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Table of Contents


Title Page

SB Ordinance No. 2013-297: An Ordinance approving the annual budget of Leganes for Fiscal Year 2014 in
the total amount of Seventy One Million Seven Hundred Eighty Three Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Seven
Pesos (P71,783,457.00) covering the various Expenditures for the operation of the Local Government, and
Appropriating the Necessary funds for the purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




1
MDC Resolution No.2 Series of 2013: A resolution approving the proposed projects of the Municipality of
Leganes, Iloilo chargeable against the 20% Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) Fund FY 2014 in the AMOUNT
OF Eleven Million Nineteen Thousand Three Hundred Fifty One Pesos & 02/100 (P11,019,351.02) . . . . . . . .



5
CY 2014 Annual Investment Program (AIP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8
Annual Investment Program Quarterly Release Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16
Project Briefs for the 20% Development Fund


Rehabilitation Center of Cari Mayor Elementary School and Sofia G. Gustilo Memorial Elementary
School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


19
Integrated Program for the Control of Non-communicable Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20
Upgrading of Lighting System Utilizing LED Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21
Cross- sectoral Welfare Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22
Leganes Pinalangga Ko Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24
Leganes Banwa nga Hamili-An Integrated Environmental Protection Program for a Disaster
Resilient Municipality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


26
Coastal Resource Management Program in Response to Climate Change Adaption . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28
Climate Change Responsive Agricultural Technologies to Improve Crop Production . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30
Leganes Commercial Complex Loan Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31
Various Infrastructure Projects in the Barangays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32
Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund Investment Plan (LDRRMFIP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34
SB Resolution No. 2013-083: A resolution confirming Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction Management
Council (MDRRMC) Resolution no. 13-001, approving the amount of Two Million Two Hundred Seventy
Seven Thousand Three hundred Ninety Six Pesos(P2,277,396.00) chargeable against the 70% Disaster
Preparedness in the Amount of Nine Hundred Seventy Six Thousand Twenty Six and 86/100 chargeable
against 30% quick response of the 5% DRRMF 2014 for various Projects, Programs and Activities for
current year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .






36
MDRMMC Resolution No.13-001: A resolution approving the amount of two Million Hundred Seventy
Seven Thousand Three Hundred Ninety Six Pesos (P2,277,396.00) chargeable against the 70% Disaster
Preparedness in the Amount of Nine Hundred Seventy Six and 86/100 chargeable against 30% quick
response of the 5% DRRMF 2014 for various Projects, Programs and Activities for current year . . . . . . . . . . .




38
Project Briefs for the DRRMF 2014


Fabrication of Rescue Boat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40
Conduct of Symposium on Climate Adaptability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

41
Purchase of Handheld Radios for the Incident Command System (ICS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

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Title Page

Risk Assessment Resource Inventory and Needs Projection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43
Construction of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Building and Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Rehabilitation and Expansion if Fire for Disaster Preparedness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46
Retrofitting of the Municipal Gymnasium as an Evacuation Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47
Advocacy and Information Education Campaign on Mandatory and Preemptive Evacuation . . . . . .

48
Production of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Information Education Campaign
Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


49
SB Resolution No. 2013-084: A resolution confirming Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction Management
Council (MDRRMC) Resolution No. 13-002, approving the realignment of appropriation from 70% Disaster
Preparedness for the year 2010, 2011 and the 30% quick response 2012 amounting to One Million Eight
Hundred Sixty Three Thousand Six Hundred Fifty Five and 62/100 (1,863,655.62 to various Projects,
Programs and Activities for 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .





50
MDRRMC Resolution No. 13-002 : A resolution for the Realignment of appropriation from 70% Disaster
Preparedness for the year 2010,2011 and 2012 and the 30% quick Response 2012 amounting to One
Million Eight Hundred Sixty Three Thousand Six Hundred Fifty Five and 62/100 (1,863,655.62) to various
Projects, Programs and Activities for DRRMF 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




52
Project Briefs for DRRMF Realignment


Organization, Training and Insurance of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Volunteers . . . .

54
Purchase of Emergency Equipment and Tents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56
Vector-borne Diseases Outbreak Monitoring and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

57
Establishment of an Early Warning System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

59
Stockpiling of Relief Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61
Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62
Project Brief for General Fund


Computerization of Real Property Tax Assessment Project (ASSYS 2v.2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

64
Tax Mapping of Real Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

65
Real Property Tax (RPT) Computerization and Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

66
Rehabilitation of Various Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

67
Bloodletting Activity (Dugo sang Banwa, Kabuhi Ko- A Voluntary Blood Donation Program) . . . . . .

69
Youth Development Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

71
Operation of Gender and Development (GAD) Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

72
Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) Welfare Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

73
Crime Prevention and Peacekeeping Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

75
Codification Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

77

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Title Page

Updating of Existing Revenue Code, Investment Incentives Code and Code of General Ordinances

78

Updating of Citizens Charter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

79
Gender and Development Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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5

Republic of the Philippines
Province of Iloilo
Municipality of Leganes

MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL


EXCERPTS FROM THE MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF THE MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
HELD AT THE SANGGUNIANG BAYAN SESSION HALL, LEGANES, ILOILO ON OCTOBER 9, 2013 AT 9:50 IN
THE MORNING


PRESENT:
Hon. Adolfo E. Jaen - Municipal Mayor, Presiding Officer
Hon. Joseph Allen D. Espao - Municipal Vice Mayor, Chairman, Appropriation,
Budget and Finance
Hon. Romeo P. Lamanero, Jr. - Punong Barangay, Brgy. Bigke
Hon. Nonito G. Jinon - , Cagamutan Norte
Hon. Rebecca Q. Masisado - , Calaboa
Hon. Felix G. Bactong - , Camangay
Hon. Juvy T. Montero - , Cari Minor
Hon. Rodolfo E. Hubero, Jr. - , Gua-an
Hon. Larry H. Labuson - , Guinobatan
Hon. Rudy B. Villegas - , M. V. Hechanova
Hon. Donardo E. Gustilo - , Nabitasan
Hon. Rodito C. Jinon - , Napnud, Liga President
Hon. Efren S. Tubongbanua - , Poblacion
Mr. Ricardo G. Abono - LCDPMPC Chairperson, NGO
Mr. Rommel J. Tubongbanua - Representative, APEX Leganes, NGO
Ms. Joni Ann Sisteverio - Representative, APEX Leganes, NGO
Mr. Nonito T. Gulmatico - Representative, Senior Citizens Federation
Association, Inc. (SCFAI)


ABSENT:
Hon. Danilo S. Guay - Punong Barangay, Brgy. Buntatala
Hon. Nicanor C. Harder, Jr. - , Cagamutan Sur
Hon. Alexander S. Galve - , Cari Mayor
Hon. Reynaldo A. Juntarciego - , Guihaman
Hon. Alex A. Yocogco - , Guintas
Hon. Lupo P. Seolay - , Lapayon
Hon. Nio Vincent J. Vallejo - , San Vicente
Hon. Denmark Solito - Representative, Phil. Guardians Brotherhood, Inc.
Hon. Newell G. Celo Representative, Knights of Columbus
Rep. Office of the Congressman, 2
nd
District of Iloilo


RESOLUTION NO. 2
Series of 2013

A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE PROPOSED PROJECTS OF THE
MUNICIPALITY OF LEGANES, ILOILO CHARGEABLE AGAINST THE
20% INTERNAL REVENUE ALLOTMENT (IRA) FUND FOR FY 2014
IN THE AMOUNT OF ELEVEN MILLION NINETEEN THOUSAND
THREE HUNDRED FIFTY ONE PESOS & 02/100 (P11,019,351.02)


- over -


6

MDC Res. No. 2, s. of 2013
October 9,2013
Page 2 of 3



WHEREAS, the municipality has conducted a series of workshop in the Executive-Legislative
Agenda (ELA) formulation together with the ELA Team;

WHEREAS, the Executive-Legislative Agenda (ELA) Formulation Workshop was facilitated by
personnel from the Provincial DILG in coordination with the MLGOO of Leganes;

WHEREAS, as a result of these series of workshops, the ELA Team through the consolidation of
the Municipal Planning and Development Office was able to come up with a prioritized list o Multi
Sectoral projects;

WHEREAS, after a thorough discussions among the members of the ELA Team, they were able to
finalized the Programs/Projects/Activities (PPAs) to be funded out of the 2014 20% Internal Revenue
Allotment (IRA) Fund;

WHEREAS, the final list of PPAs chargeable against the 2014 20% IRA in the total amount of
ELEVEN MILLION NINETEEN THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED FIFTY ONE PESOS & 02/100 (P11,019,351.02)
were presented to the members of the Municipal Development Council (MDC) for approval;

WHEREAS, after a short deliberation, the body agreed to approve the following
programs/projects/activities, to wit:

1. Leganes Pinalangga Ko Program

P 2,846,666.67
2. Leganes Banwa nga Hamili

2,250,000.00
3. Coastal Resource Management Program in Response to Climate
Change Adaptation

330,000.00
4. Cross-Sectoral Welfare Program

706,613.67
5. Integrated Program for the Control of Non-communicable
Diseases

400,000.00
6. Climate Change Responsive Agricultural Technologies to
Improve Crop Production

290,000.00
7. Repair/Construction of 2 school buildings for Nabitasan and
Cari Mayor Elementary School

300,000.00
8. Various Projects for the Barangays (P50,000.00/brgy. and
P500,000.00 as per discretion of the Mayor)

1,400,000.00
9. Upgrading of Lighting System Utilizing LED Lights

330,000.00
10. LCC Loan Repayment

2,166,070.68

TOTAL 20% IRA, FY 2014

P 11,019,351.02



- over -

7




MDC Res. No. 2, s. of 2013
October 9, 2013
Page 3 of 3



WHEREAS, the proposed projects will redounded to the best interest of the Municipality;

NOW THEREFORE

BE IT RESOLVED as this Municipal Development Council hereby resolved to approve the
proposed projects of the Municipality of Leganes in the amount of ELEVEN MILLION NINETEEN
THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED FIFTY ONE PESOS & 02/100 (P11,019,351.02) chargeable against the 20%
Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) Fund, FY 2013;

RESOLVED FURTHER to furnish a copy of this resolution to the Sangguniang Bayan for approval;

RESOLVED FINALLY to furnish copies of this resolution to the Office of the Municipal Budget,
Office of the Municipal Accountant, Office of the Municipal Treasurer and Office of the Municipal
Planning and Development for their information and guidance.

ADOPTED this 9
th
day of October, 2013 on motion of Punong Barangay Efren S, Tubongbanua of
Barangay Poblacion, Leganes duly seconded by Liga President, Hon. Rodito C. Jinon of Barangay Napnud,
Leganes.

I HEREBY CERTIFY as to the correctness of the foregoing resolution.



SHIRLEY J. SALIGBON
Administrative Aide VI
Member, Secretariat, MDC



WITH MY CONCURRENCE:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Mun. Planning & Devt. Coordinator
Head, Secretariat, MDC



APPROVED:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor
Chairman, MDC
Presiding Officer




/sljs

8

Annex A
Summary Form

CY 2014 Annual Investment Program (AIP)
By Program/Project/Activity by Sector
As of January 1, 2014

Municipality: Leganes, Iloilo

AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
2014-
1000-1
Various Infrastructure Projects in the Barangays - this
program will implement various infrastructure support
projects in all eighteen (18) barangays of the municipality.
The program allocation will be divided equally among the 18
barangays at P 50,000.00 per Barangay and the remainder
will be released at the discretion of the Municipal Mayor. It
is the discretion of the respective barangays to identify their
priority project for funding under this program.
Liga ng mga
Barangay, MEO
January
2014
December
2014
At least 18 infrastructure
projects in various
barangays of the
municipality have been
implemented
DF 1,400,000.00
2014-
3000-100-
1
Rehabilitation of roofing for Nabitasan Elementary School
and Cari Mayor Elementary School
MEO, Nabitasan
ES, Cari Mayor
ES
December
2014
2 school buildings
rehabilitated
DF 300,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
1
Integrated Program for the Control of Non-communicable
Diseases the project will provide various laboratory
examinations to all Leganesnons including universal
coverage of blood typing and water analysis.
MHO January
2014
December
2014
Decreased incidence of
non-communicable
disease through early
diagnosis and
management
DF 400,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
1
Upgrading of Lighting System Utilizing LED Lights MEO, GSO January
2014
December
2014
Lighting system upgraded
to LED light
DF 330,000.00
2014-
3000-500-
1
Cross-Sectoral Welfare Program the project will undertake
the rehabilitation and improvement of the Youth
Development Center, and the Gender and Development
Center and furnishing of Leganes Balay Dalangpan
MSWDO January
2014
December
2014
Functional Youth
Development Center and
Gender and Development
Center
DF 706,613.67
2014-
8000-1
Leganes Pinalangga ko Program included in the program
are the improvement of parks, plaza and its periphery,
declogging and clearing of drainage systems complementing
all municipal streets including the LCC, and the improvement
of drainage system from the Leganes National High School to
Sitio Pangpang with pedestrian and bike lane
MEO, GSO January
2014
December
2014
Reduced risk of
inundation
DF 2,846,666.67

9


AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
2014-
8000-2
Leganes Banwa nga Hamili the project will enforce and
closely monitor all environmental ordinances on solid waste,
watershed, airshed and mangrove protected areas including
trainings and information education campaign, purchase of
one garbage truck, establishment of materials recovery
facilities in all barangays, provision of garbage receptacles
and institutionalization of incentives system for anti-littering.
With the closure of the Municipalitys controlled dumpsite, it
is imperative that we should find an alternative site to
accommodate the solid waste generated by the Municipality.
Iloilo City has signified its intention to accommodate our
garbage in exchange for a tipping fee of P90.00 per cubic
meter.
MAO January
2014
December
2014
Reduction in solid waste
generation; absence of
garbage heaps
DF 2,250,000.00
2014-
8000-3
Coastal Resource Management Program in Response to
Climate Change Adaptation the project will implement the
coastal resource management plan of the Municipality
including activation of Bantay Dagat, advocacy campaigns,
establishment of a mangrove nursery, installation of fish
condominiums, coastal clean-ups, and enforcement of
fishing closures, restrictions and permits on Municipal
waters.
MAO January
2014
December
2014
Increased fish catch by
5%; increased mangrove
cover 15%
DF 330,000.00
2014-
8000-4
Climate Change Responsive Agricultural Technologies to
Improve Crop Production the project would introduce to
farmers new innovations and technology on pest
management and organic farming, provide seed subsidy, and
conduct farmers field school and demo field.
MAO January
2014
December
2014
Increased crop yield by
5%
DF 290,000.00
2014-
8000-5
LCC loan payment LEDO January
2014
December
2014
Reduced long-term
obligation
DF 2,166,070.68
2014-
3000-200-
2
Vector-borne Diseases Outbreak Monitoring and Control MDRRMC, MHO January
2014
December
2014
Vector borne diseases
controlled through
environmental sanitation
DRRMF 600,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
2
Fabrication of rescue boat MDRRMC, PNP January
2014
December
2014
1 rescue boat fabricated DRRMF 100,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
3
Purchase of handheld radios for the incident command
system (ICS)
MDRRMC, PNP January
2014
December
2014
Increased efficiency in
communication by 50%
DRRMF 30,000.00

10


AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
2014-
3000-400-
4
Risk Assessment, Resource Inventory and Needs Projection MDRRMC,
MPDO
January
2014
December
2014
Risk assessment, resource
inventory and needs
accomplished
DRRMF 500,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
5
Construction of disaster risk reduction and management
building and warehouse
MDRRMC, MEO January
2014
December
2014
MDRRM building and
warehouse constructed
DRRMF 700,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
6
Rehabilitation and expansion of fire station for disaster
preparedness
MDRRMC, BFP,
MEO
January
2014
December
2014
Fire station rehabilitated
and expanded
DRRMF 100,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
7
Retrofitting of the Municipal Gymnasium as an evacuation
center
MDRRMC, MEO January
2014
December
2014
Municipal Gymnasium
retrofitted for use as an
evacuation center
DRRMF 700,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
8
Advocacy and information education campaign on
mandatory and preemptive evacuation
MDRRMC January
2014
December
2014
Preemptive and
mandatory evacuation
advocacy campaign
conducted
DRRMF 50,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
9
Production of disaster risk reduction and management
information education campaign materials i.e. brochures,
leaflets and flyers
MDRRMC January
2014
December
2014
Disaster risk reduction
and management
information education
campaign materials
produced
DRRMF 47,396.00
2014-
3000-400-
10
Organization/training/insurance of disaster risk reduction
and management volunteers
MDRRMC January
2014
December
2014
Volunteer groups
organized, trained and
provided with insurance
DRRMF 600,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
11
Purchase of emergency equipment and tents MDRRMC January
2014
December
2014
Emergency equipment
and tents purchased
DRRMF 300,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
12
Establishment of an early warning system MDRRMC, MEO January
2014
December
2014
Early warning system
established
DRRMF 150,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
13
Stockpiling of relief goods MDRRMC,
MSWDO
January
2014
December
2014
Basic emergency food and
medicine are made
available in case of
emergency
DRRMF 213,655.62
2014-
8000-6
Conduct of symposium on climate change adaptability MDRRMC, MAO January
2014
December
2014
90% participation of
farmers in climate change
adaptability symposium
DRRMF 50,000.00

11



AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
2014-
3000-400-
13
Quick Response MDRRMC January
2014
December
2014
Efficient and timely
response to disasters
ensured
DRRMF 976,026.86
2014-1000 Executive Services Mayors Office January
2014
December
2014
Issuance of permits,
clearances, affidavits,
franchises,
recommendations and
referrals
GF 4,509,139.00 6,030,344.15 134,000.00 10,673,483.15
Administrative Services Municipal
Administrator
January
2014
December
2014
Deliver administrative
support
GF 158,501.00 158,501.00
HRMO January
2014
December
2014
Submission of pertinent
papers and reports to CSC
and updated leave cards
GF 400,958.00 170,500.00 30,000.00 601,458.00
General Services GSO January
2014
December
2014
Maintain all municipal
properties and
equipments
GF 526,286.00 1,965,000.00 130,000.00 2,621,286.00
Legislative Services SB January
2014
December
2014
Enact ordinance and
resolutions and conduct
public hearings
GF 7,816,679.00 1,285,000.00 270,000.00 9,371,679.00
Secretary to the
SB
January
2014
December
2014
Transcribe the minutes of
the SB regular sessions
and receive requests for
inclusion in the session
agenda
GF 1,221,000.00 171,000.00 1,392,000.00
Planning and Development Coordination Services MPDO January
2014
December
2014
Updated socio-economic
profile and CLUP,
formulation of AIP, and
conduct M & E
GF 1,192,002.00 283,200.00 90,000.00 1,565,202.00
Civil Registry Services MCR January
2014
December
2014
Transcription of all
registrable documents
and judicial decrees
GF 1,019,513.00 45,000.00 115,000.00 1,179,513.00
Budgeting Services MBO January
2014
December
2014
Review all barangay
budgets and annual
budget prepared and
integrated with PPAs
embodied in the AIP
GF 1,090,127.00 66,500.00 25,000.00 1,181,627.00

12



AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
Accounting Services Municipal
Accounting
Office
January
2014
December
2014
Prepare all pertinent
financial documents,
reports and journals
GF 1,055,649.00 303,400.00 38,000.00 1,397,049.00
Treasury Services MTO January
2014
December
2014
Collection of the
projected local taxes
GF 2,590,119.00 732,000.00 3,322,119.00
Assessment of Real Property Services Municipal
Assessors Office
January
2014
December
2014
Ocular inspection,
appraisal and assessment
of all real property units
and maintenance of all
tax maps per barangay
GF 1,428,684.00 211,000.00 30,000.00 1,669,684.00
2014-
3000-200
Health Services MHO January
2014
December
2014
All health related
PPAs of the
municipality are
implemented on time
Provide medical
assistance to all
clients
Monitor the status of
sanitation of all
business
establishments
GF 4,121,139.00 1,890,000.00 6,011,139.00
2014-
3000-500
Social Welfare Services MSWDO January
2014
December
2014
Conduct of day care
sessions for 3-6 y. o.
preschool children
Provide care and
custody to 0-3 y. o.
preschoolers
Provision of socio-
cultural and
economic
development
opportunities to
senior citizens,
persons with
disabilities
Provision of socio-
cultural and
GF 1,755,771.00 1,721,227.00 3,476,998.00
13

AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
economic
development
opportunities to men
and women
Provision of financial
assistance to all
eligible indigents
2014-8000 Engineering Services MEO January
2014
December
2014
Prepare all plans and
program of works
needed, all infrastructure
projects implemented,
and act on all applications
for building and electrical
permits, and occupancy
GF 1,343,216.00 132,500.00 1,130,000.00 2,605,716.00
Agricultural Services MAO January
2014
December
2014
Technical and financial
assistance extended to all
identified farmers and all
environmental projects
and services implemented
GF 3,165,229.00 358,000.00 3,523,229.00
Economic Enterprise and Public Utilities Operation Services LEDO January
2014
December
2014
All income generating
facilities and properties of
the municipality are
properly maintained
GF 3,772,385.00 1,825,000.00 1,393,000.00 6,990,385.00
2014-
3000-100-
3
Improvement of school physical facilities DepEd, MEO January
2014
December
2014
Various school physical
facilities improved
External
Funding
10,000,000.00
2014-
3000-100-
4
Rehabilitation/improvement/construction of school buildings
in Cagamutan Norte Elementary School, Napnud Elementary
School, Calaboa Elementary School and Guintas Elementary
School
Cagamutan
Norte ES,
Napnud ES,
Calaboa ES,
Guintas ES
January
2014
December
2014
School buildings
rehabilitated/ improved/
constructed
External
Funding
6,000,000.00
2014-
3000-100-
5
Operation of 25 day care center and 10 supervised
neighborhood play (SNP) with supplemental feeding
MSWDO, MNC January
2014
December
2014
Psycho-social stimulation
to at least 875
preschoolers were
provided
External
Funding
2,340,000.00

14



AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
2014-
3000-100-
6
Construction of an additional building for Nabitasan National
High School
Nabitasan NHS January
2014
December
2014
Additional school building
constructed
External
Funding
1,000,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
3
Construction of separate standard clinical laboratory MHO, MEO January
2014
December
2014
Clinical laboratory
upgraded into a
secondary clinical
laboratory
External
Funding
500,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
4
Purchase of laboratory equipment MHO January
2014
December
2014
Main health center and
barangay health stations
are equipped to promote
quality health services
External
Funding
250,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
5
Free medicines for NHIP and 4Ps beneficiaries MHO, MSWDO January
2014
December
2014
At least 746 beneficiaries
are provided with free
medicines
External
Funding
150,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
6
Construction of two barangay health stations in Napnud and
Nabitasan
MHO, MEO January
2014
December
2014
2 barangay health stations
upgraded to conform with
DOH standards
External
Funding
500,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
7
Improvement of Lapayon and Cagamutan Norte barangay
health stations
MHO, MEO January
2014
December
2014
2 health stations
improved
External
Funding
500,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
14
Construction of low cost housing MUDHB, MEO January
2014
December
2014
Low cost housing
provided for informal
settlers
External
Funding
15,000,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
15
Purchase of police vehicle PNP January
2014
December
2014
1 unit police vehicle
provided
External
Funding
1,200,000.00
2014-
3000-400-
16
Purchase of fire truck BFP January
2014
December
2014
1 fire truck acquired External
Funding
27,000,000.00
2014-
3000-500-
2
Pag-ulikid sa mga Katigulangan improvement/ expansion of
the Senior Citizens Center
MSWDO, OSCA January
2014
December
2014
At least 1,000 senior
citizens provided with
socio-economic and
cultural opportunities
External
Funding
1,500,000.00
2014-
8000-7
Gui- gui Creek Palamunitan and floating restaurant including
the ripraping of Gui-gui Creek
MEO, MTC January
2014
December
2014
1 tourist attraction
established
External
Funding
3,000,000.00

15






AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Description Implementing
Office/
Department
Schedule of
Implementation
Expected Outputs Funding
Source
Amount
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
PS MOOE CO TOTAL
2014-
8000-8
Rehabilitation/improvement of drainage in-front of Leganes
Central Elementary School including the construction of
PUJ/PUB bay
MEO January
2014
December
2014
Inundation mitigated External
Funding
1,500,000.00
2014-
8000-9
Rehabilitation of irrigation canals MAO, NIA January
2014
December
2014
Improved irrigation water
supply by 15%
External
Funding
11,000,000.00
2014-
8000-10
Concreting of provincial road from the Coastal Road to M.V.
Hechanova
MEO January
2014
December
2014
Reduction in travel time External
Funding
2,000,000.00
2014-
8000-11
Concreting of barangay roads in San Vicente, Cagamutan Sur,
Cari Minor and Guinobatan
MEO January
2014
December
2014
Reduction in travel time External
Funding
3,000,000.00
2014-
8000-12
Repair/concreting of provincial road from Sitio Pang-pang
Bridge to Coastal Road
MEO January
2014
December
2014
Reduction in travel time External
Funding
5,000,000.00
2014-
8000-13
Completion/concreting of Leganes to Sta. Barbara Road DPWH January
2014
December
2014
Reduction in travel time External
Funding
40,000,000.00
2014-
8000-14
Installation of covered walk from Gustilo Street to Saint
Vincent Shrine
MEO January
2014
December
2014
Covered walk installed External
Funding
2,000,000.00



Prepared by: Reviewed by: Attested by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE NIMIA J. BADANA ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I Municipal Budget Officer Municipal Mayor


16

ANNUAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM
Quarterly Release Schedule
CY 2014

AIP Reference
Code
Program/Project/Activity Quarter TOTAL
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
20% Development Fund CY 2014 2,754,837.75 2,754,837.75 2,754,837.75 2,754,837.77 11,019,351.02
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
2014-3000-
100-1
Rehabilitation of Cari Mayor Elementary School and Sofia G. Gustilo Memorial Elementary School
Cari Mayor Elementary School
Materials 107,391.50 - - - 107,391.50
Labor 42,608.50 - - - 42,608.50
Nabitasan Elementary School
Materials 107,419.00 - - - 107,419.00
Labor 42,581.00 - - - 42,581.00
2014-3000-
200-1
Integrated Program for the Control of Non-communicable Diseases
Purchase of hemoglobin meter and various reagents - - 6,679.90 143,320.10 150,000.00
Purchase of water analyzer - - 250,000.00 - 250,000.00
2014-3000-
400-1
Upgrading of Lighting System Utilizing LED Lights
Materials - - - 300,000.00 300,000.00
Labor - - - 28,000.00 28,000.00
Contingencies - - - 2,000.00 2,000.00
2014-3000-
500-1
Cross-sectoral Welfare Program
Youth Development Center
Materials - - 108,000.00 - 108,000.00
Labor - - 72,000.00 - 72,000.00
Contingencies - - 20,000.00 - 20,000.00
GAD and Balay Dalangpan
Materials - - 273,571.00 - 273,571.00
Labor - - 182,381.00 - 182,381.00
Contingencies - - 50,661.67 - 50,661.67
Subtotal 300,000.00 - 963,293.57 473,320.10 1,736,613.67
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
2014-8000-1 Leganes Pinalangga ko Program
Improvement of park, plaza and its surroundings
Materials and equipment
Paint (latex and enamel) 73,000.00 - - - 73,000.00
Paint reducer 1,500.00 - - - 1,500.00
Paint brush 1,000.00 - - - 1,000.00
Paint roller, etc. 1,000.00 - - - 1,000.00
Shovel 1,500.00 - - - 1,500.00
Labor 100,000.00 - - - 100,000.00
Contingencies - 2,000.00 - - 2,000.00
17

AIP Reference
Code
Program/Project/Activity Quarter TOTAL
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
Improvement of Municipal Drainage System from the Leganes National High School connecting to
Buntatala River with pedestrian and bike lane

Materials - 433,332.90 - - 433,332.90
Labor - 190,000.00 - - 190,000.00
Equipment rental - 20,000.00 - - 20,000.00
Fuel, oil and lubricants - 6,000.00 - - 6,000.00
Contingencies - - 17,333.77 - 17,333.77
Declogging and clearing of drainage systems complementing all Municipal streets including Leganes
Commercial Complex

Materials and equipment
Steel bars, sand and gravel, cement, etc. 290,320.08 209,679.92 - - 500,000.00
Shovel, pales, etc. - 5,000.00 - - 5,000.00
RC pipes - 100,000.00 - - 100,000.00
Concrete hollow blocks - 75,000.00 - - 75,000.00
Filling materials - 50,000.00 - - 50,000.00
Labor 300,000.00 300,000.00 300,000.00 300,000.00 1,200,000.00
Equipment rental (boom trucks, loader, etc.) - 65,000.00 - - 65,000.00
Contingencies - - 5,000.00 - 5,000.00
2014-8000-2 Leganes Banwa nga Hamili - An Integrated Environmental Protection Program for a Disaster Resilient
Municipality

Enforcement of environmental ordinances 100,000.00 - - - 100,000.00
Labor component 400,000.00 - - - 400,000.00
Solid waste management capacity building and production of information education campaign materials 60,000.00 - - - 60,000.00
Anti-littering incentive system 30,000.00 - - - 30,000.00
Garbage receptacles - 30,000.00 - - 30,000.00
Establishment of materials recovery facilities 100,000.00 - - - 100,000.00
Purchase of garbage truck - - - 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00
Tipping fee 125,000.00 125,000.00 125,000.00 125,000.00 500,000.00
Monitoring and evaluation of environmental compliance 30,000.00 - - - 30,000.00
2014-8000-3 Coastal Resource Management Program in Response to Climate Change Adaptation
Advocacy and implementation of CRM 50,000.00 - - - 50,000.00
Establishment of mangrove nursery 100,000.00 - - - 100,000.00
Installation of artificial reef and fish condominiums - - 50,000.00 - 50,000.00
Reactivation of Bantay Dagat 50,000.00 - - - 50,000.00
Fishing closure advocacy 50,000.00 - - - 50,000.00
Coastal clean-up 30,000.00 - - - 30,000.00

18

AIP Reference
Code
Program/Project/Activity Quarter TOTAL
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
2014-8000-4 Climate Change Responsive Agricultural Technologies to Improve Crop Production
Integrated Pest Management - 15,000.00 - 15,000.00 30,000.00
Organic Fertilizer Use 20,000.00 - - - 20,000.00
Seed Subsidy Assistance - 100,000.00 - - 100,000.00
Farmers Field School - 50,000.00 50,000.00 - 100,000.00
Conduct of Demo Field - - 20,000.00 - 20,000.00
Vegetable Production - 10,000.00 10,000.00 - 20,000.00
2014-8000-5 Leganes Commercial Complex Loan Payment 541,517.67 541,517.67 541,517.67 541,517.67 2,166,070.68
Subtotal 2,454,837.75 2,327,530.49 1,118,851.44 1,981,517.67 7,882,737.35
GENERAL PUBLIC SERVICES
2014-1000-1 Various Infrastructure Projects in the Barangays
P 50,000.00 per barangay - 300,000.00 300,000.00 300,000.00 900,000.00
As per LCEs discretion - 127,307.26 372,692.74 - 500,000.00
Subtotal - 427,307.26 672,692.74 300,000.00 1,400,000.00
TOTAL 2,754,837.75 2,754,837.75 2,754,837.75 2,754,837.77 11,019,351.02
Balance - - - - -




Prepared by: Reviewed by:
Attested by:




ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE NIMIA J. BADANA ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
MGDH I - MPDC MGDH I - Municipal Budget Officer Municipal Mayor


19








AIP Code: 2014-3000-100-1
Name of Program: Rehabilitation of Cari Mayor Elementary School and Sofia G. Gustilo Memorial Elementary School
Brief Description: The project will include the roofing rehabilitation of the Grade III classroom of the Sofia G. Gustilo
Memorial Elementary, and the Grade I and Grade V classrooms of the Cari Mayor Elementary
School. The rusty corrugated metal roofing and wooden trusses of these school buildings will be
replaced with galvanized iron roofing and steel trusses.
Program
Components:
Fabrication and installation of steel trusses;
Installation of galvanized iron roofing; and
Replacement of ceiling
Proponent: Cari Mayor Elementary School and Sofia G. Gustilo Memorial Elementary School
Justifications: Across the country, increased accountability for public education has emerged as a central theme in
both the educational and political arenas. Leaders and public bodies have focused on the nations
crumbling school infrastructure. Postponing needed rehabilitation will allow school buildings to
deteriorate and rob future generations of adequate facilities.

Assuring roof integrity must be given a high priority to protect the significant investment the
government have in school structures and prevent further deterioration. Small improvements in
school infrastructure could lead to important advantages for the well-being of students.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Boy and girl school children
Estimated Cost Cari Mayor Elementary School
Materials P 107,391.50
Labor 42,608.50
Sofia G. Gustilo Memorial Elementary School
Materials 107,419.00
Labor 42,581.00
Total P 300,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Increase in price of materials can adversely affect the output of this project.
Success Indicator: Two school buildings rehabilitated
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Assistance from the private sector is expected



Prepared by: Noted by:



MARY P. GUSTILO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
DepEd District Supervisor MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

20








AIP Code: 2014-3000-200-1
Name of Program: Integrated Program for the Control of Non-communicable Diseases
Brief Description: The project will provide various laboratory examinations to all Leganesnons including universal
coverage of blood typing and water analysis which will effectively detect and control of non-
communicable diseases.
Program
Components:
Provision of laboratory examinations;
Universal blood typing; and
Water sanitation
Proponent: Municipal Health Office
Justifications: Non-communicable diseases are now becoming a major threat to public health. According to the
Department of Health, non-communicable diseases not only affect the older generation, but it also
affects the younger and more productive age groups. However they are highly preventable and are
attributed to lack of regular exercise, improper diet, excessive intake of alcohol, and smoking.
Locally generated statistics suggests that non-communicable diseases are gradually increasing and
the need for us to educate our people on living a healthy lifestyle.

The availability of laboratory examination for early detection of high risk individuals is essential to
patient awareness to the potential harm of an unhealthy lifestyle.

Without adequate and appropriate water sanitation facilities, water-borne and water-washed
diseases can easily spread through water contamination. The reduction in incidence of diarrhea or
other diseases caused by contaminated water can considerably improve health and nutrition.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Men, women and children
Estimated Cost Purchase of hemoglobin meter and various reagents P 150,000.00
Purchase of water analyzer 250,000.00
Total P 400,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Delay in the release of funds
Success Indicator: Decrease incidence of non-communicable diseases by 15% by the end of 2014 through early
detection and management
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Favorable response from the private sector id expected.



Prepared by: Noted by:



DR. ZENY D. DEQUILLA ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Rural Health Physician MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

21








AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-1
Name of Program: Upgrading of Lighting System Utilizing LED Lights
Brief Description: The project will replace existing traditional bulbs with LEDs in various locations in the Poblacion of
the Municipality.
Program
Components:
Identification of existing bulbs that will be replaced; and
Replacement of traditional bulbs with LED
Proponent: Municipal Engineering Office
Justifications: The upgrading of lighting system with the use of light emitting diodes (LED) can provide
considerable savings on the local governments electric consumption, reduces our carbon footprint,
and it can provide a clearer light output that last longer compared to other traditional bulbs.

The light output of individual light emitting diodes is low compared to incandescent and compact
fluorescent bulbs. However, the compact size of diodes means that multiple diodes can be clustered
together into a LED array. Individual LEDs are also becoming more powerful, with a higher lumen
output. As a result, LED arrays have the potential to have a much lower profile than other lighting
technologies while using less energy.

LEDs use 50 to 90 percent less energy than other light sources while maintaining the same light
output. LEDs have two to three times longer life than conventional light sources. It is commonly
reported that LEDs can last 20 to 30 years depending on the quality of the product, power usage,
and other factors.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Men and women residents
Estimated Cost Materials P 300,000.00
Labor 28,000.00
Contingencies 2,000.00
Total P 330,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Price increase of LED lights can affect the number of bulbs replaced.
Success Indicator: Replaced at least 84 bulbs with LED
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Business establishments in the Poblacion can benefit from the increase of nighttime activity.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. NINFORD H. RAYMUNDO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I Municipal Engineer MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

22


AIP Code: 2014-3000-500-1
Name of Program: Cross-sectoral Welfare Program
Brief Description: In support of the governments thrust to integrate development efforts that cuts across sectors for
cost effective programs, this program will undertake the rehabilitation and improvement of the
Leganes Youth Development Center and the Gender and Development Center, and the provision of
initial basic furnishing of the Leganes Balay Dalangpan.
Program
Components:
Rehabilitation and improvement of the Leganes Youth Development Center and the Gender
and Development Center;
Fabrication of furnishings for the Leganes Balay Dalangpan; and
Operation of the centers
Proponent: Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office
Justifications: Local government units have the inherent mandate to provide opportunities for young men and
women for their socio-cultural and economic advancement. Furthermore, there is a need to harness
their potential as partners in development. There are a number of loosely organized youth groups
that needs leadership development intervention and at the same time provide mechanisms to
counter the dangers and ill-effects of modern technology. The renovated Leganes Youth
Development Center can serve as a haven for the socio-cultural and intellectual development of
young men and women in Leganes.

The establishment of the Gender and Development Center will serve as a tangible beacon for the
gender-responsive efforts of the Municipality. The Center will serve gender groups such as the
Kalipunan ng Liping Pilipina (KALIPI) and the Empowerment and Reaffirmation of Paternal Abilities
Association (ERPAT). For the last quarter of 2013, initial efforts have been done to increase womens
participation in the solid waste recycling activities of the Municipality. This livelihood component
needs to be integrated, expanded and sustained by the GAD Center involving the men sector.

While the women and men are developed and empowered, they can also be harnessed as support
group in the reception and management of distressed individuals under the supervision of social
workers and police officers in the annexed Leganes Balay Dalangpan.

The local government should be encouraged to take into account the needs of the socially
disadvantaged and the elderly. Shelter is not only a temporary dwelling for them, but should
provide opportunity and awareness to lead a rich, normal and secure life. The Balay Dalangpan will
serve as a temporary shelter of victims of dometic violence, temporary home for the aged who are
restricted or who are otherwise disabled to continue to live in their own homes, abandoned children
who are waiting for the intervention from national government agancies, and a place to sleep and
rest for stranded visitors of Leganes. Through this shelter, the Municipality will be able to assist in
securing the social integration of these deprived, abused, battered members of our society.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Men, women, youth and distressed individuals
Estimated Cost Youth Development Center
Materials P 108,000.00
Labor 72,000.00
Contingencies 20,000.00
GAD Center and Balay Dalangpan
Materials 273,571.00
Labor 182,381.00
Contingencies 50,661.67
Total P 706,613.67
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Inadequate funds may hamper the sustainability of the program;
Inadequate personnel to manage the special cases and to supervise the voluntary service of
the men and women in the Center; and
Fluid nature of youth may affect the leadership aspect of the program
Success Indicator: Functional Leganes Youth Development Center, Gender and Development Center and Leganes
Balay Dalangpan;
At least 100 women members of KALIPI and at least 30 father members of ERPAT given
opportunities for socio-cultural and economic development;
At least 24 distressed individuals managed; and
At least 180 in-school and out-of-school youths have accessed the library and electronic
facilities of the Youth Development Center for socio-cultural and academic purposes

23





Expected Private
Sector Response:
The private sector will provide financial support and assist in the social marketing of the GAD Center
and Leganes Balay Dalangpan, promote recycled and remodeled products of the GAD Center,
provide donations of electronic equipment and gadgets to the Youth Development Center, and
provide technical assistance to youth beneficiaries.



Prepared by: Noted by:



LOLITA P. CAMARIG ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I - MSWDO MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

24


AIP Code: 2014-8000-1
Name of Program: Leganes Pinalangga Ko Program
Brief Description: All lampposts in the plaza and its surrounding area will be repainted with yellow and white stripe up
to two meters high. All gutters alongside of the pathways and streets throughout the Municipality
will also be repainted.

A 1.20 meter reinforced concrete (RC) pipe will be installed from the Leganes National High School
to Sitio Pangpang. Catch basins will be constructed every ten meters of the entire length of the
drainage system and a 1.20 by 0.15 by 100 meter concreted sidewalk and bike lane will be provided.

Furthermore, the program will undertake the demolition of all illegal structures on and along the
Municipal drainage system. Almost 50% of RC pipes under private driveways along the Municipal
drainage system are undersized which causes the inefficient flow of waste and rain water. These
undersized RC pipes must be replaced with larger pipes to allow waste and rain water to flow freely
and not stagnate.
Program
Components:
Improvement of park, plaza and its surroundings;
Improvement of Municipal drainage system from the Leganes National High School connecting
to Buntatala River with pedestrian and bike lane; and
Declogging and clearing of drainage systems complementing all Municipal streets including the
Leganes Commercial Complex (LCC)
Proponent: General Services Office and Municipal Engineering Office
Justifications: The Municipality is geographically located in a low lying area and is frequently inundated. The local
government should adequately provide for the improvement/rehabilitation of its drainage system
to mitigate flooding. This program will not only prevent flooding but likewise eliminate corollary
problems associated with it such as damage to agriculture, life and property, and prevent the spread
of vector and water-borne diseases.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Residents of the Municipality of Leganes
Estimated Cost Improvement of park, plaza, and its surroundings
Materials and equipment
Paint (latex and enamel) P 73,000.00
Paint reducer 1,500.00
Paint brush 1,000.00
Paint roller, etc. 1,000.00
Shovel 1,500.00
Labor 100,000.00
Contingencies 2,000.00
Improvement of Municipal drainage system from the Leganes National High
School connecting to Buntatala River with pedestrian and bike lane

Materials 433,332.90
Labor 190,000.00
Equipment rental 20,000.00
Fuel, oil and lubricants 6,000.00
Contingencies 17,333.77
Declogging and clearing of drainage system complementing all Municipal streets
including Leganes Commercial Complex

Materials and equipment
Steel bars, sand and gravel, cement, etc. 500,000.00
Shovel, pales, etc. 5,000.00
RC pipes 100,000.00
Concrete hollow blocks 75,000.00
Filling materials 50,000.00
Labor 1,200,000.00
Equipment rental (boom trucks, loader, etc.) 65,000.00
Contingencies 5,000.00
Total P 2,846,666.67
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Delay in fund releasing and the inadequate value of money can have an adverse impact on the
program.
Success Indicator: 50% reduced risk of inundation; and
100 meter drainage from LNHS to Sitio Pangpang improved

25





Expected Private
Sector Response:
Support and cooperation from the private sector is expected.



Prepared by: Noted by:



NICHOLS G. HAGORILES ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Administrative Assistant II MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

26




AIP Code: 2014-8000-2
Name of Program: Leganes Banwa nga Hamili An Integrated Environmental Protection Program for a Disaster
Resilient Municipality
Brief Description: The program will enforce and closely monitor all environmental ordinances on solid waste,
watershed, airshed and mangrove protected areas including trainings and information education
campaign, purchase of one garbage truck, establishment of materials recovery facilities in all
barangays, provision of garbage receptacles and institutionalization of incentives system for anti-
littering. With the closure of the Municipalitys controlled dumpsite, it is imperative that we should
find an alternative site to accommodate the solid waste generated by the Municipality. Iloilo City
has signified its intention to accommodate our garbage in exchange for a tipping fee of P 90.00 per
cubic meter.
Program
Components:
Information education campaign;
Capacity building;
Establishment of materials recovery facilities;
Institutionalization of incentives system for anti-littering; and
Garbage collection
Proponent: Municipal Agriculture Office
Justifications: Leganes is one of the coastal towns in the Province of Iloilo which shares a common border with
Iloilo City, the regional administrative center of Western Visayas. The town is fast developing with
an increasing population density partly due to in-migration thus increasing the volume of waste
generated.

The enactment of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act paved the way for a shift from
indiscriminate waste disposal to institutionalized proper solid waste management at every
household, industry and the community. Protecting the environment and our natural resources
from the hazards caused by improper waste management has been a top priority.

The impact of disasters, whether natural and man-made, not only has human dimensions, but
environmental ones as well. Environmental conditions may exacerbate the impact of a disaster, and
vice versa. Improper waste disposal can worsen the negative environmental impacts of a typhoon,
leading to flooding, silting, and ground/surface water contamination.

Mitigating these cyclical causes and impacts will assure that future generations will be able to live in
sustainable ways and reduce the risks that natural and man-made hazards pose to people living
today. Emphasizing and reinforcing the centrality of environmental concerns in disaster
management has become a critical priority, requiring the sound management of the environment as
a tool to prevent disasters and lessen their impacts on people, their homes, and livelihoods.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
General public
Estimated Cost Enforcement of environmental ordinances P 100,000.00
Labor component 400,000.00
Solid waste management capacity building and production of information
education campaign materials

60,000.00
Anti-littering incentive system 30,000.00
Garbage receptacles 30,000.00
Establishment of materials recovery facilities 100,000.00
Purchase of garbage truck 1,000,000.00
Tipping fee 500,000.00
Monitoring and evaluation of environmental compliance 30,000.00
Total P 2,250,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Failure of the program to prosper due to delayed release of funds
Success Indicator: Absence of garbage heaps;
10% improvement in water potability; and
15% increase in irrigation water supply

27







Expected Private
Sector Response:
Private sector can be tapped to provide technical and financial support.



Prepared by: Noted by:



WILSON A. BATISLAON ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MENRO Designate MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

28







AIP Code: 2014-8000-3
Name of Program: Coastal Resource Management Program in Response to Climate Change Adaptation
Brief Description: The program will reactivate the Bantay Dagat, conduct coastal resource management advocacy
campaigns, mangrove nursery will be established including the construction of artificial reef and fish
condominiums, conduct coastal clean-ups, and enforce fishing closures, restrictions and permits on
Municipal waters.
Program
Components:
Reactivation of Bantay Dagat;
Advocacy campaign;
Mangrove nursery establishment;
Installation of artificial reef and fish condominiums; and
Implementation of fishing closures, restrictions and permits system
Proponent: Municipal Agriculture Office
Justifications: Coastal zones are already experiencing some of the changes that are expected to accelerate with
climate change, such as the increased frequency of extreme weather events. Coastal erosion and
ecosystem loss are already taking place. Human activities that directly impact coastal zones include
drainage of coastal wetlands, deforestation and reclamation; discharge of sewage, fertilizers and
contaminants into coastal waters; extractive activities including sand mining and hydrocarbon
production; harvest of fisheries and other living resources; introduction of invasive species;
construction of seawalls and other structures; engineering activities and diversions of coastal
waterways; and disruption of ecosystem services by large-scale ecosystem conversion for
agriculture, industrial and urban development or aquaculture.

Human encroachment has caused the disappearance of mangrove and mangrove associates, loss of
habitat and spawning grounds for marine life. The depletion of fish biomass has decreased fish catch
which can affect food security.

Predicted climate change-related impacts on the coastal zone include increases in sea level and sea
surface temperature, and changes in salinity, alkalinity, wave climate, and ocean circulation. These
changes are expected to impact freshwater resources due to seawater intrusion into surface water
and coastal aquifers; and result in encroachment of saltwater into estuaries and coastal river
systems, coastal inundation and higher levels of sea flooding. In addition, key coastal sectors such as
fisheries and aquaculture, agriculture and forestry, tourism, settlements and infrastructure,
biodiversity and health will be affected.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Men and women fisherfolks
Estimated Cost Advocacy and implementation of CRM P 50,000.00
Establishment of mangrove nursery 100,000.00
Installation of artificial reef and fish condominiums 50,000.00
Reactivation of Bantay Dagat 50,000.00
Fishing closure advocacy 50,000.00
Coastal clean-up 30,000.00
Total P 330,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Failure of the program to prosper due to delayed financial release
Success Indicator: Increased fish catch by 5%; and
Increased mangrove cover by 15%

29










Expected Private
Sector Response:
The private sector can be tapped to provide technical and financial support to fisherfolks.



Prepared by: Noted by:



WILSON A. BATISLAON ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MENRO Designate MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

30




AIP Code: 2014-8000-4
Name of Program: Climate Change Responsive Agricultural Technologies to Improve Crop Production
Brief Description: The project will introduce to farmers new innovations and technology on pest management and
organic farming, provide seed subsidy, implement agricultural programs and best practices to
improve crop production. Farmers training will be conducted to introduce the latest and more
advanced rice farming technology like the palay check system to equip farmers with the necessary
knowledge and skills. These farming technologies will hopefully increase rice yield per hectare.
Program
Components:
Integrated pest management;
Organic farming;
Seeds subsidy;
Farmers field school; and
Conduct of demo field
Proponent: Municipal Agriculture Office
Justifications: Leganes is predominantly an agricultural Municipality where rice is the major crop and the main
source of income of local farmers. In order to improve rice productivity, new technologies must be
adopted including the use of high yielding rice cultivars.

Climate has obvious and direct effects on agricultural production. Innovative agricultural practices
and technologies have a potential role in climate change mitigation and adaptation. The
development and effective diffusion of new agricultural practices and technologies will largely shape
how and how well farmers mitigate and adapt to climate change. This adaptation and mitigation
potential is nowhere more pronounced than in developing countries where agricultural productivity
remains low; poverty, vulnerability and food insecurity remains high; and the direct effects of
climate change are expected to be especially harsh. Most new technologies change the use of farm
inputs, often in ways that alter the impacts of weather on production and of production on carbon
emissions.

From these considerations, it is the institutional responses that will enhance information flows,
incentives and flexibility of agriculture to climate change. Existing technology options must be made
more available and accessible without overlooking complementary capacity and investments.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Local men and women farmers
Estimated Cost Integrated pest management P 30,000.00
Organic fertilizer use 20,000.00
Seed subsidy assistance 100,000.00
Farmers field school 100,000.00
Conduct of demo field 20,000.00
Vegetable production 20,000.00
Total P 290,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Failure of the program to prosper due to extreme weather condition
Success Indicator: Increased crop yield by 5%
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Private sector can be tapped to provide technical and financial support to local farmers.



Prepared by: Noted by:



SERLE G. DEYSOLONG ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
OIC MAO MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

31







AIP Code: 2014-8000-5
Name of Program: Leganes Commercial Complex Loan Payment
Brief Description: The Municipality of Leganes incurred a loan amounting to P 25,000,000.00 for the construction of
the Leganes Commercial Complex of which the local government is obligated to pay within 12 years
or on March 2019. The principal loan is payable in 44 equal quarterly amortization that started at
the end of the first quarter from the date of initial release with a prime rate at the time of availment
plus a minimum of 2% spread per annum.

The loan payment for CY 2014 will be divided into two parts. The larger chunk of the obligation or
the principal will be paid out of the 20% development fund of the Municipality while interest
payment will be appropriated under the Local Economic Development Office budget.
Program
Components:
Payment of long-term loan
Proponent: Local Economic Development Office
Justifications: The Municipality of Leganes entered into contract with the Land Bank of the Philippines (LBP),
authorized under SB Resolution No. 2006-020 series of 2006 to avail of a loan for the construction of
the Leganes Commercial Complex. The LGU, on January 16, 2007, signed a deed of assignment with
LBP to withhold in favor of the LBP the IRA of the Municipality in whatever amount as may be
necessary to settle any unpaid portion of the loan and/or any amortization due thereon in
accordance with the terms of the loan agreement.

The Municipality is obligated to pay a loan amounting to P 25,000,000.00 within a 12 year term
which will mature in March 2019. The principal of the loan is payable in 44 equal quarterly
amortizations that started at the end of the first quarter of the second year from initial release and
the interest is payable in 48 quarterly amortizations that started at the end of the first quarter from
the date of initial release with a prime rate at the time of availment plus a minimum of 2% spread
per annum.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
General public
Estimated Cost Loan payment (principal) P 2,166,070.68
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: A penalty maybe imposed for late payment
Success Indicator: Payment of the loan would decrease the long term obligation of the Municipality with Land Bank of
the Philippines by P 2,166,070.68.
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Positive response can be expected for timely payments of the loan.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

32






AIP Code: 2014-1000-1
Name of Program: Various Infrastructure Projects in the Barangays
Brief Description: This program will implement various infrastructure support projects in all eighteen (18) barangays of
the municipality. The program allocation will be divided equally among the 18 barangays at P
50,000.00 per Barangay and the remainder will be released at the discretion of the Municipal
Mayor. It is the discretion of the respective barangays to identify their priority project for funding
under this program.
Program
Components:
Barangay project identification and assessment;
Project implementation; and
Monitoring and evaluation.
Proponent: Liga ng mga Barangay
Justifications: Section 17 (b) (1) of R.A. 7160 which provides a short list of basic services and facilities that the
barangay is mandated to provide such as, barangay health center and day-care center,
infrastructure facilities such as multi- purpose hall, multipurpose pavement, plaza, sports center,
and other similar facilities. Considering the low financial capacity of the barangays to finance the
improvement these basic facilities that the LGC mandates, they need external monetary assistance
to provide such facilities.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Men, women and children
Estimated Cost Bigke Renovation of Multipurpose Hall P 50,000.00
Buntatala Construction of streetlight posts 50,000.00
Cagamutan Norte Rehabilitation of basketball court 50,000.00
Cagamutan Sur Rehabilitation of Multipurpose Hall 50,000.00
Calaboa Regravelling of barangay road 50,000.00
Camangay Construction of basketball court 50,000.00
Cari Mayor Regravelling of farm to market road 50,000.00
Cari Minor Regravelling of farm to market road 50,000.00
Gua-an Constructionof footwalk to Sitio Pangpang 50,000.00
Guihaman Rehabilitation/repainting of day care center ceiling 50,000.00
Guinobatan Rehabilitation of Multipurpose Hall 50,000.00
Guintas Rehabilitation of roofing second floor and shade of
Barangay Plaza
50,000.00
Lapayon Completion of access road going to barangay basketball
court
50,000.00
M. V. Hechanova Rehabilitation of Multipurpose Hall 50,000.00
Nabitasan Completion of Multipurpose Hall 50,000.00
Napnud Rehabilitation of Multipurpose Hall 50,000.00
Poblacion Regravelling of farm to market road 50,000.00
San Vicente Construction of footwalk to Purok 4 50,000.00
As per LCEs discretion 500,000.00
Total P 1,400,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Increase in price of materials and unfavourable weather conditions can adversely affect project
implementation.
Success Indicator: At least 18 infrastructure projects in various barangays of the municipality have been implemented

33








Expected Private
Sector Response:
Cooperation and support for barangay projects is expected.



Prepared by: Noted by:



NIO VINCENT J. VALLEJO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Liga ng mga Barangay President MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor


34

Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Fund Investment Plan (LDRRMFIP)
January to December 2014

Municipality of Leganes, Iloilo

Functional
Classification
Program/Project/Activity Code and Description Implementing Office Schedule of Implementation Expected Output Funding
Source
Appropriation/Allocation
Amount
Starting Date Completion Date MOOE CO Total
2 Vector-borne Diseases Outbreak Monitoring and
Control
MDRRMC, MHO January 2014 December 2014 Vector borne diseases controlled
through environmental sanitation
DRRMF 600,000.00
3 Fabrication of rescue boat MDRRMC, PNP January 2014 December 2014 1 rescue boat fabricated DRRMF 100,000.00
3 Purchase of handheld radios for the incident
command system (ICS)
MDRRMC, PNP January 2014 December 2014 Increased efficiency in
communication by 50%
DRRMF 30,000.00
94 Risk Assessment, Resource Inventory and Needs
Projection
MDRRMC, MPDO January 2014 December 2014 Risk assessment, resource
inventory and needs accomplished
DRRMF 500,000.00
3 Construction of disaster risk reduction and
management building and warehouse
MDRRMC, MEO January 2014 December 2014 MDRRM building and warehouse
constructed
DRRMF 700,000.00
3 Rehabilitation and expansion of fire station for
disaster preparedness
MDRRMC, MEO January 2014 December 2014 Fire station rehabilitated and
expanded
DRRMF 100,000.00
2 Retrofitting of the Municipal Gymnasium as an
evacuation center
MDRRMC, MEO January 2014 December 2014 Municipal Gymnasium retrofitted
for use as an evacuation center
DRRMF 700,000.00
94 Advocacy and information education campaign on
mandatory and preemptive evacuation
MDRRMC January 2014 December 2014 Preemptive and mandatory
evacuation advocacy campaign
conducted
DRRMF 50,000.00
2 Production of disaster risk reduction and
management information education campaign
materials i.e. brochures, leaflets and flyers
MDRRMC January 2014 December 2014 Disaster risk reduction and
management information
education campaign materials
produced
DRRMF 47,396.00
94 Organization/training/insurance of disaster risk
reduction and management volunteers
MDRRMC January 2014 December 2014 Volunteer groups organized,
trained and provided with
insurance
DRRMF 600,000.00
3 Purchase of emergency equipment and tents MDRRMC January 2014 December 2014 Emergency equipment and tents
purchased
DRRMF 300,000.00
3 Establishment of an early warning system MDRRMC, MEO January 2014 December 2014 Early warning system established DRRMF 150,000.00
2 Stockpiling of relief goods MDRRMC, MSWDO January 2014 December 2014 Basic emergency food and medicine
are made available in case of
emergency
DRRMF 213,655.62
35


Functional
Classification
Program/Project/Activity Code and Description Implementing Office Schedule of Implementation Expected Output Funding
Source
Appropriation/Allocation
Amount
Starting Date Completion Date MOOE CO Total
94 Conduct of symposium on climate change
adaptability
MDRRMC, MAO January 2014 December 2014 90% participation of farmers in
climate change adaptability
symposium
DRRMF 50,000.00
1 Quick Response MDRRMC January 2014 December 2014 Efficient and timely response to
disasters ensured
DRRMF 976,026.86



Prepared by: Approved by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
MGDH I - MPDC Municipal Mayor


36




37



38


39



40



AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-2
Name of Program: Fabrication of Rescue Boat
Brief Description: Saving lives has always been a priority of disaster risk reduction and management; a goal that
can be further reached with the fabrication of a rescue boat. The rescue boat will have a capacity
of six to eight persons and will include a wheeled boat carrier. The boat will be used to ferry
emergency supplies, rescuers and people in need.
Program Components: Design formulation;
Fabrication of rescue a boat and boat carrier; and
Installation of an optional detachable boat engine
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: The Municipality is traversed by the Buntatala, Janipa-an and Jalaur Rivers. The former two rivers
are tributaries of the larger Jalaur River which is the second largest river in island of Panay and
the 17th largest river system in the Philippines in terms of drainage basin size. It has an
estimated drainage area of 1,503 square kilometers and travels 123 kilometers from its source to
its mouth in Barangay Nabitasan. The river has an annual average discharge of 40.29 m/second.

The floodplains of the Jalaur River experiences seasonal inundation during the months of June to
September. The river overflows and floods the surrounding areas with a maximum height of 2.0
to 2.5 meters. Water levels can rise quickly with strong currents and high turbidity. Individuals
and families can get trapped by floodwaters easily and without proper rescue equipment can
result in casualties. The fabrication of a rescue boat will help save countless of lives.
Intended Beneficiaries: Vulnerable households in flood prone areas
Estimated Cost Materials (e.g. assorted lumber, marine plywood, assorted CU and CW nails,
marine epoxy adhesive, marine epoxy paint, etc.)
P 66,500.00
Labor (e.g. fabrication of hull, sidings, painting of body, etc.) 28,500.00
Contingency 5,000.00
Total P 100,000.00
Program Term: January to April, 2014
Possible Risks: Inadequate experience of rescue responders in operating a rescue boat has a potential adverse
impact in the projects ability to operate effectively.
Success Indicator: One rescue boat fabricated; and
Increased rescue efficiency by 85%
Expected Private Sector
Response:
The private sector is expected to strongly support the effort of local government in disaster
preparedness.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

41




AIP Code: 2014-8000-6
Name of Program: Conduct of Symposium on Climate Change Adaptability
Brief Description: A symposium on climate change adaptability will be conducted to be participated by more or less
300 farmers and agriculture stakeholders. Awareness on the part of these farmers may reduce
losses and the ill effects of environmental changes. The symposium will give farmers from
different barangays in the Municipality an opportunity to be enlightened on various issues on
climate change.
Program Components: Symposium; and
Production of reading materials
Proponent: Municipal Agriculture Office
Justifications: Adaptation is relevant for all climate-sensitive domains, including agriculture, water
management, and disaster prevention. Agricultural activity has always included adaptation to a
number of diverse stresses and opportunities-elements that continue influencing developments
in the agriculture sector. Climate and weather conditions are a good example of factors that
require on-going adaptation. With climate change they take on even more significance. The
mutually supportive relationship between sustainable agriculture and climate change adaptation
is enough to justify more government support for sustainable agriculture policies and programs.
Intended Beneficiaries: Local Farmers
Estimated Cost Food and snacks P 30,000.00
IEC materials 5,000.00
Tokens 5,000.00
Venue and accommodation 10,000.00
Total P 50,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Unfavorable weather condition
Success Indicator: 90% participation of farmers in climate change adaptability symposium
Expected Private Sector
Response:
Private sector can be tapped to provide technical and financial support to local farmers.



Prepared by: Noted by:



SERLE G. DEYSOLONG ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
OIC MAO MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor


42




AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-3
Name of Program: Purchase of Handheld Radios for the Incident Command System (ICS)
Brief Description: The importance of communication is vital in terms of responding to any situation like incidents
and disaster. Immediate response is necessary to save lives and property. The six (6) units of
handheld radios to be procured by the project will be used by the Operational Coordination Unit
of the Incident Command System of the Municipality, headed by the Chief of Police.
Program Components: Purchase of six (6) pieces handheld radio
Proponent: Leganes Police Station
Justifications: The handheld radios will aid in (a) coordinating any activated ICS in disaster affected areas; (b)
maintaining communication link between the Incident Commander and the Emergency
Operation Center for the purpose of coordinating the overall response, resource requests and
event status information; (c) coordinating all ground and inland water search and rescue
operations; (d) coordinating the transportation of people injured in the disaster and health care
personnel to appropriate medical facilities as required; (e) coordinating law enforcement and
traffic control operations during a major emergency; (f) coordinating movement and evacuation
operations; and (g) coordinating and providing support for physically challenged or medically
disabled persons during evacuation.

Accordingly, radio communication is the fastest and thrifty way in contacting interagency
departments as quickly as possible and prevent severe damaged to lives and property.
Intended Beneficiaries: Men, women and children of the Municipality
Estimated Cost Handheld radio P 30,000.00
Program Term: January to December 2014
Possible Risks: Delays in release of funds and weakness in procurement can adversely affect the project.
Success Indicator: Increased efficiency in communication by 50%; and
Zero casualty during disaster
Expected Private Sector
Response:
Positive response from the private sector is anticipated.



Prepared by: Noted by:



PSI CYRIL S. OCTAVIO, MPA ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
OIC Leganes Police Station MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

43



AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-4
Name of Program: Risk Assessment, Resource Inventory and Needs Projection
Brief Description: Risk is the potential for an unwanted outcome resulting from an event. It is determined by the
product of: (a) the likelihood of the impact; and (b) the consequence of the impact. Risk
assessment serves as the first step in reducing vulnerabilities. It will guide the Municipality in
prioritizing its actions and develop effective strategies for disaster prevention, mitigation,
preparedness and response.

The project will undertake data collection and inventory, data review and analysis, report
preparation and submission, and mainstreaming of disaster risk reduction and management
(DRRM) in land use planning.

Risk assessment can proceed from retrospective data and interpret the relevance of historical
events as well as incorporate forward-looking perspectives, integrating the anticipated impacts
of phenomena that are altering historical trends, such as climate change. In addition, it may
consider remote events that lie outside projections but which could conceivably occur. This
requires the aggregation of assorted information and interdisciplinary findings, along with
scenario building and simulations, which can be supplemented by expertise from a wide range of
disciplines. Data repositories on hazards, exposures, vulnerabilities and losses enhance the
accuracy of risk assessment, contributing to more effective measures to prevent, prepare for and
financially manage disasters.
Program Components: Data collection and inventory;
Data review and analysis;
Multi-stakeholder consultation and participation;
Report preparation and submission; and
Mainstreaming of disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) in land use planning.
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: Disasters can have widespread impacts, inflicting not only physical harm and damage to
population and assets, but also impairing economic activity, with potential cascading and global
effects. These direct and indirect impacts generate losses for households, businesses,
governments, and other segments of the economy insofar as income is lost and wealth
destroyed, be it in the initial phase of a disaster or during recovery. These costs may be
catastrophic, aggravating economic and social impacts.

Risk assessment guides the optimal allocation of scarce resources available to the phases of
DRRM. By identifying and assessing the likelihood and consequences of potentially disastrous
events, risk assessment provides governments with the basis for the prioritization of investments
in disaster risk reduction, the improvement of emergency management capabilities and the
design of financial protection strategies in a manner tailored to local conditions, needs and
preferences. The results may be used also to inform and educate all relevant stakeholders about
the most important threats society faces and thereby contribute to a culture of risk amongst
communities and individuals. Risk assessment is thus an essential prerequisite for the full array
of DRRM plans and policies that contribute to overarching governmental objectives of reducing
societys vulnerability and enhancing its resilience.

DRRM-enhanced land use planning will significantly contribute to risk reduction efforts and help
make societies more resilient to natural hazards, and at the same time ensuring that
development efforts shall not be compromised by these hazards. The DRRM-enhanced land use
plan will:

a. Provide a firmer basis for sectoral plans especially those that relate to the physical
aspects of development like land, natural resources, and infrastructures as well as the
socioeconomic dimensions that aim to lessen vulnerabilities and improve resilience of
communities to disasters;
b. Reconcile and rationalize land use and development proposals among adjoining
localities and with higher level framework plans.
c. Guide government agencies and private developers, particularly those undertaking
large-scale projects, on the proper project location and the implementation of the
necessary mitigation works; and
d. Provide a basis for adjudicating conflicts arising from the implementation of land use
plans, development projects, and similar activities that straddle the boundaries of two
or more municipalities within the province.
44



Intended Beneficiaries: Vulnerable households in hazard-exposed areas in the Municipality
Estimated Cost Participatory risk assessment and identification of resources and capacities P 364,000.00
Supplies and materials 100,000.00
Transportation of enumerators 36,000.00
Total P 500,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Refusal of stakeholders to participate during risk assessment, resource inventory and needs
assessment activities.
Success Indicator: Incorporation of DRRM in the Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP);
Risk assessment, resource inventory and needs projection report submitted; and
Contingency Plan formulated.
Expected Private Sector
Response:
The private sector is expected to participate in the formulation/consultation of DRRM strategies
of the Municipality.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

45



AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-5
Name of Program: Construction of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Building and Warehouse
Brief Description: The Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (MDRRM) building and warehouse will
serve as the emergency operations center (EOC) or the central coordination point for all
emergency operations, information gathering and dissemination, and serve as the command
center for coordination of all units and service sectors and other agencies of the government as
well as CSOs, volunteer groups and the private sector at the activities on the onset, during and
post-disaster. The proposed building will be central in the logistical coordination of relief
procurement, transport, tracking and tracing, warehousing and delivery operations. The
proposed warehouse is necessary for the storage of emergency rescue equipment and stockpile.

The MDDRM building and warehouse will be annexed with the existing TESDA Building.
Program Components: Site work;
Laying of foundation;
Structural;
Faade construction;
Interior construction; and
Grading and improvements
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: The MDRRM Office/EOC is currently sharing an office space with two other offices in the ground
floor of the Municipal Hall. There is not enough space for the disaster risk reduction and
management operation and storage of equipment and stockpile. This project will hopefully
address the issues in EOC logistics

Logistics is central to disaster relief for several reasons. First, it serves as a bridge between
disaster preparedness and response, between procurement and distribution, and between EOC
and the field that allows the transition between emergency and development programs, and
links the entire supply chain. Second, it is crucial to the effectiveness and speed of response for
major humanitarian programs, such as health, food, shelter, water and sanitation. Establishing a
long-term process logistics will ensure local development and resilience, and disaster risk
reduction and management sustainability.
Intended Beneficiaries: Men, women and children of the Municipality
Estimated Cost Materials P 499,000.00
Labor 174,650.00
Contingencies 26,350.00
Total P 700,000.00
Program Term: January to April, 2014
Possible Risks: An increase in the process of materials can adversely affect the completion of the proposed
MDRRM building and warehouse.
Success Indicator: MDRRM building and warehouse constructed
Expected Private Sector
Response:
The private sector is expected to support the efforts of the Municipality on disaster
preparedness.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

46





AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-6
Name of Program: Rehabilitation and Expansion of Fire Station for Disaster Preparedness
Brief Description: The project will undertake the construction of an annex building at the back of the existing
Municipal Fire Station to accommodate a kitchen and sex disaggregated toilets. The hallway
between the Municipal Fire Station and the Commission on Elections (COMELEC) will be
removed to expand the front office space of the station. Additional storage space will be
provided to contain various fire fighting and emergency equipment and paraphernalia.
Program Components: Demolition and clearance;
Site layout;
Structural work and extension;
External works; and
Site clearing
Proponent: Bureau of Fire Protection, Leganes
Justifications: The Municipal Fire Station provides a wide variety of emergency services that include not only
fire suppression, but fire safety and inspection, fire and arson investigation, and public fire safety
education. In addition to these services, the Fire Station is also involved in disaster risk reduction
and management activities of the Municipality. These activities include hazardous materials
response and mitigation, special rescue situations, and emergency management.

The existing space allocated for the Fire Station is insufficient to accommodate the various
services and activities that they provide. For expediency of public service and safety of
Leganesnons, it is imperative that an adequate office space be provided for the efficient
operation and storage of fire fighting and emergency equipment of the Station.
Intended Beneficiaries:
Estimated Cost Materials P 71,000.00
Labor 28,000.00
Contingencies 1,000.00
Total P 100,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: An increase in the prices of construction materials can affect the completion of the project.
Success Indicator: Fire station rehabilitated and expanded by 9.86 square meters
Expected Private Sector
Response:
Support from the business sector is expected.



Prepared by: Noted by:



SFO2 ARIEL S. SELOTERIO, BFP ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Acting Municipal Fire Marshall MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

47




AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-7
Name of Program: Retrofitting of the Municipal Gymnasium as an Evacuation Center
Brief Description: The Municipal Gymnasium was identified as the main evacuation center of the Municipality of
the Leganes that will accommodate internally displaced population (IDP) when a mandatory or
preemptive evacuation is declared. It is necessary to retrofit the Municipal Gymnasium to
improve and make the facility adequate for use of IDPs. The project will replace the dilapidated
roofing, gutters and down spouts, provide an area for food preparation, and additional toilets,
baths and wash areas. Furthermore, the drainage system will be rehabilitated and the concrete
entrance pavement will be elevated.
Program Components: Demolition and clearance;
Site layout;
Structural work and extension;
External works; and
Site clearing
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: As an evacuation center, the Municipal Gymnasium should comply with national and
international minimum standards. The local government should ensure the availability and
adequacy of basic and essential needs of an evacuation center. A minimum shelter requirement
of 3.50 square meters per person and one unit toilet and bathroom facility per 20 persons should
be provided.
Intended Beneficiaries: Internally displaced population affected by natural calamities
Estimated Cost Materials P 505,800.00
Labor 187,146.00
Contingencies 7,054.00
Total P 700,000.00
Program Term: January to March, 2014
Possible Risks: Increase in the cost of construction materials and unfavorable weather condition can affect the
timely completion of the project.
Success Indicator: Municipal Gymnasium retrofitted for use as an evacuation center; and
Municipal Gymnasium has complied with the minimum standard for an evacuation center.
Expected Private Sector
Response:
High level of appreciation on the support extended to displaced families.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

48




AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-8
Name of Program: Advocacy and Information Education Campaign on Mandatory and Preemptive Evacuation
Brief Description: Disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) awareness is a foundation and prerequisite for
effective DRRM strategies. This initiative will undertake an intensive information education
campaign through school and barangay-based interventions. The Sangguniang Bayan Ordinance
for mandatory and preemptive evacuation will be translated into Hiligaynon vernacular to
ensure that it will reach the targeted audiences and induce the desired changes in behavior and
perception.

Information on mandatory and preemptive evacuation will be communicated to the general
public in a simplified way, accompanied with illustrations, and its expected benefits in tarpaulins
that will be posted in various conspicuous places in Leganes. All DRRM strategies contained in
these messages will be specific and realistic for local conditions. To be effective, these campaigns
should ensure that the public receives consistent messages repeated over an extended period of
time and from multiple sources to create public recognition, anticipation and to reinforce what
was learned during previous events.
Program Components: Campaigns; and
Participatory learning
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: The government has an obligation not only to help people in an emergency but also to take
decisive steps to remove them from harms way. The Department of Interior and Local
Government issued Memorandum Circular No. 2012-35 mandating all local government units to
cause the enactment of a local ordinance for the implementation of mandatory or preemptive
evacuation in areas declared to be in eminent danger.

DRRM preparedness strategies will be worthless if residents of environmentally-critical areas
refuse to comply with regulations to ensure their safety. The key to an effective mandatory and
preemptive evacuation are information and knowledge shared through awareness-raising and
educational initiatives so that people make informed decisions and take action to ensure their
resilience during disasters.
Intended Beneficiaries: Vulnerable households in environmentally critical areas of the Municipality
Estimated Cost Printing of Mandatory and preemptive Ordinance on
tarpaulins both in English and Hiligaynon;
P 50,000.00
Barangay pulong-pulong to include transportation and
meals/snacks;
Supplies and materials; and
Public address system
Total P 50,000.00
Program Term: January to May, 2014
Possible Risks: The refusal of identified vulnerable households to follow the ordinance can affect the success of
the initiative.
Success Indicator: Zero casualty during natural calamities
Expected Private Sector
Response:
The private sector is expected to agree and understand the disaster risk reduction and
management activities of the local government.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

49




AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-9
Name of Program: Production of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Information Education Campaign
Materials
Brief Description: A year-round information education activity will be undertaken to popularize and enhance public
knowledge on disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM), and effectively cultivate a
culture of safety and preparedness in entire Municipality through the production of locally
relevant educational materials in natural disaster prevention, recognition and preparedness that
integrate important principles of sustainability and are adaptable to different sectors and
stakeholders.

The campaign is divided into two parts, namely, emergency warnings and pre-emergency
communications that can raise public awareness on various hazards, vulnerabilities and risks,
and on early warning sign and countermeasures. The public awareness campaign will be
communicated through various media conduit e.g. brochures, leaflets, flyers, tarpaulins, etc.; the
messages will be guided by the audiences characteristics, and should be frequent, credible, and
accurate in nature and aiming to positively influence the receivers perception of the message.
Program Components: Design and editing;
Production; and
Campaign
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council
Justifications: There is an urgent need to educate people to prepare sufficiently for natural disaster. The
purpose of DRRM public awareness is fourfold: first, for the local government to conform to legal
mandates, to advocate and educate communities, to change local belief systems, and eventually
change risky behavior. Public awareness campaigns advocate risk communication messages to
encourage a group of people to perform certain risk reduction measures by way of giving them
information and promoting why these measures are the best means of reducing their specific
risks.
Intended Beneficiaries: Men, women and children of the Municipality
Estimated Cost IEC materials P 47,396.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Lack of personnel to undertake the implementation
Success Indicator: Disaster risk reduction and management information education campaign materials produced
Expected Private Sector
Response:
Agrees and understand disaster risk reduction and management strategies of the Municipality



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

50





51




52


53



54


AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-10
Name of Program: Organization, Training and Insurance of Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Volunteers
Brief Description: The project will organize various volunteer groups in all barangays in the Municipality, conduct
skills development training of volunteers on emergency response and recovery, and insurance
coverage of volunteers. This project is in compliance with Section 13 of the Philippine Disaster
Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010 (R.A. 10121).

The training of volunteers will include water search and rescue, fire fighting, and first aid.
Trainees will be given a P 120.00 allowance for their food and transportation expenses for the
five-day training.
Program Components: 1. Organization of volunteer;
2. Capacity development;
3. Accreditation of volunteer groups; and
4. Acquisition of insurance policy for volunteer groups.
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: The UN General Assembly defines volunteerism as undertaken of free will, for the general
public good and where monetary reward is not the principal motivating factor. Furthermore,
the UN General Assembly recognized that volunteerism is an important component of any
strategy aimed at...poverty reduction, sustainable development, health, disaster prevention and
management and social integration and, in particular, overcoming social exclusion and
discrimination. Volunteerism is an important component of any disaster risk management
strategy that aims at fostering community recovery, strength and resilience in vulnerable areas.

Section 13 of R.A. 10121 provides that local governments may mobilize individuals or organized
volunteers to augment their respective personnel complement and logistical requirements in the
delivery of disaster risk reduction programs and activities. The local government concerned shall
take full responsibility for the enhancement, welfare and protection of volunteers, and the
Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (MDRRMO) shall take charge in the
accreditation and inclusion of volunteers in the database of community disaster volunteers.

Training is a key component in capacity development strategies. In fact, deployed volunteers are
not always sufficiently trained, so training becomes integral to the success of the project. A long-
term training strategy can be very effective and will build sustainable capacity at the community
level. In case a volunteer incurs death or injury while engaged in any activities defined under R.A.
10121 shall be entitled to compensatory benefits and individual personnel accident insurance.

Volunteerism benefits both society at large and the individual volunteer by strengthening trust,
solidarity and reciprocity among citizens, and by purposefully creating opportunities for
participation.
Intended Beneficiaries: Men, women and children in the Municipality
Estimated Cost Trainings
Water search and rescue
Allowance of trainees (190 participants at P 120.00 per day for 5 days) P 114,000.00
Honorarium of trainers (6 trainers at P 500.00 per day for 5 days) 15,000.00
Food and snacks for trainers and facilitators (35 trainers and facilitators
at P 200.00 per day for 5 days) 35,000.00
Supplies
Printed t-shirts
No collar (190 participants at P 150.00 per shirt) 28,500.00
With collar (35 trainers and facilitators at P 250.00 per shirt) 8,750.00
Writing materials and handouts (190 participants at P 50.00 per
participant)
9,500.00
Tarpaulins and other educational materials 5,000.00
Fire fighting
Allowance of trainees (190 participants at P 120.00 per day for 3 days) 68,400.00
Food and snacks for trainers and facilitators (35 trainers and facilitators
at P 200.00 per day for 3 days) 21,000.00
Supplies
Writing materials and handouts (190 participants at P 50.00 per
participant)
9,500.00
Tarpaulins and other educational materials 2,000.00

55




First aid
Allowance of trainees (75 participants at P 120.00 per day for 3 days) 27,000.00
Honorarium of trainers (5 trainers at P 500.00 per day for 3 days) 7,500.00
Food and snacks for trainers and facilitators (35 trainers and facilitators
at P 200.00 per day for 3 days) 21,000.00
Supplies
Writing materials and handouts (75 participants at P 50.00 per
participant)
3,750.00
Tarpaulins and other educational materials 2,000.00
Insurance of volunteers (P 200.00 annually per volunteer for 190 volunteers) 38,000.00
Other trainings and unforeseen volunteer expenditures 184,100.00
Total P 600,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Lack of technical personnel to undertake the activities stipulate by the project
Success Indicator: 18 accredited community disaster volunteer groups organized, trained and provided with
insurance
Expected Private Sector
Response:
Agrees and understand disaster risk reduction and management activities



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

56



AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-11
Name of Program: Purchase of Emergency Equipment and Tents
Brief Description: The project will procure various emergency equipment such as but not limited to flood light,
illuminated jackets (night light), warning bells, bolt cutters, life buoys, pulling/lifting machine,
portable tower light, hydraulic cutter, hydraulic spreader, power pack pump, grapnel with
polypropylene rope, snap link, eye goggles, safety full body harness, 10 ton chain pulley block, 1
Manila rope 100 meters roll. In addition, family-sized tents will be purchased to augment the
capacity of the evacuation centers during calamities.
Program Components: 1. Procurement of emergency equipment and tents; and
2. Storage and tracking
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: The achievement of emergency preparedness takes place through a process of planning, training
and exercising accompanied by the acquisition of equipment and apparatus to support
emergency action. The commonality of emergency response functions provides multiple use
opportunities for equipment and can create shortages. It is imperative that the local government
acquire the equipment and materials needed to support emergency response.

The identified evacuation centers in the Municipality have inadequate space to accommodate all
evacuees. The purchase of tents is essential in augmenting existing evacuation centers in the
Municipality. Tents are relatively quick and simple to erect, and remain flexible for later changes
or for relocation.
Intended Beneficiaries: Internally displaced population affected by natural calamities
Estimated Cost Life jackets; P 300,000.00
Rain coats;
Flashlights;
Rubber boots;
Responder boots;
Portable generator sets 5 KVA;
20 x 30 Maruyama tent;
Search light water resistant;
Fox 40 whistle;
Fire extinguisher;
Emergency lights;
Handheld radio; and
AM/FM radio
Electric airpot (at least 4 gallon capacity)
Hot and cold water dispenser
Total P 300,000.00
Program Term: January to February, 2014
Possible Risks: Specifications of emergency equipment and tents are unavailable in the local market.
Success Indicator: Emergency equipment and tents purchased
Expected Private Sector
Response:
High level of appreciation on the support extended to displaced families.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

57

AIP Code: 2014-3000-200-2
Name of Program: Vector-borne Diseases Outbreak Monitoring and Control
Brief Description: Vector-borne diseases are those diseases that are spread by insect vectors. The insects act as an
essential stage in the transmission of the infection from one person to another or from an
intermediary hosts to humans. There are a large number of viral, rickettsial, bacterial and
parasitic diseases that can be transmitted by insect vectors. Various vector-borne are amongst
some of the major microbial causes of morbidity and mortality today. Dengue, malaria and
lymphatic filariasis are examples of tropical vector-borne diseases.

Preventing or reducing vector-borne pathogen transmission depends entirely on control of the
vectors or interruption of humanvector contact. Integrated vector management is a strategic
approach to vector control promoted by the World Health Organization and includes control of
vectors. Integrated vector management considers five key elements in the management process,
namely, (a) advocacy, social mobilization and legislation, (b) collaboration within the health
sector and with other sectors, (c) integrated approach to disease control, (d) evidence-based
decision-making, and (e) capacity-building.

The overall objectives of this project is to:
a. Detect epidemics quickly for early intervention;
b. Measure the burden of disease and provide data for the assessment of the social and
economic impact of vector-borne diseases on the affected community;
c. Monitor trends in the distribution and spread of vector-borne diseases over time and
geographically; and
d. Evaluate the effectiveness of vector-borne disease prevention and control.

Furthermore, the project seeks to change the environment in order to prevent or minimize
vector propagation and human contact with the vector pathogen by destroying, altering,
removing or recycling non-essential containers that provide larval habitats.
Program Components: Clinical management and delivery of clinical services and referral;
Laboratory diagnosis and diagnostic tests;
Vector management and delivery of vector control services; and
Surveillance, emergency preparedness and response
Proponent: Municipal Health Office
Justifications: Human life is dependent on the dynamics of the Earths climate system. The interactions of the
atmosphere, oceans, terrestrial and marine biospheres, cryosphere and land surface determine
the Earths surface climate. Atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, which include
carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide are increasing, mainly due to human activities, such
as use of fossil fuel, land use change and agriculture. An increase in greenhouse gases leads to
increased warming of the atmosphere and the Earths surface.

It is estimated that average global temperatures will have risen by 1.03.5 C, increasing the
likelihood of many vector-borne diseases. The temporal and spatial changes in temperature,
precipitation and humidity that are expected to occur under different climate change scenarios
will affect the biology and ecology of vectors and intermediate hosts and consequently the risk
of disease transmission.

In addition to the direct influence of temperature on the biology of vectors and parasites,
changing precipitation patterns can also have short- and long-term effects on vector habitats.
Increased precipitation has the potential to increase the number and quality of breeding sites for
vectors such as mosquitoes and the density of vegetation, affecting the availability of vector
habitat, in turn leading to disease outbreaks. There is also good epidemiological evidence of
disease risk in humans linked to climate variability.

Climate change can affect both the distribution of the vector and the effectiveness of pathogen
transmission through the vector. There are a varied mechanisms whereby climate change
impacts the risk of transmission of vector-borne disease such as increase or decrease in survival
of vector, changes in rate of vector population growth, changes in feeding behaviour, changes in
susceptibility of vector to pathogens, changes in incubation period of pathogen, changes in
seasonality of vector activity, and changes in seasonality of pathogen transmission.
Intended Beneficiaries: Men, women and children
Estimated Cost Labor P 600,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Climate instability and environmental vulnerability can affect the project outcome.

58




Success Indicator: Decreased morbidity by 52%; and
Zero vector-borne disease mortality
Expected Private Sector
Response:
The project will be collaboration between the public and private sectors. The private sector will
help strengthen communication with the community and other key partners.



Prepared by: Noted by:



DR. ZENY D. DEQUILLA ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Rural Health Physician MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

59





AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-12
Name of Program: Establishment of an Early Warning System
Brief Description: Early warning system is a set of capacities needed to generate and disseminate timely and
meaningful warning information to enable individuals, communities and organizations
threatened by hazard to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to reduce the
possibility of harm or loss. The expression end-to-end warning system is used to emphasize
that warning systems need to span all steps from hazard detection to community response.

The project will identify strategic areas for the installation of an early warning system, fabricate,
distribute and install improvised early warning system, and recondition and retrofit existing
emergency response vehicles with sirens, blinkers, fog lights and public address systems.

The most reliable way of predicting a flood is observing the river level upstream from the flood-
prone area. Most gauges are scaled on bridges or piers in a river. The scales are painted on the
bridge/pier with water resistant color during very low river level. Intervals of 5cm are practical.
They have to be big enough to be read from the edge of the river even if the river level is high
and the visibility is low.
Program Components: Monitoring and warning services;
Dissemination and communication; and
Response
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: Disasters are local, and local governments have the primary responsibility to look after the
welfare of its citizens. Thus local governments have the primary legal responsibility and authority
to warn its citizens and help them to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters.

Early warning system is an effective tool to avert or minimize loss of life and property. It is an
early detection of unforeseen or sudden occurrence especially danger that demands immediate
action. Early warnings give people time to flee from a flash flood or tsunami; enable local
authorities to evacuate or shelter large numbers of people in advance of a typhoon; provide
information on the occurrence of a public health hazard; and enable a faster response to
problems of food and water insecurity. Warnings issued well before an event also enable people
to protect some property and infrastructure. In general, the longer the lead time, the greater
amount of property and infrastructure that can be protected.
Intended Beneficiaries: Men, women and children of the Municipality
Estimated Cost Materials P 99,750.00
Public address system
4 sch 40 GI pipes
10 mm plain bars
Ball hammer
Various colors of reflectorized paint
2 paint brush
1 paint brush
Paint thinner
Labor for: 42,750.00
Fabrication of improvised bell
Painting of flood alert level on permanent structures
Contingency 7,500.00
Total P 150,000.00
Program Term: January to June, 2014
Possible Risks: Lack of necessary personnel to sustain the project
Success Indicator: Early warning system established

60







Expected Private Sector
Response:
Owners of local businesses with flood-sensitive goods on their premises might be very interested
in getting timely warnings to prepare themselves and protect their property.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

61




AIP Code: 2014-3000-400-13
Name of Program: Stockpiling of Relief Goods
Brief Description: Stockpiling of relief goods is a pre-disaster activity to address the need of the internally displaced
population in times of disaster. Special effort will be made to ensure that essential food and
medicines, and potable water are immediately extended to evacuees. In addition, other items
for search and evacuation, temporary shelter, communication systems, energy fuel needs will be
mobilized.
Program Components: Identification of essential relief goods that need to be stockpiled;
Acquisition of non-perishable/non-food relief goods; and
Standby arrangements with local suppliers through a memorandum of agreement for
perishable goods.
Proponent: Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
Justifications: Disasters occur suddenly, sometimes without warning, and in a very short span of time. The
government has to provide maximum succour to the affected community. Mobilization of such
large range and quantity of items in times of emergency can be done only if there are enough
stocks available within a short accessible distance. A well organized stockpiling system for easy
availability and easy access becomes the basic requirement of a dependable contingency
planning.
Intended Beneficiaries: Internally displaced population affected by natural calamities
Estimated Cost Food P 184,000.00
Potable drinking water 1,800.00
Medicines 15,000.00
Fuel 6,000.00
Contingency 6,755.62
Total P 213,655.62
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Failure of to initiate a memorandum of agreement with NGAs and private business operators
Success Indicator: Basic emergency food and medicine are made available in case of emergency for at least 700
evacuees
Expected Private Sector
Response:
A memorandum of agreement between the Municipality and various business establishments
for the immediate preparation and stockpiling of goods/supplies for use during disaster
quick response operations.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

62


63


64






AIP Code: 2014-1000-2
Name of Program: Computerization of Real Property Tax Assessment Project (ASSYS 2v.2)
Brief Description: The Assessment System 2 version 2 (Assys2 v.2) is an in-house software developed by the
Information Communication Technology Management Office (ICTMO) of the Province of Iloilo in
collaboration with the Technical Team from the Provincial Assessors Office. The system is currently
operational and being used in the Provincial Assessors Office since June 2013 to assist in their
assessment function.

The Assys2 v.2 will be installed in the Municipal Assessors Office and all personnel involved will be
trained on data encoding of property details, property appraisal and assessment, issuance of
certifications on total landholdings with or without improvements, preparation of notice of
assessment (NOA), assessment roll and tax map control roll (TMCR), downloading and uploading of
records to the Municipal Treasurers Office, transaction processing, printing of tax declarations,
certifications and reports, and updating of the system.
Program
Components:
Upgrading of computers to the required capacity of the software;
Software installation; and
Staff training
Proponent: Municipal Assessors Office
Justifications: The applicability of the software at the local level will help the local government to effectively and
efficiently implement the assessment functions of the Municipal Assessors Office. It will ensure the
uniformity and consistency of reports, and will help reduce the amount of time and money spent
during general revision.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Real property owners in the Municipality
Estimated Cost Honorarium of software installer and staff P 15,000.00
Training expenses 10,000.00
Upgrading of computers 25,000.00
Printer (duplex printer) 7,000.00
Total P 50,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: The software may experience some technical risks associated with computer viruses and bugs.
Success Indicator: 30 minute reduction in the processing time of tax declaration transfer; and
50% reduction in report preparation time.
Expected Private
Sector Response:
The improvement in assessment services will generate a favorable response from real property
owners.



Prepared by: Noted by:



GLORIA C. GACER ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I Municipal Assessor MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

65





AIP Code: 2014-1000-3
Name of Program: Tax Mapping of Real Properties
Brief Description: The project will include the preparation, re-sectioning and drafting of barangay base maps, parcel
numbering of tax maps, inscription of permanent property identification, number and field appraisal
and assessment, drafting of section, barangay and municipal index maps, and the preparation of the
tax map control roll.
Program
Components:
Pre-field work
Field work; and
Post-field work
Proponent: Municipal Assessors Office
Justifications: Tax maps are the single most important tool of the assessment process. It is impossible to establish
an adequate property record and accounting system without tax maps for they are the basic
foundation of the system. They establish a permanent link between the real property in the field
and the tax records in the office. They are indispensable to the discovery of property and the
identification of property ownership. They simplify the task of property description and tie together
all property records, including field appraisal and assessment sheet, tax rolls, and collection
registers.

Tax maps also serve an important purpose of providing the public with vital real property
information. Tax maps make possible the establishment of a system of records that is easily adapted
to automatic data processing techniques.

The Municipality of Leganes has not been tax mapped since 1975, hence, it is necessary to update
existing tax maps to reflect new roads, subdivisions and re-section to conform to the existing tax
mapping manual.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Real property owners in the Municipality of Leganes
Estimated Cost Labor for two(2) job hires P 100,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Tax maps are made preparatory to general revision. When tax maps are not updated there is a
possibility that some existing properties do not have a tax declaration and therefore no taxes paid.
Success Indicator: 184 tax maps updated and 11,721 real property unit (RPU)
Expected Private
Sector Response:
An encouraging response is anticipated due to updated tax maps and real property records that will
be available to all agencies and real property owners.



Prepared by: Noted by:



GLORIA C. GACER ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I Municipal Assessor MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

66





AIP Code: 2014-1000-4
Name of Program: Real Property Tax (RPT) Computerization and Campaign
Brief Description: The existing RPT software of the Municipality of Leganes needs to be update to harmonize with the
provincial government. The new RPT billing and collection system will give fast and accurate
computation and reports required. The system will be connected on-line with the Municipal
Assessors Office and will help generate current and prior years collectibles, official receipts,
certification of payment, notice of delinquency, warrant of levy, statement of account, abstract of
collections, tax dues listing, table of penalty, and barangay report.
Program
Components:
Installation of software; and
Hands-on training
Proponent: Municipal Treasurers Office
Justifications: Real property tax administration uses information on the ownership of properties, the size and
nature of each property, and their estimated values for purposes of taxation, and then applies the
appropriate tax rate to calculate the tax liabilities. To relieve the Municipal Treasury of the
tremendous burden of manually processing vast amounts of data, information technology should be
employed to increase accuracy and consistency of the data, and to save processing time.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Tax payers of the Municipality of Leganes
Estimated Cost Installation of software and training P 150,000.00
Supplies and materials, and one unit computer to be used as server 50,000.00
Total P 200,000.00
Program Term: January 2014
Possible Risks: Inflation can adversely affect the implementation of the project.
Success Indicator: 25% increase in real property tax collection
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Taxpayers are satisfactorily attended to and contented with the Municipalitys tax collection service.



Prepared by: Noted by:



LOLITA P. RESBO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
OIC-Municipal Treasurer MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

67






AIP Code: 2014-1000-5
Name of Program: Rehabilitation of Various Offices
Brief Description: A conducive work environment increases the potential of employees to perform well. The
rehabilitation of various offices provides an engaging atmosphere for employees to work and clients
who seek public service. The project will renovate the offices of the Sangguniang Bayan,
Commission on Elections, Bureau of Internal Revenue, Municipal Civil Registrar, Accounting and
Municipal Mayor detailed as follows:
Office Scope of Work
Sangguniang Bayan Change of panel doors into glass, rehabilitation of Session Hall flooring
Comelec Installation of cabinets and partition, rehabilitation of door and ceiling, and
painting
MCR and BIR Transfer to existing Municipal Accounting Office, installation of cabinets and
partition/enclosure, and repainting
Mayors Office Repair and installation of cabinets, repair of wooden floors, windows,
gutter and toilet
Accounting Transfer to MPDO, and installation of cabinets
MEO Improvement of warehouse, replacement of MEOs exterior walls from
hardiflex to concrete, repair of roofing, and installation of partition
Program
Components:
Transfer/rearrangement of various offices;
Clearing; and
Renovation
Proponent: Municipal Engineering Office
Justifications: Designing a comfortable office environment is more than aesthetics; careful attention to design,
layout and amenities can give a boost employees productivity. The rehabilitation of various offices
will provide a conducive place for employees where they can improve the quality of performance
for public service. It is important to enhance the functionality of the work space to motivate
employees to work with dedication while reducing work stress and injuries. Enhanced performance
through improvement of various offices can maximize the efficiency in public service. Moreover,
constituents would find it more comfortable and convenient to transact in a healthy and safe
workplace environment. Appropriating certain amount for the improvement of various offices is
never wastage but a very wise investment.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
General public
Estimated Cost Office improvement of the:
Sangguniang Bayan P 100,000.00
Comelec 100,000.00
MCR, BIR, Accounting and Mayors Office 250,000.00
Improvement of warehouse and MEO 250,000.00
Total P 700,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: A poor workplace can decrease employees productivity and efficiency, vulnerable to health risks
and stress.
Success Indicator: Renovation of seven (7) municipal offices and national government agencies assigned in the
Municipality

68









Expected Private
Sector Response:
The improved convenience in transacting with the local government will ensure a positive response
from the private sector.



Prepared by: Noted by:



ENGR. NINFORD RAYMUNDO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Municipal Engineer MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor


69






AIP Code: 2014-1000-6
Name of Program: Bloodletting Activity (Dugo sang Banwa, Kabuhi Ko A voluntary Blood Donation Program)
Brief Description: The program will instill into the collective consciousness of Leganesnons the principle of
volunteerism through advocacy and awareness, and recruitment. The program will provide
convenient opportunities to donate blood supported by sustained public health campaigns and
grassroots activities that start the process of building a relationship with donors.

Information and education campaigns and materials will address common myths and fears by
providing clear information to allay apprehensions. Simple language will be employed to provide
information on who can give blood and who may be unsuitable to donate, either to protect their
health or that of the recipients of their blood.

The bloodletting activity will be done at least three times during the year and will target more than
300 blood donors.
Program
Components:
Education, advocacy and awareness;
Recruitment of volunteer blood donors; and
Conduct of regular blood donation activity
Proponent: Municipal Health Office and Sangguniang Bayan Committee on Health, Sanitation and Nutrition
Justifications: Blood is life. Timely access to safe blood transfusion is a life-saving measure in many clinical
conditions and can also prevent serious illness in patients suffering from violence and injury, road
traffic accidents, child birth related complications and other conditions.

Blood donation is a humanitarian act and a social responsibility, as recognized by Republic Act 7719
otherwise known as National Voluntary Blood Service Act of 1994 through its implementing
program the National Voluntary Blood Program of the Department of Health. The countrys ability
to consistently meet the clinical demands for blood and blood products depends on blood donation
by a sufficient number of healthy individuals. In order for the country to meet the blood
requirement, 1-3% of the population should donate blood voluntarily. Leganes with a population of
more than 30,000, will need at least 300 blood donors to reach the target.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Leganesnons needing blood transfusion
Estimated Cost Donor recruitment and education P 20,000.00
Travel expenses 30,000.00
Food expenses 34,000.00
Logistics 1,000.00
Formation of Local Blood Council and meetings 5,000.00
Contingency 10,000.00
Total P 100,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Delays in release of funds can have adverse impact on the program.
Success Indicator: Conduct of blood donation activity for 2-3x for 2014 to reach a target of 300 volunteer blood
donors in the Municipality of Leganes;
A registry of volunteer blood donors for different blood types identified from 18 barangays;
An organized and functional Local Blood Coordinating Council in the Municipality of Leganes
implementing the National Voluntary Blood Program; and
An organized donor recruitment officers

70










Expected Private
Sector Response:
Favorable and supportive response is expected from the private sector.



Prepared by:



DR. ZENY D. DEQUILLA DR. JUDITH S. JIMENO
Rural Health Physician Chairman, Sangguniang Bayan Committee on Health,
Sanitation and Nutrition



Noted by: Approved by:



ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
MGDH I MPDC Municipal Mayor


71





AIP Code: 2014-1000-7
Name of Program: Youth Development Services
Brief Description: The Integrated Human Resource Development Program (HRDPY) is one of the primary national
programs devolved to local governments units. The 2014 Youth Services of the Municipality of
Leganes is designed to maximize the potential of the youth to nation building and to minimize
human resource wastage. The focal venue of the program is the existing Leganes Youth
Development Center cum Library. The most recent addition to the program is the endowment of
computers from the national government for the electronic and social media needs of the youth,
thus the Center will be known as the Leganes Youth Development Center and E-Library which will
contribute to minimize the negative and ill-effects of electronic technology and social media. In
addition, the program will include livelihood skills training on t-shirt and canvass silk screen printing.
Program
Components:
Socio-cultural and economic activities for youth including a youth camp;
Organizational and leadership development;
Skills training for livelihood; and
Operation of the Center
Proponent: Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office
Justifications: A youth development program is essential in human resource development. It is parallel to the
national government thrust to break intergenerational poverty. The Youth Development Services
Program (YDSP) is aimed to prepare the youth for a more progressive adulthood or married life
while harnessing their strength and enthusiasm for community leadership and participation. At
present the Pag-asa Youth Association of the Philippines (PYAP) Leganes Chapter has been
federated and can be utilized for the realization of the program objectives.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Out-of-school and in-school youth from 18 barangays of the Municipality
Estimated Cost Labor component P 50,000.00
Travel for Organizational Development 5,000.00
Socio-cultural activities with Youth camp 30,000.00
Supplies (including the E-library) 5,000.00
Maintenance of E-library 5,000.00
Livelihood skills training on t-shirt and canvass silk screen printing 20,000.00
Total P 115,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Loose and fluid organization of youth, and e-technology problems/breakdown can affect the
implementation of the program.
Success Indicator: Enhanced leadership capacities of at least 180 young individuals;
Improved socio-economic status of at least 30 youths;
Active participation of at least 15 youth organizations; and
At least 180 youths have accessed the e-library facilities and services
Expected Private
Sector Response:
The private sector will serve as a potential market outlets of youth products and services, and as a
technical inputs provider.



Prepared by: Noted by:



LOLITA P. CAMARIG ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MSWDO MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

72





AIP Code: 2014-1000-8
Name of Program: Operation of Gender and Development (GAD) Center
Brief Description: The 2014 Operation of GAD Center is an expanded program designed to enhance the parenting
capacities of men and women, improve their socio-economic status and maximize their
participation in the integrated development thrusts of the Municipality. The operation of the GAD
Center will provide the men and women of Leganes opportunities and avenue for socio-economic,
organizational and leadership development. Federated womens and mens organizations will be
tapped to realize the objectives of the program and become partners in the integrated development
thrusts.

The Center will become the tangible point of all the GAD-related initiatives of the LGU, integrating
nutrition and solid waste management concerns of the LGU into the program.
Program
Components:
Socio-economic activities for men and women;
Organizational and Leadership Development;
Skills training for livelihood; and
Operation of GAD Center
Proponent: Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office
Justifications: The systematic, unfavourable treatment of individuals on the basis of their gender, which denies
them rights, opportunities or resources can be mitigated by gender equity. The GAD strategy
subscribes to the idea that development involves the expansion of freedoms and strengthening of
capabilities. It recognizes that equality between women and men is a key human right, participation
in development is crucial to the empowerment of women and men, gender equality means
promoting the equal participation of women as agents of economic, social, and political change, and
achieving equality between women and men may involve the introduction of specific measures
designed to eliminate prevailing gender inequalities and inequities.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Women members of the Kalipunan ng Liping Pilipina (KALIPI) and men members of the
Empowerment and Reaffirmation of Paternal Abilities (ERPAT) Association
Estimated Cost Labor component P 60,000.00
Travel for Organizational Development 5,000.00
Capital assistance for self liquidating income generating project 20,000.00
Supplies 2,000.00
Skills training for livelihood 15,000.00
Total P 102,000.00
Program Term: January December 2014
Possible Risks: Loose and fluid organizations, fluctuating market outlet, and limited access to technological updates
can affect the project.
Success Indicator: Enhanced parenting and leadership capacities of at least 180 men and women;
Improved socio-economic status of at least 180 men and women;
18 men and women organizations activated; and
Effective integration of nutrition and solid waste management in the GAD program
Expected Private
Sector Response:
The private sector will serve as a potential market outlet of GAD products and services, furthermore
they will provide technical inputs to the project.



Prepared by: Noted by:



LOLITA P. CAMARIG ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MSWDO MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

73






AIP Code: 2014-1000-9
Name of Program: Persons with Disabilities (PWDs) Welfare Program
Brief Description: The welfare program for persons with disabilities will be implemented in coordination with and in
support of the Senior Citizens Welfare Program. The program is geared towards improving PWD
mobility and productivity, and will consist of both mainstreaming operational activities and
disability-specific programming such as physical therapy services, livelihood and assistive devices.
Program
Components:
Skills training for livelihood;
Organizational and leadership development;
Purchase of assistive devices; and
Physical therapy services
Proponent: Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office
Justifications: Mainstreaming disability in the development agenda of the Municipality is a strategy for achieving
equality for persons with disabilities. This is parallel to the national governments thrust of
maximizing the participation of the PWDs nation building.

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) promotes the realization of the
rights of PWDs and their full inclusion into all aspects of life. The CRPD stipulates that PWD inclusion
measures should be:

inclusive of and accessible to persons with disabilities;
facilitate and support capacity-building, including through the exchange and sharing of
information, experiences, and training programs;
facilitate cooperation in research and access to scientific and technical knowledge; and
provide technical and economic assistance, including by facilitating access to and sharing of
accessible and assistive technologies, and through the transfer of technologies.

Inclusion of PWDs in development programming makes sense also from a purely economic
perspective. There is a vicious cycle between poverty and disability, at the individual, family and
community level. These costs to society do not result from the disability itself; rather they are the
result of barriers that exclude persons with disabilities from education or from work. People with
physical, sensory or mental impairments that cause some loss of function are prevented or disabled
from leading normal lives. Unless that individual can be cured or somehow rehabilitated, they will
not be able to participate in the life of mainstream society.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Persons with disabilities
Estimated Cost Labor component P 50,000.00
Livelihood skills training on therapeutic massage and reflexology 15,000.00
PWD assistive devices 32,627.00
Total P 97,627.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: The unpredictable nature of PWDs life can affect the full implementation of the program.
Success Indicator: Enhanced leadership capacities of at least 30 PWDs;
Improved socio-economic status of at least 30 PWDs;
Strengthened PWD organizations; and
Improved functionality of at least 5 PWDs provided with assistive devices

74









Expected Private
Sector Response:
The private sector can provide additional funding support and technical inputs to the program.



Prepared by: Noted by:



LOLITA P. CAMARIG ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
MGDH I MSWDO MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor


75


AIP Code: 2014-1000-10
Name of Program: Crime Prevention and Peace Keeping Strategies
Brief Description: The program will include the maintenance of police equipment, enhancement training of barangay
tanods, barangay peacekeeping action team (BPAT) and barangay information network (BIN) in
every barangay, conduct of anti-drug symposium, police incentives for anti-drug operations and
accomplishments, conduct of seminar on women and children, and court appearances.
Program
Components:
Maintenance of police equipment;
Enhancement training of barangay tanods, BPATs and BINs;
Conduct of anti-drug symposium;
Provision of incentives for anti-drug operations and accomplishments;
Conduct seminar involving women and children; and
Court appearances
Proponent: Philippine National Police
Justifications: Police equipment such as handheld and base radios and its outdoor antenna needs routine
maintenance to improve signal strength, and to ensure a means of relaying messages from field
responders to the Police Station in situations like incidents and disasters.

Adequate workforce is very crucial in law enforcement. The standard ratio of police to population is
1:500 as stipulated in R.A. 6975. But due to financial and manpower constraints, the Municipality fell
short of the minimum standard. Police force augmentation should be employed to close the gap in
enforcing the law, preventing and controlling crimes, maintaining peace and order, and in ensuring
public safety and internal security as well. Aside from an open force multipliers, we also need
sufficient covert operatives/BIN in every barangay to feed reliable intelligence report in line with
police operation, searching for wanted persons, organized crime groups and to aide in the conduct
of follow-up and hot pursuit operations. These operatives/BINs needs to be trained to perform
accurately and efficiently. Moreover, these informants financial support to constantly communicate
with intelligence personnel in order to validate raw information.

In order to diminish and eventually eradicate illegal drug users and pushers, the Municipality is
responsible in:
Educating not only students but even out-of-school youths of the ill-effects of drug use;
Giving necessary and informative preventive tips in avoiding the illegal drug trade;
Informing the community that excessive drug use can exacerbate the crime rate; and
Incarcerating the pushers and saving the lives of the users with the active support of the
local community.

Women and children are vulnerable to physical, psychological, emotional, economic and sexual
abuses. To give justice to these different abuses, the Municipality is responsible in:
Educating and informing women and children of their rights, pertinent laws and authorities
that can protect them from violence and abuse; and
Teaching women and children to defend themselves against domestic violence and abuses,
and how to avoid being victim of such.

In order for justice to prevail, it is imperative that the apprehending police officers should follow
through with litigation, and appearing in court as needed. Without the appearance of PNP
personnel, filed cases can be dismissed.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
General public
Estimated Cost Maintenance of police equipment P 50,000.00
Enhancement training of barangay tanods, BPATs and BINs 80,000.00
Conduct of drug symposium 50,000.00
Incentives for drug operations and accomplishments 50,000.00
Seminar involving women and children 50,000.00
Court appearance subsidy 40,000.00
Total P 320,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Delays in procurement and inflation can affect the implementation of the project.
Success Indicator: Crime rate reduced by 50%;
Zero casualty during an incident and/or disaster;
Crime clearance rate of 50%;
Reduced number of drug users and pushers by 10%;
Reduced violence against women and children by 10%; and
76




Increased morale and efficiency of PNP personnel
Expected Private
Sector Response:
The intensified proactive peace keeping strategy of the local PNP will prevent crimes from disrupting
local businesses. A positive response can be expected as a result of this strategy.



Prepared by: Noted by:



PSINSP CYRIL S. OCTAVIO, MPA ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
OIC Leganes Police Station MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor


77







AIP Code: 2014-1000-11
Name of Program: Updating of Existing Revenue Code, Investment Incentives Code and Code of General Ordinances
Brief Description: The project will integrate the new enactments and amendments, update the schedule of fees and
penalties and formulate other applicable measures appropriate to the current circumstances and
situations, increase in revenue will likely be the increase and enhancement of basic services to the
people of the Municipality.
Program
Components:
Retrieval and inventory of all laws and ordinances pertaining to collection of fees and taxes,
regulations on investments and provisions of incentives and those general in application;
Arrange, integrate and systematize aforementioned laws;
Update fees, charges and penalties; and
Provide easy and accessible laws and ordinances related to aforementioned subject matter.
Proponent: Sangguniang Bayan
Justifications: The Local Tax Code, the Code of General Ordinances and Investment Incentive Code had been in
existence for several years already. Since the approval of these Codes, several amendments and
enacted laws, related thereto were subsequently made therefore, it is imperative to update these
codes to include the aforementioned changes.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Leganesnons
Estimated Cost: Labor P 30,000.00
Professional and consultancy expenses 10,000.00
Public consultation and hearings 20,000.00
Supplies and materials 15,000.00
Publication in local newspaper and newsletter 15,000.00
Bookbinding 10,000.00
Total P 100,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Delayed approval of the Codes
Success Indicator: Revenue Code, Investment Incentives Code and Code of General Ordinances are updated and
approved by the Sangguniang Bayan.
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Favorable and supportive



Prepared by: Noted by:



JOSEPH ALLEN ESPAO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Municipal Vice Mayor MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

78


AIP Code: 2014-1000-12
Name of Program: Codification Program
Brief Description: The Sangguniang Bayan as the lawmaking body of the Municipality of Leganes aimed to implement
the codification of all ordinances, update some provisions, and formulate new laws deemed
necessary. Codification is the process by which all ordinances are being gathered and collected and
the end product is an enactment-a-code. It is a continuous process that needs to be given priority for
the purpose of maintaining local laws and ordinances up-to-date thereby eliminating the need to
refer to separate documents and the most current information will be easily accessible. By codifying
all laws and ordinances it will be easy to file, fast to retrieve and readily accessible to all, future
updates and amendments/modifications would also be easy for future legislators.
Program
Components:
Retrieval and identification of all ordinances enacted in the municipality;
Listing of all retrieved ordinances to know parts/provisions that are missing, amended, repealed
or obsolete;
Classify and systematize the arrangement and update existing laws on its subject matter;
Revision or re-examination of the provisions of an ordinance and to restate the provisions in a
correct and improved form which also includes the weeding out of obsolete or inactive
provisions in the existing ordinance and integration of other applicable laws; and
Promote organization and accessibility of records and local laws in the LGU.
Proponent: Sangguniang Bayan
Justifications: Various local ordinances covering diversified subject matters had long been in existence. The Office
of the Sangguniang Bayan, the legislative staff and the Secretary to the Sangguniang Bayan had been
filled with bulky, old hard copies of legislative outputs specifically ordinances, resolutions,
committee reports, minutes and many others. Three legislative staff and the Secretary to the
Sangguniang Bayan is continually loaded with the regular office work, thereby the retrieval,
inventory, encoding and research warrant hiring of extra administrative workers at the disposal of
the codification of ordinances and the implementation may have been affected in the absence of a
quick and readily available references that may also incur delay, extra time and labor.
Intended
Beneficiaries:
Leganesnons
Estimated Cost: Labor P 65,000.00
Professional and consultancy expenses 10,000.00
Public consultation and hearings 15,000.00
Supplies and materials 25,000.00
Publication in local newspaper and newsletter 30,000.00
Bookbinding 15,000.00
Total P 160,000.00
Program Term: January to December, 2014
Possible Risks: Delayed approval of the Codes
Success Indicator: Market code and other codes as maybe required or deemed necessary for the development of the
Municipality are updated and codified.
Expected Private
Sector Response:
Favorable and supportive



Prepared by: Noted by:



JOSEPH ALLEN ESPAO ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Municipal Vice Mayor MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

79






AIP Code 2014-1000-13
Name of Project Updating of Citizens Charter
Brief Description This program will improve efficiency in the delivery of government services to the public particularly
in frontline transactions by reducing bureaucratic red tape, preventing graft and corruption, and
providing penalties for those officials and employees who are caught in the act. The Citizens Charter
of Leganes marks a commitment in qualitative and quantitative terms for delivery of service to the
people of the Municipality. It enshrines the thrust between the service provider and its clients. The
constituents must be aware of what are the services offered in this municipality, who are the
persons to be approached and responsible and how prompt the services and efficiency
responsiveness to clients request.
Proponent Human Resource Management Office
Program/Project
Components
Setting up service standards of a Citizens Charter will be in a form of information:
1. Billboard posted at the main entrance of offices or at most conspicuous places;
2. Tarpaulins for frontline services in each offices shall be written specifically in the local
dialect that:
Detail the procedure to obtain a particular service;
The person responsible to be approached;
The maximum time to conclude the processing of documents presented by the
customer, if necessary;
The amount of fees required in a particular transaction;
3. Installation of IEC materials, production/fabrication of directional signs, complaint slips,
suggestion box;
4. Maintain public assistance and complaint desk with officer-of-the-day;
5. Put-up posters for anti-fixers campaign; and
6. Observance of no-noon breaks policy for frontline offices.
Justification The Citizens Charter is an initiative of the Department of Interior and Local Government
implementation of this program will put ease on the rendition of employees and clients utilization of
front line services. It promotes integrity, accountability, proper management of public affairs and
public property. The local government will establish effective practices armed at the prevention of
graft and corruption in this Municipality. This program of the government promotes transparency in
the LGU with regard to the manner of transacting with the public. It signifies procedures that will
reduce red tape and expedite transactions in government.
Intended
Beneficiaries
General public
Estimated Cost Production/Fabrication of billboards, directional signs, complaint slips, Ci-Cha
manual
P 25,000.00
Tarpaulin printing 14,000.00
Contingencies 1,000.00
Total P 40,000.00
Program Term January to December, 2014
Possible Risk The failure of the clientele and service provider to follow the frontline services procedure, delayed of
approval of Annual Budget, and the gradual increase in prices can adversely affect the project.
Success Indicators Citizens Charter updated

80









Expected private
Sector Response
Private sector can be tapped to provide technical assistance in developing strategies to reduce the
processing time even further.



Prepared by: Noted by:



MARY JEAN A. BERNALDEZ ENGR. SAMSON J. JASPE
Administrative Officer II (HRMO I) MGDH I MPDC



Approved by:



ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
Municipal Mayor

81

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Municipality of Leganes
Province of Iloilo
CY 2014

AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Gender Related
Issue Addressed
Expected Outputs Schedule of
Implementation
Performance
Indicators
(Outcome)
Implementing
Office/
Department
Funding
Source
Appropriation
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
2014-
3000-100-
1
Rehabilitation of roofing for Nabitasan
Elementary School and Cari Mayor Elementary
School
Enhancement of
educational support
facilities for boy and
girl students
2 school buildings
rehabilitated for use of
boy and girl students
January
2014
December
2014
Improved classroom-
student ratio
MEO,
Nabitasan ES,
Cari Mayor ES
DF 300,000.00
2014-
3000-200-
1
Integrated Program for the Control of Non-
communicable Diseases the project will
provide various laboratory examinations to all
Leganesnons including universal coverage of
blood typing and water analysis.
Enhancement of
men and womens
access to health
services
Decreased incidence of
non-communicable
disease of men, women
and children through
early diagnosis and
management
January
2014
December
2014
Decreased mortality
and morbidity
MHO DF 400,000.00
2014-
3000-500-
1
Cross-Sectoral Welfare Program the project will
undertake the rehabilitation and improvement
of the Youth Development Center, and the
Gender and Development Center and furnishing
of Leganes Balay Dalangpan
Enhancement of
men and womens
access to social
welfare services
Functional Youth
Development Center,
Gender and Development
Center and Leganes Balay
Dalangpan
January
2014
December
2014
Improved access of
men and women to
various social welfare
services
MSWDO DF 706,613.67
2014-
8000-3
Coastal Resource Management Program in
Response to Climate Change Adaptation the
project will implement the coastal resource
management plan of the Municipality including
activation of Bantay Dagat, advocacy campaigns,
establishment of a mangrove nursery,
installation of fish condominiums, coastal clean-
ups, and enforcement of fishing closures,
restrictions and permits on Municipal waters.
Enhancement of
economic
opportunities for
men and women
fisherfolks
Restored fish habitat and
increased mangrove cover
by 15%
January
2014
December
2014
Increased fish catch
by 5% of men and
women fisherfolks
MAO DF 330,000.00
2014-
8000-4
Climate Change Responsive Agricultural
Technologies to Improve Crop Production the
project would introduce to farmers new
innovations and technology on pest
management and organic farming, provide seed
Enhancement of
economic
opportunities for
men and women
farmers
Technology transfer and
subsidy to men and
women farmers provided
January
2014
December
2014
Increased crop yield
by 5%
MAO DF 290,000.00
82

AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Gender Related
Issue Addressed
Expected Outputs Schedule of
Implementation
Performance
Indicators
(Outcome)
Implementing
Office/
Department
Funding
Source
Appropriation
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
subsidy, and conduct farmers field school and
demo field.
2014-
3000-200-
2
Vector-borne Diseases Outbreak Monitoring and
Control
Enhancement of
men and womens
access to health
services
Vector borne diseases
controlled through
environmental sanitation
January
2014
December
2014
Decreased mortality
and morbidity
MDRRMC,
MHO
DRRMF 600,000.00
2014-1000 Crime Prevention and Peace Keeping Strategies Promotion of a
gender-responsive
delivery of police
services to men and
women
Community information
dissemination drive and
consultations conducted
January
2014
December
2014
Decreased crime rate PNP GF 320,000.00
2014-1000 Codification Project (Phase II) Formulation and
implementation of
legislative measures
that will eliminate
gender bias
Codes approved January
2014
December
2014
Pertinent legislative
measures
implemented
SB GF 160,000.00
2014-1000 Updating of Citizens Charter Formulation and
implementation of
legislative measures
that will eliminate
gender bias
Citizens Charter updated January
2014
December
2014
Reduction in
processing time of
documents
HRMO, SB GF 40,000.00
2014-
3000-500
Youth Development Services Enhancement of
men and womens
access to basic youth
services
Youth services provided January
2014
December
2014
Increased
participation of
young men and
women in
government initiated
activities
MSWDO GF 115,000.00
2014-
3000-500
Persons with Disability Services Enhancement of
men and womens
access to basic youth
services
PWD services provided January
2014
December
2014
Increased PWD
participation in
development
activities
MSWDO GF 65,000.00

83





AIP
Reference
Code
P/P/A Gender Related
Issue Addressed
Expected Outputs Schedule of
Implementation
Performance
Indicators
(Outcome)
Implementing
Office/
Department
Funding
Source
Appropriation
Starting
Date
Completion
Date
2014-
3000-200
Bloodletting Program Enhancement of
men and womens
access to health
services
2 bloodletting activities
conducted
January
2014
December
2014
Decrease in mortality
rate of men and
women patients
MHO GF 100,000.00
Total GAD Related PPAs 3,426,613.67
Total Annual Budget for CY 2014 65,068,457.00
Required 5% for GAD 3,253,422.85
Surplus (Deficit) 173,190.82



Prepared by: Recommending Approval: Approved by:



ENGR. SAMSON J.JASPE NIMIA J. BADANA ATTY. ADOLFO E. JAEN
MGDH I MPDC MGDH I Municipal Budget Officer Municipal Mayor