropriate personal protection clothing and equipment (PPE) suitable
for the type of work being undertaken
b) The importance of taking a break shortly after starting the task to evaluate and
discuss any changes in the conditions
c) Understanding that personal actions might degrade the safety in an area
d) Knowing that subsequent incidents wont be the same
e) Realising that mitigating risk may also create new risks
f) Spatial awareness; being conscious of the immediate environment (especially
working in tight spaces) so that hazards are not inadvertently caused



Module 2 Test: Ten minute module test with ten questions based on the learning outcomes.
Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).

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MODULE 3 UNDERSTANDING THE RISK ASSESSMENT PROCESS


Element 3.1 Risk Assessment

Give an explanation of:

a) The difference between hazards, risks and controls
b) Voluntary risks (smoking or driving a car) and involuntary risks (acts of nature)
c) How involuntary risks can be:

Task related
Inherent
Process related

d) The steps of risk assessment outlined by different organisations such as the UKCS
Step Change in Safety:

Identify if there are procedures and previous risk assessments obtain
copies and review them
Ask how people could get hurt? Could we cause damage to equipment or the
environment? (*see e) below)
Decide on precautions and controls (*see e) below)
Communicate the findings with the appropriate person(s)
Implement the controls BEFORE starting the job

e) *The use of a risk matrix

Risk equals probability multiplied by consequences (which could include
people, infrastructure, environment & reputation)
Look at risk with no controls
Add controls to make the risk as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP)

f) The need for continuous risk assessment to identify hazards as they evolve



Module 3 Demonstration: Illustrate the key elements of preparing a risk assessment using
a practical exercise, if possible, from the offshore oil and gas industry.

Module 3 Practical Exercise: The delegates in small groups (2-3) should discuss the
hazards without controls, prepare a risk assessment, and then decide on controls that can
be added to lower the risk from medium/high to ALARP. A sample of the group risk
assessments should be discussed with the class.

Module 3 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).


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MODULE 4 TASKS THAT REQUIRE PERMIT TO WORK


Element 4.1 Permit to Work (PTW)

Give an explanation of:

a) Principles & objectives of the Permit to Work system for controlled work or special
work activities to ensure:

Proper planning and consideration is given to the risks of a particular job
The proper authority has generated the permit
The right precautions have been taken
The person in charge is aware of the activity(ies)

b) Step Change in Safety guidance on the essential rules of PTW including
HSG 250
c) Using colour codes for identifying the type of work
d) The fact that the permit is a legal document
e) How the control of risks is an integral part of the Permit to Work process
f) Processes in place (electronic or paper) to create, organise and archive permits
g) Who is involved in PTW generation such as:

Site controller or OIM
Department head
Affected Area Authority
Work crew
Control Room Operator

h) Signing the PTW declaration
i) Handing the permit to the permit office or CRO to stop work and re-sign to reinstate
work
j) Personal responsibility to adhere to the strictures of the PTW system



Module 4 Demonstration: Illustrate the key elements of a PTW system, i.e. following a
permit through from start to finish, using examples of relevant permits showing the hazard,
risk, cross-referencing and authorisation sections that the delegates should complete.

Module 4 Practical Exercise: From an example Permit to Work, each delegate will
highlight the controls they would need to adhere to if they were part of the work crew. A
sample of the highlighted PTWs should be discussed with the class.

Module 4 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).

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MODULE 5 PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MAINTAINING ASSET INTEGRITY


Element 5.1 Asset Integrity

Give an explanation of:

a) The meaning of asset integrity and a description of its other names (e.g. platform
integrity)
b) Divisions of asset integrity offshore:

Structural integrity (North Sea gets 100 foot waves; other areas of the world
experience hurricanes, icebergs etc.)
Well integrity including well construction, well equipment and reservoir
conditions
Fire and explosion prevention
Refuge and evacuation including muster control, temporary refuge and
evacuation escape

c) Safety critical elements understanding why some items and systems are critical to
safety
d) Company specific models (e.g. Barrier Model) for demonstrating weaknesses in the
system
e) Escalation scenarios - realising that a series of minor risks might combine to create a
major hazard or that a major hazard may result from a minor problem that was
ignored
f) Employer responsibilities for asset integrity such as:

Using performance standards & manufacturers notes to determine how an
item should work
Ensuring that safety critical items are in a condition to keep employees safe
Ensuring that equipment on the platform is capable of doing the job it was
intended to do
The need for third party verification

g) Personal responsibility for asset integrity such as:

Reporting unsafe conditions to appropriate personnel
Following instructions
Not taking shortcuts
Intervening when procedures are not being followed by others



Module 5 Demonstration: Illustrate the concept of safety critical items by using a common
offshore example or by defining the parts of a vehicle.

Module 5 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).

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MODULE 6 USING MANUAL HANDLING TECHNIQUES EVERYDAY

Element 6.1 Manual Handling Hazards

Give an overview of:

a) Regulations and company procedures with respect to manual handling
b) Manual handling hazards including:

Rig floor operations
Access & egress to work areas
Working in confined or limited spaces
Using power tools
Moving chemicals
Moving equipment from the rigging loft

c) Statistics of manual handling incidents
d) The function of the human spine and types of injury (acute and chronic) such as:

Slipped disc
Hernia
Fractures
Sciatica

e) Factors contributing to manual handling incidents:

Poor ergonomic design
Repetition
Twisting and bending
Not following the risk assessment
Lack of training
Lack of planning
Poor handling of heavy power tools





Continued
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Module 6 Using Manual Handling Techniques Everyday continued


Element 6.2 Manual Handling Controls and Mechanical Devices

Give an explanation of:

a) The MH hierarchy to assess manual handling operations for the possibility of risk
b) Understanding that any changes to a normal lift limits the weight that can be lifted by
various proportions
c) Ergonomics and the importance of maintaining correct body posture
d) Methods to control the risk such as:

Warming-up muscles before lifting
Safer lifting techniques & team handling
Communication with team members during lifting or moving processes
Designating a leader for team operations
Establishing safe routes for transferring goods
Storage for ease of movement i.e. on low shelves or at the front of cupboards
Making turns with your feet

e) Using mechanical aids including forklifts and trolleys etc.



Module 6 Demonstration: Illustrate the key principles of manual handling by demonstrating
a poor lift and asking delegates to discuss the mistakes and how the lift could be improved.

In addition, a) provide a demonstration of a team lift with a leader selected and appropriate
communications methods used and b) provide a large bulky package that requires the use of
a trolley.

Module 6 Practical Exercise: Delegates should practise and then demonstrate the
techniques either singly or in teams.

Module 6 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).


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MODULE 7 CONTROLLING THE USE OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES OFFSHORE


Element 7.1 Sources of Chemical Hazards

Give an overview of:

a) Regulations and guidelines dealing with chemical hazards such as COSHH and the
EH40/2005 Workplace Exposure Limits HSE Document
b) The sources of chemical hazards offshore and whether they are covered under
COSHH such as:

painting, cleaning/domestic activities
drilling operations, chemical based mud and other drilling fluids
well completion; maintenance (lubes, oils)
water, gas, carbon dioxide & acid washes for enhanced recovery
Asbestos
NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material)

c) How personnel might come into contact with hazardous substances by:

Inhalation (very fast smoking)
Ingestion (dont wash hands after use)
Absorption (engine oil is a known carcinogen)
Injection (needle injury, cut from contaminated surfaces)

d) Sensitisation (even a small quantity on first usage can cause problems or manifest
itself 20 years later)
e) Government regulations pertaining to product labelling
f) Hazard symbols showing the common dangers offshore e.g. highly flammable; toxic;
irritant, corrosive etc.
g) The applicability of COSHH to unknown fumes or gases in the area (e.g. H
2
S)
h) Employers duties under COSHH

Prevent exposure of personnel to hazardous substances wherever possible
Provide suitable and sufficient COSHH assessments
Provide control measures
Monitor the level of exposure
Ensure correct storage

i) Employees duties under COSHH

To use the control measures provided
To read all documentation
Participate in any health surveillance
Report defects in equipment




Continued
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Module 7 Controlling the Use of Hazardous Substances Offshore continued


Element 7.2 Practical Controls for Chemical Hazards

Give an overview of:

a) Reading labels on the chemicals
b) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) which must accompany every chemical
showing Safety and Risk Phrases
c) Hierarchy of control including:

Changing the process or activity to eliminate the hazardous substance
Replacing the hazardous substance with a safer alternative
Controlling exposure at source e.g. local exhaust ventilation
Choosing and wearing task specific PPE such as rubber gloves, rubber
aprons and vapour masks
Choosing and wearing respiratory protective equipment such as filtering
devices (see d below)

d) Filters have numbering like FFP1, 2 or 3 or have different colours depending on the
substances to be filtered
e) Using barrier cream on skin
f) Access to COSHH lockers - the storage of chemicals to prevent fire, explosion,
chemical burns and environmental damage
g) Never using tins or packages that have unknown substances or are half-used by
someone else
h) Health surveillance of employees; monitoring workers exposure
i) Keeping full PPE on until after the area is tidy and the job is complete



Module 7 Test: Ten minute module test with ten questions based on the learning outcomes.
Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).



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MODULE 8 KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESSES OF WORKING AT HEIGHT


Element 8.1 Working at Height Activities & Hazards

Give an overview of:

a) Planning & organising WAH activities considering the following factors:

Weather
Location
Fragile surfaces
Falling objects

b) Legislation & industry guidance with respect to WAH
c) A place being at height if a person can be injured falling from it, even if it is at or
below ground level
d) The hazards of working at height such as falling, dropped objects, suspension
trauma
e) Manriding as a WAH activity
f) The WAH hierarchy for managing & selecting equipment for WAH:

Avoiding working at height where possible
Using work equipment or other measures to prevent falls
Using work equipment to minimise the consequences of a fall

g) Types of ladders, scaffolding equipment and mobile elevated work platforms
(MEWPs)
h) Awareness of a scaffold tagging system & requiring trained personnel to install and
correct the structure
i) Signing for Tools Aloft, using a tool belt, tool rolls or a shadow wall
j) Associated WAH fall protection systems including harnesses, lanyards and inertia
reels
k) Using the trailing hand technique for climbing stairs and safely crossing gangways



Module 8 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).


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MODULE 9 BEING AWARE OF MECHANICAL LIFTING ACTIVITIES

Element 9.1 Hazards of Mechanical Lifting Operations

Give an overview of:

a) The magnitude of loads to be lifted offshore (e.g. a typical piece of pipework
equalling 28 bags of cement) showing why it is important to get lifting activities right
b) Statistics of lifting accidents in the oil and gas industry
c) Hazards associated with lifting operations such as:

Encroaching personnel
Conflicting activities
Obstructions
Damaged loads
Dropped objects
Adverse circumstances affecting plant and machinery stability
New equipment although certified are not always safe
Damaged wire rope slings
Weather offshore


d) The speed at which mechanical lifting hazards can happen
e) Roles in lifting operations such as the LOLER focal point, crane operator, banksman
(must not get physically involved in preparing the load for lifting) and rigger/slinger
(attaching/detaching and securing of loads to the lifting equipment)
f) Relevant legislation such as LOLER - applies to lowering or lifting a load right down
to the last split pin
g) What is meant by the Safe Working Load (SWL)
h) Equipment hazards in lifting operations such as load stability, load security and load
handling
i) Man-riding activities and the use of specific winches
j) PRfS such as:

Obeying barriers in restricted areas
Being aware that crane operations are in progress
Not moving near or under lifting operations




Module 9 Test: Five minute module test with five questions based on the learning
outcomes. Mark the papers and discuss the answers as a group (5 minutes).


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A.6 Duration of Training and Delivery Options

The total training day includes contact time, refreshment and meal breaks and travel
between training sites where applicable.

The total contact time per day shall not exceed 8 hours and the total training day shall not
exceed 10 hours. Contact time for delegates should not run consecutively for more than 2
hours without a refreshment break.

OPITO approval will not be awarded for delivery of individual MIST modules, only for the
complete (9 module) standard. However, there are two different approaches which can be
taken in relation to the delivery of the standard:

Delivery Option 1:

Modules 1-9 of the MIST can be delivered consecutively over two days with an optimum
contact time of 13.5 hours. The table below indicates the approximate time in which to
deliver the contents of each module.


Delivery Option 2:

One or more modules can be incorporated into an employers in-house training programme.
The table below gives the training provider a minimum time in which to deliver the contents
of each module detailed within this standard.

Where this option is chosen, in addition to satisfying OPITOs Approval Criteria, the following
conditions apply:

1. The MIST content may be incorporated into more in-depth programmes of longer
duration, e.g. PTW User training, company specific Safety Observation Systems,
etc.
2. All MIST related learning material and documentation must clearly reference the
applicable section(s) of the MIST standard
3. Each delegate will complete the MIST training within a 30 day period
4. A system to record which modules and on which dates have been completed by
each delegate, must be maintained
5. A delegate will not be deemed to have completed the MIST training, and will not be
registered on Vantage, until the delegate has attended all of the nine MIST modules


Note:
Within both Delivery Options, where some modules are to be delivered within in-depth
and/or in-house programmes by a sub-contracting company (whether by classroom or CBT
delivery); OPITO Approval will remain with the organisation applying for approval. It will be
the responsibility of that OPITO Approved organisation to ensure all training material and
delivery complies with this MIST standard.


Continued
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A.6 Duration of Training and Delivery Options continued


Delivery times:

Module 1 Introduction to the
Hazardous Offshore
Environment
30 minutes (including 10 minutes for test &
discussion)

Module 2 Working Safely 2 hours (including practical session and 15 minutes for
test & discussion)
Module 3 Risk Assessment 2 hours (including practical session and 10 minutes for
test & discussion)
Module 4 Permit to Work 1 hours (including practical session and 10 minutes
for test & discussion)
Module 5 Asset Integrity 1 hour (including 10 minutes for test & discussion)

Module 6 Manual Handling 1 hours (including practical session and 10 minutes
for test & discussion)
Module 7 COSHH 2 hours (including 15 minutes for test & discussion)

Module 8 Working at Height 1 hours (including 10 minutes for test & discussion)

Module 9 Mechanical Lifting 1 hours (including 10 minutes for test & discussion)




A.7 Delivery through CBT

An organisation may decide that the most appropriate method for delivering this learning is
through computer based training (CBT) supported by some elements of demonstration and
delegate participation. As with classroom instruction, it will be up to the organisation that
applies for OPITO approval to demonstrate how the learning outcomes will be met and the
tests delivered.

The recommended contact times contained in A.6 are for classroom based delivery and may
not apply to CBT delivery. However the time spent on each module as a percentage of the
total time will not change and it is foreseeable that this would take a minimum of 9.5 hours
(in total).
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A.8 Assessment

Delegates attending this training programme will be given a series of explanations
and demonstrations which will identify what they are expected to know and do.

At the end of each module, candidates will be given a short test which will allow them
to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the course content. A pass
mark of 80% is required for each test.

Four modules also have practical components in which the delegates will take an
active part. These exercises should be checked for accuracy by the training provider
and results fed back to the delegates. (These exercises will form an integral part of
the modules and will be reviewed/corrected by the training provider where required.
They will not contribute to the final pass/fail decision.)

Any delegate failing to meet the expected outcomes as the course progresses can be
given additional training. However, it should be clear that time to do this within the
optimum contact time is limited and the delegate would have to show, through
repeating test & practice sessions, that they have bridged the gap in their knowledge
and understanding.

If any delegate fails, in the opinion of the training providers and after reasonable
tuition, to meet the learning outcomes of any individual module, the entire MIST must
be repeated.

NOTE: All practical exercise and test documentation completed by the delegates will
be retained by the training provider for audit purposes.




A.9 Further Training & Periodicity

Reassessment, via an on-line assessment, will take place every four years or more
frequently if persons have not worked offshore for at least 12 months.

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SECTION B RESOURCES


B.1 Staff

In order for a training programme to be delivered successfully, it is necessary to have
appropriate people in presenting and supporting roles.


OPITO approved training providers will deliver and carry out assessment of the module.

Training staff will:

Have appropriate knowledge & experience

Be trained in instructional/assessment techniques and/or have proven
instructing/teaching experience

Be included in an ongoing training and development programme, which
ensures they are aware and knowledgeable of all changes to legislation
and industry requirements



B.2 Trainer/Delegate Ratio

The ratio shown for theory sessions indicates the maximum number of delegates that should
attend the course in any one session.


Theory 1 : 16

Demonstrations 1 : 16

Practical 1 : 8
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B.3 Facilities

To ensure proper presentation the training provider should have:

Administration arrangements appropriate for enrolment and certification of delegates

A designated room that will not be used simultaneously for any other activity and which
provides sufficient room for delegates to participate fully in the instruction, demonstration
and practice sessions



Location of Training

It is recognised that the restricted range of resources and facilities required makes this
course suitable for on-location training. However, prior to any courses being delivered
remotely, training providers must comply with the following requirements:

a) Prior to initial approval, the training provider will specify a single approved site and
advise OPITO of its intention to deliver training remotely.

b) The training provider will advise OPITO of the location of any remote training in
advance of each delivery.

c) The training provider shall ensure the suitability of facilities and arrangements prior to
delivery.

d) Documented evidence will be retained by the training provider to show that delivery
of training at the remote site meets the criteria detailed in this OPITO standard
including, but not limited to, facilities, equipment and qualifications of instructional
staff.

e) Documented management procedures shall be retained which record any measures
required to assure the quality and safety of on-location training.

f) All records and associated documentation must be retained at a single, specified
location, mutually agreed with OPITO, and made available at time of audit.

g) OPITO reserves the right to physically audit any or all of the remote sites operated by
the training provider.


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B.4 Equipment & Reference Material

The following equipment and reference material is required to meet the stated content of the
training course.

Illustrations of rig and platform types
Examples of relevant legislation and guidance documentation as they are discussed
in each module
Examples of a Safety Observation report card
Examples of risk assessments and a risk matrix
Example of work permits in different coloured folders including a blank document for
delegates to complete
Objects and a trolley to demonstrate manual handling
Examples of an MSDS & COSHH assessment sheet
Examples of PPE to include coveralls, boots, hard hat and gloves
Examples of respiratory protective equipment (RPE)

Please note: Due to the variety of forms, records, plans, schedules etc. used offshore the
examples used for training purposes may differ from those found onsite. Training examples
should represent the range of documents available and should be as typical and current as
possible.

All equipment must be maintained, and where appropriate, inspected and tested in
accordance with current standards/legislation.

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SECTION C OUTCOME


C.1 Certification and Recording

Persons successfully completing the nine introductory training modules will be issued
with an OPITO endorsed certificate for the Offshore Oil & Gas Industry Minimum
Industry Safety Training Programme.

The issue of the certificate indicates that the delegate has achieved the level of
training as defined by oil and gas employers and approved by OPITO. The details of
each delegate will be registered on Vantage, the industrys central recording data
base.

It is the responsibility of the training provider to issue the delegates with a certificate
containing the following:

a) Establishment Name
b) Full OPITO Course Title & Registration Code
c) Delegate's Name
d) Course Dates
e) Expiry date
f) Unique Certificate Number (UCN) Refer to OPITO UCN Guidance doc. for
details
g) Itemised Module Titles
h) Establishment Signatory

Each individual attending any OPITO approved course must complete a central
register form. The forms must be returned by the training establishment to OPITO
within one week of the training delivery.

Please note: New training providers (to OPITO) will be required to send both the
original (paper) registration forms, and the electronic registration until notified
otherwise by Central Register.

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Appendix 1 OPITO Information

The topics listed below are to be delivered as part of the introduction to this course and
included in the Lesson Plans/Instructor guides/Exercise Plans. Additional introduction topics
may include training centre layout and alarms, emergency actions, first aid and domestic
arrangements.

Mandatory OPITO Information:

a) Medical Fitness
b) Certification Periods
c) CR/Vantage (provided by OPITO)
d) OPITO Customer Service Statement (provided by OPITO)
e) The roles of employers and training providers (provided by OPITO)
f) What is OPITOs role in industry? (provided by OPITO)
g) Current Global Network of training providers (provided by OPITO)
h) Emergency Response Framework (provided by OPITO applicable for ER Training
Providers)