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General Powerlifting => Universal Topics => Topic started by: Robert Frederick on April 28,
2014, 03:29:45 PM
Title: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on April 28, 2014, 03:29:45 PM
If the volume of load in a training week cycle is less than 20% of the total for one month, it
can be regarded as small; if it is from 21-30%, it is considered medium; between 31-40%,
it is considered large and greater than 40% is a maximum load.
Boris states that monotonous training loads, even more so the more frequently used, the
faster the body gets used to them and the less effective they become for the development
of the athlete. Thus, load variability is one of the most important principles in the
construction of the training process. Variability is the basis for stable progress.
Table 10 shows that the relative weekly load volumes vary between small, medium, large
and maximum loads. It should be noted that these options are not the only load distribution
possibilities. There are other options, especially in the preparatory months.
Options with one digit (1, 2, 3, etc.) indicate that the maximum volume of load falls on that
week of the month. If two numbers indicate the option, the first digit indicates the week
with a highest volume; the second digit indicates the week with a comparable but slightly
reduced volume.
When A.V. Cherniak analyzed training diaries of qualified weightlifters (Master of Sport,
Master of Sport International Class and Honored Master of Sport), he found that the most
common schemes during the competition period were: 1, 2, 1-3, 3-1, with deloading the
last week before competition.
Table 10
Variants For Weekly Load Distribution In A Preparatory Mesocycle (B. Sheiko, 2011)
Variants

% Monthly
Volume
Number of
Lifts
1st Week
2nd

3rd

4th

1st Week
2nd

3rd

4th

TOTAL
1 46% 20% 22% 12% 138 60 66 36 300
1-2 34% 30% 24% 12% 119 105 84 42 350
1-3 36% 16% 27% 21% 144 64 108 84 400
1-4 35% 22% 14% 29% 158 99 63 130 450
2 22% 38% 25% 15% 110 190 125 75 500
2-3 20% 34% 30% 16% 110 187 165 88 550
2-4 21% 35% 13% 31% 126 210 78 186 600
3 15% 28% 35% 22% 97 182 228 143 650
3-1 28% 15% 35% 22% 196 105 245 154 700
3-2 22% 27% 33% 18% 165 203 247 135 750
3-4 17% 21% 35% 27% 136 168 280 216 800
4 18% 26% 12% 44% 153 221 102 374 850
4-2 15% 28% 22% 35% 135 252 198 315 900
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4-3 22% 15% 28% 35% 220 150 280 350 1000
Table 11
Variants For Weekly Load Distribution In A Competition Mesocycle (B. Sheiko, 2011)

Variants

% Monthly
Volume
Number of
Lifts
1st Week
2nd

3rd

4th

1st Week
2nd

3rd

4th

TOTAL
1 40% 27% 20% 13% 108 73 54 35 270
2 29% 38% 22% 11% 101 134 77 38 350
3-1 28% 24% 34% 14% 120 103 147 60 430
1-3 38% 20% 28% 14% 190 100 140 70 500
See Fig. 9 Diagram of possible load distributions in a competitive mesocycle
Application of the principle of variability is acceptable for athletes of any skill level in any
sport. The above allocation scheme for weekly cycles is fully applicable to the various
qualifications of powerlifters across weight categories.
The largest volume of load often falls on the first or second week of the month before the
event. Rarely is a large volume of load observed in the third week.
Upon completion of the training week it is necessary to make a comparative analysis
between what was planned and what was actually done. If there is a deviation from the
plan, it is necessary to find an objective reason, which must be corrected for in the following
week.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: hurril on June 05, 2014, 03:44:48 PM
This is incredibly interesting. My question concerns the differences (and the similarities)
between the overall volume of load per month and the ones for each individual lift. Is the
big idea that I pick one variant for each lift and then just combine them and hope for the
best or are there better strategies to employ here?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 05, 2014, 04:49:52 PM
These are total volume patterns. For distributing the volume across the lifts you could start
with 50% bench, 25% squat and 25% deadlift. From there you could tweak it a little so it
makes more sense for you. There are a couple examples of lift distributions in the
intermediate spreadsheets.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: hurril on June 05, 2014, 05:06:22 PM
Thank you for responding so quickly. I downloaded the spreadsheets and had a look a few
minutes ago and looked at closely those things.
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I can see how you would partition the total volume the way you describe; it'd be interesting
to read a little more about the thought process that went in to that.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 05, 2014, 06:12:06 PM
My understanding of it is that it works out to be 50% upper body and 50% lower body,
which seems like a logical starting point. Say you want to overload the bench for a bit. Then
bump it up, possibly with a larger bench pyramid and reduce the others accordingly. The
next week you give the bench a break from that with possibly more higher end lifts and less
volume. Meanwhile, the other lifts go up. Maybe throw in a squat pyramid during the week,
followed by more high end the next week. And so on.
So that's how it works out in theory. Then you go try it and find out something needs a little
adjusting. For one person maybe it's too much volume for benching and not enough for
squats. Maybe someone else has a decent squat but needs more for the deadlift. Or maybe
you do more squats one period and more deadlifts the next. So you wind up with something
that's loosely based on the 50:50 starting point and will vary from person to person
depending on individual needs.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: hurril on June 05, 2014, 07:11:10 PM
Something I tend to do in programs that I author, is that sometimes I'll synchronize the
squat and deadlift (albeit inverted). I.e.: I'll back down on the number of deadlifts as a
function of an increasing number of squats (per week). At other times I'll pull back on all
lifts in order to scale the entire week back a little (because the week before was huge.)
But I always find myself struggling a little with good rules of thumb and more thought-
through patterns of distribution. The tables and examples listed in this article are all very
helpful for this very reason.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Roadblock on June 07, 2014, 02:45:44 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on April 28, 2014, 03:29:45 PM
If the volume of load in a training week cycle is less than 20% of the total for one month, it can be regarded as small; if
it is from 21-30%, it is considered medium; between 31-40%, it is considered large and greater than 40% is a
maximum load.
How do you calculate the training load per week and compare it to the month? Is it total
work (ie. all main movements performed totaled together) divided into the months total or
is it individual work (ie. each main lift divided by that main lifts total for the month)?
Thanks,
RB
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 07, 2014, 01:59:45 PM
Quote from: Roadblock on June 07, 2014, 02:45:44 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on April 28, 2014, 03:29:45 PM
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If the volume of load in a training week cycle is less than 20% of the total for one month, it can be regarded as small;
if it is from 21-30%, it is considered medium; between 31-40%, it is considered large and greater than 40% is a
maximum load.
How do you calculate the training load per week and compare it to the month? Is it total work (ie. all main movements
performed totaled together) divided into the months total or is it individual work (ie. each main lift divided by that main
lifts total for the month)?
Thanks,
RB
Weekly load is total work as you defined it, divided by the month's total, and multiplied by
100%.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Roadblock on June 07, 2014, 08:56:48 PM
Thanks man.
RB
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Don on July 24, 2014, 11:46:21 AM
Interesting.
Have some weekly load distribution options been more successful than others?
Or is it a matter of determining what option fits best into the larger plan?
Also. Is there significance to the "Total" column in Table 10 and 11?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Weekly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on July 24, 2014, 02:29:52 PM
Quote from: Don on July 24, 2014, 11:46:21 AM
Interesting.
Have some weekly load distribution options been more successful than others?
Or is it a matter of determining what option fits best into the larger plan?
Also. Is there significance to the "Total" column in Table 10 and 11?
I know there are some that I don't like. Having the biggest load on the first week is no fun
nor is having it the last week. Put it in the middle and I like it much better. Actually, I take
that back about the last week. I like 4-2.
The total column just shows you that the percents can apply to any monthly volume.
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Sheiko Forum
General Powerlifting => Universal Topics => Topic started by: Robert Frederick on April 28,
2014, 02:59:05 PM
Title: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: Robert Frederick on April 28, 2014, 02:59:05 PM
Daily Loading Schemes
Load cases with two, three and four single workouts per week.
With two workouts per week the range of variation is not great.
Boris offers 2 options of training sessions in the week:
Option 1:
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Workout Rest Rest Workout Rest Rest Rest
Option 2:
Monday

Tuesday
Wednesday

Thursday

Friday
Saturday

Sunday

Rest
Workout

Rest Rest
Workout

Rest Rest
When planning the training sessions Boris makes use of variability, i.e. alternating small,
medium and large loads which is clearly seen in Tables 1 and 2.

Table 1
Options (1-4): Preparatory Period Load Variants For 2 Workouts Per Microcycle
1st Option 2nd Option 3rd Option 4th Option
Monday Large Medium Small Small
Tuesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Wednesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Thursday Small Medium Large Medium
Friday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Saturday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Table 2
Options (5-8): Preparatory Period Load Variants For 2 Workouts Per Microcycle
5th Option 6th Option 7th Option 8th Option
Monday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Tuesday Medium Large Medium Small
Wednesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Thursday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Friday Small Large Large Small
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Saturday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest

See Fig.1 Diagram of methods of distributing load for a microcycle with two workouts per
week
With three workouts per week load variability can increase beyond that of two workouts per
microcycle, but not as great as with 4 workouts per microcycle. But even with three we can
achieve diversity and great effect.
Boris offers the two most acceptable options:
Option 1:
Monday
Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday
Saturday

Sunday

Workout

Rest Workout Rest
Workout

Rest Rest
Option 2:
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Rest Workout Rest Workout Rest Workout Rest
For example:
Table 3
Options (1-4): Preparatory Period Load Variants For 3 Workouts Per Microcycle
1st Option 2nd Option 3rd Option 4th Option
Monday Small Medium Medium Small
Tuesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Wednesday Large Large Small Large
Thursday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Friday Small Medium Large Medium
Saturday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest
The largest microcycle workload is scheduled in the second microcycle (see Table 3). Such a
distribution is possible in the second month of training beginners and the first month of
training qualified athletes when they learn and improve their technique in the competitive
exercises with lower intensity (50 - 70%), with the number of repetitions from 4 to 6 in a
set.
Table 5
Options (5-8): Preparatory Period Load Variants For 3 Workouts Per Microcycle
5th Option 6th Option 7th Option 8th Option
Monday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Tuesday Large Large Medium Large
Wednesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Thursday Small Medium Small Small
Friday Rest Rest Rest Rest
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Saturday Medium Large Medium Large
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest
In the second embodiment, microcycle load is much higher than the first. Load peaks in the
sixth microcycle. In the fifth and seventh microcycles the load is average, and increases
again at the eighth (see Table 5 and Figure 2).
See Fig. 2 Diagram of methods of distributing the load for microcycles with three workouts
per week
Any plan, even one perfectly planned for a group of athletes written by a highly
accomplished coach needs to be adjusted during training sessions. This is explained by the
fact that the athletes find themselves with different anatomical and physiological realities,
and therefore they will have different reactions to load, different recoverability between
them, and miscellaneous technique errors in the execution of competitive exercises.
Therefore, the coach should give additional exercises to eliminate the technical errors that
occur during training.
Unlike many powerlifting professionals in the USA (Jeff Wright, Rick Weil, Bill Kazmaier, Ted
Arcidi, Michael Simpson, John Kuc, etc.), UK, Canada, and Australia, Russia has many
followers of the cycling method described above (Surowiecki A., Zavyalov I., Verkhoshansky
Y., etc.) while many other countries, utilize cyclic load planning with their athletes lifting
maximum weights even in the first (competitive period) weeks. For example in the program
by John Kuc:

2nd Week Prior to Competition
1st day benching
%RM Reps Sets
45.0 10 1
58.3 8 1
73.3 6 1
85 3 1
96.7 1 1
101.7 1 1
103.3 1 1
95.0 3 1
2nd day benching
%RM Reps Sets
45.0 10 1
58.3 8 1
73.3 6 1
85 3 1
96.7 1 1
101.7 1 1
95 3 1

1 Week Before Competition
Day 1 (Tuesday)
Bench press
%RM Reps Sets
45.0 10 1
58.3 8 1
73.3 4 1
85 2 1
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96.7 1 1
101.7 1 1
Competition on Saturday.
Your attempts at competition must be within:
93.3 - 95%; 100 - 103.3%; 106.7 - 110%, depending on the progress you have made in
the program.
Boris believes that an athlete following such a training plan will not be able to recover and
perform successfully in competition. Boris instead plans a reduction in volume and intensity
prior to competition (see Table 6).
Table 6
Loading Variance For 3 Workouts Per Microcycle During the Competition Period


6 Weeks

5 Weeks

4 Weeks

3 Weeks

2 Weeks

1 Week

Monday Large Small Medium Test Medium Small
Tuesday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest
Wednesday Small Medium Large Small Small Small
Thursday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest
Friday Medium Large Small Large Medium Rest
Saturday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Comp.
*weeks countdown starts from the beginning of the competition
A large load is scheduled for Monday of the first week after two days of rest. The last large
load scheduled is in the fourth week. In the third week, 17 - 20 days before the event is
scheduled, a test of performance in all three movements should take place. The test can be
scheduled in one day of training (i.e. squats, bench press, and deadlift) or two training days
(i.e. the first day: squats and bench press, the second day - deadlift). The test allows the
coach to see what condition the athlete comes to competition in and allows the coach to
determine the initial weights during the competition and to choose tactical approaches to
the bar (i.e. how to select weights for the three competitive approaches).
See Fig. 3 Diagram of the distribution of load during a competition mesocycle
See Fig. 4 Distribution of number of lifts during the competition mesocycle (6 weeks out
from competition)
Through a reduction in volume and intensity Boris initiates super-compensation in the
athlete, which promotes the achievement of high competition results.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: mudaliar89 on June 17, 2014, 07:11:44 PM
Are there defiinitions of small/medium/large daily loads?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: BuccioniPL on June 17, 2014, 07:20:50 PM
Quote from: mudaliar89 on June 17, 2014, 07:11:44 PM
Are there defiinitions of small/medium/large daily loads?
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In general is a combination of volume and intensity.
Just some examples (not necessarely applicable):
60%x5x5 light
70%x5x5 medium
80%x3x5 hard
As you can guess, combinations are pretty much endless.
In each work -out you have to take into account first of all the number of lifts. Secondly the
average intensity and the max intensity you reach
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: dimitris on June 17, 2014, 08:03:46 PM
Quote from: BuccioniPL on June 17, 2014, 07:20:50 PM
In general is a combination of volume and intensity.
Just some examples (not necessarely applicable):
In each work -out you have to take into account first of all the number of lifts. Secondly the average intensity and the
max intensity you reach
I thought it was like the weekly load. less than 20%small, 21-30% medium, 31-40%large.
Instead of month, the percentages are based of the weekly Number of Lifts.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 18, 2014, 05:40:10 AM
Quote from: dimitris on June 17, 2014, 08:03:46 PM
I thought it was like the weekly load. less than 20%small, 21-30% medium, 31-40%large. Instead of month, the
percentages are based of the weekly Number of Lifts.
My personal approach would be to work it out as follows:
Take your monthly total number of lifts (NL). Divide that by the number of workouts per
month (12). That is your average daily load. Define that to be a medium load. Then take
+/- 10% of that to establish the range. Lower than that range is a small load, higher is a
larger load. So for example lets say your monthly NL is 600, then your average daily load is
50 = 600/12. So a medium load is 45-55 lifts. Less than 45 is a small load and greater than
55 is a large load.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: FreakGoHome on June 18, 2014, 09:09:34 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 18, 2014, 05:40:10 AM
My personal approach would be to work it out as follows:
Take your monthly total number of lifts (NL). Divide that by the number of workouts per month (12). That is your
average daily load. Define that to be a medium load. Then take +/- 10% of that to establish the range. Lower than that
range is a small load, higher is a larger load. So for example lets say your monthly NL is 600, then your average daily
load is 50 = 600/12. So a medium load is 45-55 lifts. Less than 45 is a small load and greater than 55 is a large load.
What about loading? x lifts done at 60% is a smaller stress than x lifts at 80%.
Wouldn't a better measure of stress be in terms of tonnage? We can use the same method
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but this way we also factor in the intensity the lifts are performed at and not just the
number of lifts.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: dimitris on June 18, 2014, 12:13:10 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 18, 2014, 05:40:10 AM
My personal approach would be to work it out as follows:
Take your monthly total number of lifts (NL). Divide that by the number of workouts per month (12). That is your
average daily load. Define that to be a medium load. Then take +/- 10% of that to establish the range. Lower than that
range is a small load, higher is a larger load. So for example lets say your monthly NL is 600, then your average daily
load is 50 = 600/12. So a medium load is 45-55 lifts. Less than 45 is a small load and greater than 55 is a large load.
Let's use the 6 week, 4-days per week from the book (that's what I have handy now):
It has 1244 NL. 1244/16=77.75. That means 70-85 is medium. Now, here what that gives
us:
Week 1: light, light, light, light
Week 2: light, light, light, light
Week 3: light, light, medium, light
Week 4: light, light, light, light
Week 5: light, light, light, light
Week 6: light, light, light, light
Let's try the percentages based of the weekly NL:
Week 1: light, medium, heavy, medium
Week 2: light, medium, heavy, medium
Week 3: medium, medium, medium, medium
Week 4: heavy, medium, heavy, medium
Week 5: medium, medium, medium, medium
Week 6: medium, medium, medium, medium
Hmm. The 2nd table makes more sense, but it lacks variation too. Perhaps it's something
more simple? Like NL <40 light, 40-60 medium, 60+ heavy?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: dimitris on June 18, 2014, 12:22:08 PM
hahaha. That's why I avoid calculations before I drink coffee. Gotta go, I'll post it later :)
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 18, 2014, 12:32:28 PM
Quote from: dimitris on June 18, 2014, 12:13:10 PM
Let's use the 6 week, 4-days per week from the book (that's what I have handy now):
It has 1244 NL. 1244/16=77.75. That means 70-85 is medium. Now, here what that gives us:
Week 1: light, light, light, light
Week 2: light, light, light, light
Week 3: light, light, medium, light
Week 4: light, light, light, light
Week 5: light, light, light, light
Week 6: light, light, light, light
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Let's try the percentages based of the weekly NL:
Week 1: light, medium, heavy, medium
Week 2: light, medium, heavy, medium
Week 3: medium, medium, medium, medium
Week 4: heavy, medium, heavy, medium
Week 5: medium, medium, medium, medium
Week 6: medium, medium, medium, medium
Hmm. The 2nd table makes more sense, but it lacks variation too. Perhaps it's something more simple? Like NL <40
light, 40-60 medium, 60+ heavy?
Try it again with 24 workouts. It is 6 weeks x 4 days. That gives you about 50 lifts per day
for medium.
Quote from: FreakGoHome on June 18, 2014, 09:09:34 AM
What about loading? x lifts done at 60% is a smaller stress than x lifts at 80%.
Wouldn't a better measure of stress be in terms of tonnage? We can use the same method but this way we also factor
in the intensity the lifts are performed at and not just the number of lifts.
One measure of stress isn't really sufficient as you pointed out. That's why the number of
lifts is usually paired with the average weight lifted. Since the latter doesn't vary too much
you can get a good estimate by just counting the number of lifts.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: dimitris on June 19, 2014, 01:09:04 AM
Now we ve got this:
Week 1: light, medium, heavy, medium
Week 2: light, light, heavy, medium
Week 3: medium, heavy, heavy, heavy
Week 4: heavy, light, medium, light
Week 5: medium, light, light, medium
Week 6: medium, medium, heavy, medium
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: owik on June 19, 2014, 01:28:27 AM
Why go four heavy days in a row, in week 3-4? Would not that give too much fatigue.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 19, 2014, 03:12:30 AM
Quote from: owik on June 19, 2014, 01:28:27 AM
Why go four heavy days in a row, in week 3-4? Would not that give too much fatigue.
That would be rough. Thankfully the following weeks are on the lighter side.
The +/- 10% figure is also just a starting point for the contrast between days too. The
picture would probably look a little different had we picked a different percent.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
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Post by: dimitris on June 19, 2014, 12:51:46 PM
Quote from: owik on June 19, 2014, 01:28:27 AM
Why go four heavy days in a row, in week 3-4? Would not that give too much fatigue.
It's not heavy as big weights. The more correct term is large. We are talking about Number
of Lifts. For example, in the 3rd week, 3rd workout you do squat 4x6x65% and in the 4th
workout bench 4x6x70%. These two alone, are 36 and 42 NL. Add in them bench and
deadlift respectively and you've created 2 large (heavy) days.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: joshuadelapenha on July 13, 2014, 12:07:07 PM
Sorry to bother but i noticed that the load variance has a test on Monday of the load
variance for the competition period during the 3rd week. I noticed that Boris has it on a
Wednesday of the first week (4th according to the table) of the competition period.
Any reason for this slight difference.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: Robert Frederick on July 13, 2014, 02:29:12 PM
Quote from: joshuadelapenha on July 13, 2014, 12:07:07 PM
Sorry to bother but i noticed that the load variance has a test on Monday of the load variance for the competition period
during the 3rd week. I noticed that Boris has it on a Wednesday of the first week (4th according to the table) of the
competition period.
Any reason for this slight difference.
Which two examples are you referring to? I see it on Monday three weeks out in table 6
above.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: joshuadelapenha on July 14, 2014, 03:48:27 AM
In the 3 day program and 4 day program.
The skills test is on Wednesday not the first day of the week.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: DocWallaby on July 14, 2014, 06:28:53 AM
I have spreadsheeted the universal four day program and made some adjustments for my
second run through. I would love to upload this and have some feedback if this is
appropriate? How would I go about doing this?
It has graphs of numbers of lifts over ten weeks so may be of general interest to stir
discussion.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: joshuadelapenha on July 14, 2014, 09:27:28 AM
Quote from: DocWallaby on July 14, 2014, 06:28:53 AM
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I have spreadsheeted the universal four day program and made some adjustments for my second run through. I would
love to upload this and have some feedback if this is appropriate? How would I go about doing this?
It has graphs of numbers of lifts over ten weeks so may be of general interest to stir discussion.
That would be excellent!
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 1
Post by: Robert Frederick on July 14, 2014, 11:30:53 AM
Quote from: joshuadelapenha on July 14, 2014, 03:48:27 AM
In the 3 day program and 4 day program.
The skills test is on Wednesday not the first day of the week.
The test is over two days, Monday and Wednesday. Having done it, it seems to fit in more
like an ordinary workout.
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Sheiko Forum
General Powerlifting => Universal Topics => Topic started by: Robert Frederick on April 28,
2014, 03:17:02 PM
Title: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Robert Frederick on April 28, 2014, 03:17:02 PM
Increasing the number of training days to four times a week is a big step forward in the
direction of increased loads. A greater variation of loading can be planned with four
workouts per week.
An example distribution of monthly load in microcycles with four workouts per week can be
seen as follows (see Table 7).
Options with a sharp change in number of lifts from workout to workout are called
intermittent stressors; options with a gradual increase or decrease of volume during three
workouts or more are called gradual stressors.
Table 7
Options (1-4): Preparatory Period Load Variants For 4 Workouts Per Microcycle
1st Option 2nd Option 3rd Option 4th Option
Monday Medium Large Large Medium
Tuesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Wednesday Large Medium Small Small
Thursday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Friday Medium Large Large Large
Saturday Small Small Small Small
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest
See Fig. 5 Diagram of methods of distributing the load in microcycles with 4 workouts per
week
In embodiments 1-4 the maximum load is scheduled in the second: two large loads with
one medium and small training day (see Figure 5 and Table 7).

Table 8
Options (5-8): Preparatory Period Load Variants For 4 Workouts Per Microcycle
5th Option 6th Option 7th Option 8th Option
Monday Medium Medium Large Large
Tuesday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Wednesday Small Medium Small Large
Thursday Rest Rest Rest Rest
Friday Medium Small Small Small
Saturday Small Large Medium Medium
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest
In cases 5-8 the maximum load is planned in version 8: two large workouts followed by
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small and medium training days (Table 8 and Figure 6).
See Fig. 6 Diagram of ways (5-8) of distributing the load of microcycles with 4 workouts per
week
Table 9
Loading Variance For 4 Workouts Per Microcycle During the Competition Period

6 Weeks

5 Weeks

4 Weeks

3 Weeks

2 Weeks

1 Week

Monday Large Large Medium Test Medium Small
Tuesday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest
Wednesday Large Small Large Medium Small Small
Thursday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest
Friday Small Medium Medium Medium Medium Rest
Saturday Medium Small Small Small Rest Comp.
Sunday Rest Rest Rest Rest Rest Comp.
*weeks countdown starts from the beginning of the competition
See Fig. 7 Method of distributing the load during the competition mesocycle
Just as in the planning with three workouts per week, a test in the competition exercises is
scheduled for the 12th workout (3 weeks) preceding the event. During the second week
prior to the event the scheduled training sessions reduces to 3 (Monday, Wednesday and
Friday), with Saturday being a rest day. If an athlete competes on Friday, Boris
recommends that one small workout, that is more like a warm-up, should take place on
Tuesday with Wednesday and Thursday being rest days. If the athlete performs on
Saturday, then the athlete trains on Monday with a small load and even less load on
Wednesday with Thursday and Friday being rest days. If the athlete performs on Sunday
(i.e. heavyweights), he also trains on Monday, Wednesday and has 3 days of rest.
See Fig. 8 Diagram of the method of distribution the load of microcycles with 4 workouts
per week during the competition mesocycle
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: hurril on June 05, 2014, 07:03:45 PM
I know there are (older) five-day templates from the old snow leopard club era. It would be
interesting to see some examples on how that'd fan out as far as the daily loading goes.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Green.is.Mean on June 06, 2014, 12:59:02 PM
Quote from: hurril on June 05, 2014, 07:03:45 PM
I know there are (older) five-day templates from the old snow leopard club era. It would be interesting to see some
examples on how that'd fan out as far as the daily loading goes.
I hope its ok for me to post this. It's from the Online Translation of Sheikos Powerlifting
Book:
Day 1. Week 2. Week 3. Week 4. Week
Monday Large Medium Large Large
Tuesday Small Large Small Small
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Wednesday Medium Large Large Medium
Friday Large Medium Large Medium
Saturday Small Small Small Small
This was an Example for training pattern of 5 or even 8 times each week. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday mostly 2 Training sessions if training 8 Times each Week.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 06, 2014, 06:20:48 PM
Quote from: hurril on June 05, 2014, 07:03:45 PM
I know there are (older) five-day templates from the old snow leopard club era. It would be interesting to see some
examples on how that'd fan out as far as the daily loading goes.
See my post in the CMS/MS/MSIC section with the Fedorenko cycle.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: dimitris on June 06, 2014, 06:29:31 PM
One option from the new book. (If I'm not allowed to post it, mods please delete it)
1st option 2nd option 3rd option 4th option
1st workout heavy medium heavy medium
2nd workout light light Light light
3rd workout medium heavy heavy medium
4th workout heavy medium heavy heavy
5th workout light light light light
heavy=large, light=small, medium=medium :)
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 06, 2014, 06:34:06 PM
I think you should be fine to post it from what I've been told. Share more!
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: dimitris on June 07, 2014, 01:17:05 AM
Second table:
5 option 6 option 7 option 8 option
1st workout heavy light heavy medium
2nd workout light heavy medium heavy
3rd workout heavy light heavy medium
4th workout medium heavy light light
5th workout light light medium medium
Competition mesocycle:
week 4 week 3 week 2 week 1
1st workout heavy medium medium light
2nd workout light light rest rest
3rd workout medium heavy light light
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4th workout medium medium medium rest
5th workout light light rest meet
I kept the heavy/medium/light terms, because that's what I use in my notes.
That's all for now from the book, as I think it's "unfair" to post more, unless Mr Sheiko does.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: hurril on June 08, 2014, 02:22:02 AM
I would gladly purchase the book if I could read it. (I take it its in russian?)
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 08, 2014, 05:49:30 AM
Quote from: hurril on June 08, 2014, 02:22:02 AM
I would gladly purchase the book if I could read it. (I take it its in russian?)
Boris is working on getting it translated soon.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: hurril on June 08, 2014, 04:30:38 PM
Brilliant =)
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: DRY on June 09, 2014, 03:40:31 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 08, 2014, 05:49:30 AM
Quote from: hurril on June 08, 2014, 02:22:02 AM
I would gladly purchase the book if I could read it. (I take it its in russian?)
Boris is working on getting it translated soon.
I hope it is translated well. I bet every little improvement in the english would mean a lot
more copies sold.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: FreakGoHome on June 09, 2014, 06:14:17 AM
Quote from: DRY on June 09, 2014, 03:40:31 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 08, 2014, 05:49:30 AM
Quote from: hurril on June 08, 2014, 02:22:02 AM
I would gladly purchase the book if I could read it. (I take it its in russian?)
Boris is working on getting it translated soon.
I hope it is translated well. I bet every little improvement in the english would mean a lot more copies sold.
Yeah, I think there is a pretty significant market for this kind of work in the English
language.
I mean where do powerlifters in the English speaking world (who don't have the guidance of
a coach!) turn for information? Starting Strength? T-Nation? E-books from the likes of
Wendlers, Lilliebridges, Carrolls, Lilys? Dear god...
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Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 09, 2014, 07:24:24 AM
The hold up is the contract with the publisher of the currents works, which states that they
have exclusive rights. There may be wiggle room though with some fine legal
maneuvering.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: DRY on June 09, 2014, 04:39:25 PM
Quote
Yeah, I think there is a pretty significant market for this kind of work in the English language.
I mean where do powerlifters in the English speaking world (who don't have the guidance of a coach!) turn for
information? Starting Strength? T-Nation? E-books from the likes of Wendlers, Lilliebridges, Carrolls, Lilys? Dear god...
In my opinion, for the most part the guys who find a good home to train in do fine. They
learn from each other and help each other. The guys who train by themselves rely on all of
these e-books (not to say anything about their quality, haven't read any of them) and
youtube celebrities for their knowledge.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 09, 2014, 04:53:13 PM
Quote from: DRY on June 09, 2014, 04:39:25 PM
Quote
Yeah, I think there is a pretty significant market for this kind of work in the English language.
I mean where do powerlifters in the English speaking world (who don't have the guidance of a coach!) turn for
information? Starting Strength? T-Nation? E-books from the likes of Wendlers, Lilliebridges, Carrolls, Lilys? Dear god...
In my opinion, for the most part the guys who find a good home to train in do fine. They learn from each other and
help each other. The guys who train by themselves rely on all of these e-books (not to say anything about their quality,
haven't read any of them) and youtube celebrities for their knowledge.
I agree. Boris also likes the group method. That's what the forum is for, to bring people
together so we can help each other get ridiculously strong. We tossed around the idea of
implementing his group method for beginners in that section with different age groups and
virtual online "technique" meets. But many people have the idea that Sheiko style training
is only for advanced lifters.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 09, 2014, 05:16:07 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 09, 2014, 04:53:13 PM
But many people have the idea that Sheiko style training is only for advanced lifters.
I've been trying to destroy that myth for ages but there's so many years of disinformation
out there already.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: DRY on June 09, 2014, 05:27:44 PM
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Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 09, 2014, 05:16:07 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 09, 2014, 04:53:13 PM
But many people have the idea that Sheiko style training is only for advanced lifters.
I've been trying to destroy that myth for ages but there's so many years of disinformation out there already.
I think the only argument with any merit against this style of training for younger guys is
ego and psychology. Many of them can't help but go heavy every day. Obviously it is not
good for their progress in the long run, but if you try to force a volume based program on
them they may quit
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: ranson on June 09, 2014, 07:49:17 PM
As a beginner/intermediate lifter, I would say that Sheiko is a great beginner workout. I
started with 5-3-1, more or less, and while I made great gains, I didn't get enough volume
to develop technique. With Sheiko, I spend more time under the bar, and get more
opportunities to develop my feel for the lifts.
The downside that I see, is that without guidance and coaching, uncorrected flaws in your
form, especially on the bench, could quickly lead to overuse injuries. Back when I was
benching once per week, I could get away with errors that I can't allow now that I'm
benching three or four times per week.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Masterbench on June 09, 2014, 10:44:48 PM
What sort of set/rep/percentage scheme should you work with on the 4th day? I understand
it is a small/light session, but I am not sure what Boris what quantify this as in terms of
volume. I am running the standard 3 day a week cycle to start but my recovery has been
great so I wanted to add a 4th day.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 10, 2014, 09:54:50 AM
You can do normal deadlifting on the fourth day and do some easy bench stuff. So that
could mean
1) Deficit Deadlift
2) Incline Bench
3) Dips
4) Deadlift from knees
5) extra
Or you could do only one deadlift round and make it a full movement. The fourth day is
usually classified as light because of the break from the benching, otherwise it's a normal
day.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: ado gruzza on June 10, 2014, 01:18:00 PM
Forth day should be lighter.
The lower the level of the trainee, the lighter should be the 4th day.
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That's just my opinion.
A beginner lifter should spend saturday doing some move with the barbell, working on
posture and technique with low weight. The right % is as much as he can controll his
instinctive activities under the bar.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Harry_t on June 27, 2014, 10:16:08 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 10, 2014, 09:54:50 AM
You can do normal deadlifting on the fourth day and do some easy bench stuff. So that could mean
1) Deficit Deadlift
2) Incline Bench
3) Dips
4) Deadlift from knees
5) extra
Or you could do only one deadlift round and make it a full movement. The fourth day is usually classified as light because
of the break from the benching, otherwise it's a normal day.
Hi guys,
I've been reading the forum for a few hours now trying to figure out how to add a 4th day
to the 3-Day Program.
I'm having doubts regarding volume distribution and sets/reps/%. Should I split the Deadlift
volume from the 2nd day and use it in the 4th (half on the 2nd day half on the 4th)?
Can somebody please do an example for 1 week so I can fully grasp the idea?
Also, in the quoted statement you said that the 4th day should be light. Should it ALWAYS
be light or should I vary based upon the 3rd day (similar to table 8 on topic General
Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2)?
Thanks
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Daily Loading Part 2
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 28, 2014, 04:39:56 AM
Since the 3rd and 4th workout of the week are back to back one of them should be light.
Tables 7 and 8 show some good examples. I can't say whether to split the volume because
there are situations where that makes sense and then there are some where you should
add volume instead.
Some 4 day stuff is coming soon. Hang in there a little bit.
SMF 2.0.7 | SMF 2014, Simple Machines
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Sheiko Forum
General Powerlifting => Universal Topics => Topic started by: Robert Frederick on April 28,
2014, 02:25:51 PM
Title: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on April 28, 2014, 02:25:51 PM
Training Cycles
To ensure the growth of sports performance, it is necessary to continuously develop the
functionality of the athletes body. This is achieved by systematically increasing load
through careful planning.
In accordance with the objective of continuous improvement, load planning in powerlifting
training should include the following aims:
- Improving overall physical development
- Further development of special physical qualities
- Further improvement of technical and tactical abilities
Sports training is constructed in the form of cycles of different duration. In 1964, L.P.
Matveev illustrated the general structure of a long-term training process at the micro
(small), meso (middle), macro (large) cycle(s) of training.
Microcycle
A microcycle is a series of workouts carried out over several days and which provides a
complete solution to the task of a particular training stage. Typically, the microcycle
duration is one week.
The number of training sessions in microcycle can range from 2 to 10-12 sessions. Several
factors are taken into consideration in the construction of a microcycle. Fatigue
management and the recovery process are of particular concern.
Mesocycle
A mesocycle on average lasts from two to six weeks and includes a number of relatively
complete microcycles. The construction of the training process at the mesocycle level allows
you to organize training in accordance with the main task of the period or phase of training,
to ensure optimum dynamics between training and competitive pressures, and employs
suitable combinations of various means and methods of training. (J.K. Colds, 2007)
Macrocycle
A macrocycle is an organized grouping of mesocycles associated with the development,
stabilization and temporary loss of sporting form. The macrocycle is thus divided into three
periods: preparatory, competitive and transition. The duration of a macrocycle can range
from 3-4 months to multi-year plans (e.g. 4 year Olympic cycles).
The preparatory period is aimed at developing the sporting form and creating a solid
foundation of preparation (general and special) for the main event and various other
aspects of preparedness. During this period there is an increase in strength, speed,
flexibility, agility, and is in general versatile physical training. It is characterized by the
highest volume of training load and a gradual increase in the intensity of competition
exercises.
The increase in the volume of the load should go in waves, i.e. months of heavy load should
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alternate with months of reduced load. A gradual increase in the load is only suitable for
beginners and low-level athletes. It is also suitable for qualified athletes after a long
transition period, at the beginning of a new cycle.
This period can be divided into two stages: general physical preparation and special physical
preparation.
The competitive period is characterized by a stabilization of sporting form and further
improvement in various aspects of preparedness. This period also provides integrated
training and is a direct preparation for the competition itself.
The main objective of the competition period is the implementation of high-level training.
Work in this period is characterized by a low volume and high intensity. The number of lifts
is reduced by 20-40% as compared to the preparatory period with the reduction depending
on the athlete's weight. The heavier the athlete, the greater the reduction.
The transition period aims to restore physical and mental capacity after high level training
and competitive pressures to prepare for the next macrocycle at a higher level. This period
forms the bridge between sports training cycles. Boris notes that he has always been
against long transition periods.
Yearly Planning
Suppose an athlete plans on entering five important competitions (at the end of months 3,
5, 6, 9 and 11) and three of which (at the end of months 3, 5 and 9) are for him, the most
important.
Cycle Months
1 1-3
2 4-6
3 7-9
4 10-11
Further suppose that the optimal numbers of lifts per month for this athlete during the
preparatory and competition periods are 1,500 and 1,050, respectively. The yearly schedule
may then look like the following:
Month Lifts
1 1,350 (preparatory, after a training lay-off)
2 1,500 (preparatory)
3 1,050 (competition)
4 1,430 (preparatory, slight reduction)*
5 1,000 (competition)
6 860 (competition)
7 1,150 (preparatory)**
8 1,500 (preparatory)
9 1,050 (competition)
10 1,150 (preparatory)***
11 770 (competition)
12 640 (active rest, GPP)
Average Number of Lifts Per Month = 1,120
* Looking forward, two competition months at higher intensity
** Recuperation before loading and competition
*** Definite background of fatigue, reduced loading is appropriate
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The months plan is distributed non-uniformly: weeks with a large load should be alternated
with weeks with small and medium loads.
Large loading has the greatest affect on the trainee and it creates the conditions for the
further increases in competition results. Moderate loading maintains the level of trainability.
Small loads are employed for active restoration and contribute to super-compensation,
thereby creating the highest level of functional possibility. Variability is an essential
component of maintaining sensitivity toward the training stimulus. Thus, only a sequence of
loading and rest can contribute to a continuous increase in results.
Two-time Olympic champion in weightlifting, doctor of medical science Professor A.
Vorobyov (1989) states that using any load with low intensity doesn't help him to achieve
high results. High intensity in training is extremely important. It is an axiom.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 10, 2014, 07:16:43 PM
Is there a recommendation for how often a deloaded prep cycle or active rest cycle should
performed?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 11, 2014, 01:52:15 PM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 10, 2014, 07:16:43 PM
Is there a recommendation for how often a deloaded prep cycle or active rest cycle should performed?
When I originally wrote this I had transition periods of increasing length sprinkled
throughout the year. Boris said he was against them so I deleted them and made a note. As
it is you can see there are some periods with reduced loading in the one year example. He
didn't object to those. Nothing specific though.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Boris Sheiko on June 12, 2014, 12:42:29 PM
When your competition is finished you have to find out when your next competition will be.
If there are more than 4 months left you can have a rest of 7-10 days. Take note that the
rest should be active: swimming, team games, easy running, etc.
Weightlifting World Champion, doctor of science and professor Alexey Medvedev proved that
resting more than 2 weeks in training has a negative impact on the training process. And
after a month's break, even with an active rest, many athletes find getting back to previous
form very difficult.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: owik on June 12, 2014, 01:49:12 PM
Very interesting topic. Are there any guidlines regarding the load (NL) for
beginners/MS/CMS? I am thinking of yearly load, monthly load in prepartion and monthly
load in competiton? Even a break down in week loads would be very interesting.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
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Post by: Bench Polkov on June 12, 2014, 02:00:50 PM
Quote from: Boris Sheiko on June 12, 2014, 12:42:29 PM
When your competition is finished you have to find out when your next competition will be. If there are more than 4
months left you can have a rest of 7-10 days. Take note that the rest should be active: swimming, team games, easy
running, etc.
Weightlifting World Champion, doctor of science and professor Alexey Medvedev proved that resting more than 2 weeks
in training has a negative impact on the training process. And after a month's break, even with an active rest, many
athletes find getting back to previous form very difficult.
Thanks Coach Sheiko. I definitely agree on the last part, I have had 4-5 week layoffs due to
illness or other issues and put myself back months.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Blitzball on June 12, 2014, 03:27:54 PM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 12, 2014, 02:00:50 PM
Quote from: Boris Sheiko on June 12, 2014, 12:42:29 PM
When your competition is finished you have to find out when your next competition will be. If there are more than 4
months left you can have a rest of 7-10 days. Take note that the rest should be active: swimming, team games,
easy running, etc.
Weightlifting World Champion, doctor of science and professor Alexey Medvedev proved that resting more than 2
weeks in training has a negative impact on the training process. And after a month's break, even with an active rest,
many athletes find getting back to previous form very difficult.
Thanks Coach Sheiko. I definitely agree on the last part, I have had 4-5 week layoffs due to illness or other issues and
put myself back months.
what is the logic behind this function of our body?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 12, 2014, 03:38:33 PM
Quote from: Blitzball on June 12, 2014, 03:27:54 PM
what is the logic behind this function of our body?
I know right. On the other side of the coin though we remodel ourselves depending on the
stimulus. If we weren't flexible like this we'd get nothing out of lifting weights.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 12, 2014, 04:12:46 PM
The longest undeloaded cycle I've ever run was 24 weeks for bench at last year's IPF
Oceanias. My wrists felt like glass after that and I spent nearly a half hour a day rolling out
knots in my pecs. Good times. Still set my comp pb and the Oceania record there though.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Blitzball on June 13, 2014, 12:40:05 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 12, 2014, 03:38:33 PM
Quote from: Blitzball on June 12, 2014, 03:27:54 PM
what is the logic behind this function of our body?
I know right. On the other side of the coin though we remodel ourselves depending on the stimulus. If we weren't
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4 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
flexible like this we'd get nothing out of lifting weights.
i meant why do we need like 2-3 months to get back on track if we stop training for 1
month.why does our body take so long?i would expect with a pause of 2 months we would
need like 1 month to regain full strength
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 13, 2014, 03:53:06 AM
Quote from: Blitzball on June 13, 2014, 12:40:05 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 12, 2014, 03:38:33 PM
Quote from: Blitzball on June 12, 2014, 03:27:54 PM
what is the logic behind this function of our body?
I know right. On the other side of the coin though we remodel ourselves depending on the stimulus. If we weren't
flexible like this we'd get nothing out of lifting weights.
i meant why do we need like 2-3 months to get back on track if we stop training for 1 month.why does our body take
so long?i would expect with a pause of 2 months we would need like 1 month to regain full strength
Don't know exactly. As a chemist though I can't help but to think in terms of equilibrium. It
takes more and more work to gain less and less. Then when you stop you effortlessly lose
your gains. That sounds like an equilibrium condition to me, just like charging up a battery.
I do think the equilibrium point can be shifted though. If it were to take you one year to
build a certain amount of strength and it took someone else one month to do the same from
the same starting point, it has been shown that your strength would be more persistent
upon discontinuing training than the other guy's. Why is that? It probably has to do with the
type of adaptation that created the gains in the first place. Strength arising from increases
of muscle cross-sectional area last longer than neural adaptations. Easy come, easy go.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: FreakGoHome on June 13, 2014, 12:49:48 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 13, 2014, 03:53:06 AM
Don't know exactly. As a chemist though I can't help but to think in terms of equilibrium. It takes more and more work
to gain less and less. Then when you stop you effortlessly lose your gains. That sounds like an equilibrium condition to
me, just like charging up a battery. I do think the equilibrium point can be shifted though. If it were to take you one year
to build a certain amount of strength and it took someone else one month to do the same from the same starting
point, it has been shown that your strength would be more persistent upon discontinuing training than the other guy's.
Why is that? It probably has to do with the type of adaptation that created the gains in the first place. Strength arising
from increases of muscle cross-sectional area last longer than neural adaptations. Easy come, easy go.
This kind of post makes me really wish there was a "like" function on this forum!
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Blitzball on June 13, 2014, 09:00:19 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 13, 2014, 03:53:06 AM
Quote from: Blitzball on June 13, 2014, 12:40:05 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 12, 2014, 03:38:33 PM
Quote from: Blitzball on June 12, 2014, 03:27:54 PM
what is the logic behind this function of our body?
I know right. On the other side of the coin though we remodel ourselves depending on the stimulus. If we weren't
flexible like this we'd get nothing out of lifting weights.
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5 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
i meant why do we need like 2-3 months to get back on track if we stop training for 1 month.why does our body take
so long?i would expect with a pause of 2 months we would need like 1 month to regain full strength
Don't know exactly. As a chemist though I can't help but to think in terms of equilibrium. It takes more and more work
to gain less and less. Then when you stop you effortlessly lose your gains. That sounds like an equilibrium condition to
me, just like charging up a battery. I do think the equilibrium point can be shifted though. If it were to take you one year
to build a certain amount of strength and it took someone else one month to do the same from the same starting
point, it has been shown that your strength would be more persistent upon discontinuing training than the other guy's.
Why is that? It probably has to do with the type of adaptation that created the gains in the first place. Strength arising
from increases of muscle cross-sectional area last longer than neural adaptations. Easy come, easy go.
pretty much nature works that way.very nice response
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: owik on June 15, 2014, 03:15:00 PM
Quote from: owik on June 12, 2014, 01:49:12 PM
Very interesting topic.
Are there any guidlines regarding the load number of lifts (NL) for beginners/MS/CMS?
I am thinking of yearly load, monthly load in prepartion and monthly load in competiton? Even a break down in week
loads would be very interesting.
Any thoughts about this query Mr Sheiko?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 03:40:07 AM
Quote from: owik on June 15, 2014, 03:15:00 PM
Quote from: owik on June 12, 2014, 01:49:12 PM
Very interesting topic.
Are there any guidlines regarding the load number of lifts (NL) for beginners/MS/CMS?
I am thinking of yearly load, monthly load in prepartion and monthly load in competiton? Even a break down in week
loads would be very interesting.
Any thoughts about this query Mr Sheiko?
I think this might be from the old Sheiko book...
Quote
The first stage is the powerlifer's accommodation to the growing
volume and intensity of the loading. A yearly rise in both with
contribute to the powerlifter's improvement and last an average of 6
years. The second stage is defined by a *relatively* stable yearly
volume but a yearly increase in intensity. A direct correlation exists
between intensity and one's total but while such a correlation between
volume and total is not supported."
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: BuccioniPL on June 16, 2014, 11:21:43 AM
Quote
Print Page - General Training Overview - Yearly Loading http://sheiko-program.ru/forum/index.php?action=printpage;topic=7.0
6 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
........
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
[/quote]
Total number of reps done per months I guess?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: BuccioniPL on June 16, 2014, 02:10:04 PM
Quote from: BuccioniPL on June 16, 2014, 11:21:43 AM
Quote
........
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
How much can these numbers vary from individual to individual? Much or little??
The only comparison I know are in the 2 intermidiate programs.
[/quote]
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: ptccanberra on June 16, 2014, 04:56:20 PM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 03:40:07 AM
Quote from: owik on June 15, 2014, 03:15:00 PM
Quote from: owik on June 12, 2014, 01:49:12 PM
Very interesting topic.
Are there any guidlines regarding the load number of lifts (NL) for beginners/MS/CMS?
I am thinking of yearly load, monthly load in prepartion and monthly load in competiton? Even a break down in week
loads would be very interesting.
Any thoughts about this query Mr Sheiko?
I think this might be from the old Sheiko book...
Quote
The first stage is the powerlifer's accommodation to the growing
volume and intensity of the loading. A yearly rise in both with
contribute to the powerlifter's improvement and last an average of 6
years. The second stage is defined by a *relatively* stable yearly
volume but a yearly increase in intensity. A direct correlation exists
between intensity and one's total but while such a correlation between
volume and total is not supported."
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
Is that monthly?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
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7 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 05:41:12 PM
Quote from: ptccanberra on June 16, 2014, 04:56:20 PM
Is that monthly?
Yes I believe it is.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 16, 2014, 05:52:25 PM
Quote
The first stage is the powerlifer's accommodation to the growing
volume and intensity of the loading. A yearly rise in both with
contribute to the powerlifter's improvement and last an average of 6
years. The second stage is defined by a *relatively* stable yearly
volume but a yearly increase in intensity. A direct correlation exists
between intensity and one's total but while such a correlation between
volume and total is not supported."
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
I think these come from Eric Talmant.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 06:06:54 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 16, 2014, 05:52:25 PM
Quote
The first stage is the powerlifer's accommodation to the growing
volume and intensity of the loading. A yearly rise in both with
contribute to the powerlifter's improvement and last an average of 6
years. The second stage is defined by a *relatively* stable yearly
volume but a yearly increase in intensity. A direct correlation exists
between intensity and one's total but while such a correlation between
volume and total is not supported."
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
I think these come from Eric Talmant.
Yeah I'm not 100% sure where they're from but I was presuming he'd translated it from the
book.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: BuccioniPL on June 16, 2014, 06:40:07 PM
Unfortunately I am at very loooooooooooow level as per NBL / month... :) :) :)
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: DRY on June 16, 2014, 08:28:44 PM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 06:06:54 PM
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8 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 16, 2014, 05:52:25 PM
Quote
The first stage is the powerlifer's accommodation to the growing
volume and intensity of the loading. A yearly rise in both with
contribute to the powerlifter's improvement and last an average of 6
years. The second stage is defined by a *relatively* stable yearly
volume but a yearly increase in intensity. A direct correlation exists
between intensity and one's total but while such a correlation between
volume and total is not supported."
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
I think these come from Eric Talmant.
Yeah I'm not 100% sure where they're from but I was presuming he'd translated it from the book.
I thought talmants words were not to be trusted 100%?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 08:31:41 PM
Quote from: DRY on June 16, 2014, 08:28:44 PM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 16, 2014, 06:06:54 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 16, 2014, 05:52:25 PM
Quote
The first stage is the powerlifer's accommodation to the growing
volume and intensity of the loading. A yearly rise in both with
contribute to the powerlifter's improvement and last an average of 6
years. The second stage is defined by a *relatively* stable yearly
volume but a yearly increase in intensity. A direct correlation exists
between intensity and one's total but while such a correlation between
volume and total is not supported."
The recommendations for
volume are as follows. Novices = 700, class 3 = 900, class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k, MS = 1.25k, MSIC = 1.7k. This is total number of reps done
with the bar over 49%
I think these come from Eric Talmant.
Yeah I'm not 100% sure where they're from but I was presuming he'd translated it from the book.
I thought talmants words were not to be trusted 100%?
His translation of the methodology was a bit poor but I thought that the figures might at
least semi-accurate if he did just copy them from the book.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Aaron83 on June 19, 2014, 01:05:16 PM
What would be the recommended volume for a bench press specialist?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Boris Sheiko on June 23, 2014, 03:46:45 PM
Quote
The recommendations for volume are as follows.
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9 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
Novices = 700,
Class 3 = 900,
Class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k,
MS = 1.25k,
MSIC = 1.7k.
This is total number of reps done with the bar over 49%
I don't agree. These recommendations are for gifted lifters or for those taking steroids.
Classes 1,2,3 = high
Novices = too much
These lifters train three times per week so this volume is high for them. We need to
consider the average lifter too not only the gifted ones.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 25, 2014, 09:56:34 AM
Quote from: Boris Sheiko on June 23, 2014, 03:46:45 PM
Quote
The recommendations for volume are as follows.
Novices = 700,
Class 3 = 900,
Class 2-1 = 1K,
CMS = 1.1k,
MS = 1.25k,
MSIC = 1.7k.
This is total number of reps done with the bar over 49%
I don't agree. These recommendations are for gifted lifters or for those taking steroids.
Classes 1,2,3 = high
Novices = too much
These lifters train three times per week so this volume is high for them. We need to consider the average lifter too not
only the gifted ones.
How should we be calculating these figures? The original version of #37 that we saw had
1110 lifts over 4 weeks. Your Universal Approximate program has 1431 lifts over 6 weeks
which averages 954 lifts over 4 weeks. I know many drug-free intermediate lifters who have
done well with #37 so I don't think that is too high.
Could you give us some recommendations for monthly volume Coach Boris?
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 25, 2014, 11:50:32 AM
I was just going to add that the number of lifts also depends on weight class in addition to
skill level. So the two three day programs while targeting the same skill level have different
volumes. On top of that you've got gifted and enhanced lifters further complicating things.
So I think having fixed volume targets doesn't really work as well as just adjusting
according to how you're getting along with the program.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
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10 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 25, 2014, 01:26:57 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 25, 2014, 11:50:32 AM
I was just going to add that the number of lifts also depends on weight class in addition to skill level. So the two three
day programs while targeting the same skill level have different volumes. On top of that you've got gifted and enhanced
lifters further complicating things. So I think having fixed volume targets doesn't really work as well as just adjusting
according to how you're getting along with the program.
I totally agree and follow this method myself but some basic goal fogures would be good for
people just learning to use the templates.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 25, 2014, 02:10:22 PM
Alright, we might be able to do something like:
1000 lifts is the base
+100 if X is true
-100 if Y is true
...and so on.
I don't think he works this way though. When working with students he'll adjust weekly
depending on how things go so that he dials it in exactly on what is needed depending on
the individual. Of course he has to start somewhere and make an initial guess. That's why
he wants to see some training history first. If someone was doing 500 lifts per month he
won't give them 1,000 to start with, maybe 600 and see how it goes with adjustments as
needed.
People just starting off with this should probably do the same thing. Count up the previous
month's work and plan the next month accordingly depending on the desired effect. But
yeah, thanks for pushing for something concrete. Sometimes leaving it too open ended
doesn't turn out so well either.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 25, 2014, 02:27:44 PM
Yeah some sort of starting point and basic method for adding volume would help the less
experienced. I don't mind writing something for the method from my experience but some
recommendations from Boris would be good.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 27, 2014, 03:12:33 PM
Boris has responded. It's a little bit lengthy so we might have to turn it into an article. One
quick thing is that when considering monthly load the period is important i.e. prep or comp.
So generally you take your yearly load and divide by 12. Some months will be high loads
while others will be low loads, the same way daily and weekly load works. Doing this
calculation for the <80kg and >80kg templates, assuming run back to back all year, you get
880 and 630 monthly NL, respectively.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Giraffe on June 27, 2014, 05:34:21 PM
Interesting topic. I do not consider myself gifted (quite the opposite), and I have had my
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11 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
best results performing ~1000 fundamental lifts per month, probably because my loads are
so low.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 27, 2014, 07:09:04 PM
I'm doing ~1200 at the moment. I've done close to ~1600 previously. I don't consider
myself gifted either but I think I've just conditioned myself to the volume. And being a
student has helped a lot too.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Bench Polkov on June 27, 2014, 07:15:35 PM
Quote from: Robert Frederick on June 27, 2014, 03:12:33 PM
Boris has responded. It's a little bit lengthy so we might have to turn it into an article. One quick thing is that when
considering monthly load the period is important i.e. prep or comp. So generally you take your yearly load and divide by
12. Some months will be high loads while others will be low loads, the same way daily and weekly load works. Doing
this calculation for the <80kg and >80kg templates, assuming run back to back all year, you get 880 and 630 monthly
NL, respectively.
Send it through to me and I'll try to do a little write-up too.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on June 27, 2014, 08:36:46 PM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 27, 2014, 07:09:04 PM
I'm doing ~1200 at the moment. I've done close to ~1600 previously. I don't consider myself gifted either but I think
I've just conditioned myself to the volume. And being a student has helped a lot too.
You're CMS right? 1200 is in agreement. MS and above have no recommendations and are
totally individual. For them he gave case examples from 1200-3100 per month. Yeah, that's
no typo - 3100. It's not translated yet though. Coming soon.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Giraffe on June 29, 2014, 06:11:43 AM
Quote from: Bench Polkov on June 27, 2014, 07:09:04 PM
I'm doing ~1200 at the moment. I've done close to ~1600 previously. I don't consider myself gifted either but I think
I've just conditioned myself to the volume. And being a student has helped a lot too.
Yes I have come to realise that external stressors have a bit part in what amount of training
I can do. A few years ago I had a much more relaxed job, but now I am typically working
10-20 hours per week more than I was, so finding it hard to fit everything in.
Considering studying part time as well soon, so that may be the end of me... :'(
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: BuccioniPL on June 30, 2014, 01:17:55 PM
I'm in MS class, doing far less NL of aforementioned numbers.
It's true, it is really individual. With my current life regime I can substain this load.
I really feel to be at cutting edge of my work capacity.
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12 of 14 26/08/2014 2:03 AM
I would do more without a job, because it means sleeping much more, resting CNS
and so on.
But I do not think I would make as twice lifts as today. Maybe 10% more.
Work capacity improve very slowly in drug free lifters. Moreover I think that much
is dependent upon body structure. My Thigh have been always large with a low
amount of work needed to be trained. My upper part needs more volume.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: DivanoPL on July 04, 2014, 03:10:59 AM
I'm about to finish some weeks at 340/300 reps a week raw. Really hard but the feeling
with the lifts is awesome. Next period i cut the volume at 300/250 lift a week with gear and
some lift at 90%. It's the first time that i do this volume. I'm a CMS.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: joshuadelapenha on July 12, 2014, 07:46:31 AM
Not sure if this has been addressed already but I see that it is stated the optimal number of
lifts in the prepatory period is 1050.
"Further suppose that the optimal numbers of lifts per month for this athlete during the
preparatory and competition periods are 1,500 and 1,050, respectively. The yearly schedule
may then look like the following"
Q: How come Competition Period #32 only has 543 lifts? That is nearly half the optimal
amount.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on July 12, 2014, 02:29:36 PM
Quote from: joshuadelapenha on July 12, 2014, 07:46:31 AM
Not sure if this has been addressed already but I see that it is stated the optimal number of lifts in the prepatory period
is 1050.
Where did you see that? Check the recommended volume thread here. (http://sheiko-
program.ru/forum/index.php?topic=311.0) The optimal number of lifts differs from person
to person and in time as well for each person.
Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: joshuadelapenha on July 13, 2014, 11:41:15 AM
"The main objective of the competition period is the implementation of high-level training.
Work in this period is characterized by a low volume and high intensity. The number of lifts
is reduced by 20-40% as compared to the preparatory period with the reduction depending
on the athlete's weight. The heavier the athlete, the greater the reduction."
The 3 day program for under 80kg has 1110 the first mesocycle, 989 the second mesocycle
and 543 the competition mesocyle.
From the 2nd to the competition (last) is a reduction of 45%. How come it is out of the
20-40% reduction considering that an athlete under 80Kg would be considered light?
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Title: Re: General Training Overview - Yearly Loading
Post by: Robert Frederick on July 13, 2014, 02:36:52 PM
Quote from: joshuadelapenha on July 13, 2014, 11:41:15 AM
"The main objective of the competition period is the implementation of high-level training. Work in this period is
characterized by a low volume and high intensity. The number of lifts is reduced by 20-40% as compared to the
preparatory period with the reduction depending on the athlete's weight. The heavier the athlete, the greater the
reduction."
The 3 day program for under 80kg has 1110 the first mesocycle, 989 the second mesocycle and 543 the competition
mesocyle.
From the 2nd to the competition (last) is a reduction of 45%. How come it is out of the 20-40% reduction considering
that an athlete under 80Kg would be considered light?
The numbers aren't concrete but they are a good starting point for understanding how it all
works.
SMF 2.0.7 | SMF 2014, Simple Machines
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