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Tools for the beginner and expert p.

21 SPECIAL
GIFT ISSUE!

Projects, Techniques, and Products

Build this

Reversible
Treasure Chest

p.36

4 MORE

PROJECTS

Arts & Crafts


Table
n Shaker
Nesting Boxes
n Rustic
Dough Bowl
n Turned
Pizza Cutter
n

VOL. 10/NO. 56 DEC/JAN 14

Display until January 28, 2014

Whats The Secret To Flawless Edge


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Red router bits are a registered trademark of Freud America, Inc. (US) 1-800-472-7307

Last time a band played


this well, Ringo was
at the drums!

Our bandsaws will bring music to your ears.


Go to your local Woodcraft today and
find out how we can bring
harmony to your shop.
LAGUNATOOLS.COM

Contents: Projects
Dec/Jan 2014

29

Rustic Country
Dough Bowl

Once you make the investment in


power-carving tools and accessories,
follow Alan Hollars instructions to
shape and hollow backyard logs into a
variety of charming containers.

36

Treasure Chest

Because kids dont stay kids


forever, this accommodating
design lets you switch from
storing playthings in a toy chest
to storing quilts in a blanket
chest by simply flipping the side
panels to repurpose the box and
change its looks.

48

Shaker Nesting Boxes

Discover the secrets behind making one oval lidded


box, and youll know how to make several in different
sizes. Here, find the patterns, jigs, and know-how to
create a set of five decorative boxes.

2 woodcraftmagazine.com
Dec/Jan 2014

Cover photo: David Crosby

Contents: Projects and Tools

54

Arts & Crafts End Table

62

Big-Wheel Pizza Cutter

21

2013 Gift-Buying Guide

This weekend woodworking project serves as a


great accent piece while adding to your collection
of furniture in the same beloved style.

Need a stocking stuffer fast? How about shaping


a handsome handle for an all-business chrome
cutting wheel that measures 4" across. Total
turning time: one hour.

This unique selection considers the needs of


woodworkers just getting started as well as those
seasoned craftsmen who wish to step up to tools
offering higher quality and precision.

Departments
06 Cutting In
10 Mailbox

Tips & Tricks
14

4 woodcraftmagazine.com
Dec/Jan 2014

68 WoodSense:
Teak

72 Products

that Perform:
Pinnacle 4012
Scrub Plane

Cutting In

Moonlight serenade

ver the years, the editorial staff at Woodcraft Magazine


has provided readers with an enormous library of plans and
techniques aimed at furnishing home interior and exterior
spaces with tables, chairs, and accents, and at developing
woodworking skills. Occasionally, however, we introduce
you to a niche area of woodworking that could repay you
a hundredfoldshould you choose to pursue it in earnest.
Indeed, you may seek to become an expert in such a niche area
after buying the needed tools, accessories, and materials to
launch your new interest or moonlight activity.
In this issue of the magazine, we have two such
examples that may light a spark. On page 48, youll
discover how to make Shaker nesting boxes that
always prove to be a hit at crafts shows. Everything
you need to get startedfrom the banding to the
tacks to the boiling boxare included in the story,
supported by a complete set of step-by-step
instructions and patterns. This inroad may lead
you into making Shaker baskets and trays
and building a booth to sell your wares.
On page 29, we show how to get
set up for making country dough
bowls. The real beauty here is that
once you have the various tools on
hand, the right-angle grinders, chainsaw,
and special cutters, you are well on your way. The cost of bowl
blank materials may be as little as the stack of logs sitting
behind your house. For many, that supply may be endless,
particularly if you live in the wooded hills of Appalachia.
With all of that said, we occasionally feature projects by
artisans who make their living with the designs they share in the
magazine. They allow us to publish their design so that readers
may make a few for family members or friends, not for resale or
to compete in their marketplace. To find out what projects fall
in this category, call our editorial office at 1-800-542-9125. In
the meantime, enjoy your newfound skills.

Dec/Jan 2014
Volume 10, Issue 56
Editor-In-Chief
Senior Editors


Art Director
Graphic Designer

Jim Harrold
Paul Anthony
Joe Hurst-Wajszczuk
Chad McClung
Shayne Hiles

Copy Editor, Proofreader


Sharon Hambrick
Contributing Consultants/
Craftsmen/Project Designers
Alan Hollar, Al Huls, Marlen Kemmet,
Andy Rae, Mario Rodriguez, Pete Stephano

Publisher

Jody Garrett

Advertising Sales Manager

Vic Lombard

Circulation Support

Kim McLaughlin

Advertising/Administrative
Coordinator

Kiah Harpool

Circulation
Circulation Specialists, Inc.
Subscriptions
U.S. and Canada, $19.97 for one year
Single copy, $5.99
customer_service@woodcraftmagazine.com
(800) 542-9125
Contact Us
Woodcraft Magazine
4420 Emerson Avenue, Suite A
P.O. Box 7020
Parkersburg, WV 26102-7020
(800) 542-9125 Fax: (304) 420-9840
Email: editor@woodcraftmagazine.com
Online: woodcraftmagazine.com
Woodcraft Magazine (ISSN:1553.2461, USPS 024-953)
is published in January, March, May, July, September
and November and printed in the United States by
Woodcraft Supply, LLC, 4420 Emerson Ave., Suite A,
Parkersburg, WV 26104. Tel: (304) 485-2647. Periodical
Postage paid at Parkersburg, WV, and at additional
mailing offices. Copyright 2013 by Woodcraft
Supply, LLC. All rights reserved. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to Woodcraft Magazine, P.O. Box
7020, Parkersburg, WV 26102-7020. Canada Post:
Publications Mail Agreement #40612608
Canada Returns to be sent to Pitney Bowes,
P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2
Printed in the USA
Safety First! Working wood can be dangerous.
Always make shop safety your first priority by
reading and following the recommendations of
your machine owners manuals, using appropriate
guards and safety devices, and maintaining all your
tools properly. Use adequate sight and hearing
protection. Please note that for purposes of
illustrative clarity, guards and other safety devices
may be removed from tools shown in photographs
and illustrations in this publication.

6 woodcraftmagazine.com
Dec/Jan 2014

Photos: Larry Hamel-Lambert

Fast Setups / Safety / Versatility

The MAgswiTch workholding sysTeM


All your table top workholding needs in one complete system.
A workholding system built around Magswitch on/off magnetic clamps providing strong, precise
placement anywhere on any steel table. Our award winning technology is a breakthrough for fast, easy,
strong workholding on any steel table or fence. The system accommodates your workholding needs on
all your power tool tables including table saws, joiners, planers, band saws and shapers.

it All Begins here.


The starter kit

Add attachments (below)


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Precise tensioning
Anywhere on table

Vertical Featherboard
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Safety award winner. Helps mitigate kickback.


Absolute must buy with Starter Kit.
Dual plane workholding.
Stack horizontal for tall panels.

Thin stock hold down


Attachment
Three tools in one.
Thin stock hold near blade.
Clean cuts with strong hold near blade.
Cut thin strips with roller guide.

resaw guide
Attachment

dual roller
Attachment

18 & 36 Universal
Track Attachment

Add extra Bases


or MagJigs

Adjustable roller bearing for glide.


Angled in-feed/out-feed for blade drift.
Micro adjust to exact 90.
Use on band saw or out-feed on table saw.

Instant wall anywhere you need it.


Accepts standard hardware.
Accepts all standard T-bolts, 1/4

Ideal for tall panel feed.


Glide rollers - yet strong firm hold.
Adjustable roller bearings.
Great for hold on out-feed as well.

Use the MagJigs in your own fixtures.

hex, 5/16 hex, and Kreg clamps.

Visit your local Woodcraft retailer and ask them about the
Magswitch Woodworking Tools! www.woodcraft.com

www.magswitch.com.au

NEW EZ Pro
Crown King
helps you create seamless,
perfectly mitered interior
and exterior corner joints.

#880

Now you can make it yours!


Cutting crown molding has never been so easy. The EZ Pro Crown King allows you to cut precise joining angles without
tedious trial and error process, right out of the box. With just one base unit, an insert, and your miter saw, you can create
interior and exterior joints for the three most common crown molding spring angles: 38, 45, and 52. It doesnt matter
if youre a professional or a DIYer, you should check out this new addition to Generals EZ Pro line. Whether its for ceiling
and wall corners, decorative elements for cabinetry and furniture, or enhancements for doors and windows, Generals
Crown King produces crown molding joints that are affordable, yet fit for a castle!
For more information and to purchase Generals new Crown King and the rest of our line of EZ Pro products, visit:

woodcraft.com/generaltools

General Tools & Instruments 80 White Street, New York, NY 10013 | tel 800-697-8665 | www.generaltools.com

The EZ Pro
Mortise & Tenon Jig
lets you make
perfectly matched
mortise & tenon
joints with one jig.

#870
The EZ Pro
Dovetail Jig
lets you make
dovetail and box
joints through
or half-blind.

#861
The EZ Pro
Pocket Hole Jig
has everything you
need to make flush,
corner and angle
pocket hole joints.

#850
The EZ Pro
Doweling Jig
lets you make perfectly
aligned dowel joints
every time.

#851

Mailbox
Cabinet-level decision
Inspired by the pie safe in your Dec/Jan 2013 issue,
I built my own version. (See the photo at right.) The
punched tin was too country for my wife and I, so I
decided on the flat panel approach for the doors. Poplar
lumber and birch plywood were used to construct the
piece. For a finish, I sprayed Benjamin Moore Aura
Charlotte Slate on the surfaces using an Earlex HVLP
sprayer. I then top-coated the paint with General
Finishes High Performance Satin Urethane. This is the
first timeI have used the saw-tooth shelf system, and I
think it adds a nice touch to the piecean improvement
over traditional shelf pins. Thanks for the inspiration!
Keith Johnson, Greenwich, Connecticut
Keith, thanks for sharing. You showed how a little creativity
can give a project design an entirely original look.
Jim Harrold, editor-in-chief, Woodcraft Magazine
TM

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10 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

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It Was A Huge
Decision To Bail
on A corporate job.
But, Woodcraft was the best decision I ever made.
Meet Allan hobbyist woodworker, accomplished businessman and a firm
believer that life should be rewarding both personally and professionally.
Allan was working for a large Fortune 500 company which had an awesome
benefit and pension package. He had over 10 successful years with them,
but he was spending little time at home because he was always traveling.
It became evident his life was anything but balanced. So, when he saw a
franchise opportunity with Woodcraft, the most trusted name in woodworking,
he reached for the brass ring. No wonder. From demographic research
for a store location to a detailed operations manual coupled with ongoing
technical and marketing support, Woodcraft provides a complete franchise
system backed by the most recognized brand in the industry. Allan will
tell you that although it has not been an easy road, with a lot of hard
work and the support of Woodcraft, dreams do come true.
Which begs the question, when will yours?

FOR FRANCHISE INFORMATION, CALL

1.855.923.7326
www.woodcraftfranchise.com
P.O. Box 245, Parkersburg, WV 26102

Allan Chaney

Multiple Store Owner


Tulsa & Oklahoma City, OK

Mailbox
Gold Rush winners
strike it rich
In our Aug/Sept 2013 issue, we
announced a mega sweepstakes
offering a chance to win tools,
training, gift certificates, and
free subscriptions to Woodcraft
Magazine. Here, now, are
some of the lucky winners.
Grand Prize Winner:
Joe Ness, Deltona, Florida
Powermatic tool prize
package valued at $15,000
and training with a
Powermatic rep at the
Orlando Woodcraft store.
Second Prize Winners:
Philip Hendrix, Aceworth,
Georgia; Kris Telford, West

Valley City, Utah; Dean


Roadifer, Lebanon, Oregon
$250 Woodcraft Gift Card
with a 2-year Woodcraft
Magazine subscription
Third Prize Winners:
Fifty winners (too

Chairs?
No problem.

numerous to mention)
1-year Woodcraft
Magazine subscription
Congratulations to all, and
thanks for participating.
Jim Harrold, editor-in-chief,
Woodcraft Magazine

Lifetime
Warranty

Three easy steps to routing


perfect mortise & tenon joints.

V-DrillGuides
SEE VIDEO
leighjigs.com
800-663-8932

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LEIGH MORTISE & TENON JIGS

12 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

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Build Your Own SawStop

Visually select and price every option on any SawStop model.


See the results. Save, print, or share. Only at SawStop.com.

Visit sawstop.com/build
Want to talk? 866-SawStop

Tips & Tricks


TOP TIP
Thin-plate ZCI
My hybrid tablesaw has a 18"thick metal throat plate that
sits in an opening with very
shallow ledges. This shallow
recess complicates making a
zero-clearance insert (ZCI) for
the opening in order to minimize
exit tear-out and prevent
narrow rippings from falling
into the saw. My solution is to
modify the stock throat plate.
Make a sub-plate by cutting a
piece of 38"-thick plywood to fit
between the leveling screw tabs
in your table opening. Wax the
underside of the stock plate and
the inside edges of its slot (to
resist glue when attaching the
filler strip later), and then screw

1) Shape sub-plate
to fit between
leveling screw tabs
in table recess.

2) Screw
stock plate
to sub-plate.

3) Glue
filler strip to
sub-plate.
Slot filler
strip
Stock throat
plate

the plate to the


plywood with
Throat plate
3
flathead screws
recess
8"-thick
plywood
driven through
sub-plate
six countersunk
Leveling screw tab
holes you drilled
through the plate.
Next, thickness a
hardwood blank to match
the width of the slot, and
plate. (To avoid scratching your
then rip from the blank a strip
plate, mask off the surrounding
thats just a hair wider than the
area with tape.) Alternatively,
thickness of the plate. Crosscut
unscrew the stock plate, and
this slot-filler strip to the slot
hand-plane the strip, testing the
length, and then glue and clamp
fit as you work. Finally, clamp
it to the underlying plywood,
down the finished ZCI, and raise
topping the strip with waxed
the spinning blade through it.
paper and a caul. After the glue
David Schermock, Humble, Texas
dries, sand the strip flush to the

14 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

The American Woodshop


with Scott & Suzy Phillips

Season 21 American Originals


Freeform Designs
& Hand Skill Solutions

Clamp small
workpiece in
handscrew to keep
hands at a safe
distance when
machining or
power-sanding.

Presented by - WBGU
Public Television

WBGU Public Television presents


13 PBS TV shows of The American
Woodshop American Originals.
Season 21 shares woodworking tips
for every skill level. Techniques include:
turning, joinery, tool tune-ups, making jigs,
bench building, and furnituremaking!
Get your tools out!

A handscrew helper

wbgu.org/americanwoodshop

Wooden handscrews are great for a variety of


clamping chores, but I also find myself reaching
for them when I need to sand or machine small
parts. Their long reach and solid grip allow you
to safely perform otherwise dicey operations
like routing or power-sanding the edges of small
blocks. Theyll keep your fingers out of harms
way, and the wooden jaws wont damage an
expensive cutter in case of accidental contact.
Jack Preston, Tucson, Arizona

The American Woodshop


Is Sponsored By:

Woodcraft Supply, Kreg Tool Company,


Easy Wood Tools & Gorilla Glue
2014 Sylvan Tool Works, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Share a Slick Tip.


Win Cash or a Prize!
Heres your chance to help someone become
a better woodworker and get rewarded for the
effort. Next issues Top Tip will receive a Woodcraft
Gift Card worth $250. Runners-up will receive $125
for an illustrated tip; $75 for an non-illustrated
one. Winning entries become the property of
Woodcraft Magazine. Send your original ideas to:
Tips & Tricks, Woodcraft Magazine, P.O. Box
7020, Parkersburg, WV 26102-7020 or email
editor@woodcraftmagazine.com.
Important: Please
include your phone
number, as an editor
will need to call you if
your trick is considered
for publication.
Illustrations: Chris Glowacki

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 15

Tips & Tricks

2) Flip blank.

Wedge-cutting revisited
Seeing Alan Turners bandsaw
wedge-cutting jig in issue #54s
Tricks column prompted me
to share my own approach,
which can be done on either
the bandsaw or tablesaw and
doesnt require making a jig.
Begin by thicknessing a board
to the desired width of your
wedges, and then crosscut away
a piece that equals the desired
wedge length. Outfit your miter
gauge with an auxiliary fence,
and set the gauge to half the
desired wedge angle. (Its best
to set it to create an obtuse
angle between the fence and
blade.) Also outfit your saws
throat opening with a zero-

1) Trim end of
wedge blank.

Set up a stop
to cut multiple
identical wedges.

Miter gauge
auxiliary fence set
to half of desired
wedge angle.

3) Saw
second cheek
of wedge.

Zero-clearance
insert

clearance insert. Now, trim the


end of your blank, flip it 180,
shift it the desired amount, and
make another cut to complete
the wedge. To make multiple
identically sized wedges, set up
a stopblock, as shown. (I use the
back edge of my featherboard.)

To prevent binding, place the


stopblock forward of the blade
a distance equal to or greater
than the length of your wedges.
Philip Houck,
Boston, Massachusetts

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16 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

8/14/13 4:45 PM

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Tips & Tricks


Shortening
screws
Its not uncommon
to have to shorten a
machine screw, bolt,
or other threaded
fastener. Unfortunately,
it can be difficult to
Hole in scrap
secure the fastener
block holds screw
for sawing.
in a vise in order to
hacksaw it to length.
My solution is to drill
a hole in a scrap board
using a bit whose
diameter exactly matches the outside diameter of
the fastener threads. I clamp this holder board
in my vise, slip the fastener through it, and hold its
head while sawing the shank to desired length.
Alejandro Balbis, Longueuil, Quebec

Special Gifts for Special People


Sarge Knife kits make the perfect gift!

N
EW

FOLDER KITS also available

DESK KNIFE/
LETTER OPENER KIT

LINER-LOCK
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w/ Leather
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KIT

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you or visit woodcraft.com
18 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

$11.99
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20 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Woodcraft Magazines
2013 Gift-Buying Guide

Tools every woodworker can use,


whether theyre starting out or stepping up
If you have ever tried to buy a
tool for another woodworker
or received one as a gift, you
know that finding the right
item is more akin to selecting
a pair of shoes than buying a
bathrobeone size does not
fit all. Thats because every
woodworker is different: the
needs of a beginner are very
different than the wants of a
sawdust-seasoned veteran.
Selecting a tool that elicits
a hurrah rather than a
harrumph will require a bit
of espionage on your part,

but if you can suss out a


little information about
the woodworker(s) on your
list, we can help you find
a gift that fits. Here, weve
selected a few musthave items for folks
on both ends of
the woodworking
experience curve.
Starting out
tools are perfect for new
woodworkers, "homeimprovers", and even kids.
Stepping up tools are
aimed at those who are
serious about woodworking
and looking for features not
typically found on entrylevel tools. Weve sprinkled
in a few moderately priced
items that would work
for woodworkers on both
ends of the spectrum.

Online Extra

Still searching for that


perfect gift? For a few
additional ideas, go to
woodcraftmagazine.com
and click on Online Extras.

Opening photos: Chad McClung


Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 21

Combination Squares
Starting Out: Bora 12" Square

#158639, $34.99
As a multi-function measuring and
marking tool, a combination square is a
must-have item. With a weatherresistant stainless steel blade,
this square is a handy addition
to either a tool pouch or toolbox.
As a plus, the head uses rare-earth
magnets to hold the rule to the head, rather
than a lock nut that can get lost on a jobsite.

Stepping Up: Starrett 12" Square

#06R12, $104.99
This square may be pricey, but its
as close to perfect as you can get.
A Starrett combination squares
blade is square to the head within
0.002" for the 12" blade; the
rule is straight and parallel
within 0.001" per foot. This
is a serious woodworkers
tool of choice for doing
layouts, checking cuts,
and setting up machinery
in the workshop.

Tape Measures
Stepping Up: M1 26' Tape
Starting Out: FastCap 16' Story Pole Tape

#826097, $9.39
Although designed for trim carpenters, this
tape sports a feature thats equally handy for
those who miscount the lines between the
big numbers. Instead, users can make a mark
on the 14"-wide blank strip on the
blade and use the tick to mark
out the cut. The built-in
sharpener is handy you
need to restore the point
on your marking pencil.

#856136, $39.99
This is the tape to own if theres a deck,
addition, or a kitchens worth of cabinets in your
woodworkers future. The patented Sight Scribe
allows you to measure and mark without using a
pencil: simply extend the retractable scribe,
pull the tape to the desired length, and
press down on the body to make your
mark. The double-sided tape and
four-way hook allow you to easily
catch a stud or plywood edge and
take your measurements from any
angle. The blade is stiff
enough for use as a
straightedge.

Chisels
Starting Out: Irwin BlueChip Chisel Set

#111165, $43.50
BlueChip chisels have been a workshop mainstay for decades. The
long blades provide ample opportunity for beginners to practice
hand-cut joinery and master sharpening. The polypropylene
handles are tough enough to survive blows from those who
dont always differentiate between a hammer and a mallet.
22 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Tool photos: Morehead Photography

Sharpening Systems

Planes

Stepping Up: DMT 600/1200 Duo-Sharp, #817198,

Stepping Up: WoodRiver


412 Smoothing Plane
#158001, $169.99
A woodworker who already
owns a hand plane or two
might be ready to forgo
scrapers and sandpaper and
pick up a smoothing plane for
the ultimate surface finish.
With a 238"-wide iron and 10"long sole, the #412 is regarded
by many woodworkers as
their go-to finishing plane. The
Bedrock-style frog adjustment
anchors the blade to
the sole, reducing
chatter for supersmooth cuts.

Diamonds like these are a


woodworkers best friend.
This dual-grit diamond bench
stone is perfect for all sorts of
chores, such as flattening the

$134.99
backs of plane irons and chisels,
sharpening all types of steel
(O1, A2, and M2) and carbide,
and flattening dished stones.

Starting Out: King 1000/6000


Waterstone, #09C31, $37.99,
and Honing Guide, #03A21, $14.99
Heres an affordable way to
honing guide
sharpen chisels and plane irons.
takes the hassle out
Use the 1000x side to remove
of holding chisels and irons at
small nicks and establish a bevel
the constant angle. Simply clamp
and then use the 6000x side to
the blade or iron into the jig and
hone a razor-sharp edge. The
then wheel the jig over the stone.
Stocking Stuffer: Granite Surface Plate, #144838
OK, it wont fit into a stocking,
but new and old woodworkers
alike will appreciate finding this
coal-colored lump under the
tree. The super flat face of the

$34.99
9 12 2" block serves as
an ideal base for leveling
small plane soles, flattening
waterstones, and general
sharpening duties.

Stepping Up: Pfeil Swiss Made Cabinetmakers


Bench Chisels, #05B54, $209.99
Crafted from the finest tool
steel and expertly ground, these
chisels are for the discriminating
craftsman. The octagonal elm
handles are comfortable to hold,
although they arent meant to
withstand hammer blows. Quality
doesnt come cheap, but bear in
mind that this set will be handeddown to woodworking offspring.

Starting Out: WoodRiver


Low Angle Block Plane
#151125, $99.99

A block plane belongs in every


tool pouch and on every
workbench. Unlike other bench
planes, the block plane can be
used one-handed. This attribute
makes it handy for situations
where you dont have clamps
or hold-downs. Block planes
are also available with standard
angle (20) beds, but the lower
12 bed allows easier shaving
of end grain. (If they already
have the low-angle, treat
them to a standard-angle.)

woodcraftmagazine.com 23

At the Bench

Starting Out: VIKA TwoFold

Workbench and Scaffold


#149184 $174.99
This dual-faced, adjustable-height table is a
whole-house workstation: it can serve as a
workbench, a workstation for bench-top tools,
and even as a scaffold. For those who cant yet
afford permanent shop space, the bench can be
folded up and stowed away when the job is done.

Stepping Up: Sjbergs Duo

Workbench, #145896, $649.99


The perfect gift for the woodworker who does
not have the time (or inclination) to build his
or her own bench. This traditional workbench
features a solid beech top, dog holes, vises, and
the sturdiness to stand up to heavy hand-planing
without racking. The vises can be positioned
to suit right- or left-handed woodworkers.

Pneumatic
Nailers
Starting Out: Freeman

18-Gauge Brad Nailer,


#415927, $69.99
If the woodworker on your list has a compressor and is still
swinging a hammer, its time to get them a gun. An 18-gauge
nailer is the go-to gun for assembling drawers, attaching
face frames, and making jigs. The smaller 18-gauge brads
provide almost as much holding power as 16-gauge finish
nails but are less visible and less likely to split the wood.

Pocket-Hole Jigs
Starting Out: Kreg R3 Jig Jr.
#147643, $39.99; Automaxx
Clamp, #158503, $29.99

An easy and affordable


introduction to
pocket-hole joinery. The R3 handles stock from 12"-112" thick.
To hold the jig to your workpiece, consider adding Kregs newest
face clamp. Once set, the Automaxx automatically adjusts to
provide consistent clamping pressure on stock up to 278" thick.
24 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Stepping Up: Grex


23-Gauge Pin Nailer
#836279, $199.99
A pin nailers ability to
tack together stock that
larger guns would turn
to splinters makes it a
welcome addition even in
a stocked shop. The pins
can secure parts while
the adhesive sets or hold pieces together
more securely than double-stick tape.

Stepping Up: Kreg Jig K5 Pocket

Hole System, #158631, $139.99


This is a cabinetmakers joinery
system. The K5 can hold workpieces
from 12"-112" thick with uniform
pressure without adjusting
the clampsimply slide the
clamp against the back of the
workpiece and then pull down on
the front toggle to lock it in place.
The jig includes a guide block for
setting the drill-bit stop collar and a

Multi-Function Drill/Drivers
Starting Out: Rockwell 3RILL 12V Li-Ion Cordless Drill

#849073, $129.99
If youre not sure what chores a drill is destined to do, consider a
drill/driver that does it all. With a flick of a switch, the 3RILL can
apply 800 inch pounds of torque in impact mode to drive a lag bolt
or 3 inch pounds of force to finesse in a small screw. With a lifetime
replacement battery program, this drill wont let you down.

Stepping Up:

Festool CXS Li-Ion 10.8V Cordless Drill


Multi-Chuck Set, #564274 $295
Serious cabinetmakers and installers would
appreciate a CXS because of its unique
ability to fit where other drills cant. The
super-compact drill features a FastFix chuck
system that enables it to use a Centrotec
chuck, a keyless chuck, or the right angle
chuck for gaining access to tight spaces.

Stocking Stuffer:

SNAPPY 5-Piece Essentials Set


#158795, $29.99
A handy assortment of pop-in/
pop-out drills, drivers, and
countersinks for general work,
such as installing hardware, building
jigs, and assembling cabinets.

Clamps

Stepping Up: Bessey REVO Parallel


Jaw Clamp 40"pair, #14951, $115.98

Even discriminating cabinetmaker-types will


appreciate another pair of parallel jaw clamps.
This clamp features impact- and glue-resistant
heads and an internal frame that ensures that
the heads remain perpendicular to the bar.
Rail protection pieces prevent workpieces
from getting stuck to the rail. In addition, the
heads can be reversed to spread parts apart.

Starting Out: Bessey H-Series

4" Pipe Clamps, #147892; $14.99,


12" F-style Clamps, #146981, $10.99

quick-release drill guide block to ensure


consistently-spaced pocket holes. The
swiveling dust-collection port and storage
compartments in the support wings make
pocket-hole drilling a cleaner operation,
and it helps keep track of parts.

Woodworkers never have enough clamps, but


setting a beginner up with a few pipe clamps
and F-style clamps is a solid start. Pipe clamps
attach to any 34" pipe; extending their reach
is as simple as purchasing another piece of
pipe. Besseys H-series clamps sport long
legs that keep them from tipping over while
providing handle clearance at the same time.
F-style clamps are used not only for assembly
but also for holding workpieces to your
bench, or to jigs, for machining operations.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 25

Change the way you build!


Water free means trouble free!
Achieves high strength quickly
Minimizes clamping times
Stains and finishes quickly
Accepts most stains and finishes
Works at any humidity

Available in 1 fl. oz.; 4 fl. oz.; 16 fl. oz.

422 Wards Corner Rd, Suite B


Loveland, OH 45140
(513) 453-0100
nexabond.com sales@nexabond.com

26 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

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Japanese Saws Sink These Teeth Into Your Projects


Known Worldwide For Superb, Precise Pull-Stroke Wood Cutting Performance
Full Line Of Quality Saws, Including Many Types Suited To Specific Cutting Needs
A Smoother, More Accurate And Faster Cut And A Thinner Kerf In Comparison
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To check out our selection of saws, planes, chisels, hammers, kitchen and garden tools and more,
visit www.JapanWoodworker.com or call 1-800-537-7820 to receive a catalog. 14WD01P4

Rustic Country Dough Bowl


Power-carve a treasure from found wood.
By Alan Hollar

Overall dimensions: 10"w 18"l 4"h

efore the advent of


woodworking power tools,
many of the kitchenware items
found in homes originated from
the surrounding forest and the
handcrafting skills of locals.
Bowls, trays, and utensils were
shaped from green logs with
hatchets, handsaws, adzes,
chisels, and knives. They were
then smoothed by scraping.
They took time and brawn to
create, resulting in functional
pieces that displayed somewhat
uneven lines and endearing
country charm. Even the wood
choices added personality to
the pieces, featuring sapwood,
crotch figure, knots, and other
eye-catching elements.
Today, you can capture the
same good looks in a fraction of
the time using handheld angle
grinders and various carving
attachments. Ill show you how
to power-carve a dough bowl to

Opening photo: Morehead Photography

shape from a log half, ending up


with a prized container by the
days end. Once you make the
initial investment in tools and
cutters, youll find you can fill a
pickup with one-of-a-kind bowls
and trays using green wood from
your own backyard. One more
thingdont feel obligated to knead
bread dough in the bowls you
make. Use them instead to hold
fruits and nuts, as a display item,
or as a treasured holiday gift.

Select and prep


your stock

1 Scout outside for a good dough

bowl candidate from available


logs or pile of firewood. Straight
timber is the best choice for your
first bowl because its easier to
work. Look for softer hardwoods
like poplar, soft maple, and cherry.
A 13"- to 14"-diameter log that is
20" long can yield two 10" wide
18" long dough bowls that

include 112"-long handles. For the


bowl shown here, I used cherry.
Once you find the right
candidate, chainsaw an
unseasoned log to 20" long, as
depicted in Cut 1 in Figure 1.
Dough bowlsunlike furniture
piecesdo not require hardand-fast fine measurements
in the making, so if you are
off a little, it wont matter.
Now, make a pair of parallel
slices through the center of
the log, cutting lengthwise,
where shown in Cut 2. Here
you are parting away the pith
or waste slab and establishing

Tip Alert

To stabilize the log workpiece


for trimming with a chainsaw,
I use a rough outdoor table and
wedge the workpiece between
other log chunks.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 29

Figure 1: Cutting Sequence

Figure 2: Bowl Layout

Cut 1: Saw log to 18" to

20" long, squaring the ends.

10"-12"

End View

4"

18"-20"

(Bowl
bottom)

Tapered sides
Interior bowl
perimeter

212"

Cut 2: Mark

4"-5"

1012"

214"

(Waste
containing
pith)

2" reference
holes

and slab off the


logs center.
(Save the top
section for a
second bowl.)

112"

Round over
corners

4-5"
4-5"

4"

Handle Side View


16"

Cut 4: Bevel-cut

the tapered sides.

Cut 3: Mark depth of

Side View

bowl blank (about 4" to


5"), and slab off bottom.

1"-114"

Cut 5: Mark and

cut the tapered


ends and handles.

Tools For The Job

Note: Hole depth=bowl height - 34". Taper


inside walls by removing waste from interior
bowl perimeter to bowl bottom perimeter.
Feather and blend inside corners. Round
over outside corners of the sides.

1. Chainsaw with
a 24" to 20" bar
2. Marker
3. T-bevel
4. No.5 jack plane
5. Bosch 412"
angle grinder
6. Lancelot 14-tooth,
4"-dia., (roughing)
wood carving disc
7. Holey Galahad
4"-dia., round,
medium (red),
smoothing disc
8. Caliper

To follow through on the instructions, youll need the


tools, cutters, and other items shown in the photo below.
(See also the Convenience-Plus Buying Guide.) For safety,
include work gloves, face shield, ear protection, and a
dust mask. Chips will fly, and youll want full protection!

9. Merlin (Proxxon)
power carver
10. Merlin 8-tooth,
2"-dia. chain disc
11. Merlin 2"-dia.
tungsten-carbide
medium disc
12. Portable drill
13. Inflatable dome
sander (238 1916")
and sanding
sleeve, 60-grit
14. Disc sanders
15. Sanding strips
in various grits

8
13

312"

12

11

14

7
2
30 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

10

15

Cardboard
template to lay
out bottom.

A
the top faces of the bowl blanks.
These should be square to
the ends of the bowl blank.
Next, measure down from
the bowl blanks top face 4" to
412", and mark a parallel bottom
face. Mark a 10"- to 12"-wide
top face on the bowl blank that
is centered between the blanks
edges. Connect the lines using a
felt-tip marker and straightedge
wood strip. You want the best
wood the log has to offer for
your bowl, not the wane or
pith. Now, with the blanks end
against a strip screwed in place,
slice off the rounded crown of
the blank, creating a flat blank
bottom that is parallel to the
top face, as indicated in Cut 3.
Cut and place a rectangular
piece of cardboard (about 5
20") on the bottom face of
the blank and between the
waney edges. Strike parallel

B
lines inside the wane along the
cardboard piece to lay out the
bowls 4" to 5" true bottom,
as shown in Photo A. Lay out
the blanks top face, as well,
with a pair of parallel lines
within the waney edges.
Holding an adjusted sliding
bevel against the blanks
ends, strike angled lines that
connect the top face and
bottom face lines, as shown
in Photo B. These will serve
as guidelines for cutting the
tapered sides of the bowl blank.
Place the blank top face down
on a pair of scrap spacers, and,
with the chainsaw bar angled,
cut the tapered blank sides, as
shown in Photo C and Cut 4.
Lay out the interior
perimeter rectangle on the
blanks top face, referencing
Figure 2. Referencing Figure 1,
lay out the handles and

7
8

C
Project photos: John Mode; Illustrations: Charles Lockhart

tapered ends of the bowl


blank, as shown in Photo D.
Now, with one end of the blank
wedged snugly against a cleat
that is screwed to the table and
the other end elevated, make
a pair of cuts to rough-form
a handle and tapered end, as
shown in Photo E and Cut 5.
Repeat to cut the other bowl
blank end in the same manner.
Moving inside and using
a hand plane, belt sander, or
8" jointer, flatten the bottom
face of the blank, as shown
in Photo F, making it parallel
with the top face and ensuring
it sits without rocking.
Lay out a centered inside
rectangle on the blanks top
face that represents the inside
bottom of the bowl, where
shown in Figure 2. Note that
the bowl walls must remain 34"
thick along all tapered sides.

10

11

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com

31

Cleat screwed
in place

Mark the locations for the depth


reference holes at the corners
of the inside rectangle for 12"
holes. Mark a fifth reference
hole at the rectangles center.
Measure the height of the
bowl blank all around, noting

12

F
the measurement at the lowest
corner. Install a 12" twist bit
in a portable drill, and wrap
a piece of tape on the bit to
serve as a hole depth stop. This
should be the height of the bowl
minus 34". Now, drill the five

Power-Carving Safety Guidelines


1. Read the angle grinders

operating instructions, and


never remove the cutter
guard. Opt for a grinder
having a paddle switch,
and make sure the guard is
between you and the cutter.
2. Keep both hands on the angle
grinder during operation,
and never lay it down until
the cutter stops rotating.
3. Wear eye, ear, and respiratory
protection when operating
power carvers; wear gloves to

protect hands when removing


a large quantity of chips.
4. Secure work to a mounting
board or carvers work
positioner when shaping the
interior with cutters. Make sure
the mounting board allows
enough room to clamp it to
the bench without interfering
with waste removal.
5. Get a feel for the cutters
and discs by testing them
on scrapwood before using
them on the bowl blanks.

G
32 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

holes, as shown in Photo G,


holding the drill vertically over
the blank and stopping when
the tape touches the wood.

Power-carve the blank

Note: Power-carving in the manner


shown here requires adhering to
the safety guidelines in the sidebar.
Secure the bowl blank
upside down to the edge of the
workbench top using clamps
or an end vise and bench dogs.
Install a single Lancelot 14-tooth
chain disc on an angle grinder,
and smooth the outside face of
one bowl side by lightly grazing
its surface, as shown in Photo H.
Work the cutter from the bowls
bottom down to its top edge,
moving the tool from end to
end. You want to remove the
rough-sawn surface made by the
chainsaw and eliminate bumps
with 132"-deep cuts. This action is

I
referred to as a smoothing cut
and requires no pressure. Repeat
to smooth the other tapered side.
Now, work the ends. Secure
the workpiece to your bench,
and then smooth the tapered
ends, as shown in Photo I,
working the cutter from the
bowl bottom to the bottom
face of the handle. Again, just
barely touch the surface.
Cut a piece of scrap plywood
to 16 16", ensuring it is flat.
Now, with a medium viscosity
CA glue and activator, attach
the blank right-side up to the
plywood, pressing its flat
(planed) bottom to the plywood,
as shown in Photo J. Note that
CA glue will adhere to damp
or oily wood. (If you own a
carvers work positioner with a
faceplate and screws, consider
using it in place of the plywood.)
Now, secure this work-holding

J
plywood to a bench with a vise
and bench dogs or clamps.
With the same 14-tooth chain
disc and right-angle grinder,
hog out the waste to form the
bowls interior. Here, you want
to make chopping cuts by
dipping or plunging the cutter
into the center of the bowl, as
shown in Photos K and L. Here,
wear gloves to protect your
hands from the flying debris.
Expect to take several minutes
dipping the cutter into the blank,
working across the grain first,
and then cutting with the grain,
staying within the layout lines.
Concentrate first on the center
of the large rectangle, being
mindful that the sides taper to
the bottom, indicated by the four
perimeter drill holes. Use the
drill depth holes as guides for
determining if youve reached
the bowls interior bottom.

5 Once you removed the bulk

of the waste in the bowls


interior, make smoothing cuts,
as described earlier, to clean
up the tapered walls and the
interior bottom while working

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 33

O
Trim down any high corners of the
bowls top edges to make them the
same height all around. Redraw
any layout lines if necessary.
(Later, with further trimming
and sanding, your finished wall
thickness will be 58" thick.)
Lay out the centered bowl
handles, as shown in Figure 2.
Then, use chopping and
smoothing cuts to sculpt a handle
at each end, as shown in Photo O.
Switch to a smaller rightangle grinder with a Merlin
2"-diameter, 8-tooth chain
cutter, and trim and feather the
bowls inside corners, as shown
in Photo P, as well as further
refining the bowl handles.
Switch to a Holey Galahad
4"-diameter tungsten carbide
disc, and go over all the interior
surfaces within reach for further
smoothing and transitioning

6
7
P
up to the outside rectangular
cut lines, as shown in Photo M.
Use a caliper to check that the
sidewall thickness remains at
around 34", as shown in Photo N.

Q
34 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

of inside corners and handle


edges, as shown in Photo Q.
Use a light touch to smooth
away any remaining chainsaw
marks. This carbide disc
works well for tighter areas.
Using a hammer, pop the
blank loose from the plywood
work holder. Now, flip the
bowl upside down, secure it
in your bench, and smooth
the exterior with the same
4"-diameter abrasive disc that
you used in the previous step.
Continue refining and
smoothing the exterior
surfaces of the bowl. Use the
Merlin 8-tooth chain disc
to further detail, and round
over the handles, as shown
in the Handle Side View in
Figure 2 and Photo R.
Switch to a 2"-diameter
tungsten-carbide medium disc,

10

11

S
and go over the entire piece
again, from the inside bowl walls
and transitions to softening the
outside tapered corners to the
handles, as shown in Photo S.
Let the bowl dry for a few
days. Then, install an inflatable
dome sander and 80-grit sanding
sleeve in a drill, and sand all
the transition areas and tight
spots, as shown in Photo T.
Use disc sanders to further
smooth the surface. As you
refine the bowl, power-sand a
schedule of grits through 320.
For hard-to-get areas, use
strips of sandpaper to remove

12

13

About Our
Designer/
Builder
A lifelong
resident of
Newland,
North
Carolina,
Alan Hollar
has turned and carved wood
bowls and other items dating
back to the mid 1980s. His
imaginative works can be
found on display and for sale
at many Southern Highland
Guild galleries. Contact him
at alanturning@hughes.net.

T
machine marks and other uneven
areas, as shown in Photo U.
Pull the sandpaper strips back
and forth to achieve the desired
smoothness. Once completely
sanded, let the bowl sit for four
or five days to further dry.
(As long as Ive been making
bowls, Ive not had any crack.)
Finally, wipe all the fine
dust off your dough bowl,
and apply an appropriate
finish. (I wiped on Odies
Oil, but Danish oil or walnut,
almond, or safflower oil
would also help beautify and
preserve the wood.) n

14

Convenience-PLUS BUYING GUIDE


1.

Bosch 412" Paddle Switch Angle Grinder

#835918

$99.99

2.

Stick Fast CA Finish, Med., 2.5 oz.

#850358

$7.99

3.

Stick Fast Activator, 7.5 oz.

#839150

$8.99

4.

Lancelot Wood Carving Discs, 14-Tooth,


4" Dia. Chain Disc, 58" Arbor

#04D02

$52.50

5.

King Arthur Holey Galahad,


Round, Med., Red, 4"-Dia.

#149990

$86.99

6.

Merlin Power Carver, Complete Kit, Incl. Proxxon


Long-Neck Mini Grinder; 8-Tooth, 2"-Dia. Chain Disc;
TungstenCarbide Disc; Silicon-Carbide Grinding
Wheel; 100-Grit Flap Sander; Cut-Off Wheel; Case

#145644

$249.99

7.

Guinevere Inflatable Dome Sander, 238" 1916"

#147535

$43.99

8.

Assorted Inflatable Dome Sander Sleeves

#147536

$14.69

9.

Hand Pump (for Inflatable Dome Sander)

#147547

$12.59

10.

Odies Oil, Clear, 2 oz.

#157861

$11.99

Above items are available at Woodcraft stores, woodcraft.com or by calling (800) 225-1153.
Prices subject to change without notice.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 35

Overall dimensions:
34"w 20"d 2134"h

Treasure
Chest

This toy box matures into a blanket chest with a flip of its panels.
By Andy Rae

very kid loves a toy chest


to stow treasures in, and this
design provides delight. With its
colorful exterior and curved lid,
it makes a fun, bold statement
in any childs room. But the real
magic here happens when its
time to put the toys in the attic
and move on to more grown-up
gear. In less than five minutes, you
can transform a brightly colored
playroom piece into a stately
blanket chest that will be at home
in any bedroom, den, or living
room. All it takes is a quick flip of
the panels. (See sidebar, page 37.)

This is a deceptively easy


chest to build. At its core, its
just a plywood box. The classy
looking faux frame-and-panel
construction is created by gluing
solid wood trim to the faces of
the box. Although the lid mimics
a fancy coopered panel, theres no
fussy edge-beveling here. Instead,
the slats are glued to curved
plywood ribs before attaching
battens that accept the narrow
reversible panels. And dont worry
about pinched lil fingers: the lid
lifts easily, stays open securely,
and closes slowly and safely.

36 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Build the plywood box

1 Cut the sides (A, B) to the

dimensions shown in the Cut


List. Leave the bottom (C) about
1
16" oversized in both width
and length for now; youll trim
it to final dimensions once
the sides are assembled.
Smooth all inside faces through
220 grit, and then mask off all the
glue areas with removable tape.
Apply three to four coats of 2-lb.cut shellac, wiping on each coat
with long, overlapping strokes.
(I use shellac inside the chest
because it leaves a neutral scent.)

Figure 1: Treasure Chest

Lid bumper

Handle Detail
6"

8"

4"

Lid stay

8" chamfer

#10 Biscuit
Continuous hinge

4" rabbet,
4" deep

1
1

16" chamfer

8" chamfer

Drill 964"-dia. hole


through rail at
bottom center
of every panel.

Cut out and tape to bottom of chest.

After each coat dries, scuffsand it with 320-grit sandpaper,


except for the next-to-last coat,
which gets rubbed out with
0000 steel wool. After applying
the final coat, let it dry, and
then rub with the grain using
generous amounts of paste
wax on a 0000 steel wool pad.
After aggressively wiping away
the excess with a clean, soft
cloth, your finish should shine
and feel silky to the touch.
To ease final assembly, first
dry-clamp the four sides (A,B)
together, and drill 2"-deep pilot

Flipping the Panels


When toys get replaced by boysor
girlsits time to update your kids
dcor. Reverse the outer panels
of this toy box andPresto!it
matures into adult furniture.
Raise the panels in the main box
section by poking through the access
holes in the lower rails using a bamboo
skewer or other 18"-diameter implement.
To reverse the lid panels, push each one
out, flip it end for end, and slide it back
in its slots. Magnets buried in the panel
and frame automatically align the parts.


Opening photos: Larry Hamel-Lambert; Project photos: Andy Rae; Illustrations: Christopher
Mills

Push panel out of


slots, flip end for
end, and reinsert.

Push panels up
out of slots using
1
8"-diameter dowel.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com

37

B
With the box upside down on shop-made risers,
add glue, and then clamp the bottom even with
the box sides before adding the screws.

Add glue to the joints, clamp the box, and


drive the screws home. You can remove the
clamps as soon as the screws are in.
holes through the long sides
and into the edges of the short
sides. Then disassemble the box,
enlarge the pilot holes in the
long sides with a 764"-diameter
bit, and countersink them for
#8 screws. Add glue, reclamp
the parts, and screw them
together with #8 2" screws
(Photo A). (Before you set the
box aside, measure for square.)
Measure the outside
dimensions of the assembled
sides (A, B), and cut the
bottom (C) to fit. Attach it as
before with clamps, glue, and
screws (Photo B). Because

Tip Alert
For aesthetics, I chamfer the edges of the trim pieces before assembly.
Cut the widest chamfers, like those on the legs and top and bottom rails,
on the router table using a chamfer bit. For smaller chamfers, a block
plane does the job. For tricky grain or hard-to-reach areas, use 180-grit
sandpaper glued to a flat block of MDF.
the bottom is squared, it will
automatically square up the box.

Make the box trim

1 Mill the leg pieces (D) to the

thickness and length shown


in the Cut List, leaving them
slightly oversized in width.
Bevel one edge to 45 on the
tablesaw, setting the fence so
the ripped stock will be 2" wide
at the tip of the bevel. Check
the joint fit by holding two

mitered leg pieces together


against a corner of the chest.
Next, youll make the short
and long top rails (E, F), creating
their panel slots by ripping
each oversized rail blank into
three strips, crosscutting the
center strip into sections, and
then regluing the pieces back
together, as shown in Figure 2.
Start by initially sawing 1316"thick stock into rail blanks
that are at least 38" wider and a

Figure 2: Top Rail Construction


6"

Spacer 14 34 6"

Spacer
338"

38 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Inner face

Draw realignment triangles


before ripping rail into strips.

C
Glue the four rails together at the
same time, using scrapwood spacers
to establish the panel slots. Wax
the spacers to ensure easy release.

114"

338"
Spacer 14 34 814"

114"

814"

Center strip
7
8"
1
4"
3
4"

couple of inches longer than the


finished sizes for the top rails
(E, F) shown in the Cut List.
Draw a triangle across the
face of each rail blank to allow
reassembling the pieces in the
same orientation for the best
grain match after ripping. Then
rip each blank into three pieces
that are each slightly wider than
the finished widths shown in
Figure 2. Use a thickness planer
to clean up the saw marks, and
bring the strips to finished width.
Crosscut the center strips to
the lengths shown in Figure 2,
again marking the strips
for reorientation later.
Glue each three-piece top rail
(E, F) together using scrap wood
spacers to establish the panel
slots (Photo C). After the glue
dries, remove the spacers, and
plane the rails to final thickness.
(For efficiency and accuracy, now
is a good time to mill the short
and long lid rails (K, L) to final
thickness and width, leaving them
oversized in length for now.)
Make the side and center
stiles (G, H) to the thickness and
width shown in the Cut List,
but leave the pieces slightly
oversized in length for now. Rout
a 14" 14" rabbet in one edge of
each side stile (G) and in both
edges of each center stile (H).
Mill the short and long bottom
rails (I, J) to the thickness

clear tape along their show faces.


With the box upside down on the
bench, spread glue on the bevels
and along the inside faces of the
legs, fold each assembly square,
and press it over the corner of the
box. I used six 138" pin nails to
hold each leg assembly in place
while the glue dried (Photo D).
Close up any gaps by rubbing
a burnisher or other smooth,
round piece of metal over the
miters to squash the adjacent
fibers together (Photo E).

1) Miter and fit first corner.

Long top rail (F)

4
5

Clear tape

Short top
rail (E)

While the glue is still wet, remove


the tape and rub a burnisher
along the joint to close any gaps.

3 Mark the center of a long rail

and width shown in the Cut


List, but leave them slightly
oversized in length for now.

Apply the trim

1 Join each pair of legs (D) with

Figure 3: Mitering the Box Rails

Center slots
on box side

Tape along the leg bevels, add


glue, and fold the leg over the
corner of the chest. Pin nails will
clamp the leg until the glue sets.

Align inside faces of


slots with outside
faces of box.

(F), measure outward to half of


the finished length shown in the
Cut List, lay out the miter, and cut
it. Then clamp the rail to the box,
aligning the inside walls of the
panel slots with the outside walls
of the box, as shown in Figure 3.
(This ensures your panels will
slide in and out without binding.)
Cut the mating miter on
the adjacent short rail (E), and
check the fit of the joint, again
with the rail slots flush to the
box walls. If necessary, adjust
the fit of the miter. I typically
fine-tune miters with a block
plane, holding the work in a
simple jig clamped in a bench
vise (Figure 4 and Photo F).

4) Cut and fit

miters on last rail.

2) Miter and fit


second corner.

Top edge of box

3) Cut miter on third rail.


Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 39

Figure 4: Miter Assist Jig


Fence
1
2 118"

1) After cutting jig


parts to size, nail and
glue first rail to base
with edges aligned.

Top rail

2) Pinching rail
3) Miter ends
between fences,
of jig to 45.
glue and nail
second rail in place.

5 When satisfied with the fit

of the joint, clamp the short


top rail (E) in place, and mark
for the miters on the opposite
ends of both rails (Photo G).
Then cut to your marks.
As shown in Figure 3, miter
and fit the other long top rail
(F) in the same manner. Set the
remaining unmitered top short
rail (E) aside for the moment.
Cut #10 biscuit slots in all
the miters you just cut. To
make the job easy, clamp
your miter-assist jig to your
benchtop with the end of a
rail flush with an end of the
jig. Attach a 12"-thick
plywood sub-base to your
biscuit joiner, and youre
ready to go (Photo H).

Plywood base
1
2 414 418"

F
You can either trim an errant miter to a perfect 45
angle with this jig or adjust the angle in small degrees.

8 Rout a "-deep "-wide


1

32

stopped mortise in the rear


long top rail (F) to accept the
continuous (piano) hinge. Set a
1
1
2" rabbeting bit to project 32"
from your router tabletop, and
mark the fence for the beginning
and end of the cut. Mark the start
line 2116" to the left of the bit
perimeter and the stop line 2116"
to the right of the perimeter. (This
setup stops the cut 116" shy of each
mortise end as a safety measure.)
Begin the cut by pivoting the work
into the bit so the tip of the miter
contacts the start line (Photo I).
When the trailing miter tip meets
the stop line,
pivot the
work away
from the bit.

While the router table is set up


for the job, also rout the mating
mortise in the lids rear rail (L)
after mitering the rails ends.
Square the ends of the
mortises with a chisel, and
check the fit of the hinge
on the box and lid rails.
Glue and clamp the three
mitered top rails (E, F) to the
chest (Photo J). Again, its
not critical that the inside
surfaces of the rail and box are
flush with each other; what
is important is that the inside
walls of the panel slots are flush
with the outside of the box.
As shown in Figure 3, fit
the remaining short top rail (E),
making trial miter cuts until
the joints mate perfectly. Then

10
11

12

Plywood
subbase

G
Clamp the mitered ends of the rails to the
chest, and mark the opposite ends by pressing
a square against the inside of the chest.
40 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

H
The miter-assist jig will solidly hold each rail
in place for accurate, safe biscuit slotting.

Stop line
Start line

Long top rail (F)

Long lid rail (L)

With all but the last two miters fitted,


glue and clamp the three mitered rails
to the box, and pin them in place.

Start and stop lines on the router table fence


register the ends of the rail travel when
mortising for the continuous hinge.
cut the biscuit slots, and glue
and clamp the piece in place.
Crosscut the bottom rails
(I, J) for a perfect fit between
the legs. Lay out the locations of
the 964"-diameter access holes
on the rails between each pair
of stiles (G, H), where shown
in Figure 1, and then drill the
through-holes on the drill press.
With the box upside down,
glue and clamp the bottom rails
(I, J) in place without nails.
Crosscut the side and center
stiles (G, H) to fit tightly between
the top and bottom rails.
Attach the side stiles
(G) with glue and 1" pins.
Glue and pin the center
stiles (H) in place. To ensure
accurate positioning, place them
against the edges of carefully
squared spacer panels made
of 18" hardboard (Photo K).
Make the spacer panels wide
enough to fit precisely between

13

Hardboard
spacer panel

14

15
16
17

Tip Alert

To conceal small cracks and holes,


mix sanding dust with enough
2-lb.-cut shellac to make a wet
(but not runny) mixture. Spread
the filler into the recess, and
then sand it flush after it dries.
The repair will disappear after
applying a few coats of finish.

K
Spacer panels of 18" hardboard allow accurate positioning of the center
stiles, which will ensure a perfect fit of the finished panels youll make later.
each opposing pair of stile rabbet
shoulders, using the panel (U,
V) widths shown in the Cut
List as a starting reference.
However, make the spacer panels
18" long for easier handling.

Make the lid

1 Notch the lids long rails (K, L)

on the tablesaw with the blade


tilted to 26, as shown in
Figure 5. Make sure to
saw into the top face of the
rear railnot into the face
with the hinge mortise.
To ensure that the lid aligns
with the box, test-fit the lid rail
miter joints while the rail pieces
sit atop the assembled box rails.
When everything aligns well, cut
the biscuit slots in the miters.

3 Unlike the box top rails

(E, F), the lid rails (K, L) must


come together all at once. Use
the box top rail frame as a
platform for gluing up the lid
frame. Apply wide tape over
the box frame joints to prevent
gluing the two frames together.
Use F-style clamps to initially
position the frame members,
and then weave a band clamp
through the clamps to draw
the miters tight (Photo L).
Lengthen the V-notch in each
long rail (L) so that it extends
3
4" into each short rail (K), as
shown in Photo M. I penciled the
outline and then pared to it with
a chisel. Dont fuss, as the ribs
and the battens will eventually
cover up your handiwork.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com

41

Figure 5: Ripping
the V-notch
Long Lid Rail (L)
1) Make

first rip with


rail vertical.

2"

Angle blade to 26 on
the saws bevel gauge.

4"

2) Make second
rip with rail
horizontal.

Adjust fence and blade


until second cut precisely
intersects the first.

L
Use loosely set F-style clamps
to position the lid rails on the
box rails while pulling the miters
tight with a band clamp.

M
After assembling the frame, use
a chisel to extend the V-notch
3
4" into each adjacent rail.

N
A 18" straight bit in a laminate
trimmer lets you rout closely into
the corners of the cross rail notches
before finishing up with a chisel.

O
Center the two small middle ribs on the cross rails, and glue
the two small outer ribs flush with the inside of the frame.

Figure 6: Cross Rail Connection


Pare tongue flush
with V-groove.

Top face of
lid frame

Notch
2" w 34" l 38"d

9916"

4" rabbet,
2" deep

1
1

42 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

5 Use a knife to lay out the

cross rail (M) notches in the


long rails (L). Rout the notches
to depth, staying inside your
knifed lines (Photo N). Then
clean up to the lines with a chisel.
Make the cross rails (M) to the
size shown in the Cut List, and
cut a 14"-deep 12"-long rabbet
in each end. Glue and clamp the
cross rails (M) to the lid frame.
After the glue dries, pare the
ends of each cross rail flush with
the adjacent V-groove wall.
Make the small plywood
ribs (N), pattern-sawing them
on the bandsaw, as shown
in the sidebar on page 43.

Pattern-Sawing On The Bandsaw


Making multiple identical parts
on your bandsaw is easy with this
jig and a plywood pattern of your
desired shape. Make the jig, and
outfit your saw with a 12" 4-tpi
blade (which provides a better
cutting sight line than a narrower
blade.) Temporarily tack or tape
the plywood pattern to your stock,
and clamp the jig to your bandsaw
fence. Locate the nose block about

8" above the work, and adjust the


fence so the blocks contact point
sits even with, or slightly past, the
blade. Then position the jig fore
or aft until the block sits about
1
16" in front of the blades teeth.
To make the cut, press the
pattern against the nose block
1

while steering the work so


that the edge of the pattern
remains parallel to the blade
at all times. Dont be surprised
if you unwittingly saw into
the nose block. Thats why its
removable. Just make a new
one and keep on sawing.

Pattern-Sawing Jig

Brace
3
4 3 312"

Knob with
1
4-20 stud

Plywood fence
1
2 3 34 15"

Plywood outer guide


4 78 512"

Plywood
inner guide
1
4 78 5"
Nut
Fender
washer
Plywood base
2 6 15"

Plywood support
1
2 5 5"

Figure 7: Rib Layout

Nose block
2 2 3"

1 square = 12"

2"
818"

214"

P
Add a spot of glue to each rib, and then drive
two pins through each slat into each rib.

8 Attach the small ribs

(N) to the frame with glue


and clamps (Photo O).
Mill the slats (O) to the
thickness and length shown
in the Cut List, selecting
straight-grained stock for
stability. Rip them about 132"
oversized in width for now.

81116"

10 Tuck the outermost slats

in their respective notches,


and then dry-fit all of the
slats in place, butting their
edges tight to each other. Trim
the edges of each one a bit,
if necessary, to seat them all
firmly on the ribs. Then attach
them to the ribs (Photo P).

11

Pattern-saw the large ribs


(P) from solid stock. Test-fit
them to ensure they align with
the highest points on the slats
without extending any further,
which could cause the panels
to bind going in. Fine-tune the
curve if necessary, shaping
and smoothing the ribs with

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 43

Figure 8: Rabbeting and Beveling the Battens


Router table
fence

1) Rout a rabbet in

one edge of each of


the two end battens.

3) Rip a bevel on what will be the


bottom face of each end rabbet.

2) Using the

same setup, rout


opposing rabbets
in each T-batten.

Tablesaw
rip fence

Angle blade
to 26 on the
saws bevel
gauge.

16"

4"

Orient show
face of batten
against fence.

a disc or belt sander. Then


hand-sand through 220 grit.
Glue and pin the large ribs
(P) to the outermost small
ribs (N) and the frame.
Mill the T-battens and
end battens (Q, R) to the
dimensions in the Cut List.
Rout the edge rabbets in the
battens (Q, R) on the router table
using a rabbeting bit adjusted for
a 516"-deep cut. (See Figure 8.)
Make sure to rout only one
edge of each end batten (R).
Then rip the 26 bevel on each
end batten on the tablesaw.
Cut the end rabbets on all
the battens using the bandsaw.
First, set the fence 516" from the
blade, and make a 316"-long rip
cut with the top of the batten
pressed against the fence. Then
mark one of the battens 316"

12

13
14

15

from the end, use the piece to


reset the fence to this cutline,
and saw away the remaining
waste on all the battens while
supporting the workpiece on
edge against a squared block.
Finish-sand the battens
(Q, R) through 220 grit, and
sand or plane a 116" chamfer on
the top edges and ends. Drill
1
4"-diameter counterbores,
1
8"-deep, as well as clearance
holes for #7 158" trim-head
screws in the T-battens (Q),
locating them at the small
rib intersections. Dont drill
the end battens (R).
Use glue and pin nails to
attach the two end battens
(R) to the front and back
rails (L), aligning each until
the lower edge of its rabbet
contacts the lowest slat.

16

17

Adjust fence so
blade intersects
end of rabbet.

18

Its crucial to align the


T-battens (Q) parallel to each
other and at the same distance
apart. To do this, rip six 30"-long
spacers of equal width from 18"
hardboard, test-fitting them
between the battens until all fit
tightly. (Youll have to experiment
with the correct rip setting for
your saw, but a good starting
point is 258".) When everything
fits well, glue and screw the
battens to the lid (Photo Q).
Cut 14"-diameter plugs
on the drill press using a plug
cutter, and then glue them into
the counterbores. When the
glue is dry, pare and sand the
plugs flush with the battens.
Make the handle (T)
to the shape shown in the
Figure 1 Handle Detail, gently
curving the ends on the bandsaw.
Invert the lid, and glue and clamp
the handle to the front rail (L),
centering the handle across the
rails length and thickness.

19

20

Attach the lid to the box

1 Place the continuous hinge

Q
Use hardboard spacers to position the battens parallel and equidistant
to each other, and then glue and screw them to the underlying ribs.
44 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

in its mortise in the rear lid


rail (L). Temporarily attach
it with three equidistantly
placed screws driven into
3
32"-diameter pilot holes.
Mark box on the back
of the free hinge leaf, and
remove the hinge from the

lid. Then attach the hinge to


the box in the same manner.
Elevate the inverted lid
on a platform next to the
box (or have a helper hold it)
while you reattach the hinge
leaf to the lid with the three
screws. Close the lid and check
the fit. Make any necessary
adjustments by lengthening
the hinge mortise and drilling
for screws in new locations.
Once everything checks out,
drill and install the remaining
screws in the lid and box.
Make the lid stay blocks
(S), as shown in Figure 9,
bandsawing and sanding
the curve, as necessary, to
match the curve of the lid.
Screw the lid stay plates
to the box and the lid stay
blocks, locating them, where
shown in Figure 10.

Figure 9: Lid Stay Block

4
5

Color To Dye For

Figure 10: Lid


Stay Mounting

178"
2"

Center stay
plate across lid
stay block.

90
15

4"

138"

212"

Trace curve
using small
rib template.

312"

238"

Make and install


the panels

1 Mill the box and lid panel (U,


V, W) stock to thickness, using
scrap to check for a sliding fit
through the top rail (E, F) slots
and their respective stile (G, H)
rabbets, as well as the rabbets
in the lid battens (Q, R).

2 Cut the panels a bit narrower

than the width of the space


and about 12" longer than
the size shown in the Cut
List. Dont ease over any
of the edges yet, as a sharp
edge helps restrain dye from
migrating to an adjacent edge.

lightly with the grain using 0000 steel wool


or a white synthetic abrasive pad. Dont fret
if the color looks dull and blotchy; successive
coats will add depth, luster, and clarity.
Apply the second, third, and fourth coats of finish,
rubbing with 0000 steel wool or a white pad
between coats, but not after the final coat. Four to
six coats should do it, depending on the thickness
of each coat. More coats add depth, but too many
can diminish that close-to-the-wood look.

Dyes are available in solvent (liquid) form or as a


powder that you mix with a solvent. Several recently
developed powder dyes can be mixed with either
water or alcohol. I prefer water-based dye for wiping
because its longer dry time helps prevent lap marks,
which often occur when wiping or brushing on fasterdrying alcohol-based dyes. (When spraying, it doesnt
matter much.) Plus, water-based dyes resist fading
better. Keep in mind that many dyesespecially
the powder typeare caustic, so wear gloves, eye
protection, and a respirator rated for vapors.
Follow these guidelines when
using water-based dye:
Prepare the surface by sanding through 220 grit
to ensure clear color and grain and to prevent
muddiness. Then pre-raise the grain by wetting
the surface with clean water and sanding again
with 220 grit after the water evaporates.
Flood the surface with dye using a foam brush.
Work in the direction of the grain, overlapping
your strokes and pulling the brush completely
off the end of the work. Avoid puddles.
Once the dye has dried, apply the first coat of
your favorite clear finish. When thats dry, rub

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 45

Figure 11: Aligning the Magnets


1. Arrange lid panels (W) for pleasing grain.
2. Drill 38"-dia. 316"-deep holes for magnets.
3. At one end of lid, install all magnets with

South pole faces


up (right side)

north pole faces oriented upward.


4. At opposite end, install all magnets with
south pole faces oriented upward.

3 Mark the magnet locations,

centering them across the


thickness of the large ribs (P),
and between the battens (Q, R).
Also mark the corresponding
locations at the ends of one
face of each lid panel (W).
Drill the 316"-deep magnet
holes in the ribs using a hand
drill and a 38" Forstner or
brad-point bit (Photo R).
Drill the 316"-deep magnet
holes in the lid panels (W) using
a 38" Forstner or brad-point
bit in the drill press. (Warning:
If your bit has a long center
point that may poke through
the opposite panel face, grind
or file it down before drilling.)
Spin a 38" plug cutter on the
drill press to make face-grain
plugs in matching stock for the
holes in the lid panels (W) and
the large ribs (P). Saw them
to a thickness of about 38".
Dab epoxy into each hole
before inserting a 38" rareearth magnet. To ensure correct
polarity for panel reversal,
orient the magnets, as shown
in Figure 11. (To keep track of
their polarities, first mark all 24
magnets on the same polarized
face with a permanent marker.)
Before the epoxy sets, spread
some yellow or white glue into the
holes and onto the plugs before
tapping the plugs home (Photo S).
After the glue cures, trim
the plugs flush and sand the
surfaces through 220 grit.
Dye one side of all the panels.
(See sidebar on page 45.)

4
5

North pole faces


up (left side)

Treasure Chest Cut List


Part
Box
A
Short sides
B
Long sides
C*
Bottom
Box trim
D*
Legs
E**
Short top rails
F**
Long top rails
G*
Side stiles
H*
Center stiles
I*
Short bottom rails
J*
Long bottom rails
Lid
K
Short rails
L
Long rails
M
Cross rails
N
Small ribs
O
Slats
P
Large ribs
Q
T-battens
R
End battens
S
Lid stay block
T
Handle
Panels
U*
Small box panels
V*
Large box panels
W*
Lid panels

Thickness

Width Length

Qty. Matl

4"
4"
3
4"

16516"
16516"
1734"

16516"
3134"
3134"

2
2
1

BP
BP
BP

16"
4"
3
4"
9
16"
9
16"
3
4"
3
4"

2"
178"
178"
112"
134"
112"
112"

1714"
20"
34"
15916"
15916"
1558"
2958"

8
2
2
8
6
2
2

C
C
C
C
C
C
C

4"
4"
5
8"
3
4"
1
4"
3
4"
5
8"
5
8"
138"
7
16"

178"
178"
3
4"
2"
112"
214"
1"
1"
178"
5
8"

20"
34"
1714"
1614"
3134"
1738"
3358"
3358"
2"
6"

2
2
2
4
12
2
5
2
2
1

C
C
C
BP
M
C
C
C
M
M

4"
4"
1
4"

6"
814"
258"

1614"
1614"
33716"

4
6
6

M
M
M

15
3

3
3

1
1

* Indicates parts are initially cut oversized. See instructions.


** Indicates parts were made of more than one piece.
Materials: BP=Birch Plywood, C=Cherry, M=Maple

46 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

8
9

Tip Alert

For perfectly fitting thin plugs,


use a tapered plug cutter on the
drill press, drilling only 14" or so
into your stock to keep the plugs
fat enough to ensure a snug fit.

Drill the 316"-deep magnet holes using a 38"


Forstner bit marked 316" up from its cutting edge.
Stop drilling when the mark disappears.

10 Crosscut the panels

(U, V, W) square and


to finished length.
Rip the box panels (U,
V) about 116" narrower than
the width of the rail slots
and the lid panels about 132"
narrower than their openings.
Apply your preferred
finish. Remember to use an
odorless finish, such as shellac,
for the inside of the lid.
Once the finish is dry,
stick a couple of bumpers on
the underside of the front
lid rail (L), and turn the
knurled knobs on the stays
to adjust their resistance
for a soft lid closure. n

11

12

13

About Our Designer/Builder


Andy Rae works and
writes about
woodworking
from his home in
the mountains of
western North
Carolina, where
nothin but wood
could be finer.

With each magnet marked for polarity, install it with


a dab of epoxy, and then glue in the wood plug.

Convenience-PLUS BUYING GUIDE


1.

Blonde Shellac Flakes, 12 lb.

#158261

$35.99

2.

Chamfer Bit, 45

#129675

$16.19

3.

#10 Biscuits 28 pc.

#153576

$2.75

4.

Piano Hinge, 1116" 48"

#152157

$17.99

5.

Rabbeting Bit, 12"

#837593

$32.47

6.

Band Clamp

#111210

$10.99

7.

Spiral Upcut Straight Bit, 18"

#12W52

$15.99

8.

Trim-Head Screws, #7 158" 100 pc.

#620130

$7.99

9.

Tapered Plug Cutters, 14" and 38"

#146724 and
#830818

$11.59
$15.99

10.

8" Rare-Earth Magnets 10 pc. (24 needed)

#150950

$8.39

11.

Transfast Dye, Cardinal Red

#123835

$11.49

12.

Transfast Dye, Orange

#123832

$11.49

13.

Transfast Dye, Lemon Yellow

#123837

$11.49

14.

Transfast Dye, Dark Green

#123829

$11.49

15.

Transfast Dye, Blue

#123833

$11.49

16.

White Abrasive Pad

#146748A

$1.49

17.

Self-adhesive Bumpers, 24 pcs.

#153561

$3.29

Above items are available at Woodcraft stores, woodcraft.com or by calling (800) 225-1153.
Prices subject to change without notice.

18.

Lid Stays

#00U0601

$39.60 pr.

Above items are available at leevalley.com, or by calling (800) 871-8158. Prices subject to change without notice.

19.

8" Bamboo Skewers

Above items are available at your local supermarket.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com

47

Shaker
Nesting
Boxes

Make one or a batch in five sizes.


By Al Huls

haker lidded boxes have a


traditional charm, simplicity,
and utility rarely seen in other
storage systems. I like the
reddish hue of cherry to give
the boxes a beautiful old-time
look. I also like using cherry
because of its bending ability
when steamed. I prefer cherry
for the box bottoms and lid
tops, though you can substitute
sycamore, hard maple, lacewood,
or just about any wood for these
parts for a unique look. Keep in
mind that quartersawn stock is
less susceptible to expansion.
I like to build boxes in #0,
#1, #2, #3, and #4 sizes, though
several larger box sizes exist.
When stacked, theyre quite
eye-catching and dont take up
much display space. The boxes

also nest within each other.


That said, the #0 is small in
size and easily splits due to
the tighter bends. The #4 size
requires a juggling act to get
all the fingers aligned when
driving the tacks. For these
reasons, Ill get you started by
showing how to make a #2 box,
as depicted in Figure 1. Once
you gain confidence building
this size, move on to the other
sizes, trying boxes #1 and #3.
For the cherry bands in
various box sizes, as well as the
tacks used to fasten the ends
of the bands together, see the
Convenience-Plus Buying
Guide. Buying the bands saves
time. On the other hand, if you
want to make your own bands,
see Cutting Your Own Box

48 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Bands on page 50. For this, youll


want a bandsaw and fence thats
set up for the perfect resawing.
To make the boxes, I use a
disc sander, drill, utility knife
(with a new sharp blade), tack
hammer, tongs, wire cutter, #10
mill file, glue, and toothpicks.
Youll also need a boiling box
(available through the buying
guide), a heat source, such as a
pair of electric hot plates or a
two-burner stove, and a shopmade anvil. (See Figure 2).

Assemble the materials

In addition, youll need a set of


finger templates in various sizes,
solid wood or MDF cores to bend
the heated cherry bands around,
and shapers or driers (two per
box) to give your box and lid their

Figure 1: Shaker Box Exploded View

Top (14"-thick cherry)


4

64" holes

Toothpick

16" bevel on finger


edges and end

16" hole

Clinched Tack Detail


Tack

Box band

Bottom (14"-thick cherry)

Bevel-sand 34" in
from square end.

final oval shape as the bands dry.


To make the cores and shapers,
download the patterns at www.
woodcraftmagazine.com/
magpatterns.html. Apply the
shaper patterns to a 34" piece
of plywood, and bevel-cut their
edges at 10 at the bandsaw.
Sand the bevels smooth at the
disc sander. Drill 114" ventilation
holes where shown to help
dry the formed oval hoops.

Tip Alert
For a long lasting set of finger
templates, apply the patterns to
aluminum flashing and cut them
to shape.

Figure 2: Shop-Made Anvil


8"

R=78"

112" galvanized
pipe, 18" long

2"
5
8"
Vertical support
2 4, 1312" long

1 238" tenon,
114" long
1 2" mortise
112"

Frank Rohrbach III


Opening photo: Morehead Photography; Project photos: John Wright; Illustrations:

Base
2 6, 1812" long
Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 49

Cutting Your Own Shaker Bands


When cutting your own box and lid bands, select stock with fine straight grain, such as cherry or
maple. Note the sizes for the box bands, lid bands, and the thicknesses of the bottoms and tops.
Use a caliper for measuring thickness. A tape measure lacks the precision needed. If you cut your
own banding, remember that any variation will alter the bending capacity of the wood.
# Band thick. Box band width length Lid band width length
bottom/top thick.
0 .062

7
16 1214"
1116 1178"

.200"

1 .065

112 15"

2 1512"

.215"

8 19 4"
2
.070 2 19"

.240"

1
5

3 .075

212 23"

1116 24"

.250" (14")

4 .080

3116 27"

4 28"

.250" (14")

Aluminum flashing

B
pencil, as shown in Photo A.
Be sure to mark the nail
locations on each finger.
Using a sharp utility knife, cut
out the fingers on the box and
lid bands, as shown in Photo B.
I like to use a scrapwood cutting
board for this. Here, cut on the
line, pulling the blade away from
the hand pinning the workpiece
down. Score the wood several
times to free the waste piece.
Next, bevel the outside edges
of each finger at 10 to soften
their look, as shown in Photo C.
Dont make the rookie mistake
of beveling at 45. Cutting
with the grain, move from the
band body to the finger tips
to prevent the fingers from
splitting. For safety, I wear a
protective leather thumb guard.

Form the box


and lid hoops

1 Order the cherry bands for

the #1, #2, and #3 boxes and


lids to get started. (Order bands
for all five box sizes to make
a complete set like the one in
the opening photograph.) The

D
purchased bands are cut to the
appropriate thicknesses, widths,
and lengths described earlier.
Make a copy of the template
fingers. Now, cut out and trace
the template fingers for the #2
box onto the sized bands for
the box sides and lid with a

50 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Tongs

5 Drill tack holes through the

band fingers where marked


with a 116" drill bit, as shown
in Photo D. Use a backerboard
to prevent splintering.
Taper-sand the outside face of
the square ends of the box and lid
bands with a disc sander to a fine
point, as shown in Photo E. I hold
a pencil eraser to the end being
sanded to keep my fingers out of
harms way. Sand evenly across
the face to about 34" in from the
end. This allows the square
ends to blend smoothly where
they are overlapped by the
finger ends. (See Figure 1.)
It also makes for a neater fit
when the tops and bottoms are
inserted. You dont want light
shining through the seams.
Build the simple anvil
shown in Figure 2 from 2-by
stock and an 18"-long length

H
of 112"-diameter galvanized
pipe. The pipe rests in the
cradle and lifts out when
slipping on an oval hoop.
Place a metal boiling box on a
heat source (such as an electric
hot plate or camping stove), and
fill it two-thirds full of water. If
heating water this way seems
unsafe inside, do it outside.)
Heat the water to boiling.
Soften the bands by dropping
them in the boiling water, as
shown in Photo F. Keep them
in there for a minimum of 20
minutes. Leave the bands youre
not working on in the boiling
water so they remain pliable.
Remove the box body band
with tongs, wrap it around the
appropriate core for sizing, and
make a pencil mark on the edge
where the sides overlap each
other, as shown in Photo G. The

band begins to cool and dry


right away and does not require
special gloves for handling.
Remove the core and set it aside.
Now bend your box back into
shape, aligning the pencil marks.
Fit the anvils pipe through
the center of the box band, and
insert a tack in a predrilled nail
hole. While slowly pulling the
band toward you across the anvils
pipe, hammer lightly on the tack,
as shown in Photo H. You want
the curved pipe to bend the point
of the tack back toward the wood
and lock the ends together. This is
called clinch-nailing. Similarly,
drive a tack in each of the mating
nail holes in the box band.
Press a beveled shaper into
both ends of the box openings,
and then tightly hold the box
band in its final shape, as shown
in Photo I. Position the box band

10

11

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com

51

2"

Tape serves
as stop.

Figure 3: Drilling Jig


4" wing nut

Clamp
114 112 8" (notch to suit drill)

4" washer

Recess sized to
accommodate
your drill.

4" hole, counterbored;


locate to suit drill.
Top base
4 512 8"

on the shaper with the fingers


slightly to the right of center.
(Regardless of box size, youll
want to position all the boxes
in your set the same way.) If
needed, the first shaper can be
rotated to bring the main tack
line into the center of the oval.
Then, insert the second shaper.
Remove the lid band from
the heated water, and wrap it
around the box band, as shown
in Photo J. Mark where the
ends overlap with a pencil. Now,
remove the band, and rebend it
around the anvil pipe, aligning
the pencil marks. Clinch-nail the
finger to the tapered square end.
Place the lid band back on the
box band, and set the assembly
aside to dry overnight. Be sure
that all fingers point in the same
direction and that the nails
align, as shown in the Inset.

12
1
4 312"
carriage bolt

8" hanging hole

Lower base
4 8 15"

Note: I custom-made the jig shown


here to suit my portable drill. The
aim was to make sure that the 564"
drill bit was parallel to the outside
faces of the box bottom and lid top.
You want the drilled holes 18" above
the outside face of the box bottom
and 18" below the lids top face.

Note: Several ways exist to make the


recess for cradling the drill. I angled
a pair of fences on the tablesaw at
45, and, using a dado set and stop,
I sawed a coved recess, making the
cuts in small increments. Alternative
methods include routing the recess or
boring the recess at the drill press.

52 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Tip Alert
Continually test-fit the box
bottom and lid top in the box and
lid bands as needed. Mark any
oversized areas, and lightly sand
excess to achieve the best fit.

Complete the box

Once the box and lid hoops


are dry, remove the shapers.
Place the box and lid hoops
on 14"-thick pieces of cherry,
and lightly trace around their
insides, as shown in Photo K.
Make matching witness marks
on the box bottom and box
hoop for alignment when the
bottom is inserted. Do the
same for the top and lid hoop.
Trim off the excess wood at
the bandsaw, staying back 14"
outside of the cutline. Next, angle
the disc sander table at 4, and
bevel-sand the box bottom and
lid top to the line, as shown in
Photo L. Test-fit these pieces
to their respective hoops. You
want the box bottom and lid top
to wedge tightly into place and
be flush with the hoop edges.
Use your sander sparingly to
sneak up on the final fitting.
Note: Drilling the holes along the
bottom and top edges of the lidded
box can be done in several ways.
I made a drilling jig that fits my
drill. Check out the notes in the
drawing for construction help.
Build a custom drilling jig
for your portable drill similar
to the one in Figure 3. Install
a 564" bit in your drills chuck,
and attach your drill to the jig
using its clamp. You want the
bit parallel with the surface of
the box bottom or lid top and
1
8" in from the edge. Adjust
the thickness of the jigs upper
base to achieve the correct hole
height. Place a piece of masking

tape 12" under the bit and on the


upper base to serve as a stop.
Now, drill four to five
5
1
64" holes 2" deep about
every 112" to 2" around the
perimeter of the box band
by pushing the box onto the
bit, as shown in Photo M.
Lightly dip one-half of a round
toothpick in glue, and insert it
into one of the holes. With the
box resting on its side on your
benchtop, tap the toothpick gently
to seat it snugly in the hole. Do
this around the box bottom,
where shown in Figure 1,
to securely anchor the hoops.
Repeat for the lid. Carefully snip
the excess toothpick material
with a wire cutter, as shown in
Photo N. File the protruding
stubs flush to the box and lid.
(A file is necessary for this step

N
because it is difficult to sand the
end grain of the toothpick flat
with the containers surface.)
Apply a finish. (I wiped on
natural Watco Danish Oil on the
outside only to let the cherry
age and darken with time.) Let
the boxes dry overnight, and
then put them to good use. n

About Our Designer/Builder


A woodworker for 40 years, Al Huls currently
manages the Woodcraft store in Indianapolis,
Indiana. Over the last several years, he
has taught classes on routers, tablesaws,
cabinetmaking, and building Shaker boxes.

Convenience-PLUS BUYING GUIDE


1.

Thumb Guard, Leather, Lg.

#16V24

$4.99

2.

Kit for 3 Oval Boxes, #1, #2, #3 Bands,


Tops, Bottoms, Tacks

#50D23

$35.00

Above items are available at Woodcraft stores, woodcraft.com, or by calling (800) 225-1153.
Prices subject to change without notice.

3.

Tac Pac with Pegs, 1 pkg. each for #0, #1, #2,
#3, #4 Box Sizes

$15.00

4.

32" Galvanized Steel Water (Boiling) Tray

$38.00

5.

Bands for 5 Box Bands, #0-#4, Cherry

$19.00

6.

Oval Core Set for #0-#4 Boxes

$50.00

7.

Shaper (Drier) Set for #0-#4 Boxes

$50.00

8.

Finger Templates, Aluminum, for #0-#4 Boxes

$20.00

9.

Set of Five Tops and Bottoms, Quartersawn Cherry


for #0-#4 Boxes

$19.00

Above items are available through boxmaker John Wilson, Charlotte, Michigan, at shakerovalbox.com or by
calling (517) 543-5325. Prices subject to change without notice.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 53

Arts & Crafts


End Table
A period piece made perfect with
simple jigs and templates
By Mario Rodriguez

Overall dimensions: 22"w 22"d 2412"h


54 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

ased on the dozens of times


that Ive taught my table-building
class, it seems that Arts and
Crafts furniture may never fall
out of fashion. The clean lines
complement almost any dcor, but
I think woodworkers, especially
beginners, are particularly
delighted to show off newly
mastered joinery skills. The fact
that the base can be disassembled,
allowing the table to fold flat for
easy transport, is a major plus for
students driving compact cars.
Like the originals, my table
utilizes simple joinery (the rails
and stretchers are joined at their
mid-points with half-lap joints)
with a few subtle curves and
chamfers. Upon closer inspection,
youll see that I adopted a few
modern tricks to ensure a speedy
and successful build for even
beginning-level woodworkers.
For example, rather than relying
on traditional mortise-and-tenon
joinery, I employed loose tenons
and designed a mortising jig that
works with any plunge router.
To reduce the time spent sawing
and sanding parts, I created
templates so that the legs and top
can be quickly routed to shape.
Authentic Arts and Crafts tables
like this one sell for hundreds
of dollars, but you can build an
honest reproduction in a weekend
or two for little more than the
cost of a few board feet of lumber.
For those interested in making
Christmas gifts, the jigs facilitate
a last-minute production run.
Note: I used quartersawn
red oak. Purists prefer white
oak, but cherry or mahogany
would also make a nice-looking
table. Whichever wood you
choose, stick with quartersawn
stock. The cathedral grain
patterns of plain-sawn stock
would be too distracting.

Make the parts

1 From 5/4 (1

"-thick) stock,
mill enough material to 78" thick
to make the top (A), legs (B),
rails (C), and stretchers (D).
Select the best-looking boards,
and then glue up a panel slightly
larger than 22 22" to make the
top (A). Put that assembly aside
as you prepare the other parts.
At the tablesaw, rip the legs
(B), rails (C), and stretchers (D)
to the widths listed in the Cut
List. Using a crosscut sled or
miter saw, square-cut the rails
and stretchers to exact length.
(Youll miter the ends of the rails
after cutting the half-lap joint.)
Referring to Figure 1, lay out
the half-lap joints on the rails
(C) and stretchers (D). Clearly
mark the material that will
be removed so that you dont
mistakenly notch the wrong edge.
Set a crosscut sled on top of
your tablesaw and adjust the
blade height to one-half the width
of the rails (C). Using the layout
lines drawn on a rail (C), clamp
stopblocks to your sleds fence so
that the blade grazes the inside
edges of your lines. To notch the
rail, make the outermost cuts
first, and then slide it between
the blocks to remove the waste
(Photo A). Repeat with the
second rail, and then test the
fit. If necessary, fine tune the
joint with a sharp chisel.
Reposition the stopblocks and
then saw the opposing half-lap
notches on the stretchers (D),
just as you did for the rails.
Using a mitersaw equipped with
a fence and stop, cut the 5 angle
on both ends of both stretchers
(D). Make sure to cut the miters
so that the notch faces up on one
rail and down on the other.
Referring to Figure 1, lay out
the curves on the ends of the rails
(C). Using a bandsaw or jigsaw,
1
4

Figure 1: Table Exploded


8" chamfer

Adjust
counterbore so
that screw goes
1
2" deep in top.

16" chamfer

8 notch, 78" deep

Do not glue top


rail to legs.

8 114" mortise,
3
4" deep
3

238"

#8 112"
flathead screw

8v 114" mortise,
4" deep

8" notch,
1" deep
7

712"

End Detail
R=214"

4"

1316"

6
7

A
Hold the rail against your sleds fence and nibble out the waste.
Firmly-set stop blocks will prevent you from sawing past your lines.


Opening photo: Jim Osborn; project photos: Paul Anthony; Illustrations: John Hartman

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 55

Figure 2: Leg Template

85

R=2"
85

1 square = 1"

Figure 3: Leg Shaping Jig


Leg template

Quick-Action Toggle Clamp


(Woodcraft #144312, $12.59)

End stop

cut just outside your line, and


then use an oscillating spindle
sander to finish the curve. At the
drill press, drill 18" clearance and
5
16" counterbore holes, where
shown for attaching the top (A).

Shape the legs

1 Referring to Figure 2, lay

1" brads

Shop-made handle
Use cutoff finish nails
to secure leg to jig.

out a full-sized leg template on


a piece of 12" plywood or MDF.
Cut outside your lines, and then
carefully sand up to them.
To make the Leg Shaping
Jig shown in Figure 3 at left,
temporarily attach the leg
template adjacent to the edge of a
6 29" piece of 12"-thick plywood.
Position the fence and end stop
against the template, and then
nail these pieces to the base. Next,
trace along the legs front edge,
and then bandsaw just outside
your line. Attach the handles and
toggle clamps, and then clamp the
template to the jig. Finally, using
a table-mounted router equipped
with a flush-trim bit (see the
Convenience-Plus Buying
Guide), rout along the outside
edge of your template to shape
the working edge of your jig.
Remove the template from
the jig, and use it to lay out the
legs (B) on your stock. As you
did with the template, cut 18"
outside your lines, and then
insert the rough-cut leg into your
shaping jig and rout the outside
edge, as shown in Photo B.

Base
2 6 29"

Fence
4 234 24"

B
Using a template to lay out the legs and then routing them to final
shape ensures symmetrical parts and reduces sanding time.
56 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Figure 4: Leg Mortising Jig


#8 114" flathead screw

2 138" mortise

Top
1
2 6 38 11"

Drill out the waste,


then pare or sand
to layout lines.

Position fence
3
16" from hole.

Establishing a gap between the jig and workpiece gives


sawdust an easy exit so that it wont clog your cut.

4 34 11" spacer strip

Mortise centerline
Fence
3
4 4 9"
Supports
4 134 3"

Rout the mortises

Build the mortising


jig, and make the spacer
strip, as shown above.
Referring to Figure 1, lay
out the mortises on the legs
(B), rails (C), and stretchers
(D). Using the centerlines on
the base and fence of your jig,
clamp a leg to the fence, as
shown in Photo C. Next, install
a 12" bushing and 38" upcut
spiral bit in your plunge router,
and adjust the plunge depth to
114". Remove the spacer strip;
then plunge-rout the ends
of the mortise to full depth
(Photo D). Finish excavating
the mortise in 14"-deep passes.
Repeat with the edge mortises
in the other legs and rails.
Center the mortise layout
lines on the end of a leg with the
lines on the mortise jig, clamp
the two together, and rout an

end mortise,
as shown in
Photo E. Rout
D
the mortises in
the remaining
After clamping the work to the jig and the jig to
legs, and
your bench, fit the bushing in the slot and rout.
then mortise
the ends of the stretchers
(D) in this same manner.
Make the loose tenons (E)
by thicknessing a piece of stock
to 38", and then ripping a few
118"-wide strips (making the
tenons a bit narrower than
the mortises allows a little
wiggle room during assembly).
Round the edges with a router
bit or hand plane; then cut the
strips into 112"-long tenons.
Using the loose tenons, dryE
assemble the legs (B), rails (C),
Use a pair of sturdy clamps to
and stretchers (D), and make
secure the jig. Position the leg low
any adjustments so that the
in the vise so that neither the jig
adjoining parts are flush. Put
nor leg tips or shifts in mid-cut.
these parts aside for now.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com

57

For a free trammel jig plan, plus


seven other simple router jigs,
go to woodcraftmagazine.com
and click on online extras.
F
Use a template and a router equipped with a spiral flush-trim
bit to shape the top and smooth the edge in a single step.

Make the top

1 Using a router equipped with

a straight bit and a shop-made


trammel, make a 22"-diameter
top template for the top from
3
4"-thick plywood or MDF. Place
the template on the top panel
and trace the outline of the
top. Using a bandsaw or jigsaw,
cut to within 18" of the line.

2 Affix the template to the

top panel. Note: Screws are


more reliable than double-faced
tape. Just make sure that youre
screwing into the bottom face of
your top. Using a router equipped
with a flush-trim bit, rout the
top, as shown in Photo F.
Finish-sand the top
through 220 grit. Finally,

Arts & Crafts Finish, Simply Done

After some experimentation, I devised a finishing sequence using


materials found in most home centers that closely replicates
the color of the original Arts and Crafts pieces that Ive seen.
After finish-sanding, wipe or brush on a coat of Minwax
English Chestnut (#233). Give the piece a day or two to dry,
and then brush on a sealer coat of 2 lb.-cut amber shellac.
Allow a day or so for the shellac to dry; then rub out the table
with a non-abrasive pad. Apply a second coat of shellac, rub
it out as before, and then apply a light coat of paste wax.

Figure 5: Clamping Caul Pattern

rout a 18" chamfer along the


top edge and a 116" chamfer
along the bottom edge.

Assembly and finishing

1 Using the pattern below,

make at least two pairs of


clamping cauls from 34"thick scrap material.
Before gluing the base,
review Figure 1 and do a dry
assembly to make certain that
you understand how the halves
fit together. At this time, mark
the stretcher (D) locations on
the legs (B), making sure that
both stretchers are the same
distance from the bottom.
Starting with the rail (C) and
stretcher (D) with the up-facing
notches, apply glue to the
mortises, insert the loose tenons
(E), and then attach the legs

95

1 square = 1"

58 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Glue joint

Dry joint

G
Pay close attention to the notch directions when assembling the base
halves. Custom cauls help apply pressure directly across the angled joint.
(Photo G). Glue the remaining
stretcher to the second pair
of legs, but do not glue the
remaining rail. Finish-sand
both frames through 220 grit.
To assemble the table, fit one
base half into the other half, and
then dry-fit the remaining rail
(Photo H). Flip the assembled
base upside down and position
it on the underside of the top (A).
Center the rails on the top, and
then use the clearance holes as
guides for drilling pilot holes into
the top. Finally, attach the rails (C)
to the top with 112"-long screws.

About Our Designer/Builder

A custom furnituremaker
for over 35
years, Mario
Rodriguez
now spends
much of his
time teaching
aspiring
woodworkers at
the Philadelphia
Furniture
Workshop
(philadelphiafurniture
workshop.com).

Finish the table. (If youre


looking for a finish that
captures the Arts and Crafts
look without the hazards
of ammonia or the hassle of
mixing dyes, check out my
simple, off-the-shelf approach
in the sidebar on page 32.)
Reassemble the table,
and put it to good use. n

Screwing the rail to the top locks


the base together, but the dryfitted rail enables the base to be
disassembled and folded flat.

Arts & Crafts Table


Part

Thickness

Width Length

Qty. Matl

8"

22"

22"

RO

8"

RO

A*

Top

Legs

Rails

Stretchers

Loose tenons

3"

22"

8"
8"
8"

2"

19 8"

RO

134"

1112"

RO

118"

112"

*Indicates parts that are initially cut oversized. See instructions.


Materials: RO=Red Oak, M=Maple
Hardware: (4) #8 112" flathead screws

Convenience-PLUS BUYING GUIDE


1.

Whiteside Pattern Cutting Bit 78"D, 112"CL, 12" SH

#842403

$40.49

2.

Whiteside Upcut Spiral Bit 38" D,


114" CL, 12" SH

#08K61

$55.99

3.

Whiteside Spiral Flush-Trim Bit

#127466

$42.99

4.

Bulls Eye Amber Shellac, quart

#140701

$15.99

Above items are available at Woodcraft stores, woodcraft.com or by calling (800) 225-1153.
Prices subject to change without notice.

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 59

The Swiss Scroll Sawblades


Skip Tooth
Double Skip Tooth
Reverse Skip Tooth
Double Skip Tooth Reverse
Modied Geometry
Spiral

All Pgas Sawblades are manufactured in our Swiss


factory from the best carbon steel available. Tradition,
Precision and Expertise since 1966, are fundamental in the
production of these very high quality, world class sawblades.
Leave a smooth finish
Alternatively set teeth
Consistent quality
Long lasting
www.grobetusa.com
800-635-2993

www.scies.ch

Mfg. in Switzerland by Scies Miniatures, a Division of Grobet USA, Carlstadt, NJ 07072

Experienced woodworkers know


that Forrest blades are ideal for
remodeling high-end kitchens
and baths.
Forrest blades deliver smooth,
quiet cuts without splintering,
scratching, or tearouts. Our
proprietary manufacturing
process, hand straightening, and
unique grade of C-4 micrograin
carbide produce blades that
are perfect for cabinets, countertops, and flooring. In fact,
independent tests rate us #1 for
rip cuts and crosscuts.
Your blades are without
question the best by miles,
and I have tried them all.
Bob Jensen, Fridley, MN

Forrest Quality Shows


Duraline Hi-AT
Great for cutting
two-sided veneers
and low pressure
laminates.
Woodworker II
Best rated,
all-purpose blade for
rips and crosscuts.
Order from any Forrest dealer
or retailer, online, or by calling
directly. Our blades are
manufactured in the U.S.A.
and come with our 30-day,
money-back guarantee.
2013 Forrest Manufacturing

60 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Code WC

www.ForrestBlades.com
1-800-733-7111 (In NJ, 973-473-5236)

Super-Simple Projects

Big-Wheel Pizza Cutter


Get a handle on an all-business blade.
By Marlen Kemmet

ll pizza cutters are not


created equal. The unique
kitchen tool shown here features
a multi-colored SpectraPly
handle and wide 4"-diameter
chrome-plated cutter that
makes short work of slicing
up a thick meat-lovers pizza,
a party-sized cookie, or even
quesadillas. A threaded insert
in the handle lets you unscrew

the cutter for cleaning in the


dishwasher. To get started, pick
up the items mentioned in the
Convenience-Plus Buying
Guide at the end of the story.

Turn the handle to shape

1 Using either multi-colored

SpectraPly (shown here) or


figured stock, cut a handle blank
that measures 226". (Handle

62 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

length can vary depending on


your handles design, but youll
need to allow an extra 12" in
order to part off the handle.)
Mark diagonals on both
ends of the blank to find
the centers. Using a small
handsaw, cut 116"-deep kerfs
on one end for mounting on
the spur drive at the headstock
as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Lathe Setup


Headstock

3 Build a simple right-angle

work support with screws, and


position it on your drill-press
table (Photo A). Clamp the blank
vertically in the support. Using
a 12.5mm bit, bore a centered
7
8"-deep hole into the unkerfed
end of the blank for housing the
threaded insert and mounting
the blank on your cone center. (I
wrapped painters tape around
the bit 78" from the bits end
to serve as a depth stop.)
Mount the handle blank
between centers, fitting the end
with the hole for the threaded

Spur drive

2 2 6"
handle blank

12.5mm hole,
7
8" deep

insert onto your cone center.


With a roughing gouge, turn the
blank round at around 1,200 rpm.
Measure and mark the handle
diameters on the cylinder, where
shown in the Handle Template.
Also, for additional help, make
a copy of the full-sized handle
template, adhere it to a piece of
cardboard or hardboard, and
scrollsaw out just the colored
portion to serve as a template.
Using a 14" or 38" gouge, turn
the handle to shape, as shown in
Photo B, at around 1,500 rpm.
Guide off your layout marks,

60 cone
center

B
Turn the handle to shape, running the tip of the
gouge downhill from each end to form the cove.

A
Use a simple right-angle support
to drill a perpendicular hole in the
handle for the threaded insert.

C
Use the template to ensure your turning matches
the shape of the handle featured here. This
particular design provides a rest for your thumb.


Opening photo: Jim Osborn, Project photos: Doug Hetherington; Illustrations: Melanie
Powell

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 63

Handle Template 100% Size

112"

114"

1"

8"

138"

1"

358"
558"

and check the diameters with


a caliper. Maintain a 78" hole
at the end of the turning that
will receive the pizza cutter
insert. Also, leave at least
1
2" of waste material at the
butt end for parting later.
As you near completion,
check the turning against your
template, as shown in Photo C.
Sand the handle through
320 grit, and apply a nish of
your choice. (I used General
Finishes Salad Bowl Finish.)
Part off the waste tenon
using either a parting tool,
as shown in Photo D, or a
small handsaw. Sand this
end to shape, being careful to
maintain a rounded profile. Now
finish the sanded butt end.

7
8

D
Separate the handle from the
tenon by rounding the butt
end with a parting tool.

Assemble the Parts

1 Mix and apply five-minute

epoxy on the outside surface of


the threaded insert, being careful
not to get any on the inside
threaded surface. Wrap a clean
cloth around the handle so as
not to mar the finish, and clamp
it securely in your bench vise.
Drive the threaded insert
into the handles hole, using a
broad-bladed screwdriver or
T-Wrench for a 516-18 insert,
as shown in Photo E, flushing
it with the end of the handle.
Finally, thread the cutter onto
the handle and slice away. When
cleaning the pizza cutter, wipe
the handle with a damp soapy
cloth only. Unscrew the cutter for
washing it in the dishwasher. n

Convenience-PLUS BUYING GUIDE

E
Use a T-wrench to drive the
threaded insert squarely into
the hole, flushing its top end.

1.

SpectraPly Turning Blank, Royal Camo, 2 2 6"

#154094

$8.75

2.

Pizza Cutter Turning Kit, Chrome

#154265

$17.99

3.

Whiteside Bit, 12.5mm

#154026

$23.99

4.

5-Minute Epoxy, Syringe, 1.6 oz.

#12K65

$5.50

5.

T-Wrench for 516"-18 Inserts

#131198

$16.99

6.

General Finishes Salad Bowl Finish, 1 pt.

#125374

$11.99

Above items are available at Woodcraft stores, woodcraft.com or by calling (800) 225-1153.
Prices subject to change without notice.

64 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

SJ A 175x117 woodcraft_Layout 1 2013-09-26 10:12 Sida 1

Choose your Elite bench with free storage cabinet!


Rock solid and packed
with features
Designed and built by
Swedish craftsmen
European beech top and trestle
Top 31/4 thickness with 41/4 skirt
Massive 29 full width vises
Double row of 1 round steel
bench dogs

ELITE 2500

$2,149
Length 99
For both left and
right handed use.

ELITE 2500 Workbench + free Cabinet SM08.


Worth $ 520. Weight 371 lbs.

Rob Cosman
Your Hand Tool Coach
www.robcosman.com
" My business has me conducting seminars and
workshops on hand tool use across
Canada, the US and the UK. Good
hand work requires a good bench, the
two are inseparable. When I arrive at a
location and find a big Sjoberg, it all
but guarantees a successful event. I recommend the Sjobergs' Elite Series to
anyone starting out in woodworking.
They are solid, flat and heavy.

ELITE 1500

ELITE 2000

ELITE 2000 Workbench


+ free Cabinet SM08.
Worth $ 520

$1,999
Length 76

Offer available while stocks last.

66 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

$1,849

For a free catalog or to find


your local Woodcraft Store,
visitwoodcraft.com or call
800-225-1153.

Length 59
ELITE 1500 Workbench
+ free Cabinet SM07. Worth $ 415

Visit sjobergs.se for video and full details of range and specifications

QUALITY WOODWORKING TOOLS


SUPPLIES ADVICE

Get Organized & Protect Your Cargo


With TANOS T-LOC Systainers
The Systainer originated from the need to transport
materials and tools so they were well organized
and easy to move. This was accomplished through
a unique patented case system, which enables all
Systainers to be stacked and linked together. The
LOC in T-LOC stands for: Lock, Open and Connect!

T-LOC Systainers
One-Handed Locking, Opening And Connecting
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Strong, Versatile, 100% ABS Polymer
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Every Component Can Be Easily Replaced

PACK

STACK

Pack your items and get organized;


the possibilities are endless.

Simply click into the snap-in position


at the back, and turn the T-LOC catch.

TRANSPORT
Place your stacked systainers on
the dolly, and easily move your items.

For A Free Catalog Or To Find Your Local Woodcraft Store, Visit woodcraft.com Or Call 800-225-1153. 14WD01P2
For Information On Woodcraft Retail Franchise Opportunities, Visit woodcraftfranchise.com

WoodSense

Spotlight on Teak
The all-time weather-beating wood for land and sea
By Pete Stephano
Technical consultant: Larry Osborn

n the Southeast Asian


rain forest, teak trees attain
heights of 100' or more and a
circumference of 12' feet (5'-6'
in diameter). When plantationgrown (the most common source
for the wood today), teak may be
taller, but have a smaller girth.
Due to the large size of rainforest teak, getting the logs to
market presents a significant
challenge. Harvesters must girdle
the trees (cut through the bark
to the sapwood) around their
circumference. They then let
them die on the stump and dry
out over several years. When
dry, the tree is felled, cut into
log lengths, and hauled to a river
(sometimes by elephant or water
buffalo). Here, the logs are floated
to the closest mill and/or port.
Without girdling and drying,
the freshly cut teak logs would
prove far too heavy to float!

Its a fact that

Teak has the largest


leaves of any known tree.
Measuring up to 20" in
length and to 14" in width,
the rough-textured leaves
are utilized by local villagers
as an abrasive, much as
woodworkers use sandpaper!

Teak, one of the worlds


most valuable woods, varies
in color from a golden brown
to rich chocolate, but darkens
after exposure to sunlight.
Its not uncommon to find
teak wood with nearly black
streaks. Over time in sunlight,
the wood turns gray.
While Teak features a
coarse, straight grain that is
easily worked. The occasional
mottle figure (which somewhat
resembles a tortoise shell) is
highly prized for cabinetry.
However, the most notable benefit
lies in the woods resistance
to insects, rot, and wear. Its
low shrinkage ratio makes it
ideal for applications where it
undergoes periodic changes
in moisture, as when used in
shipbuilding, boatbuilding, and
making outdoor furniture.

History in woodworking
Teak first rose to fame as
a tough, durable, weatherresistant, seafaring wood
employed as decking and
trim on everything from
yachts to warships. But it
has also long been used for
expensive home and office
paneling and flooring, as
well as high-end furniture
for use indoors and out.

68 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Where the
wood comes from

Teak (Tectonia grandis) is a


tree species native to Burma
(a.k.a. Myanmar), Cambodia,
India, Laos, and Thailand, but
it has been nurtured to grow
in nearly 40 tropical countries,
including Costa Rica and other
South American countries.
On the Indonesian island of
Java, the Dutch established
it in plantations centuries
ago, and it is still grown
there for sustained yield.

What youll pay

For centuries, the Burmese have


been setting teak pricing-andgrading standards. Like most
other lumber, the unit (board
foot) price of teak goes up with
increases in the thickness,
width, and board length. For
instance, forest-grown, First
European Quality (FEQ) boards
of 1" thickness and at least 8"
width bring a premium price
of about $25 per board foot.
Plantation-raised teak can
cost nearly 50% less, but the
wood has a lighter, more variable
yellow color and contains
more silica. Rough, unplaned
boards always cost less. Figured
stock (mottle) is uncommonly
found and will cost double

Flatsawn teak

that of straight-grained stock.


A 48 sheet of paper-backed
veneer runs a bit over $100.

How to select
the best stock

The chemical compound of silicon


and oxygen (SiO2) extracted from
the ground by a growing teak tree
and distributed throughout its
trunk gives the wood an oily feel
(on top of its natural oil). In oldgrowth trees, the compound will
have dispersed throughout the
larger trunks, making their wood
highly desirable and thus more
costly. In other words, the wood
of older trees has a higher value.
Because teaks color can vary
depending on where and how
it was grown, attempt to buy
all of your needed stock from
the same imported shipment,
something easily done at reliable
specialty wood dealers.

Working teak in the shop

Machining teak is a pretty


straightforward process, as
long as you keep the following
observations in mind.
Despite its hardness, it rips,
crosscuts, and routs more easily
than red oak. And while the

Photo: Larry Hamel-Lambert; Illustration: Steve Sanford

woods silica content may help


boards slide across tablesaw
and jointer tops, be aware
that it is brutal on blades and
knives and causes blunting in
short order. If you use hand
tools, plan to dedicate extra
time for sharpening; silica
wreaks havoc on plane blades
and chisels and scratches
up plane soles, as well.
When drilling teak, use
high rpm for clean, chip-free
holes. Youll find that sanding
requires frequent stops to
clear the abrasive of the
woods somewhat sticky dust
(to which some may have
an allergic reaction). Using
open-coat or stearated paper
reduces this task. Resorcinol
adhesives or epoxy work
best with teak, and youll get
the best results when surfaces
to be joined are first wiped with
acetone or other potent solvent.
Teak doesnt take stain well,
and oil finishes, such a tung
and teak, attract dirt and can
turn dark. Avoid plastic-based
finishes, such as polyurethane.
For teak used indoors or inside
a boat, several coats of varnish
give the wood a nice look.
For decking or trim, leave the
wood natural without finish.
Only a cross-grain scrubbing
is needed to clean it. The same
goes for outdoor furniture. n

Teak Quick Take


Cost

High

Weight

Same as red oak

Hardness

Similar to red oak

Stability

High

Durability High
Strength

High

Toxicity

Possible allergic
reaction to dust

Tool Type

Power tools with


carbide blades
and cutters; sharp
hand tools

Common
Uses

Boat decks and


trim, cabinets,
carvings, decorative
plywood, furniture,
flooring, millwork
(doors), turnings

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 69

PEN MAKING
Accessories

TruFit vs. Standard


Shown With Brass Tubes Inserted

Get The Right Fit

MADE
IN USA

TAKE OUR CHALLENGE...


STEP 1: Use a caliper to measure the outside diameter of your brass tube.
STEP 2: Measure the outside diameter of your current drill bit.
STEP 3: Compare to a Whiteside TruFit Drill Bit.

Whiteside Pen Makers Bits - 154023 - 154031


Designed Specifically For Woodcraft Kits
Tip Designed To Allow For Better Alignment And Clean Exit Hole
1,000-1,250 RPM Continuous Feed For Optimum Performance
Provides Better Fit/Adhesion Between Brass And Blank
Made In The USA From Premium M2 High-Speed Steel

154023
154024
154025
154026
154027

7mm (.272")
10mm & 25/64" (.389")
10.5mm & 27/64" (.412")
12.5mm (.488")
3/ " (.372")
8

ULTIMATE
Trim Bits

The ULTIMATE Trim series brings


industrial engineered bits, previously
manufactured for CNC machines,
right into your shop.

154028 15/32" (.457")


154029 31/64" (.476")
154030 33/64" (.516")
154031 letter O (.314")

Whiteside Pro Pen Mandrel #2MT - 157776


New Design Allows for Fast & Easy Mandrel Adjustment
Fits #2 Morse Taper And Promotes A Better Lock To Lathe
4-Piece Design Includes Chuck, Collet Nut, Mandrel And Brass Nut
Available At Woodcraft! For A Free Catalog Or To Find Your Local
Woodcraft Store, Visit woodcraft.com Or Call 800-225-1153.

(A)

(B)

(C)

154275 (A) Flush Trim


154276 (B) Pattern/Plunge
154274 (C) Combination

QUALITY WOODWORKING TOOLS


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Pluma Pen Kits

(A)

The sleek, smooth, refined lines of this


pen and its distinct feel in your hand
are sure to make this one of your favorite
pen kits. The elegant crosshatch pattern
on the accent bands and cap not only
enhances the beauty of the kit but also aids
in the operation of the twist mechanism.
The unique design of this pen kit incorporates a double barrel, a feature that allows
for the combination of substrates or the
ability to add contrast to the kit. Kit requires
a pen blank, bushing set (146597) and
27/ " pen makers bit, all sold separately.
64

(B)

(C)

158627
158628
158629
158630
146597

Chrome (A)
Gunmetal (B)
Woodcraft Gold (C)
Replacement Tubes
Bushings

Elegant
Crosshatch
Pattern

To Find Your Local Woodcraft Store Or For A Free Catalog, Visit woodcraft.com Or Call 1-800-225-1153. 14WD01H

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 71

Products that Perform

Pinnacle 4012 Scrub Plane


A go-to tool when machines fall short

The Pinnacle 4012

By Craig Bentzley
Flattening stock is an essential
step in the milling process.
These days, most of us use
electric-powered jointers, but
for centuries, cabinetmakers

Stanley #4012 , was mass


produced for nearly 50 years.
With a heavily cambered
blade, no chip-breaker, and an
extra-large mouth opening,
this tool defies conventional
hand-plane design. But unlike
other planes made to produce
whisper thin shavings, a scrub
planes sole purpose is to hog
off large amounts of wood.
When properly sharpened and
set, a scrub plane can remove
material almost as fast as a
handheld power planer.
If you enjoy the thrill of
the hunt, you might snag one
at an antique auction or flea
market, but you dont have
to. Woodcraft now offers the
Pinnacle 4012 a brand new
made in the USA scrub plane
that takes all the right cues from
its predecessor while offering
noteworthy improvements.

and carpenters relied on


roughing, or scrub, planes. The
most popular model was first
introduced in the late 1800s.
This plane, the venerable

Plane perpendicularly or diagonally across the high spots using overlapping


strokes. Check your progress frequently; flattening is fast work.
72 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

In a side-by-side comparison
with a vintage Stanley, I
discovered that the Pinnacle
sports some new details that
improve longevity, performance,
and feel. For starters, the body
is made from ductile iron
instead of cast-iron. This means
that it wont break should it
topple from your bench. To
better withstand the demands
of roughing stock, the blade is
made from tough A2 steel with
a Rockwell hardness rating of
60-62. The blade is also 50%
thicker (316"-thick) than the
original Stanley blades, for more
aggressive, chatter-free stock
removal. Last but not least,
the knob and tote have been
upsized for maximum comfort.

Photos: Paul Anthony

The perfect way to cut


logs the traditional way.
The Lynx saw range
Available at Woodcraft
www.flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk
orderonline@flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk
Tel: +44 114 2725387

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 73

Products that Perform


Multi-use performer

So youre asking yourself: Do


I need one? If you use rough
stock, the answer is yes; if you
dont, the answer is maybe.
Once you learn how this
tool works and what it can
do for you, youll be better
able to make a decision.
As a modern-day
woodworker, I use electricpowered machinery whenever
possible, but when working
with boards wider than my
jointer, I reach for my scrub
plane. Used across the grain
usually taking diagonal passes
as shown at leftthis plane
quickly levels twists, bows,
and cups. (After this step, I
can continue flattening the
stock using my #5 and #7,
or else enlist my thickness
planer.) For this chore alone,
my scrub plane earns its keep.
A scrub plane also offers a
handy way to quickly remove
material on the edge of a
board. As with flattening, use
the scrub to get the board to
rough width and then use a
jointer plane to finish the edge.
When used with the grain, a
scrub planes heavily cambered
blade creates a hand-hewn
texture. This scalloped surface
can add a nice tactile element
to country-style furniture
or timber-frame structures.
Note: In this instance, the blade
needs to be very sharp and the
depth of cut reduced, or else the
plane can cause severe tearout, particularly in areas where
the grain reverses direction.
Pinnacle 4012 Scrub Plane
#159000, $169.99

Sharpening The Blade


The A2 steel blade will hold
an edge for a long time, but
at some point, youll need
to resharpen the blade. This
cambered blade defies common
sharpening jigs, but fear not;
freehand honing and grinding is
not as hard as you might think.
Honing the micro bevel on a
3
16"-thick blade is easy. Rest a
small sharpening stone (I prefer
a super-fine diamond honing
paddle) on the high points of
the hollow-ground edge, and
take six or so side-to-side passes
until a burr forms on the back
of the blade. Next, repeat the
process using a ceramic or hard
Arkansas stone. The honing
process will establish a micro
bevel on the leading edge as
shown above right. (The back
of the blade doesnt need
to have a mirror finish, but
you should rub the polishing
stone across the back of the
blade to knock off the burr.)
After you use the plane
for awhile, or if you want to
customize the camber (I find
the 3"-radius camber a bit
too aggressive), youll need to
regrind the edge. To do this,
darken the back edge of the
blade with a marker, and then
use a square to scribe a line
across the edge slightly back
from the existing edge. Make a
template for the desired radius,
line it up so the radius touches
the outer points of your scribed
line, and then scribe the radius.
Next, set your grinders tool
rest to 30, and grind the edge.

74 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

Microbevel

To touch up the bevel, rest


the stone against the hollowground edge and hone using
use a side-to-side motion.

To grind a new camber, sweep


the bevel side to side in an arc,
working back to your scribed line.

Introducing The WoodRiver


#4 and #5 Bench Planes
#4
A-2 Steel Blade

Lever-cap Locking Cam

Lateral Blade
Adjustment Lever

Bubinga Knob

Bubinga Handle

Heavy, StressRelieved Ductile


Iron Casting

Depth Adjustment

Fully Machined
Adjustable Frogs

Soles And Sides


Machined Flat
And Square

The WoodRiver V3 line of hand planes is based on the reliable Stanley Bedrock design featuring heavy, stress-relieved
ductile iron castings, fully machined adjustable frogs and A-2 steel blades. These bench planes feature an evolving
design that incorporates input from users, experts and the manufacturer to ensure that the planes perform as precisely
and efficiently as possible.

#4 Bench Hand Plane, V3

158001

The WoodRiver V3 #4 Bench Hand Plane is 27/8" long, 103/8" wide,


has a 23/8" blade, and weighs just over 6 lbs. Commonly referred to
as a smoothing plane, the #4 offers the user more heft, size and
a larger tote than a traditional #4. Features include soles and sides
machined flat and square and minimal tune-up required before use.

#5 Bench Hand Plane, V3

158002

The WoodRiver V3 #5 Bench Hand Plane is 27/8" long, 1415/16" wide,


has a 23/8" blade, and weighs slightly over 7 lbs. The #5 is generally
thought of as an all-purpose plane capable of performing the smoothing
tasks of the smaller planes and the jointing tasks of the larger planes.
Features include soles and sides machined flat and square and
minimal tune-up required before use.
14WD01P

HELPING YOU MAKE WOOD WORK


For A Free Catalog Or To Find Your Local Woodcraft Store, Visit woodcraft.com Or Call 800-225-1153.
For Information On Woodcraft Retail Franchise Opportunities, visit woodcraftfranchise.com

The Market

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(Distributor Inquiries Invited)

ADVERTISE IN

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Contact: Kiah Harpool
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or e-mail at:
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woodcraftmagazine.com
76 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

www.radarcarve.net
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Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 77

The Market
NAILS, TACKS & BRADS

NOW
AT WOODCRAFT
NEWAVAILABLE
TO THE WAREHOUSE

National Hardware has everything you need to complete your woodworking project.
18072

800.346.9445
Create a glass-smooth finish on porous wood grain surfaces.

R:
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FOR SA LE

Ready to use Environmentally-friendly Water-based gel Dries clear

s
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struments

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Ready to use Fast drying Easy clean-up


Fills wood pores to create a smooth, "tabletop" finish.
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aquacoat.com

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SURFACE PREPARATION: Surface must be clean and dry (free from all dirt,
oil, wax and polish). Nail and screw holes, etc., should be countersunk and
filled with Aqua Coat Wood Putty. Sand the surface thoroughly, using 220
grit, or finer, sandpaper. Remove all dust with a vacuum, forced air or damp
cloth (water).
DIRECTIONS FOR USE: Aqua Coat Clear Wood Grain Filler Gel should be
applied after the piece is stained and a coat or two of finish have been
applied. Stain and finish coats must be dry and lightly sanded with 320 grit
before applying filler. If no stain is being applied, you may apply Aqua Coat
Clear Wood Grain Filler Gel to the raw wood. Work filler generously into
open wood grain and pores with a small squeegee or flexible putty knife.
Filler may also be applied with a soft cloth, using a circular motion, much
like applying a paste wax. Go across the grain and then reapply with the
grain. Inspect to see if the grain is completely filled, then lightly scrape off
excess. Let dry 45 minutes. If grain is not completely filled, sand and repeat
the application process. Filler can be lightly sanded with 320 grit between
coats. More filler may be applied between coats of finish. Make sure
to
+++
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IMPORTANT: 12 coats recommended. A final coat of finish is always
recommended over the clear grain filler.
Aqua Coat Clear Wood Grain Filler may be thinned with water.

Havre, MONTANA

established: 1985 (prime location)


includes: 3.43 acres, showroom,
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dollscabinets.com for information.

Dont
Miss
Out
on our information-packed issues!
Subscribe,
renew or give
a gift today!

Also
available
digitally!

woodcraftmagazine.com (800) 542-9125


78 woodcraftmagazine.com Dec/Jan 2014

1. Publication Title Woodcraft Magazine 2. Publication Number 024-953


3. Filing Date 9/30/2013 4. Issue Frequency Bi-Monthly: Dec/Jan,
Feb/March, April/May, June/July, Aug/Sept, Oct/Nov 5. Number
of Issues Published Annually 6 6. Annual Subscription Price $19.97
7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication Woodcraft
Magazine 4420 Emerson Ave, Suite A Parkersburg, WV 26104
8. Complete Mailing Address of Publisher Woodcraft Supply LLC
P.O Box 1686 Parkersburg, WV 26102 9. Full Names and Complete
Mailing Addresses of Publisher Jody Garrett 4420 Emerson Ave,
Suite A Parkersburg, WV 26104; Editor Jim Harrold 4420 Emerson
Ave, Suite A Parkersburg, WV 26104; 10. Owner Woodcraft Supply
LLC P.O. Box 1686 Parkersburg, WV 26102 11. Known Bondholders,
Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent
or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities.
None 12. Tax Status The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this
organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes:
has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months 13. Publication
Title Woodcraft Magazine 14. Issue Date for Circulation
Data Below A/S 2013
15. Extent and Nature of Circulation
Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months:
a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run):
132,822
b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

(1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated
on PS Form 3541. (Include paid distribution above
nominal rate, advertisers proof copies, and
exhange copies):
100,292

(2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS
Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above
nominal rate, advertisers proof copies, and
exhange copies):
0

(3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales
Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors,
Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution
Outside USPS:
6,461

(4) Paid Circulation by Other Classes Mailed Through
the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail):
0
c. Total Paid Distribution
[Sum of 15b. (1) (2), (3), and (4)]:
106,753
d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and
Outside the Mail)
(1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside County Copies
included on PS Form 3541:
7,868
(2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on
PS Form 3541:
0
(3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other
Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail):
0
(4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail
(Carriers of other means):
123
e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution
(Sum of 15 (1), (2), (3), and (4)):
7,991
f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c. And 15e.):
114,744
g. Copies not Distributed:
18,078
h. Total (Sum of 15f. And 15g.):
132,822
i. Percent Paid (15c. Divided by 15f. times 100)
93%
No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date
a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run):
132,757
b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

(1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated
on PS Form 3541. (Include paid distribution above
nominal rate, advertisers proof copies, and
exhange copies):
101,830

(2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS
Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above
nominal rate, advertisers proof copies, and
exhange copies):
0

(3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales
Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors,
Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution
Outside USPS:
7,135

(4) Paid Circulation by Other Classes Mailed Through
the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail):
0
c. Total Paid Distribution
[Sum of 15b. (1) (2), (3), and (4)]:
108,965
d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and
Outside the Mail)
(1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside County Copies
included on PS Form 3541:
7,850
(2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on
PS Form 3541:
0
(3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other
Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail):
0
(4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail
(Carriers of other means):
0
e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution
(Sum of 15 (1), (2), (3), and (4)):
7,850
f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c. And 15e.):
116,815
g. Copies not Distributed:
15,942
h. Total (Sum of 15f. And 15g.):
132,757
i. Percent Paid (15c. Divided by 15f. times 100)
93.3%
16. Publication of Statement of Ownership
Will be printed in the Dec/Jan 2014 issue of this publication.
17. Signature and Title of, Publisher, Jody Garrett, 4420 Emerson
Ave, Suite A Parkersburg, WV 26104 Date: 10/1/113. I certify that all
information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand
that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form
or who omits material or information requested on the form may be
subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or
civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

Ad Index
PRODUCT Website
Adhesives

Page
Turning Supplies

Nexabond

www.nexabond.com 26

Beall Tool Co.

www.bealltool.com 76

Satellite City

www.caglue.com 18

Berea Hardwoods

www.woodcraft.com 71

Easy Wood Tools

www.woodturning.com 10

Ring Master Lathe

www.ringmasterlathe.com 76

Titebond

www.titebond.com/InstantBond IBC

Bits, Blades, & Cutters


www.forrestblades.com 60

Northwest Bamboo

Freud

www.freudtools.com/Quadra-Cut IFC

West Penn Hardwoods www.westpennhardwoods.com 79

Pgas Sawblades

www.grobetusa.com 60

Woodfinder

PS Wood

www.pswood.com 76

Whiteside Machine

www.woodcraft.com 70

Carving
www.katools.com 17

Dust Collection
American Fabric Filter www.americanfabricfilter.com 76
Oneida

www.oneida-air.com

26 & 73

Hand Tools

www.nwbamboo.com 76

www.woodfinder.com 77

Aqua Coat

www.aquacoat.com

BDH Belts

www.BDHbelts.com 76

Big Gator Tools

www.biggatortools.com 12

Blokkz

www.blokkz.com 77

Purpleheart,
Zebrawood,
Paduak, Bocote,
Curly Soft Maple...
and many other species
including Bubinga
and Canarywood!
1
8", 14", 38" and 34" thickness
by random widths (3-8") wide
and random lengths (18-36").

Brand-First

www.brand-first.com 76

www.westpennhardwoods.com

Brusso

www.brusso.com 60

Cabinotch

www.cabinotch.us/woodcraft 16

Create-A-Bed

www.wallbed.com 77

Woodworking Supplies
76 & 78

230 S. Clinton Street


Olean NY 14760
Phone: 716-373-6434
Like us on Facebook!

Doll's Cabinetry and Woodcraft www.dollscabinets.com 78

Fortune

www.woodcraft.com 75

DMT

www.dmtsharp.com 20

Thomas Flinn

www.flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk 73

Earlex

www.earlex.com

14 & 71

Fred Wissen Designs www.ptownstubbie.com 78

Moisture Meters
Lignomat

Domestics & Exotics

Wood & Veneers

Forrest Mfg.

King Arthurs Tools

10 Square
Foot
Project
Packs Available...

www.wood-moisture.com 79

Power Tool Accessories

General Tools

www.generaltools.com

Howard Products

www.howardproducts.com 20

8-9 & 66

Japan Woodworker

www.japanwoodworker.com 28

Kreg

www.kregtool.com 15

Magswitch

www.magswitch.com.au 7

Leigh

www.leighjigs.com 12

National Hardware

www.natman.com 78

Norton

www.nortonconsumer.com 27

Boeshield

www.boeshield.com 77

Radarcarve

www.radarcarve.net 76

RoyalWood Ltd.

www.royalwoodltd.com 78

Power Tools
General International www.general.ca 3
Laguna Tools

www.lagunatools.com 1

Jet

www.jettools.com/grinder BC

Sarge

www.woodcraft.com 18

Mirka

www.mirka-ceros.com 61

Sjberg

www.sjobergs.se 66

Rikon

www.rikontools.com

Snappy Tools

www.snappytools.com 77

SawStop

www.sawstop.com/build 13

Starrett

www.starrett.com 19

Tormek

www.affinitytool.com 20

5 & 65

School/Instruction
CT Valley School of WW www.schoolofwoodworking.com 73
The American Woodshop www.wbgu.org/americanwoodshop 15

Touchstone Home Products www.touchstonehomeproducts.com 77


Woodcraft Franchise www.woodcraftfranchise.com 11
Woodcraft Supply

www.woodcraft.com

67 & 80

Lignomat: 800-227-2105

www
m
lignomatt .co
www.. lignoma
.com

Ligno-Scanner at Woodcraft # 150260


mini-Lignos #150259 and #153775

Dec/Jan 2014 woodcraftmagazine.com 79

Since 1928, Woodcraft has been committed to providing quality tools, supplies and advice
to our customers. From providing in-store classes and demonstrations to funding educational woodworking programming, Woodcraft has remained steadfast in our commitment
to the beginner, intermediate and experienced woodworker for over 80 years running.

R
OB
COSMAN

The American
Woodshop

YOUR HAND TOOL COACH

www.wbgu.org/americanwoodshop

www.thomasjmacdonald.com

Woodcraft is pleased to continue sponsorship


of The American Woodshop with Scott and Suzy
Phillips, now in its 21st season on PBS.

We are also proud to provide major funding for


the two-time Daytime Emmy Award-nominated
public television series and recipient of four Telly
Awards, Rough Cut Woodworking with
Tommy Mac.

Season 21 The American Originals Freeform


Designs and Hand Skill Solutions will feature 13
episodes with woodworking tips for
every skill level.
Techniques include:
turning, joinery,
tool tune-ups,
making jigs,
bench building, and
furnituremaking.
Join Scott and
Suzy to get the
most out of your
woodshop tools!

Season four projects include a Bent Lamination


Chair (season opener), Pine Chest (17th century
design), Boston Strong Memory Box, Glass Desk
Lamp, Federal Hall Table, Rice Paper Divider,
Bookstand, Birdhouse (three actually), Baseball
Bat Bed, Chairs x 2,
Photo
Pub Table, Kitchen
Anthony Tieuli
for WGBH
Scraps, and
Educational
Garden
Foundation
Bench.

www.RobsWorkshop.com
Woodcraft is privileged to partner with Rob
Cosman,Your Hand Tool Coach, featured on
the educational handtoolworkshop.com.
Rob Cosmans daily online episodes teach the
proper use of hand tools and power tools in a
motivational and educational way. Hand-tool
demonstrations are Tuesdays and Thursdays,
and power tools are demonstrated Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays.
Purchase any WoodRiver Hand Plane,
and receive a one-month FREE
subscription to Robs online
workshop.

Get your tools out!

Woodcraft Stores In Your Area:


Alabama
Birmingham/Pelham:
205-988-3600
Arizona
Phoenix/Chandler:
480-539-9663
Tucson:
520-742-9663
California
Orange County/
Fountain Valley:
714-899-1422
Sacramento:
916-362-9664
San Francisco Bay
Area:
Dublin:
925-875-9988
San Carlos:
650-631-9663
Ventura:
805-658-9663
Colorado
Colorado Springs:
719-266-9889
Denver:
303-290-0007
Loveland:
970-292-5940
Connecticut
Hartford/Manchester:
860-647-0303

Norwalk:
Woodworker's Club
203-847-9663
Delaware
Wilmington/New Castle:
302-323-0400
Florida
Jacksonville:
904-721-9796
Orlando:
407-260-5002
Tampa/Clearwater:
727-532-6888
Georgia
Atlanta:
770-587-3372
Hawaii
Honolulu:
808-841-9876
Idaho
Boise:
208-338-1190
Illinois
Chicago Area:
Libertyville:
847-680-9663
Woodridge:
630-435-9663
Indiana
Indianapolis:
317-578-3400
Kansas
Kansas City/Lenexa:
913-599-2800

Kentucky
Lexington:
859-231-9663
Louisville:
502-671-0900
Maryland
Rockville:
Woodworker's Club
301-984-9033
Massachusetts
Boston/Woburn:
781-935-6414
Boston Walpole:
508-668-2413
West Springfield:
413-827-0244
Michigan
Detroit Area:
Canton:
734-981-6808
Sterling Heights:
586-268-1919
Grand Rapids:
616-957-9663
Saginaw:
989-249-6662
Minnesota
Minneapolis/
Bloomington:
952-884-3634
Missouri
St. Louis/
Maryland Heights:
314-993-0413

New Hampshire
Portsmouth/Newington:
603-433-6116
New York
Rochester:
585-292-9690
North Carolina
Charlotte/Matthews:
704-847-8300
Greensboro:
336-235-0900
Raleigh:
919-781-1911
Ohio
Cincinnati:
513-407-8371
Cleveland/Oakwood:
440-232-7979
Columbus:
614-273-0488
Dayton:
937-438-1282
Toledo:
419-389-0560
Oklahoma
Oklahoma City:
405-748-8844
Tulsa:
918-384-0100
Oregon
Eugene:
541-685-0677

Portland/Tigard:
503-684-1428
Pennsylvania
Allentown:
610-351-2966
Harrisburg:
717-939-6770
Philadelphia/
Downingtown:
610-873-5660
South Carolina
Greenville:
864-627-8760
Tennessee
Johnson City:
423-282-9973
Knoxville:
865-539-9330
Nashville:
615-599-9638
Texas
Austin:
512-407-8787
Dallas/Addison:
972-422-2732
Fort Worth:
682-334-1025
Houston:
281-880-0045
South West Houston:
281-988-9449
San Antonio:
210-545-5885

Utah
Salt Lake City/
South Jordan:
801-566-5652
Virginia
Leesburg:
703-737-7880
Norfolk:
757-466-1166
Richmond:
804-355-3945
Roanoke:
540-366-7144
Springfield:
703-912-6727
Washington
Seattle:
206-767-6394
Spokane:
509-892-9663
West Virginia
Parkersburg:
304-485-4050
Wisconsin
Appleton/Fox Cities:
920-730-9663
Madison:
608-273-8868
Milwaukee/New Berlin:
262-785-6770

QUALITY WOODWORKING TOOLS SUPPLIES ADVICE

For A Free Catalog Or To Find Your Local Woodcraft Store, Visit woodcraft.com Or Call 800-225-1153. 14WD01P3

Think

When your woodworking calls for speed...Think Instant Bond!


Although our core Titebond Wood Glue product line is
ideal for a vast majority of woodworking applications,
we realize there is a growing need for faster, and in
some cases, instant adhesion capabilities. For this
reason, we now offer the Titebond Instant Bond line
of ethyl-cyanoacrylate-based wood adhesives
(a.k.a. super glues), complete with an
adhesive activator that accelerates
the bonding process.

1.800.347.4583

Titebond Instant Bond is a two-part bonding system


that takes between 5-15 seconds to set and 30-60
seconds for initial cure. The adhesives provide a strong,
permanent bond and are ideal for hard to reach joints
or surface areas that are difficult to clamp. Designed
primarily for wood and wood products,
Instant Bond adhesives are also very
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For more information and details on the adhesives, visit www.titebond.com/InstantBond

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