Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 20

Smart Grids

Ian Welch - R&D Strategy Manager

Smart Grids Ian Welch - R&D Strategy Manager
Smart Grids Ian Welch - R&D Strategy Manager

National Grid:

An international electricity and gas company

Gas Distribution - UK

electricity and gas company Gas Distribution - UK Operates the UK gas distribution system; distributes gas

Operates the UK gas distribution system; distributes gas on behalf of shippers and suppliers to 11 million consumers but has 20m+ meters

Transmission Electricity and Gas - UK

has 20m+ meters Transmission – Electricity and Gas - UK Owns the high-voltage electricity transmission system
has 20m+ meters Transmission – Electricity and Gas - UK Owns the high-voltage electricity transmission system

Owns the high-voltage electricity transmission system in England and Wales and operates the system across Britain. Also owns and operates the high pressure gas transmission system in Britain.

Wales and operates the system across Britain. Also owns and operates the high pressure gas transmission

National Grid:

An international electricity and gas company

2 nd largest US Utility

27,000 US employees

Distributes electricity to

3.3 million customers

Provides natural gas to

3.5 million customers

Services 1.1 million customers of Long

Island Power Authority

(LIPA)

Currently owns over 4,000MW of generation

Gas

1.1 million customers of Long Island Power Authority (LIPA)  Currently owns over 4,000MW of generation

Electricity

1.1 million customers of Long Island Power Authority (LIPA)  Currently owns over 4,000MW of generation

The Future of Energy - Video

The Future of Energy - Video The Future of Energy Click to play video

Energy Market is changing Smart Grid is an essential enabler

Traditional Energy Market - supply driven Large centralised generation Small range of conventional technologies
Traditional Energy Market - supply driven
Large centralised
generation
Small range of
conventional
technologies
Nuclear
Hydro-
Coal/gas fired
Gas production
power
electric
power station
station
power
$$$
Energy volume
drives energy
company
revenue
Static infrastructure
Energy
Energy
flows to
flows to
users
users
Industrial
and
Price and reliability are
main determinants of
customer choice
commercial

The future Market - customer driven

Customers focus on economic and environmental value, using a wider range of products and services

Solar Efficient water Heat Micro CHP Domestic Boilers heating Pumps Micro Biomass Industrial Micro wind
Solar
Efficient
water
Heat
Micro CHP
Domestic
Boilers
heating
Pumps
Micro Biomass
Industrial
Micro wind
and
Smart metering
+
Storage
commercial
Electricity flows to
users, and surplus
from distributed
generation flows
back to grid
Smart network technology rolled out
Natural Gas
+
Storage
Hydrogen
CO2
Biogas
Heat
Intermittency
management
Technology choice
proliferates
Onshore
Hydro- Nuclear power
CCS plant
Large scale
Gas
and
station
electric
(coal/gas)
CHP and
production
offshore
power
biomass
wind
$$$

CO2 emission reduction and wider energy services drives energy company revenue

CO 2 transport and storage

wind $$$ CO 2 emission reduction and wider energy services drives energy company revenue CO 2
wind $$$ CO 2 emission reduction and wider energy services drives energy company revenue CO 2

Smart Technology Definition Technology that provides advanced information, automation and control capabilities to help us to transmit, distribute, measure and use energy more efficiently, reliably, safely and sustainably all the way from the point of generation to consumer appliances

 

What is Smart Technology?

What does it allow you to do?

 

Meter that records interval data

Automatic meter reading

Meter

2-way communications, remote configuration

Enable customer choice and control

Informative display

Choice of tariffs e.g. time of use peak shifting

 

Meter Data Management System

Customer portal & Home Area Network

Automated thermostats, switches, plugs & appliances

Load controllers e.g. PHEV controller

Catalyst and validation of Energy Efficiency programs

Remote configuration

Automatically optimize selected home appliances

Demand response programs

Improve satisfaction levels

Sensors & measuring devices

Analytical programs e.g. pattern recognition

Automatic switches & controls

Decision support tools & graphical interfaces

Remote Asset Management

Demand Side Management

Decision support tools & graphical interfaces

Analytical programs e.g. pattern recognition

Enable Distributed generation

Remotely detect, diagnose, predict and correct network problems & faults

Condition-based, preventative maintenance

Automatic fault prevention, isolation & restoration

Enable embedded generation

Condition-based, preventative maintenance

Automatic fault, isolation & restoration

preventative maintenance  Automatic fault, isolation & restoration Home Distribution Transmission
Home Distribution Transmission

Home

Distribution

Transmission

Challenges for the electricity supply chain Smart Grid drivers

Demand Responsiveness
Demand
Responsiveness

Efficient and Time Of Use

of energy

Integrating flexible demand

Decarbonising electricity
Decarbonising
electricity

Integrating inflexible generation

Integrating Intermittency

Integrating embedded generation

Electrifying heat and transport
Electrifying heat
and transport

Increased demand:

Electric vehicles

Heat pumps

Efficient and reliable network invest & operation
Efficient and reliable
network invest &
operation

Timely capacity planning & consent / supply chain

Providing flexibility and avoiding stranding assets

Secure and Affordable

& consent / supply chain  Providing flexibility and avoiding stranding assets  Secure and Affordable

How big is the challenge in the UK?

UK Carbon Sources Other 2% Electricity Heat 32% 41% Transport 25%
UK Carbon Sources
Other 2%
Electricity
Heat
32%
41%
Transport
25%
How big is the challenge in the UK? UK Carbon Sources Other 2% Electricity Heat 32%
How big is the challenge in the UK? UK Carbon Sources Other 2% Electricity Heat 32%

Electricity Smart and Smart Grid

Electricity Smart and Smart Grid Stakeholder Consumer Supplier Generator DNO / TO / SO DSO Others

Stakeholder

Consumer Supplier Generator DNO / TO / SO DSO Others Price signals Consumer control Micro-gen
Consumer
Supplier
Generator
DNO /
TO / SO
DSO
Others
Price
signals
Consumer
control
Micro-gen /
storage
Demand offered for
Electric vehicles
interruption
Matching intermittent
generation
Virtual power plants
Capacity Management
Network /
SO control

………Competition for DSM

Network / SO control ………Competition for DSM Technology Penetration Smart Meter Smart Home Smart

Technology

Penetration

Smart

Meter

Smart

Home

Smart

Grid

Network /

TSO

Technology

Electricity Demand (GW)

08:00

03:00

07:00

06:00

05:00

01:00

04:00

00:00

11:00

02:00

09:00

12:00

10:00

13:00

14:00

15:00

Developments in Electricity Demand

2020 Demand ~ 15 GWh (daily) - 1.5 million vehicles Optimal Charging Typical winter daily
2020 Demand ~ 15
GWh (daily) - 1.5
million vehicles
Optimal Charging
Typical winter daily
Period
demand
12,000 miles p.a.
Peak Commuting Time
Peak Commuting Time

Electric Vehicles (~ 850k vehicles by 2020)

Heat pumps (600k by 2020; and

Other appliances

60

55

50

45

40

35

30

Time of Day

16:00 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00
16:00
17:00
18:00
19:00
20:00
21:00
22:00
23:00

Electricity Network Efficiency / Reliability

Fully using assets through complexity and automation

Fully using assets through complexity and automation Transmission SO / TO  Widespread use of a
Fully using assets through complexity and automation Transmission SO / TO  Widespread use of a

Transmission SO / TO

Widespread use of a Flexible AC Transmission System

More automated post fault action enhanced network capability

Greater control interface between TSO and DNO/DSO

Automation of control systems, flow control (QBs, DC links), voltage control, alarm management

Driving assets harder high temp conductors, on-line rating, sag, short term ratings of circuits and transformers

Flexible risk based SQSS

Balancing between operational complexity and asset investment - Automation versus IS faults / technology failure

DNO (Enabled through Smart Grid comms infrastructure)

Auto post fault action (self healing)

Condition monitoring

Capacity rationing / sharing by directly controlling some demand / embedded generation

Optimisation of embedded and micro-generation / virtual power plants. DSO role?

some demand / embedded generation  Optimisation of embedded and micro-generation / virtual power plants. DSO

Operating the system in 2020

Variable generation

Variable

generation

Inflexible generation

Inflexible generation

Net Scnr Mark Ops
Net
Scnr
Mark
Ops
Large generation

Large generation

What operating reserve to hold in a world of variable renewable generation and will the market balance demand and generation?

Can the new generation fleet of nuclear, wind and supercritical coal provide the full range of services?

and supercritical coal provide the full range of services? Demand Generation How do we cope with
and supercritical coal provide the full range of services? Demand Generation How do we cope with
Demand
Demand

Generation

How do we cope with

larger plant >1320 MW when it ‘falls off’ the system?

Active Distribution

Networks

Distribution connected generation

TOU sensitive demand

Distribution connected generation TOU sensitive demand How to meet these challenges in the most economic and

How to meet these challenges in the most economic and sustainable way whilst maintaining security?

TOU sensitive demand How to meet these challenges in the most economic and sustainable way whilst

Indicative Short Term Operating Reserve Requirement

Typical Current Winter Reserve

Provider Breakdown

Potential Opportunity for New

Reserve Providers in 2020

2% 4% 9% 15% ~3.5GW 34%
2%
4%
9%
15%
~3.5GW
34%

36%

2%

4% 1% 6% ~8.2GW Current Portfolio New Providers Required
4%
1%
6%
~8.2GW
Current
Portfolio
New
Providers
Required

15%

16%

56%

Small Demand sitesCurrent Portfolio New Providers Required 15% 16% 56% Large Demand sites BM STOR Non-BM STOR Pumped

Large Demand sitesNew Providers Required 15% 16% 56% Small Demand sites BM STOR Non-BM STOR Pumped Storage Interconnectors

BM STORRequired 15% 16% 56% Small Demand sites Large Demand sites Non-BM STOR Pumped Storage Interconnectors Technical

Non-BM STOR15% 16% 56% Small Demand sites Large Demand sites BM STOR Pumped Storage Interconnectors Technical Potential

Pumped StorageSmall Demand sites Large Demand sites BM STOR Non-BM STOR Interconnectors Technical Potential (GW) 0 1

Interconnectorssites Large Demand sites BM STOR Non-BM STOR Pumped Storage Technical Potential (GW) 0 1 2

Technical Potential (GW) 0 1 2 3 Air conditioning 2.8GW Industrial 2.6GW Refrigeration Domestic Wet
Technical Potential (GW)
0
1
2
3
Air conditioning
2.8GW
Industrial
2.6GW
Refrigeration
Domestic Wet
2.0GW
Appliances
Electric Vehicles
1.8GW
Heat Pumps
1.7GW
National Grid Analysis based on 'Gone Green' and the MTP 'Early
Domestic
Best Practice' dataset. Load factor and time of use assumptions
0.8GW
Refrigeration
apply.
'Early Domestic Best Practice' dataset. Load factor and time of use assumptions 0.8GW Refrigeration apply.
Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules

Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals

Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules
Components Spine Clean Energy Modules
Components
Spine
Clean Energy Modules
Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules
Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules
Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules
Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules
Smart Grid US Pilot Proposals Components Spine Clean Energy Modules

National Grid Smart Technology Model

National Grid Smart Technology Model

Smart Grid Cyber Security High Priority

SMART Cyber security high priority for:

Equipment Manufacturers building in security

Network Design designing the network to be secure

Network Operations monitoring, detection, prevention

Two key sources of risk:

deliberate attacks (eg. disgruntled employees, industrial espionage, acts of terrorists)

inadvertent compromises (eg. user errors, equipment failures, natural disasters)

espionage, acts of terrorists)  inadvertent compromises (eg. user errors, equipment failures, natural disasters)

SMART Grid Cyber Security - Key Risks

New and complex technology introducing vulnerabilities

Increased number of entry points and paths for potential adversaries to exploit

Communications networks expanded all the way to the home

Radio communication networks vunerabilities

Interconnected networks can introduce common vulnerabilities

More opportunity for introduction of malicious software

Potential for compromise of data confidentiality

Breach of customer privacy.

introduction of malicious software  Potential for compromise of data confidentiality  Breach of customer privacy.

Smart Technology Centre

Proof-of-Concept

Smart Technology Centre  Proof-of-Concept  Test and validate the technical solution before we deploy it

Test and validate the technical solution before we deploy it to our customers.

Center of Excellence

Evaluation, Demonstration, Innovation

Collaborating with several universities

developing academic curricula

workforce training programs

preparing the next generation of engineers and technicians to

work with Smart Grid technologies.

training programs  preparing the next generation of engineers and technicians to work with Smart Grid

Conclusion

We are on the verge of a fundamental shift in the Energy Industry

Smart Grids will be the service platform for future years.

Smart Grids will provide and act as a catalyst for:

current green technologies (e.g. energy efficiency, demand response)

emerging green technologies (e.g., photovoltaic, energy storage, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles).

Smart Grids will provide customers with choice

how the electricity they use is generated

greater control over how and when they use energy in their homes and businesses.

Significant Technology/Security risk need to be managed

how and when they use energy in their homes and businesses.  Significant Technology/Security risk need

Thank you

Ian Welch

Thank you Ian Welch
Thank you Ian Welch