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ME TOO MONOLOGUES
HANDBOOK





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Table of Contents:

I. What is MTM?
Executive Summary
Goals
Purpose
Future Vision
Show Life Cycle
Our Online Presence

II. Why MTM?
The Big Picture: Empathy and Identity Building
Intersectionality
This Generations Form of Advocacy
Teaching Aids for Faculty and Student Organizations/Support Institutions

III. How MTM?
Understanding Privilege, Valuing Diversity
Timeline
Organization Structure
Guide to Producing
Guide to Directing
Guide to Acting
Guide to Getting Writers/Editing Work
Guide to Writing

IV. Quick Guide to Launching
FAQs
What to Expect
History

V. Gaining Administration Support
Alignment with Diversity Goals of Higher Education
MTM Mechanisms of Effect (Proof It Works)
1. Emotional Intimacy Enhances Memory and Commitment to Prosocial Behavior
2. Overcoming Compassion Fatigue with Comedic Relief
3. Palliative Narrative
4. Contact Theory/Mere Exposure Effect & Intergroup Anxiety/Selection Bias
5. Emerging Adulthood
6. Effortless Perfection: Breaking the Mirror & Bringing New Forms of Reflection
7. Pausing to Reflect
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8. Counteracting Shame and Loneliness
9. Working Against an Alternative Unfriendly Environment
10. Breaking Down Categorization/Stereotype to Combat Prejudice
11. Perspective-Taking & Personalizing the Issue
12. Allows for Intersectionality
13. Groupthink in a Good Way

VI. Resources, Support, and Contacts
Heres a print version
Find downloadable versions at www.metoomonologues.com

VII. Appendices
A: Constitution (for Our Charter as a Student Organization)
B: Sample Rehearsal Schedule
C: Sample Pre-Show Speech
D: Production Team Application
E: Appeal for Funding
F: Sample Program
G: Sample Budget
H: Audition Blurb
I: Invites for Faculty & Special Guests
J: Graphics
K: Categorized Duke MTMs on Youtube (2011-2014)








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I. What is MTM?

Executive Summary
Me Too Monologues is an annual show about identity written, performed, and produced
by members of a university community. Students, alumni, and faculty submit stories of their
experiences, and they become a documentary theatre performance. Founded at Duke in 2009, the
show originally focused on race, ethnicity, and culture, but over the years it has expanded to
include broader concepts of identity. Recent performances have included monologues on
sexuality, class, gender, religion, family, social life, mental illness, abuse, and community.

Goals
! Assert that, whatever issues a particular student may be dealing with, he/she is not alone.
! To promote a more supportive and empathetic community climate.
! To dispel the myth of effortless perfection at Duke by presenting student strengths and
weaknesses as natural and acceptable.

Purpose
The purpose of MTM is to expose audiences to stories and experiences to which they
might not otherwise have access, using theatrical performance to encourage empathy and identity
exploration. The stories chosen for the show often feature controversial viewpoints that
encourage the audience to engage in new modes of thinking and reevaluate their own
perceptions, both of their environment and themselves. Conversely, when a person in the
audience can relate to the characters struggle the monologue provides a reaffirming sense of
validation and support, showing that person that he or she is not alone. This is where the Me
Too part of the production title was derived as in, You feel alone/dont have things figured
out/are having a hard time? Me too.
Effortless perfection the sense that one must have the perfect grades, perfect body,
perfect social life, all without an visible effort reigns on many college campus where
overachievement is expected. MTM aims to create a safe space where that toxic notion can be
combated through a more realistic, alternative narrative one that is more honest and vulnerable
due to the protective guise of anonymity. When a new actor steps onto the stage, the audience
can never be entirely sure what they are going to see or what new mode of thinking they will
encounter. Some stories in the show bring laughter, while others bring tears.
MTM also strives to provide a successful model for uniting members of different
advocacy groups on college campuses. At Duke, we are blessed to have a multitude of centers
including the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, the Center for Multicultural Affairs,
the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the Kenan Center for Ethics, the Womens Center,
and the Center for Race Relations. While these centers serve a crucial purpose in providing a
safe space and sense of community, not all students take full advantage of them. They either lack
knowledge of the resources each provides, do not feel they belong to the centers target
demographic, or view the center itself as being stigmatized. Also, it often seems as though those
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attending events at each center are those most heavily impacted by the issues being discussed, so
the programming just preaches to the choir. Simply through its entertainment value but also in
its diverse overall representation of issues MTM draws attendance from a wide variety of
groups that would normally opt out of certain types of programming or discussions that do not
apply to them directly. In this way it successfully creates a sense of universal humanity and
advocacy.
After each performance, the audience is invited to engage in talk back dialogues with
the production team, members of the cast, and two facilitators. The intended result is honest and
sincere dialogue and reflection that would otherwise be hard to generate. Even those that do not
attend the post-discussion almost always leave the theater having deeper discussions among
themselves as they continue to process what they just took in. There is a strong link between the
awakened understanding of these issues resulting from these conversations and the production
and future prosocial behavior.






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Future Vision
We have seen firsthand the incredible impact a production like MTM can have on a
college campus. The following pages will feature testimonials from audience members,
production team members, writers, actors, and administration. From our own experiences we
have figured out a system that works and would love to help schools interested in bringing MTM
to their campuses in any way possible! Use us, ask us questions! Contact us at
metoomonologues@gmail.com or cara.peterson14@gmail.com. In this handbook we have
included all the materials we have created over the years and compiled tons of tips for getting
administration on board, getting the student body invested, finding funding, and so on.
We encourage you to take what we have to offer, while also allowing your own creativity
to flow into your own finalized product. There is so much room for adding your own unique
twist to the model we have created We would love, however, to be notified if you do decide to
jump in on the national expansion of MTM so we can link any websites or Youtube channels you
may develop to our upcoming national MTM site. This way we can all be part of one big MTM
community and take part in the successes of everyones efforts. We all have something to learn
and gain from each other! This is just the beginning!


[Sitting in the audience is like] hearing a Dear Diary entry or a confession to your
closest friend or a secret that has never been told before. Monologue after monologue allows
you to take residence in someone elses head for a few minutes, and connect with each
distinctive perspective through laughter, tears, and pure felt emotion. Suddenly, you find
yourself able to connect with complete strangers as you realize their emotions, trials, and
tribulations are not so strange. Muscles are to gym, as empathy is to Me Too.
-Andrew Kragie, Me Too actor (Class of 15)






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Show Life Cycle:
! March: Production team selection
! April: Book the venue for proper dates, tentative plans for the year, get website and
Facebook page up and running (update submission deadline and audition dates)
! September: Meet once a week as a production team to work through details (reaching
out for submissions via listservs and speaking at meetings, flyering, other forms of
publicity, funding, graphic design, t-shirts & stickers)
! October: Submissions due mid-month, auditions begin shortly after; have all
monologues and actors selected by end of the month
! November: Email out decisions, begin individual and small group rehearsals
! December: Actors must have monologues memorized before leaving for break
! January: Rehearsals become more intensive, full week of nightly rehearsals before show
time, tech run-through
! February: Shows the first weekend of the month (before all other school programming
begins)

Our Online Presence:
http://www.metoomonologuesduke.org
https://www.youtube.com/user/metoomonologues/playlists


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II. Why MTM?

The Big Picture: Empathy and Identity Building
Empathy and identity are the keys to bringing about engagement in social justice issues
and increasing prosocial behavior. Both elements converge in MTM, as audience members
experience empathy while taking the perspective of each narrative performed on stage and are
immersed in an emotional connectivity that can impact the way they see their own worlds, as
well as their role in those worlds. Clinical and developmental psychology expert James Marcia
explains that the stronger an empathetic connection, the more likely one is to integrate an
experience into his or her moral identity, or the growth of moral values, character, and
behavior within an overall identity concept.
1
Moral identity enforces commitments because they
essentially state, I would not be myself if I acted or thought in a way that was different from
what I have personally committed to.
2
The resulting intrinsic motivation reinforces strong
incentives to behave according to ones own identity principles, allowing agency and purpose to
truly be a part of identity.
Much of what our production team considers to be the magic of MTM closely aligns with
the South African concept of ubuntu. Archbishop Desmond Tutu defines ubuntu as:
[T]he very essence of being human. When we went to give high praise to someone we say,
Yu, u nobuntu; Hey, so-and-so has ubuntu. You are generous, you are hospitable, you
are friendly and caring and compassionate. You share what you have. It is to say, My
humanity is caught up, is inextricably bound up, in yours. We belong in a bundle of life.
We say, A person is a person through other persons. It is not, I think therefore I am. It
says rather: I am human because I belong. I participate, I share. A person with ubuntu is
open and available to others, affirming of others, does not feel threatened that others are
able and good, for he or she belongs in a greater whole and is diminished when others are
humiliated or diminished, when others are tortured or oppressed, or treated as if they were
less than who they are To forgive is not just to be altruistic. It is the best form of self-
interest. What dehumanizes you inexorably dehumanizes me.
3

It is this sense of unity that the MTM production seeks to create. While the show does highlight
difference, it also demonstrates that no matter how different we may seem, we are all connected by the
emotions and vulnerability that make us human. As Maya Angelou once said, I am a human being,
nothing human can be alien to me.

1
Marcia, J.E., (1966), Development and validation of ego identity status, Journal of Personality and Social
Psychology,
Vol 3, pp. 551-558 [Journal Article]
2
Waterman, A. Finding Someone to be: Studies on the Role of Intrinsic Motivation in Identity Formation.
Identity:
An International Journal of Theory and Research, Vol 4(3), Jul, 2004. pp. 209-228. Publisher: Lawrence
Erlbaum [Journal Article]
3
Tutu, D. (1999). No future without forgiveness. New York: Doubleday [Book]
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In order to understand the role of empathy and identity within MTM, we wish to break down
what both terms mean in a psychological sense and how they play a role in promoting
prosocial behavior. Empathy is the chief enabling process to altruism, as it is the prime
inhibitor of human cruelty.
4
Withholding our natural inclination to feel with another allows us
to treat the other as an It, but rather a human being. Daniel Goleman, who coined the term
emotional intelligence, explains that empathy goes beyond numbers and statistics, which
evoke rational parts of our brain that think in a non-personal way, to the incorporation of faces,
lives, and stories that humanize the issue. The most important thing to recognize about empathy
is that to understand what someone else experiences we utilize the same brain wiring that is
active during our own experience.
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For example, When we hear an anguished scream, it
activates the same parts of our brain that experience such anguish, as well as the preemptor
cortex, a sign we are prepared to act.
6
By the same token, Hearing someone tell an unhappy
story in doleful tones activates the listeners motor cortexwhich activates movements as
well as the amygdala and related circuits for sadness.
7
When we empathize to the extent that we

4
Goleman, D. (2006). Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships. New York: Bantam Dell. p.
117.
[Book]
5
(Goleman, 2007, p. 28)
6
(Goleman, 2007, p. 60)
7
(Goleman, 2007, p. 60)
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truly connect with another persons experience, we do not just connect emotionally we are
additionally motivated to act and respond accordingly.
In a the winning entry of the Huffington Post 2013 Sustained Dialogue Empathy Essay
Contest, Eke Agu, a Harvard student, poetically captures the essence of what empathy feels like
as it occurs:
This conversation [with a friend talking about discrimination] was not about statistics or
innovative argumentative strategies; it was about the lived experiences I suddenly felt
very open -- not only in the sense that I was more willing to accept his assertions; I became
so aware of my insensitivity that I felt Adam-and-Eve naked. I chose to remain exposed,
steeping in this bizarre sensation of dissonance, vulnerability, and courage you do not
have to attempt walking [in someone elses shoes] to empathize -- just trying to fit into
[them] can be quite jarring. There is a dissonance in realizing that you have different but
valid claims and a vulnerability begging that you accept this truth. It does not demand pity
but rather courage. I will never know what it means to be a gay man of color raised on La
Frontera. What I can do is simply step my feet into his shoes by remembering personal
encounters that have elicited similarly visceral reactions in me.
Her beautiful description captures not just the scientific jargon, but also the human elements of
the experience.
Identity is a social-psychological construct that reflects social influences through
imitation and identification processes and active self-construction in the creation of what is
important to the self and others.
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Another less technical way to think of identity is as a self-
regulatory system which functions to direct attention, filter or process information, manage
impressions, and select appropriate responses.
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The five most commonly documented functions
of identity are: 1) Providing a structure for understanding who one is, 2) Providing meaning
and direction through commitments, values and goals, 3) Providing a sense of personal control
and free will, 4) Striving for consistency, coherence, and harmony between values, beliefs, and
commitments, and 5) Enabling the recognition of potential through a sense of future,
possibilities, and alternative choices.
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Identity is made up of factors such as race, gender,
socioeconomic status, religion, and sexuality, as well as factors like the time period in which one
is living, place of birth, family history, and so on. The embeddedness of an identity marker
shows the extent to which it is a part of our daily lives. Identity is personal and collective, and
both forms require balance with each other.






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Adams, G., & Marshall, K. A developmental social psychology of identity: understanding the person-in-context.
Journal of Adolescence, Vol 19(5), Oct, 1996. pp. 433. Publisher: Elsevier Science [Journal Article]
9
Adams & Marshall, 1996, p. 433)
10
(Adams & Marshall, 1996, p. 433)
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Intersectionality
One definite root of stereotyping and subsequent prejudices is the belief that individuals
can be fully defined by one aspect of their identity, when in fact all identities are multi-
dimensional. In 1991, feminist scholar Kimberl Crenshaw coined this notion of merging
identity markers under the term intersectionality. We believe intersectionality is a critical
factor MTM is able to provide to identity debate, as it allows people to talk not just about
specific identity markers, but also about how multiple identity markers converge to create a
distinct identity experience. Crenshaws term intersectionality originated from a field study she
was doing of battered womens shelters located in minority communities in Los Angeles. She
later published an article in the Stanford Law Review, in which she explained that experiences of
women of color are often the product of intersecting patterns of racism and sexism, yet these
experiences almost always lack representation within the discourses of both feminism and
antiracism.
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This is because their intersectional identity as both women and of color within
discourses that are shaped to respond to one or the other.
12
Crenshaw explains that because
patterns of subordination intersect,
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those with multiple subordinate identity markers are
marginalized within their marginalized groups. She suggests that racism as experienced by
people of color who are of a particular gendermaletends to determine the parameters of
antiracist strategies, just as sexism is experienced by women who are a particular racewhite
tends to ground the womens movement.
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Overall, the problem is not simply that both
discourses fail women of color by not acknowledging the additional issue of race or of
patriarchy but that the discourses are often inadequate even to the discrete tasks of articulating
[them within] the full dimensions of racism and sexism.
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The consequence of this is that
intervention strategies meant to alleviate oppression are often based solely on the experiences of
women who do not share the same class or racial background and are of limited help to women
who, because of race and class, face different obstacles. Crenshaw stresses that women of color
occupy positions both physically and culturally marginalized within dominant society, and so
information must be targeted directly to them in order to reach them.
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The example of
overlapping marginalization via race and gender is just one of the many examples of how
minorities may find themselves at a disadvantage even within their own minority groups. The
design of MTM allows issues of intersectionality to be directly addressed, for the pieces
performed are able to adequately capture intersectionality and its consequences through
monologues directly reflecting personal experiences.



11
Krenshaw, K. Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color.
Stanford Law Review, Vol. 43, July 1991, 1241-1299 [Journal Article]
12
(Krenshaw, 1991, p. 1244)
13
(Krenshaw, 1991, p. 1249)
14
Ibid.
15
(Krenshaw, 1991, p. 1246)
16
(Krenshaw, 1991, p. 1250)
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Our Generations Form of Advocacy
MTM is advocacy in its purest form. Each monologue brings a face to a statistic, making
it real and, therefore, important and relevant to each person in the audience. Because of empathy
and identity, one cannot easily sit through a monologue where someone speaks from the heart
about the pain hearing phrases like Thats so gay brings him or her and continue to use it in
their own everyday speech. Similarly, they cannot listen to someone give account of sexual
assault and not be more motivated to act instead of being a bystander when seeing a risky
situation.
It has been argued that our generation is less political than generations in the past who
actively protested the Vietnam War, led rallies on abortion, and participated in sit-ins for Civil
Rights. We would argue, however, that our generation simply expresses its advocacy in a
different form. The way in which one must fight racism, sexism, homophobia, and classism has
transformed just as these forms and manifestations of oppression themselves have mutated. Now,
the initial part of the problem is convincing people that there is still work to be done. Shih states,
Although few people would dispute the existence of egregious displays of racism in the past,
the denial of ongoing discrimination in contemporary society is commonplace. She continues,
Social movements such as the Civil Rights Movement have helped create large, overt shifts in
attitudes and behaviors in a relatively short amount of time, while understanding how to alter
more subtle types of prejudice and intergroup attitudes has been a much more challenging
endeavor.
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Psychologists note that these more subtle forms tend to bud from implicit or unconscious,
internal sources of prejudice.
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As a result, denial of discrimination occurs on both institutional


17
Shih, M., Gutierrez, A., & Stotzer, R. Perspective-Taking and Empathy: Generalizing the Reduction of Group
Bias
Toward Asian Americans to General Outgroups. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol 4(2), Jun, 2013.
pp.79-83. Publisher: Educational Publishing Foundation [Journal Article]
18
Devine, P. G. (1989). Stereotypes and Prejudice: Their automatic and controlled components. Journal of
Personality
and Social Psychology, Vol 56(1), Jan, 1989. pp.5-18. Publisher: American Psychological Association
[Journal Article]
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and individual levels, so that even when these group disparities do get acknowledged, they are
often attributed to factors other than discrimination such as laziness or natural disposition.
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Political movements of the past successful fought for rights and legislation. While there are still
battles that need to be fought on this front such as having same-sex marriage legalized in all
50 states we believe the challenge our generation must faces is often (though not always) less
blatant than hate crimes and takes the form of microaggressions. Microaggressions are are the
everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or
unintentional, which communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons
based solely upon their marginalized group membership.
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While often unintentional, they still
have a dramatic impact on peoples sense of self worth and ability to succeed in both their public
and private spheres.
We believe that most people are not purposefully racist, sexist, homophobic they
simply are not aware of how their actions impact others due to the invisibility of privilege. The
result is offensive microaggressions such as, Youre not good at math? Youre not a real Asian
or Food points are like monopoly money or Can I touch your hair? Though not intended to
be harmful, these comments and attitudes play a role in supporting systems of oppression that
reinforce hierarchical structures and effect others senses of self and worth. Todd et al. points
out, An unacknowledged problem is an unsolved problem, so a question of vital importance
to future efforts to redress intergroup inequality is how best to penetrate the pervasive
discrimination denial [which some theoretical perspective have equated with racism itself
21
] that
characterizes majority group culture.
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We are not living in a post-racial society simply because
we have a Black president, and LGBTQ issues will not be absolved once marriage is an option
for all regardless of sexuality.
Yes, there have been clear gains have been made in the court to combat numerous social
justice issues, but they have not been accompanied by corresponding equality in important life
domains, such as family assets, access to quality education, desirable jobs, physical and mental
health, among others.
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It is one thing to change laws and policies and another thing entirely for

19
Shih, M., Gutierrez, A., & Stotzer, R. Perspective-Taking and Empathy: Generalizing the Reduction of Group
Bias
Toward Asian Americans to General Outgroups. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol 4(2), Jun, 2013.
pp.79-83. Publisher: Educational Publishing Foundation [Journal Article]
20
Sue, D.W., and David Rivera. Microaggressions in Everyday Life. Psychology Today. 17 Nov. 2010.
<http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/microaggressions-in-everyday-life/201011/microaggressions-
more-just-race>.
21
McConahay, J.B. (1986). In: Prejudice, discrimination, and racism. Dovidio, John F. (Ed); Gaertner, Samuel L.
(Ed);
San Diego, CA, US: Academic Press, pp.91-125, 337, xiii. [Chapter]
22
Todd, A., Bodenhausen, G., & Galinsky, A. Perspective taking combats the denial of intergroup discrimination.
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol 48(3), May, 2012. pp.738-745. Publisher: Elsevier Science
[Journal Article]
23
Bertrand, M., & Mullianathan, S. (2004). Are Emily and Greg more employable than Lakisha and Jamal? A field
experiment on labor market discrimination. American Economic Review, 94, pp. 991-1013 [Journal Article]
14
these changes to affect culture norms. The work of our generation is to reveal the invisibility of
privilege and how the work of social justice is still unfinished. The advocacy work of our
generation more often takes the form of awareness campaigns and enlightening discussions, and
MTM is one of the most effective formats by which to do this work.

Teaching Aids for Faculty and Student Organizations/Support Institutions
One of the strengths of MTM is that is has many applications outside the theater in which
the performance takes place. Our videos on YouTube and ability to share material via Facebook,
Twitter, and Instagram allow us to engage in our generations new sensationalism of social
media. Past monologues can also act as effective teaching tools for programming by university
faculty, multicultural and advocacy institutions, and student groups. Our team at Duke has
recently developed a programming position on the production team tasked with increasing
solidarity with other groups involved with social justice on campus by announcing their events
via our Facebook group (often accompanied by a related monologue). We have also worked with
several organizations to compile monologues for screenings and discussion programming. The
stories often get participants to feel comfortable opening up and having conversations that extend
past scholarly discussion to personal experience.
In the appendix, we have included all our past monologues on our YouTube page
organized by theme so that you can do this at your school as well, if you so choose!


I remember the first time Me Too Monologues were performed on campus, and I was struck then
by how powerful it was one a number of levels. To see how it has grown, both in audience size
and in stature on campus, is incredibly encouraging as students grow increasingly conscious of
the issues facing marginalized students at Duke---an in society, as a whole. What amazes me is
how the Monologues have continued to serve the Duke community on two critical levels: it
provides a very human expression, with all the emotional and intellectual complexity of life, of
the reality that many students live but often lack a voice of validation. In doing so, it also serves
to educate those who lack awareness of how different (and often very difficult) their peers'
experiences are, prompting a greater sensitivity and respect for the many different communities
that make up Duke University.
-Gary Glass, Counseling and Psychological Services,
Associate Director for Outreach and Developmental Programming










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III. How MTM?
Understanding Privilege, Valuing Diversity
Privilege and diversity are the two most important aspects to pay attention to within the
make-up of the show. Both terms have surface-level denotations with much deeper connotations.
Through our own personal experiences and the knowledge gathered over the past 5 years of
production, we wish to emphasize that these two components must be taken into consideration
during every move the production team makes. Understanding privilege and diversity is crucial
to maintaining the integrity of the show, keeping it relevant to campus culture, and bringing
about the greatest possible impact. This is perhaps the most important section of this handbook to
understand.
A great strength of MTM is its ability to reveal the invisibility of privilege. The common
notion is that privilege denotes high socioeconomic status. While this is accurate, it does not
capture the full truth. There are numerous forms of privilege including, but not limited to: white
privilege, male privilege, cisgender/hetero privilege, ability privilege, and Christian privilege.
These privileges come with the ability to identify as that which is unmarked or has been labeled
the norm. Gloria Steinem, a feminist scholar and advocate, further explains, Whoever is in
power takes over the noun and the norm while the less powerful get an adjective. Thus, we
read about African American doctors but not European American doctors, Hispanic leaders
but not Anglo leaders, gay soldiers but not heterosexual soldiers."
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Yet, privilege remains
invisible because those that hold it are usually unaware of the difference in experiences between
themselves and those who do not share their same identity markers.
For example, people who identify as heterosexual have most likely never given extensive
thought to their sexuality because they have never had to come out, while most LGBTQ
individuals remain in the continuous process of coming out to old friends and new for their
entire lives. Many Caucasian people have also probably never thought of themselves as having a



24
Steinem, G. (2007, July 11). A Modest Proposal. Huffington Post. Retrieved June 10, 2014 from
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gloria-steinem/a-modest-proposal_3_b_55772.html [Column/Opinion]
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race. From presidents to magazine covers, the faces weve predominantly seen have associated
power with whiteness and beauty according to a white standard. Being white doesnt feel as
defining because it doesnt carry the mark of other. One last example is that most men have
likely not considered that being too drunk or dressing a certain way may be interpreted as an
invitation for sexual assault, whereas many women are forced to consider these issues every time
they go out. That sense of unmarkedness and the ability to not have to think about specific issues
is privilege. This privilege can be dangerous, particularly when one people with certain
privileges think the way they experience the world is how others must experience the world, and
he or she can therefore speak for or represent those others and their interests.
Production team member Cara Peterson recounts how she used to think that when she
spoke about gender issues, what she said was representative of all women, when it was actually
only representative for white, educated, straight/cisgender women. Even then, that was not
entirely accurate because the diversity of experience within certain identity markers are so
expansive. Steinem reiterates Caras point, A key aspect of white womens privilege has been
their ability to assume that when they talked about themselves they were talking about all
women, and many white feminists have unthinkingly generalized their own situations.
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It is the
thoughtless belief that one can speak for all of humankind even within the social justice
realm that gets us in trouble, for we cannot speak for each others experiences. Each person
needs their own chance to tell their story. This is why it is important that, though anybody in the
Duke community can write for the show, most of the pieces chosen to be performed showcase
stories highlighting the impacts of identity markers outside the hegemonic norm. This allows
these experiences to have the spotlight for once and to be documented and acknowledged.
Only by creating a consciousness of privilege are we able to begin changing systems of
oppression through empathy and identity building. It boils down to the following statement by
Robert Anton Wilson: Every kind of ignorance in the world all results from not realizing that
our perceptions are gambles. We believe what we see and then we believe our interpretation of
it, we don't even know we are making an interpretation most of the time. We think this is reality."
We do not realize that with different identity markers come different experiences, different
worlds, different realities, and this makes it harder to understand where others are coming from
or empathize with them due to the disconnect.
Study after study has proven that sexism, racism, homophobia, classism, and numerous
other forms of oppression are still alive and well. Yet, the MTM production team agrees that, in
the majority of the discussions we have attended or overheard about these issues, those in the
privileged majority position take a defensive stance. We believe this is because their ability to
view themselves as an inherently good person is threatened by the notion, or perceived
accusation, that they participate in or benefit from a system that oppresses others, even
unintentionally. The most common reaction is for those with privilege to dive into an explanation
of why those not benefiting from the system are overreacting or by making statements about how

25
Steinem, G. (2007, July 11). A Modest Proposal. Huffington Post. Retrieved June 10, 2014 from
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gloria-steinem/a-modest-proposal_3_b_55772.html [Column/Opinion]
17
they can see the issues but do not accept responsibility for playing a role in the way the system
responsible for them. These responses invalidate the experiences of the minority voices and, yet
again, silence them by usurping the speaking space. MTM creates a more effective model of
communication. Afftene Taylor, Theatrical Director 2012, claims Me Too is about the smallest,
least heard voice getting the biggest platform possible, an uninterrupted speaking platform at
that. That one voice has the stage, literally, and an idea can be expressed from start to finish.
Dialogue among audience members can take place after at the talkbacks, but, while the story is
unraveling, there is no opportunity for defensive comments to be interjected.
Often times even those who are aware of issues within the social justice realm think that
the only way for them to be an ally is through the action of speaking, mobilizing, calling others
out, making their opinions heard. One of the greatest lessons our production team has learned
through MTM is that for some of us, especially those who do hold certain identity markers of
privilege, our greatest action may actually be to listen. And listening can be considered its own
action. Cara Peterson expands on this point when saying:
Through my possession of several privileged identity markers, I have naturally come to
expect that my voice will always be welcome, and always be heard. I never understood
that this is not how it is for many others, and that I must make a more concerted effort to
make sure those whose voices are not normally heard get the attention they deserve.
Steinem claims the best thing one can do for those who are marginalized is to listen to them,
because you don't know you have something to say until somebody listens to you.
26

Now that we have discussed the important role of privilege, we wish to move on to
diversity-- an element of MTM that must always be kept at the forefront of the minds of
production team members. Representation of a diverse range of voices in MTM is the most
important element of the production. It is an element that one must always work to maintain, and
is easier than one would think to lose. Every level of MTM--the monologues selected, the actors
chosen, the production team make-up--must have a wide representation of identity markers. It is
only through this diverse representation that all people will continue to trust MTM with their
stories and talents. As soon as a group feels their identity is not being represented it becomes
more difficult for them to feel the MTM is a place for their voices, no matter how much diversity


I believe in a lot of what this show is trying to doshowing vulnerability at Duke, showing
whats below the surface. A lot of times Duke students project an image that ends up
perpetuating our loneliness because we dont see other people are struggling like we are.
I just wanted to be part of a project that helps empower and at the same time
humble students.
Elizabeth Hoyler, Me Too actress 2014


26
Jackson, C. (2014, April 7). UPDATE: Gloria Steinem to Speak at Duke Chapel.Retrieved June 15, 2014 from
http://today.duke.edu/2014/04/steinem [Online Article]
18
is expressed on the call for submissions and groups and institutions to which you reach out.
Additionally, even though the make-up of the production team is not extremely obvious
to the viewer, it is important to maintain diversity on this level because many monologue
submissions, actor tryouts, and future production team applications come as a result of knowing
someone who was already on the production team. It is critical to have a diverse range of
community members from a diverse range of organizations (greek life, selective living groups,
theater, the Black Student Union, the Asian Students Association, the Organization of Female
Engineers you get the point) and to always be consciously reaching out to these groups.
Approach them during the activities fair at the beginning of the year to get their email contacts,
or sit down with institution leaders to see what kind of programming they are doing throughout
the year and to see how MTM can provide solidarity with the cause. MTM is not meant to be a
transactional organization gathering monologues and putting them on display, but instead it must
try its hardest to almost become an extension of numerous different groups and organizations.
Let us give you an example of a similar theatrical production at our school meant to
represent the female portion of Dukes population. This production had a strong start and still
continues to put on a funny and dynamic show. However, their production team slowly got
narrower and narrower until essentially all its members came from the same sorority. The
diversity of the show reflected this they continue to have a very difficult time getting diverse
pieces for their show because they have become known more as the white-sorority-womens
monologues and many of the voices they have every intention of representing do not feel their
stories have a place in the production. It is an easier problem to run into than one would think.
Even after thinking strongly about these issues, we ran into a similar (though less extreme)
complaint in 2014 (http://www.dukechronicle.com/articles/2014/02/07/me-too). We felt
frustrated because, at the end of the day, we can only put into the show the monologues we
receive.
Some strategies for avoiding this problem are as follows: always make sure the basic
bases of race, sexuality, gender, and class are covered. If you have a hard time doing so, even
after visiting numerous chapter meetings and general body meetings, look through past popular
articles in your school newspaper for ones about these topic (there are bound to be at least a
couple) and personally reach out to the author via email. Personalize the way in which you reach
out for submissions, explain why you think someone has something important to that a wider
audience would benefit from hearing. Also, if you have a spoken word group on campus or any
creative writing courses, I highly recommend asking to visit a gathering or class, or ask leaders
and teachers to announce the opportunity for people to submit their work to MTM. Do not just sit
back and wait for diverse pieces, actors, and production team members to come to you. Be
proactive! Losing diversity in the show is hard to come back from, so it is better to just avoid it
in the first place!
19




As a writer for Me Too Monologues 2013, one of the most empowering experiences I have
ever had was putting emotions that I had never previously expressed to anyone down on
paper and witnessing those words performed on stage, coming to life in ways I never could
have imagined. The pride and fulfillment continued far past Me Too Monologues, as
individuals both those who knew I had written and those who didnt praised my
monologue and told me how much it had meant to them. Everyone deserves that voice.
Whether they are the writer, the actor, or the spectator, it is our duty to provide that
opportunity to individuals. I want to make Duke the kind of place where self-expression
and self-exploration are encouraged by all. I dont want to feel like I am concealing facts or
telling half-truths when I talk about how incredible Duke is and how much I love it it is
because I unequivocally believe that it is an extraordinary place and I love it with all of my
heart that I believe it can be better. It wont ever be perfect, but the only way to improve it
is through dialogue and self-reflection. Me Too Monologues has started that process.
Rachel Fraade, Me Too Writer and Publicity Manager (Class of 16)


20
Timeline
Coming soon in spreadsheet form! Feel free to email cara.peterson14@gmail.com with any
questions.

Organization Structure
The structure of MTM is one that is designed to expands as the production itself expands.
We recommend beginning with at least an Executive Producer, Director, and Faculty Advisor. It
is okay to start off small productions such as MTM take time to become prominent on campus.

Executive Producer
! Calls and presides over official meetings of the organization along with the Theatrical
Director
! Maintains accurate ledger and financial records
! Approves all expenditures from the organization financial account
! Approves (i.e. signs) all request for allocations from third-party sources
! Maintains organization in good standing with Duke University and sponsors via
communication with the University Center Activities and Events (UCAE) and/or other
interested University entities
! Maintains organization website and multimedia publications along with the Assistant
Producer and Graphic Designer
! Assists the Theatrical Director in show preparation, including but not limited to: booking
show venue, booking rehearsal spaces, reviewing show content, acquiring monologues
and actors, and finding sponsors.

Assistant Producer
! Maintains the official roster of the organization
! Records minutes of all official meetings of the organization
! Maintains official historical file for the organization (constitution, by-laws, minutes,
rosters, financial records, risk management records, etc)
! Contacts approved vendors for quotations and orders
! Assists the Executive Producer in her/his duties as requested

Theatrical Director(s)
! Is responsible for the overall practical and creative interpretation of the monologues,
taking into account the budgetary and physical constraints of production
! Works closely with the creative and production teams, the performers and the producer to
create a performance which connects with the audience
! Encourages Duke Community to submit monologues, through conversation, workshops
or script development schemes as necessary
! Adapts a script as necessary
! Analyses and explores the script content and conducts relevant research
21
! Conducts auditions for productions , selecting and hiring designers, light technicians, etc.
! though all of the production team is present during auditions and plays a role in
selecting monologues and actors
! Manages time and organizes people and space
! Attends production meetings as requested
! Conducts rehearsals
! Attends all dress and technical rehearsals and prepares detailed notes for the cast, creative
and production teams
! Helps to publicize the production by giving interviews and leading discussions
! Gives tasks to the Assistant Director(s) as necessary

Assistant Director(s)
! Assists the Theatrical Director(s) with her/his duties as requested
! Keeps the production running smoothly
! Maintains rehearsal schedule
! Works with the director(s) during the audition process, and is present for all rehearsals

Manager of Programming and Publicity
! Serves as a representative of MTM on campus and in neighboring areas
! Publicizes MTM and related events
! Attends sorority and fraternity chapter meetings, selected-living group meetings, and
extracurricular meetings to promote MTM and make them aware of submission and
audition deadlines (though this is truly a job to be shared with the entire production team)
! Maintains organization in good standing with Duke University and sponsors via
communication with the University Center Activities and Events (UCAE) and/or other
interested University entities along with the Executive Producer
! Creates text blurbs for emailing listserves and strategic contacts (collaborates with
Producers on this front)
! Coordinates with the Graphic Designer on publicity materials, including but not limited
to: flyers, handouts, and MTM paraphernalia

Graphic Designer
! Develops design and brand image with approval of Production Team
! Delivers design initiatives within desired deadlines
! Assists the Producers and Publicity Managers as requested
! Maintains website and multimedia publications along with Publicity Manager and
Producers




22
Faculty Advisor
! A full-time faculty or staff member of Duke University shall be selected by the
executive board and serve as the organization advisor. The advisor shall be an ex-officio
member of the organization and all of its committees.
! Interpret University Policy for organization
! Direct membership to appropriate campus resources to accomplish organizations goals
! Act as the official university contact in matters of policy violation



23
Guide to Producing

Over summer:
Determine show dates and reserve a space to hold the performances
Create a Me Too Monologues website where students can learn about Me Toos
structure and goals, as well as how to submit a monologue/audition
Create a Me Too Monologues Partnership Proposal that includes the shows anticipated
budget, as well as an introduction to the show and the benefits of partnering with Me
Too. This will come in handy when soliciting donations.
o For example, for a donation of $500, we offer:
" Placement of the donating organizations name on our t-shirts, banner, and Plaza
board
" A feature on our website
" Placement of the organizations merchandise or pamphlets outside of our
performance venue
o Sample budget:
Item Anticipated
Cost
1 Website Maintenance $120.00
2 T-Shirts (250) $2,000.00
3 Merchandising
(Stickers, buttons,
ticketing)
$150.00
4 Videographer $100.00
5 Invitations $75.00
6 Advertising (flyers,
banners, printing,
plaza board(s))
$225.00
7 Show Tickets and
Supplies
$10.00
Total $2,680.00

August-September:
Determine dates for auditions to be held and reserve an audition space
24
Set a monologue submission deadline (this year we planned in advance to extend the
deadline from Friday, October 17th to Sunday, October 19th)
Reach out to organizations on campus who might share some of Me Toos values (ex:
Womens Center, Center for Multicultural Affairs, Center for Sexual and Gender
Diversity, etc.), and set up meetings to discuss potential partnerships
Seek out and apply for any grants offered that relate to Me Toos goals
Work with publicity manager to create flyers publicizing the monologue submission
deadline. Distribute flyers amongst production team and hang them across campus!
October:
Make announcements about Me Too at the meetings of various student groups to
encourage them to share their stories with Me Too!
Aggressively publish the upcoming submission deadline via social media, more flyering,
word of mouth, etc.!
Collaborate with director to create a rehearsal schedule and find rehearsal spaces
November-December:
Finalize partnerships with campus organizations
Organize a promotional video and photo campaign to launch in the weeks leading up to
the show
The photo campaign typically involves photographing the actors individually and
integrating a powerful quote from the monologue they will be performing into the photo
(make sure to also include information about performance dates/times/location!) Ask
actors to make these photos their Facebook profile pictures.
The promotional video features the actors and highlights Me Toos larger themes and
goals our video from last year is available on our websites homepage
(www.metoomonologuesduke.org) if you need inspiration
January:
Send out official invitations to key faculty members who would benefit from attending
the performance
Ensure all partnering organizations have their organization names featured and their
materials available at the show (if this was indicated this in your partnership agreement)
After the show:
Create an application for next years production team and publicize it on your website,
Facebook page, by word of mouth, etc.
o Collaborate with the remainder of the production team to fill positions for the
new team
Re-register as a student organization if necessary
Compile a list of what did and did not work with this years show, and create goals for
next year
Ensure the outgoing and incoming student in each position meet with one another to
discuss the positions responsibilities and how to best attack them
25


Advice for soliciting submissions:
While you can solicit any kind of stories for your production, it can help to give people a
prompt. For Duke, we ask members of our community to send in stories about their
identities and how these identities have affected their Duke experiences. More info and
wording of our prompts can be found on our website: http://www.metoomonologuesduke
.org/what-to-submit/
A reliable mechanism for collecting anonymous submissions is a Qualtrics or Google
survey. On the survey, ask writers to submit a pin number of their choosing and to attach
their monologues as a Word Document. The pin numbers allow you to let people know if
their monologues have been chosen by posting the pins of selected monologues on your
website, listserv, and/or Facebook page. You can add any other questions your team might
have. For example, we ask if writers are okay with us publishing monologues in print or
online.
One of the most reliable ways to get submissions is to talk to people you know about
submitting. People generally respond more to personal contact than to an email blast or to
flyers. So talk to people whom you think might have interesting stories to tell or
perspectives to offer. The drawback of this approach is that the group of people you know
may not be representative of your community as a whole. In the end, its good to pair
personal contact with a general call for submissions. This general call for submissions can
work through methods like listservs, social media, and posters.
In the survey for submissions, make clear your productions policy on editing. If you plan to
edit monologues for length and performability, let people before they submit. Also, its good
to clarify a length for monologues (between one and one and a half pages single spaced is a
good range).
Some writers may want help crafting ideas or editing their monologues before submitting.
Thus, its good to offer people the option of contacting you for help. In this case, whoever
helps the writer edit would know the writers identity, so the monologue wouldnt be
entirely anonymous, but the writers identity could still remain hidden from the audience,
26
If you want diverse submissions, it helps to have a diverse production team. People tend to
be more willing to submit if they feel people of their identity are well-represented in the
production team.

Advice for selecting submissions:
Selecting monologues often involves two types of judgment: 1) evaluating quality of
storytelling, and 2) evaluating relevance of the story to ones audience. These judgments are
often highly subjective, and that can make the selection process difficult.
When evaluating quality of storytelling, remember that a strong written piece may not
always be a strong performance piece. Some pieces feel like essays more than performance
texts. Some poetry is great for performance while other poetry is not. Reading fragments
aloud can help.
When evaluating relevance of the story to ones audience, think about whether the
monologue presents a perspective not usually heard in your community. Me Too can
challenge dominant narratives and can present alternative narratives that people have thought
or experienced but few have expressed. What is going to get audience members to say me
too?
Diversity of perspective matters. If your community is diverse, Me Too should reflects that
diversity. Of course, diversity operates on many levels in terms of identity, topic, and
opinion.
Dont dismiss a monologue just because its not politically correct or because it expresses
problematic views. One year, we had a monologue submitted by a male student whose
girlfriend was grappling with an eating disorder. The monologue was sexist in several places
and described his girlfriend as psycho and overly emotional. We considered censoring the
sexist parts, but in the end trusted the audience to see the sexism in the monologue and
respond to it as they saw fit. The monologue offered a perspective on eating disorders we
dont usually hear, and sexism was just a part of that perspective.
Me Too at Duke involves the whole production team in the selection process. That way, we
get a variety of perspectives about the monologues and get advocates for monologues that
some of us might overlook. We do a mix of discussion and voting to make the final
selections. To streamline the process, we have each member of the production team read the
submissions beforehand and come in to the discussion with a list of their favorites.
It can help to pick the monologues after auditions because that select actors and monologues
together and choose monologues based on which actors could perform them. However, if you
have a lot of submissions, its good to have a general idea which monologues you want to do
before going into auditions. That way, you can think about actors in the context of which
monologues they could perform.




27
Advice for editing monologues and selecting the order of the shows:
It is possible to edit a monologue and still maintain its integrity. The two main reasons to
edit would be for length and for performability. Longer monologues are more difficult to
work with and can make the show drag. Many writers need a chance to set all their thoughts
to paper, and this tendency can make monologues repetitive and lengthy. You can also edit
monologues such that they flow better and are easier to perform. Smoothing transitions and
altering awkward phrasing can make performance easier.
It can be interesting to splice monologues together into what the Duke Me Too team calls
montages. This means placing multiple actors on stage at the same time and jumping
back and forth between their monologues. This technique is particularly good for calling
attention to similarities and differences between monologues. For example, a few years ago,
we had two monologues about sexual assault that we spliced into a montage. In one
monologue, a student talked about how speaking up about sexual assault was empowering,
but in the other, a student suggests that speaking up wasnt right for her. These pieces
spliced together had an effect that neither could have had alone.
When ordering the monologues, some factors to think about are tone, relationships between
monologues, and identity of the performer.
The starting piece sets the tone for what the rest of the show will be like. Do you want to
start with humor? Do you want to start serious? A mix? Any of these is a valid choice; just
make them a conscious decision.
After several serious monologues, the audience usually needs a break. Incorporating a
humorous monologue after tough monologues can offer much-needed relief.
You can also strategically position monologues so that they enter into dialogue with one
another. For example, we placed a monologue about mens body image immediately after
one about womens body image to call attention to how the two pieces agreed and
disagreed.
Keep in mind the identities of the performers as you order to show. If you start with a white
male voice when most of your monologues are not by white males, does that reinforce
systems of privilege? On the other hand, if you place all male monologues at the end of the
show, how might this alienate men in the audience?

28
Guide to Directing

Running auditions:
Audition signups can work through a Google Drive spreadsheet with all of the times of the
audition slots. Any user with a link to the document can add their name to the document to
sign up for a slot.
Publicize auditions through listservs, social media, and flyers as well as through personal
interaction.
See Appendix J of this handbook for our audition blurb, the information weve distributed in
past years about auditions.
For Dukes Me Too auditions, we have actors read monologues from past years. We place
these monologues on our website and on our emails to the listserv about auditions.
However, it takes a long time (as much as 8 minutes) to people to read through full
monologues, so if you want to shorten auditions and fit more people into a shorter amount
of time, its good to have people read only chunks of monologues and not entire
monologues.
Start the audition by asking people a bit about themselves and why they are interested in Me
Too. This can make people feel more comfortable at auditions and can give you an idea
about whether a person would be good to work with and whether a person understands the
principles behind Me Too.
After people read the piece they prepared, it can be helpful to give them direction and see
how they take it. Ask them to try performing what they just read in a different way. If they
make a clear adjustment, it will be easier to get them to make adjustments during rehearsal.
Some of our best performers in Me Too have had little or no acting experience. At Duke,
one of Me Toos strengths is its accessible to those outside theatre, and we find this
accessibility helps, not hurts, the quality of performances.
If the entire production team is deciding on monologues, it can help to have the whole team
at auditions. Thus, the team can keep the actors in mind when deciding on monologues. The
downside is that it can be intimidating to walk into an audition and to find a large team
there.

Running rehearsals:
The monologues are wonderful gifts. The writers were generous enough to submit the pieces
to the show. In exchange for these gifts, it is the directors and the actors duty to treat these
monologues with care and respect. The theatrical process can be stressful and certain
monologues can be frustrating at times, but one should treat the monologues
sympathetically and try to understand why a writer wrote their monologue. Also, when
youre talking about monologues, remember that the writer could be in the room as an actor
or member of the production team!
A director should make rehearsals a comfortable space for actors to experiment and to talk
through ideas. This means not dictating an actors entire performance and not shutting down
29
an actors ideas. Key to creating a safe space is establishing a cohesive group that can
support actors in times of need. Doing team-building exercises and having group
discussions over ideas in monologues can help bring a group together. A cohesive
community can also be an end in and of itself.
Because were working with monologues, you can have a mix of individual and group
rehearsals. Its usually good to start with a group rehearsal to build camaraderie between
the actors and to give the actors a sense of the other monologues. Then for the week before
the show, its good to do tech in the space with the whole group so that actors can get used
to the flow and shape of the production. Between the first rehearsal and tech week, you have
flexibility to do whatever balance of group and individual rehearsals you want.
Pair up actors as memorization partners. It helps to have someone to run lines with.
Performing intense monologues can be emotionally demanding. Remind actors to take time
to decompress after rehearsals and shows, and even do a closing group exercise at the end
of rehearsals ease people out of performance mode.
Make sure actors do not talk about their monologues to those outside the show (unless they
need to for the sake of their well being). This silence keeps the show more of a surprise to
those who arent part of the production team. It also helps ensure that actors wont end up
meeting their author before the show opens, which can throw them off.
When actors create characters, these characters are neither the author nor the actor. They
are a third entity entirely. This distance can be useful for actors. It can liberate actors not to
know that they dont need to portray themselves or to get all the details correct about their
imagined author.
Each director has her/his own approach and shapes her/his own rehearsal process. For Me
Too at Duke, character work, movement work, and text analysis have been important parts
of the rehearsal process.
A useful acting exercise can be talking back, in which one actor performers her/his
monologue and the rest of the actors shout out responses to the monologue as it goes along.
These responses can be questions or reactions like What do you mean? or No way or I
feel that. These responses arent critiques of the performance but are rather comments to
spur on the performer and to prompt a fresh performance. This exercise temporarily turns
the monologues into dialogue!
If one monologue talks about another person throughout, it might help to have another actor
play that character onstage. This can be a rehearsal exercise but could also be effective for
the final performance. For example, in one monologue, a man talked about being sexually
harassed by his boss. We had another actor play his boss and perform the actions that the
man talked about in the monologue (touching him, teasing him, threatening him, etc.).
Consider including in the production an introduction and/or conclusion that incorporates
the whole cast. These group pieces can feature fragments from each monologue or can be
monologue performed by the whole group. A group piece can emphasize that, although each
monologue is individual, those individuals are part of a larger community.
30
Think about involving an assistant director. This takes some of the burden off the director
and allows you to train a director who can take over in future years. If you do have an AD,
make clear your expectations of her or him. Discuss the division of labor and make sure you
and the AD arent overlapping or competing for control over certain tasks.



What to do during the run of the show:
Warm up the cast vocally and physically before each performance. Play some games to get
the cast focused and excited about the show. Pep talks are welcome.
Consider introducing the show to the audience at the start of each performance. You can
explain what Me Too is and get the audience warmed up for the show. Sample pre-show
speeches can be found in Appendix C and Appendix G.
Audiences usually have a difficult time understanding that the monologues were submitted
anonymously and that the actors did not write the monologues theyre performing. Make the
point as clearly as you possibly can.
Tell the audience that they can respond out loud to the show. If youve ever been to a spoken
word poetry performance, audience members snap and hum when a part of a poem resonates
with them. When you give the audience this freedom, it will help them feel more involved,
and it will give actors more to work off of. With a vocal audience, Me Too has the spirit of a
dialogue.
31
Guide to Acting

The monologues are wonderful gifts. The writers were generous enough to submit the pieces
to the show. In exchange for these gifts, it is the directors and the actors duty to treat these
monologues with care and respect. The theatrical process can be stressful and certain
monologues can be frustrating at times, but one should treat the monologues
sympathetically and try to understand why a writer wrote their monologue. Also, when
youre talking about monologues, remember that the writer could be in the room as an actor
or member of the production team!
Take care of yourself during the production process. Many of the monologues in Dukes Me
Too production have been on intense subject matters. Its emotionally trying to perform
some of these monologues night after night. Find ways to decompress after performances
and rehearsals. If going to emotional places during performance is interfering with the rest
of your life, find ways to imitate emotions onstage without actually having to experience
them.
When you create a character, remember that this character is neither the author nor you the
actor. They are a third entity entirely. You dont need to portray yourself or to get all the
details correct about their imagined author.
Start memorizing early. Much of the acting doesnt begin until you put down your paper.
Find a partner in the cast, and memorize your monologues together.
Rehearsal etiquette matters. Get to rehearsals on time. Respect those around you. Dont
coach another actor on her or his monologue unless the director says its okay.
Experiment and try new things in rehearsal. Youre only going to discover new things about
your monologue if you try it a bunch of different ways. Be creative and bring ideas to the
table. The director can always tell you if youre going too far or missing the spirit of the
monologue.
Dont talk about your monologue with those outside the show (unless you need to for the
sake of your wellbeing). This spoils some of the surprise of the show for those not involved
in the production team. It also lessens the chance that youll end up talking about your
monologue to its author.
If you know your author, thats okay. When youre crafting your performance, you dont
need to create a character based on the person you know. Youll never be able to imitate the
author exactly, so why imitate them at all?
After a performance, the author of your monologue may approach you. This can be a really
meaningful experience. It can also be quite disorienting. You have one character that you
created and then you have the real life author. Dont feel the need to change your character
to become more like your author. Trust that your performance honored the author even if it
didnt replicate her or him.
See our audition blurb in Appendix J for advice on auditioning.


32
Guide to Writing

Often the best format for writing a monologue is to start off writing specifically about a
certain moment. Write about what it felt like to be in that moment with dramatic detail, and
then slowly incorporate some sort of lesson learned or emotion felt by the end of the
monologue.
Some of the best monologues allow the audience to see the many facets that make us human,
so try not to write in just one emotional tone; in other words, dont be like just angry or just
distraught, show variations of feeling.
Try not to use too many big words and to use more basic structures than you might use
if you were only intending for your work to be read; things translate differently when being
performed.
Below is the explanation for the types of monologues we are looking for that is
currently on our MTM webpage. You are more than welcome to take the whole thing or
pieces of it to use in your own personal calls for submissions:

We want all storiessad, happy, funny, scary, angry, contemplative, whatever.
We want all formatsanecdotes, poems, speeches, blog posts, conversations, interviews.
Really, absolutely any format is acceptable.
No story is too small.
If you want to submit a story, but arent sure how to put it on paper, please email us.
Wed be more than happy to work with you.
For length, aim for 1 page single-spaced, or 2 pages double-spaced. Please note that we
sometimes edit pieces that come to us any longer than this. If you would like creative control
over edits please note so in your submission and a good way to contact you.

We understand that some of you may be slightly apprehensive about submitting a
monologue from your personal email address. Therefore, we have created a form that
you can use to send us your submission. The form asks for a monologue code. You will
make up any 6-digit number and input it in the designated field. Keep this code! After we
choose monologues, we will post the codes that have been chosen so that you know if
your monologue will appear in the show.

You may open this form, input the required information (6-digit monologue code number
that you make up), attach/upload your monologue, and it will be sent to us completely
anonymously. This way, there will be absolutely nothing linking your name to your
submission.

Here are some quick tips for writing your story:
" Dont approach it like an academic essay.
" Write it like youre saying it to somebody.
33
" Take a look at some past performances. (There is a link in the menu above.)
" If you feel like you have nothing to say about identity, youre wrong.
Look at this list of words, and see how any of them relate to you:

" Family
" Friends
" Religion
" Spirituality
" Race
" Sex
" Gender
" Ethnicity
" Language
" Culture
" Accent
" Atheism
" LGBT
" Minority
" Majority
" Discrimination
" Disability
" Class
" Nationality
" Community
" Queer
" Money
" Career
Perhaps ask yourself some of the following questions:
" Has there been a moment in your life that has altered the way yo view things to how you
saw things before that moment and how you see things now?
" What is something that you think is normal/obvious, but others still find controversial?
" What is something people wouldn't know about you unless you told them?
" Are you the person everyone else thinks you are?
" When you look in the mirror, what do you see?
" What do you wish you had know before taking your first steps onto Duke's campus?
" Have you ever felt inferior?
" How are you different from the person you were in high school?
" What is the best way and the worst way you have changed since coming to college?


34
V. A Quick Guide to Launching

FAQs
How much will it cost to do Me Too Monologues with my community?
Conceivably, you should be able to do it for free. The three things you need are people, a
space, and a survey, and often times you can find all of these for free. If actors, directors, and a
production team volunteer to participate, then you have all the people you need. If you can
reserve a space or find someone to donate a space, that will be free as well. You can also do the
show outside in a public space! To get the monologues submitted, you need an online form. You
can make one on Google Drive (or on Qualtrics if your university has an account). Alternately,
you can go low tech and have people submit monologues in hard copy into a submission box.
The costs of Me Too are minimal to none. Me Too at Duke spends the vast majority of its funds
on T-shirts for audience members, which is a beneficial though not vital part of the
production.

How will I get enough submissions for the show?
Everyone has a story. If you ask around, youll find more people willing to send theirs in
than you expected. Talk to friends about submitting monologues. If you read an interesting
article in the school paper, contact the author about writing a monologue. You can even submit a
few monologues yourself. In Me Toos first year, several of the monologues were written by the
director. Get creative! Set up a booth on campus to talk about Me Too Monologues and
encourage people to submit. There are more than enough stories out there; with some ingenuity,
youll be able to get people to submit them.

Do I need to be a theatre person to do Me Too?
Nope. Our founder, Priyanka Chaurasia, had never done theatre before creating Me Too
at Duke. Many of our performers are doing theatre for the first time. Were all actors and
storytellers in our everyday lives, and this knowledge can help you build Me Too. You can also
find allies with theatre experience who are able to coach you through the production process. For
advice, you can look to us on the Me Too team at Duke or to theatre professors and students at
your university. If you care about social justice and storytelling, youll be recruit people to your
side who can help you with the theatrical element of the production.

What to Expect
Programs like this do not happen overnight. Try not to bite off more than you can chew
and do not expect the first year of the show to be a smashing hit with people waiting in three
hour lines to get in the door. It will happen, but it takes patience and momentum can only build
over time. We have provided the history of our show below, so that you can see what the growth
process has looked like for us so far.


35
History
Priyanka Chaurasia created the show in 2009 after attending Common Ground, a Duke
diversity immersion retreat that provides open spaces for students to share their own stories and
thoughts on how they are affected by identity markers. Priyanka felt moved by what people had
to say, particularly about race, and was compelled to make sure these experiences and insights
could be heard by wider audience on a larger platform in the form of testimonial theater
(Oberski, 2010). As years have passed, the focus of MTM has expanded from primarily race to
essentially all identity issues including campus culture, sexuality, class, gender, religion, and
disability. As part of the MTM process, students anonymously submit personal stories and, of
those, roughly fifteen are chosen by the production team to be performed. At the same time, the
team is watching students audition and matching the person they feel would do the best with
each piece to the monologues chosen. Nobody who performs a monologue wrote it his or herself.
The first MTM show was held on Martin Luther King Day with help from the MLK
committee and the Kenan Institute for Ethics. It was originally meant to be staged in Brodie
Theater on East campus (seats 80), but when the Facebook event reached over 400 RSVPs,
Priyanka scrambled for a bigger venue and managed to snag the White Lecture Hall (seats 250).
Every row was full and people still continued to sit on the floor, aisles, and stairs! Every year
since its establishment has brought yet more advancements to the production. By 2012 the show
was a weekend long event, with three fully packed shows in the Nelson Music Room (seats
roughly 500) and a three member production team (Theatrical Director, Executive Producer, and
Assistant Producer). By 2014, the production team had reached six members (+ Assistant
Director, Publicity Manager, and Graphic Designer) and the show expanded to two weekends
with five packed shows in total, with programming for Me Too Week in the four days in
between the weekends. With the added two shows, the production had over 2,200 viewers, not
including YouTube that is almost a third of the undergraduate population! And the future
looks even brighter! The production team for this upcoming 2015-year has eight members
(+Director and Assistant Director of Programming and National Expansion) with a focus on
continuing to keep the show strong while spreading to other university campuses with the help of
Priyankas marketing expertise.
The Me Too team feels that other universities could benefit from MTM just as much as
Dukes community has benefited from the creative outlets it has provided for advocacy,
reflection, increased understanding, and personal discovery. We urge you to launch the
production at your own university and promise to support you every step of the way and make
the process as easy as possible by providing as many resources as we have to offer (templates for
grants, our constitution, budget, invites to special administrators, flyers, banners, and so on are
included in the appendix and should be available shortly through our national website once it is
launched).




36
V. Gaining Administration Support
Alignment with Diversity Goals of Higher Education
In her article Fostering the Moral and Civic Engagement of College Students, Anne
Colby writes, College students are not passive recipients of socialization, but actively construct
and reconstruct their understanding of moral experiences such as justice, rights, equality and
welfare through their experiences. A college education is meant to open students horizons
through exposure to different worldviews and modes of thinking. Students are ideally taught to
question the world around them and to rebuild it again on a foundation of what they believe to be
truth, as opposed to standards they passively accepted as simply the way things are or as a
default. As a result, many college students find themselves questioning the worldviews they
brought in and redefine their identities along the way, too.
27

In 2002, Duke President Nannerl Keohane stated: As a University, we participate in the
education and socialization of undergraduate students to fully appreciate life of the mind, mature
in social roles that prepare them to make significant civic contributions as world citizens, enjoy
productive careers and loving relationships, and successfully navigate the complex work of
living a meaningful life. MTM contributes to this ideal of a truly formative education and adds
so much to what a university can teach its students. My ultimate hope is that MTM may
crystallize the sense that Duke, and any college that launches this production on their campus, is
a place where these things occur and can evolve authentically.
A national study on campus culture nicknamed the Chilly Papers illustrates the need for a
production like MTM on college campuses. The core analysis of the report is embodied within
the following quotation from one of the studys interviewees:
[Although our college] houses a diverse group of people [t]hat does not make it
diverse Many women and minority students think that both attitudinal and
institutional factors relegate them to second-class status this is a fragment
community, dominated by a core group whose particular values are supported by the
larger community and by the College itself.
28

College community spaces are almost always set up in a way that caters to the hegemonic power,
leaving those that do not fit the unmarked mold to feel less significant in the grand scheme of
campus social and academic culture. The challenge we face is to focus its efforts on presenting
multiplicity and variety as the actual norm. Privileging inevitably communicates values and
universities must examine whom it is privileging and for what purposes, whether that be through
funding and space allocation policies or procedures for academic, residential, and social groups.
When asked in a survey about the importance of diversity experiences during their four
years of college, students placed their expectations for meeting different people close to very

27
Arnett, J. Emerging Adulthood: A Theory f Development From the Late Teens Through the Twenties. American
Psychologist, Vol 55(5), May, 2000. pp.469-480. Publisher: American Psychological Association [Journal
Article]
28
Campus Climate Survey: Faculty Comments, 2, 1991. Box 1. Women's Center records, Duke University
Archives,
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.
37
important on the measurement scale.
29
And while Admissions selects a diverse conglomerate of
students to attend its university in order to facilitate this intercultural communication and
interaction, students actual self-reported behavior is at odds with that expectation.
30
A Duke
study showed, Across different racial and ethnic groups, student networks during the first two
years, at best, remain as racially or ethnically homogeneous as they were during high school. At
worst, they become even less racially or ethnically diverse.
31
The Campus Life and Learning
Project hypothesizes that this is because their desires are for exposure and not necessarily
engagement.
32
But is mere exposure enough for them to engage with difference and learn how
to operate in an increasingly diversifying world? How can institutions inspire greater diversity
and intercultural competency within student networks?
We believe the answer is not only making these opportunities for engagement available,
but also to get students excited about them. MTM has done just this. The production has created
a brand for itself that links advocacy and entertainment to the extent that even those who would
not normally involve themselves in the social justice world find themselves in line for up to three
hours to ensure a spot in the theater. MTM is effective because it is not an academic lecture or
overly structured dialogue it comes straight from peers and raises points controversial enough
to inspire passionate, spontaneous dialogue as audience members leave the theater and long after.





"Me Too Monologues is an effective vehicle in identifying campus-wide social issues and
sparking dialogue among and between students, staff and faculty."
-Zoila Airall, Dukes Assistant VP of Student Affairs for Campus Life


29
Duke Campus Life and Learning Project. 2008. p. 85. <http://www.soc.duke.edu/undergraduate/cll/>.
30
Ibid.
31
Ibid.
32
Ibid.
38
MTM Mechanisms of Effect (Proof It Works)

1. Emotional Intimacy Enhances Memory and Commitment to Prosocial Behavior
Numerous research studies have pointed to the benefits of using narrative, in forms
ranging from fiction to biography, as a mechanism to develop readers empathy, ethnic
consciousness, critical thinking skills, and organizational strategies.
33
Academic fields such as
social work, law, secondary school education, nursing, and medicine have even begun using
narrative as an effective training tool because of its capacity to inspire professional growth and
empathy.
34
MTM is effective because it allows for peoples personal stories to be exchanged
using an intimate, narrative format. The production is unusual in that it creates a space for an
audience of over 500 viewers while also managing to generate an aura of emotional intimacy that
would normally only be possible between two or three already-bonded individuals in a secluded
setting.
Sociologist Brene Brown describes emotions inspired by intimacy as the energy that
exists between people when they feel seen, heard, and valued; when they can give and receive
without judgment; and when they derive sustenance and strength from the relationship.
35
By
staging narratives via a presentation style that mirrors an intimate heart-to-heart, MTM enables
the viewer to use this emotional intimacy to reach a new level of emotional transcendence.
Transcendence, when used as a psychological term, means being able to see the bigger picture
by stepping outside the circle of egocentricity [w]hen this happens, ones own troubles lose
some of their salience.
36
The more one transcends into a story, the greater the likelihood that the
event will be committed to memory and continue to impact ones future actions. Studies have
shown that the majority of attitude changes are mediated by emotional as opposed to rational
responses.
37

Memory and learning become greater when linked with feelings because the composition
of our brain: 1) Remembers stories better than facts and 2) Has memory commitment devices
that tend to become more sensitive as experiences evoke greater emotion. Cognitive scientist
Roger C. Schank notes, Stories are easier to rememberbecause in many ways, stories are
HOW we remember.
38
MTM fits into this because, in the flurry of emotion it brings, audience

33
(Shapiro et el., 2005; Pardeck, 2005; Freeman and Bays, 2007; Holloway, 2009; Djikic et al., 2009; Schotland,
2009 in Turner, 2013, p. 854)
34
(Turner, 2013, p. 853)
35
(Brown, 2010, p. 19).
36
Zachar, P. Pathological Narcissism and Its Relationship to Empathy and Transcendence. The Pluralist, Vol 1(3), Fall
2006. Pp. 89. Publisher: Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois.
37
Mazzocco, P., Green, M., Sasota, J., & Jones, N. This Story Is Not for Everyone:Transportability and Narrative
Persuasion. Social Psychological and Personality Science, Vol 1(4), Oct, 2010. pp. 364. Publisher: Sage
Publications [Journal Article]
38
Pink, D. H. (2006). A whole new mind: Why right-brainers will rule the future. Riverhead Books: New York. p.
100.
39
members are likely to recall emotion-rising monologues more often and with more clarity and
detail than neutral events.
39


2. Overcoming compassion fatigue with comedic relief
One of the keys to MTM is making use comedic relief. The directors agonize over the
order of the monologues so that if one piece is heart wrenching or controversial, the next
monologue can help the audience to recover from emotional overload before compassion fatigue
is induced. Compassion fatigue is a medical term used to describe the vicarious traumatization
or secondary traumatization common among nurses and caretakers.
40
The American Institute
of Stress explains that compassion fatigue is different from burnout, the cumulative process
marked by emotional exhaustion and withdrawal associated with increased workload and
institutional stress, because burnout is not related to trauma. One nurse paints the following
picture:
We have not been directly exposed to the trauma scene, but we hear the story told
with such intensity, or we hear similar stories so often, or we have the gift and curse
of extreme empathy and we suffer. We feel the feelings of our clients. We experience
their fears. We dream their dreams. Eventually, we lose a certain spark of optimism,
humor and hope. We tire. We arent sick, but we arent ourselves.
41

While this level of compassion fatigue requires an extended onset period that would not occur
from sitting through a mere two hours of the MTM production, audience members may feel self-
protection mechanisms arise within themselves that create a sense of impersonalization,
disconnection, apathy, desire for isolation, or even physical tiredness. This is likely because of an
emotional residue or strain of exposure that can result from a strong identification with
helpless, suffering, or traumatized people or animals.
42
Having comedic pieces interdespirced
throughout the show is one of the best ways to counteract this effect. On a side note, this is also a
reason why it is critical for the production team to make note of monologues that may be
triggering and include an announcement to address this before the show begins.









39
Ibid.
40
Fagley, N., Coleman, J., & Simon, A. Effects of framing, perspective taking, and perspective (affective focus) on
choice. Personality and Individual Differences, Vol 48(3), Feb, 2010. pp.264-269. Publisher: Elsevier
Science [Journal Article]
41
(in American Institute of Stress, 2012).
42
(American Institute of Stress, 2012).
40
3. Palliative Narrative
Narrative medicine is a term coined in 2000 by Rita Charon at Columbia University. It
is a practice informed by the theory and practice of reading, writing, telling and receiving
stories, all of which increase the viewers capacities to comprehend the patients experience
through a holistic practice that focuses on bearing witness.
43
For those who have experienced
illness or hardship, writing about it moves this experience from talk to the visible page where
they can recover, revise, and thereby control the meaning of what has happened to them.
44
The
act of writing down or speaking out loud an account of an impactful personal experience has a
powerful effect. It brings memories and emotions that may have been repressed or
compartmentalized deep inside oneself into the daylight, so one may actually begin to process
and come to terms with them. In her book The Gifts of Imperfection, Brown quotes Hartlings
brilliant insight that:
[I]n order to deal with shame, some of us move away by withdrawing, hiding,
silencing ourselves, and keeping secrets. Some of us move forward by seeking to
appease and please. And some of us move against by trying to gain power over
others, by being aggressive and by using shame to fight shame yet all of these
strategies move us away from our story. Shame is about blame, fear, and
disconnection. If we want to live fully, without the constant fear of not being enough,
we have to own our story.
45

Before monologues even make it onto the stage, they have likely already had a profound effect
on the writer. Psychology experts Stanley and Hurst explain, [W]e rescue events and thoughts
from oblivion. We fix them, and so we render even the horror somehow acceptable or at least
tellable. In the end, if patients suffer from isolation, this narrative healing can cure [because]
what cures the condition is no longer being alone with it.
46

The sense of agency that accompanies giving ones own account is empowering in two
ways: 1) It can help in letting go of numbing and taking the edge off vulnerability, discomfort,
and pain
47
and 2) It can dissolve the sense of powerlessness that comes with feeling
victimized or caught within a web of guilt by allowing the individual to raise his or her voice and
be heard.
48
To see ones own words performed in front of a large mass of people gives one the
sense that they have the power to be heard by and impact others, thereby working against the
desperate feeling that comes when one believes they cannot affect change or that a situation is
hopeless.


43
Stanley, P., & Hurst, M. Narrative Palliative Care: a Method for Building Empathy. Journal of Social Work in
End-of-Life & Palliative Care, Vol 7(1), Jan, 2011. Special Issue: Partners in palliative care: Enhancing
ethics in care at the end of life (Selected contributions from Fourth Conference of Collaborative for
Palliative Care). pp. 45. Publisher: Taylor & Francis [Journal Article]
44
Ibid.
45
Brown, B. (2010). The Gifts of Imperfection. City Center: Hazelden. p. 46. [Book]
46
(in Stanley & Hurst, 2011, p. 45)
47
(Stanley & Hurst, 2011, p. 65)
48
(Stanley & Hurst, 2011, p. 65)
41

Storytelling is the thread to the quilt of our lives. Without narrative, whether oral or written,
we are like random patchwork and our existence lacks meaning and connectivity. On a
campus where students admittedly hide their stories, opportunities to encourage and foster
storytelling are imperative. Me Too Monologues provides students a monumental chance to
write and orate experience and existence at Duke. The show is magical, not just because it
provokes an array of emotions and thoughts, but because it reminds us what it means to
live, to connect and to be wonderfully quilted human beings.
Lexy Lattimore, Me Too Actress and Theatrical Advisor (Class of 14)



4. Contact Theory/Mere Exposure Effect & Intergroup Anxiety/Selection Bias
The contact theory hypothesizes, [I]ntergroup contact typically diminishes intergroup
prejudice.
49
It has been suggested that the prejudice reduction related to intergroup friendship
may even generalize to other outgroups not involved in the contact situation.
50
Even more
appealing is research done on Robert Zajoncs (1968) mere exposure effect theory, which
found that greater exposure to targets, in and of itself, can significantly enhance liking for those
targets.
51
To summarize, coming in contact and engaging with difference reduces prejudice.
With all these benefits at so little cost, why is contact among students not occurring more than
just sitting in the same lecture halls and sports stadiums as those with different identity markers?
Why are students still maintaining a friend group that is low on the diversity scale? We would
point to intergroup anxiety and selection bias as the two main culprits.
Intergroup anxiety is the social phenomenon identified by Walter and Cookie Stephan in 1985
that describes the ambiguous feelings of discomfort or anxiety when interacting with members
of other groups.
52
The source of the anxiety usually stems from fears of negative evaluations
from the outgroup for failing to be aware of and demonstrate appropriate behaviors that are
congruent with the outgroup's social norms.
53
Other sources of anxiety may include: Negative
psychological outcomes for the self, such as feeling uncomfortable or being deemed prejudiced
or possibly being ostracized from one's own ingroup for associating with members of an
outgroup.
54

In terms of selection bias, people that hold prejudices intentionally or unintentionally,
implicitly and explicitly avoid contact with the objects of their prejudice, while the
unprejudiced seek such contact.
55
MTM does an incredible job getting people of all different
identities together in one room, by choice, and excited to engage something that is, quite
honestly, rare.

49
Pettigrew, T. Future directions for intergroup contact theory and research. International Journal of Intercultural
Relations, Vol 32(3), May, 2008. pp.188. Publisher: Elsevier Science [Journal Article]
50
(Pettigrew, 1997; Van Laar, Levin, Sinclair, & Sidanius, 2005; in Pettigrew, 2008)
51
(Bornsteinm 1989; Harmon-Jones & Allen, 2001; Lee, 2001; Zajonc, 1968; Homans, 1950; in Pettigrew, 2008, p.
188)
52
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intergroup_anxiety
53
Ibid
54
Ibid
55
(Pettigrew, 2008, p. 188)
42
5. Emerging Adulthood
College-aged youths are in a period Jeffrey Arnett has labeled emerging adulthood,
which is neither adolescent nor young adulthood but is theoretically and empirically distinct
from them both.
56
Emerging adulthood tends to span the most volitional years of life when
the brain is under a major process of development, which means the experiences one has during
this period play a considerable role in the permanent wiring of the brain.
57
It is important for
MTM to take advantage of this period, as advances in social cognition and developments
towards higher-level moral reasoning during adolescence and emerging adulthood give rise to
increased consideration of multiple perspectives and empathy.
58
In other words, college
students are at the stage in their lives when a catalyst like MTM can spark a transformational
event that alters his or her sense of self enough to strengthen their moral identity and
commitment to prosocial behavior.



6. Breaking the Effortless Perfection Mirror & Inspiring New Forms of Reflection
College students live in an era of mass media and popular culture that idealizes
unrealistic and unattainable standards of beauty and success. This is undeniably one of the main
sources of the effortless perfection myth a dangerous pressure felt by college students to be
"smart, accomplished, fit, beautiful and popular," all without any "visible effort."
59
Jean
Kilbourne, filmmaker of Killing Us Softly, emphasizes the particular harm that ads can do to
ones sense of self:

56
Arnett, J. Emerging Adulthood: A Theory f Development From the Late Teens Through the Twenties. American
Psychologist, Vol 55(5), May, 2000. pp. 469. Publisher: American Psychological Association [Journal
Article]
57
(Arnett, 2000)
58
Smits, I., Doumen, S., Luyckx, K., Duriez, B., & Goossens, L. Identity Styles and Interpersonal Behavior in
Emerging Adulthood: The Intervening Role of Empathy. Social Development, Vol 20(4), Nov, 2011. pp.
664-684. Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. [Journal Article]
59
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-yao/college-women-pressure_b_2898446.html
43
Advertising is an over $200 billion a year industry. We are exposed to over 3,000 ads
a day. Yet, remarkably, most of us believe we are not influenced by advertising. Ads
sell a great deal more than products. They sell values, images, and concepts of
success and worth, love and sexuality, popularity and normalcy they tell us who we
are and who we should be.
60

Advertising and media sexualizes women, underrepresents minorities, and creates an unrealistic
notion of cultural norms that are unattainable, yet feel expected. Brene Brown, a sociologist
who studies shame and vulnerability, astutely proclaims, When we allow ourselves to become
culturally conditioned to believe that we are not enough and that we dont make enough or dont
have enough, it damages our soul.
61
When our self worth is tied to our net-worth, we base our
worthiness on our level of productivity.
62

The effect is that which Brown calls the hedonic treadmill. Robert Thompson, a
professor of Psychology at Duke, explains, A treadmill only goes faster and one begins to ask
is that all there is longer, harder, faster? For what end? The pressures of the hedonic
treadmill churns out overfunctioners who tend to move quickly to advise, rescue, take-over,
micromanage, and get into other peoples business rather than look inward at their own issues.
63

The common trend for may students at high-pressure institutions is that we make ourselves busy
so that we never need to slow down, as opposed to sitting still with ourselves and our emotions
for a while. We often do not realize that this overfunctioner behavior is a response to anxiety,
rather than a truth about who we are and we are in need of situations that help us understand
what we cannot easily see and inspire us to feel we can change.
MTM is the best opportunity for breaking the effortless perfection mirror because it
challenges students to look at what is going on within themselves and others beyond a surface
level by engaging in a different form of reflection. When Maya Angelou spoke at Convocation
my first year at Duke, she made the declaration: I am a human being, nothing human can be
alien to me. She continued, My Lord! That statement is liberating! It not only liberates me
from other peoples ignorance, it liberates me from my own.
64
This notion is central to MTM.
Afftene Taylor, MTMs Theatrical Director in 2012, claims, "MTM is about coming closer to
discovering the truth of who you are." To add to this, we believe it is about discovering the truth
of who others are in a way that allows you to see past smoke screens, create more realistic
expectations for ourselves, and define new norms to reach for.



60
Brown, B. (2010). The Gifts of Imperfection. City Center: Hazelden. pp. 68 [Book]
61
(Brown, 2012, p. 69)
62
Ibid.
63
(Brown, 2012, p. 109)
64
Sealey, N. (2014, May 24). I love being an African-American woman: The Maya Angelou speech that changed
my
life. Salon.com RSS. Retrieved June 21, 2014, from http://www.salon.com/2014/05/29/i_love_being_an_
african _american_woman_the_maya_angelou_speech_that_changed_my_life/ [Column/Opinion]
44

Under the veil of anonymity, students bring forth stories we would only hear in the most
intimate of late night dorm room discussions. In Me Too, we hear amazing stories about
facing the death of a parent, racial discrimination, sexual assault, figuring out ones
career. Me Too challenges the notion that students are always okay and successful and
brings forth narratives about students vulnerability. This year, we reached 1900 students,
almost a third of the student body. Each year after Me Too, our center for Counseling and
Psychological Services reports more students coming in to talk. Seeing people bring forth
their silenced narratives onstage, students are more willing to bring forth their silenced
narratives in real life.
Kari Barclay, Director of MTM (Class of 16)


7. Pausing to Reflect
Engaging students in the diversity surrounding them is difficult, particularly at schools
where high achievement is expected, because busy schedules make time a precious commodity
that is not easily bought. Students are not usually willing to spend time on less-than-stellar
programming when it could also be used studying, engaging in their own extracurriculars, or
having the chance to just take a break. The strength of a program like MTM is that it has
acquired enough hype over time to draw people in from all walks of campus life and people are
not only willing, but excited to take time out of their busy schedules to attend.
Because of this, we believe MTM has the power to create rare moments of pause and
reflection. By bringing students face-to-face with others stories, we sometimes find ourselves
watching our own struggles and delights in life unravel on the stage in someone elses words.
The MTM production slows down time and hones in on the human experience in a way that
brings greater insight towards our own behaviors and the experiences that define us. MTM
allows its viewers to come to a place of stillness that:
[I]s not about focusing on nothingness; its about creating a clearing. Its opening up
and emotionally clutter-free space and allowing ourselves to feel and think and
dream and question if we stop long enough to create a quiet emotional clearing, the
truth of our lives will invariably catch up with us.
65

We would argue that most students need more moments of reflection like these. Sitting in the
audience of the show is one of the few times when the pressures of effortless perfection and
productivity competitiveness fall silent and the focus is no longer unhealthy comparison, but an
uplifting sense of connectedness in the universal human experience. The audience engages in
each others differences through shared narratives and settles into realizing we all have our own
issues.



65
Brown, B. (2010). The Gifts of Imperfection. City Center: Hazelden. p. 109. [Book]
45
8. Counteracting Shame and Loneliness
Brown explains that the psychological impact of shame works like a zoom lens on a
camera, so that when we feel it, the camera is zoomed in tight and all we see is our flawed
selves, alone and struggling.
66
We ask ourselves questions like, Im the only one with a muffin
top? Am I the only one with a family who is messy, loud, and out-of-control? Am I the only one
not having sex 4.3 times per week (with a Calvin Klein model)? Something is wrong with me. I
am alone.
67
The media messages and the socializing impacts of college culture that make us
think this way are impossible to avoid; to do so would be like trying to hold your breath to
avoid air pollution.
68
MTM combats resulting shame and feelings of lonliness by forcing people
to zoom out and view the full picture in a way that switches their internal dialogue from overly
self critical to I cant believe it! You too? Im normal? I thought it was just me!
69
MTM acts as
a reality-check [to] our shame triggers and the messages and expectations that weve never been
good enough.
70



"Following Me Too Monologues, we have an increase in students coming to talk about their
experiences as victims of sexual assault. It is powerful to hear these stories out loud to help
survivors understand that what they experienced is viewed by their peers as traumatic.
Students also hear their peers say supportive and encouraging things about the monologues
and they come to understand that perhaps if they share their story and get some help for it
that they will be believed."
Sheila Broderick, Womens Center Gender Violence Intervention Services Coordinator


9. Working Against an Alternative Unfriendly Environment
Many universities have been marked alternative-unfriendly environments. If not properly
handled, diversity within an institution or community can become a decisively negative thing.
One anonymous Duke student notes, Without this [intercultural] understanding, we create a
community where negative student interaction is the norm because differences are ostracized
rather than appreciated.
71
If the mission of a universities is to make themselves known for their
well-rounded and empathetic student body that thrives off its diversity,
72
then they must
continue to look for ways to actively engage students in difference in a way they can get excited
about. By finding as many ways as possible to insert diversity into mainstream culture (like
MTM), it will become more and more normalized, and, therefore, welcome.

66
(Brown, 2010, p. 68)
67
Ibid.
68
Ibid.
69
Ibid.
70
Ibid.
71
(Brown, 2010, p. 33)
72
Airall, Z. email, May 21, 2014 [Personal Communication]
46


10. Breaking Down Categorization/Stereotype to Combat Prejudice
Categorization is an innate psychological tool meant to provide meaning, establish
norms, and simplify [in order to] afford coherence to our social worlds.
73
Unfortunately, it
almost always leads to misleading assumptions and oversimplifications of identity, otherwise
known as stereotype. A study of the minimal group paradigm (a category differentiation model)
showed that even with trivial memberships, anonymity, and no prior inter-group contact,
subjects are prone to viewing ingroup and outgroup members in divisive ways. The usual
consensus is that they are different from us and should also be evaluated less positively
than us.
74
In this Us-Them binary, [r]ighteousness, intelligence, integrity, humanity, and
victory are the prerogatives of Us, while wickedness, stupidity, hypocrisy, and ultimate defeat
belong to Them.
75
Kaufmann believes Us-Them restates I-It in the plural, which is clearly
dehumanizing.
76
He continues:
The relationship between one of Us and one of Them by definition lacks empathy, let
alone attunement. Should one of Them presume to speak with one of Us, the voice
would not be heard as fully or openly as would one of Usif at all. The gulf that
divides Us from them builds with the silencing of empathy. And across that gulf we
are free to project onto Them whatever we like when we refer to someone as one of
Them, we close off our altruistic impulses.
77

This is important to understand because [o]nce the others are set at a psychological
distance, they can [easily] become a target for hostility,
78
whether it be through conscious
or unconscious bias and discrimination.

73
Crisp, R., & Hewstone, M. Multiple Social Categorization. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol 39.
2007. Zanna, Mark P. (Ed); San Diego, CA, US: Elsevier Academic Press, pp.170. [Chapter]
74
(Crisp, 2007, p. 178)
75
Goleman, D. (2006). Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships. New York: Bantam Dell. p.
299. [Book]
76
Ibid.
77
(Goleman, 2006, p. 298-299)
78
(Goleman, 2006, p. 299)
47
Stereotype and bias are linked because once the seed of bias is planted, our way of
observing and evaluating the world operates in a way that tend[s] to seize whatever seems to
confirm the bias and ignore what does not.
79
In other words, whenever we encounter someone
to whom the prejudice might apply, the bias skews our perception, making it impossible to test
whether the stereotype actually fits.
80
Goleman warns that, over time, the mind builds evidence
against the other and with each additional disquiet, each unflattering media depiction, each
feeling of having been treated wrongly these incidents build, apprehension becomes antipathy,
and antipathy morphs into antagonism.
81
Bias can come from explicit and implicit reserves
within ourselves. MTM believes the biases we need to pay the most attention to are often those
of which we are unaware. They allow even the most well-meaning person to commit
microaggressions, which count as a harmful form of prejudice, too.
We must fight these prejudices because they impact the sense of self-confidence,
belonging, and acceptance of the those they are directed towards. They determines whether or
not one feels qualified to apply for certain positions, deserving of love, and capable of exercising
agency in their community. Not to mention that the American Psychological Association (2001)
has cited prejudice as a cause of health, economic, and educational disparities.
82





79
Ibid.
80
Ibid.
81
(Goleman, 2006, p. 300)
82
Paluck, E., & Green, D. Prejudice Reduction: What Works? A Review and Assessment of Research and Practice.
Annual Review of Psychology Vol 60, Jan, 2009. pp. 343. Publisher: Annual Reviews [Journal Article]
48
11. Perspective Taking & Personalizing the Issue
Perspective taking, or the cognitive capacity to spontaneously consider the world from
anothers viewpoint, is another mode of imagining a different persons experience.
83

Psychology expert Daniel Batson found that asking individuals to take the perspective of an
AIDS victim, homeless individual, and convicted murderer showed improved attitudes toward
those groups.
84
In addition, some studies found that empathy reduced group bias even when no
specific target group was identified for participants.
85

We believe that the key is personalizing the issue by reformulating an abstract statistic
into an individual human consequence. The key here is to show stories one person at a time.
Decety & Jackson note, It certainly is easier to identify with one individual than with many,
since judgments in response to personal moral dilemmas compared with impersonal ones
involve greater activity in brain areas associated with emotional and social cognition.
86

Narrative humanizes and when participants perceive themselves as similar to a target, they
engage in lower levels of stereotyping in mental state inferences than when perceived
themselves as dissimilar.
87
Watching MTM is much more effective than learning about racism,
sexism, homophobia, classism and other forms of discrimination from a textbook. It is a
personalized, peer-to-peer experience rather than a lecture from professors or the administration.


Me Too Monologues makes me proud to go to Duke. The fact that so many people come
together to create and watch the show makes me realize that there is, indeed, more than
meets the eye when it comes to this student body. I'm exceedingly happy that this kind of
conversation can not only exist, but thrive on campus.
Logan Hasson, Me Too Assistant Producer (Class of 12)


12. Allowing for Intersectionality
Identities are not always simple and clear-cut [or mutually exclusive], but often complex
and multifaceted.
88
In fact, many people identify most strongly with a combination of identity
markers in an apostrophe oriented way such as being a female-engineer, disabled-athlete,
biracial-American. After being asked to recount the first time she remembered realizing she was

83
(Davis, 1983 in Gillin, 2012, p. 84). Gilin, D., Maddux, W., Carpenter, J., & Galinsky, A. When to Use Your
Head and When to Use Your Heart: The Differential Value of Perspective-Taking Versus Empathy in
Competitive Interactions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol 39(1), Jan, 2013. pp.3-16.
Publisher: Sage Publications [Journal Article]
84
(Batson et al. 1997. in Shih, 2013, p. 80)
85
(Shih, 2013, p. 82).
86
Decety, J., & Jackson. The Functional Architecture of Human Empathy. Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience
Reviews, Vol 3(2), Jun, 2004. pp .92. Publisher: Sage Publications [Journal Article]
87
Ames, D. Inside the Mind Reader's Tool Kit: Projection and Stereotyping in Mental State Inference. Journal of
Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 87(3), Sep, 2004. pp.340-353. Publisher: American Psychological
Association [Journal Article]
88
(Crisp & Hewstone, 2006, p. 163)
49
gendered, Dr. Zoila Airall, VP of Student Affairs for Campus Life at Duke, responded, I cant
speak about what it means to be a woman without speaking about what it means to be a Black
woman. MTM allows for monologues to bridge the imaginary gaps between different identity
markers to allow for intersectionality (discussed earlier in this handbook).



13. Groupthink in a Good Way
All emotions are social.
89
Ruiz-Belda claims, [T]he presence of others affects
emotional reactions because we look to others to show us how to react to things.
90
It is useful to
get outside ones small ingroups and engage with controversial topics while surrounded by a
diverse crowd of outgroup viewers. It allows one to get a better feel for how people from all
different backgrounds may respond to different issues, as opposed to the select few with which
one associates. In line with this research, just watching a MTM performance has the ability to
change ones perspective by initiating a process wherein, rather than accepting the status quo,
one feels encouraged to question and challenge what is believed to be just the way things are.
Turner notes, The ability and motivation to envision changes to oppressive policies and to
suggest creative solutions for communities are enhanced when founded on empathy, compassion,
and commitment,
91
all of which are modes of engagement our research has been able to link
back to the MTM model. In this way, MTM contributes to the ability to be confident in
advocacy roles when alternative avenues or approaches are required, which allows individuals
to be more effective and confident in carrying out prosocial behavior.
MTM is also able to pinpoint and delve into specific issues we have been socialized to
accept without question, revealing the extent to which our culture influences and shapes our
notions about the nature of life systems and blinds us from a more honest truth.
92
We believe
MTM is a mode of public media that has the ability to shift that which the campus communities

89
(Goleman 2006, p. 83)
90
(in Paluck, 2009, p. 350).
91
Turner, L. Encouraging Professional Growth among Social Work Students through
Literature Assignments: Narrative Literature's Capacity to Inspire Professional Growth and Empathy. British
Journal of Social Work, Vol 43(5), Jul, 2013. pp.854. Publisher: Oxford University Press [Journal Article]
92
(Adams & Marshall, 1996, p. 432)
50
define as normative in a healthier direction. MTM plays a vital role in answering the following
questions: What is college culture? Who gets to define it? Do we accept a pre-existing college
student stereotype and evaluate ourselves in relation to it or do we claim the title and, in the
process, change its meaning a little further to include ourselves? MTM accentuates the sense that
an individuals personal or social identity not only is shaped by the living systems around the
individual, but the individuals identity can shape and change the nature of these living
systems.
93
This in itself is empowering and provides a greater sense of control in an
environment that can make one feel they will never be enough.

















93
Ibid.
51
VI. Resources, Support, and Contacts
Find downloadable versions at www.metoomonologues.com

Appendix A: Constitution (for Our Charter as a Student Organization)

Me Too Monologues (MTM) Constitution

Article I: Name
The name of this organization shall be Me Too Monologues, hereafter referred to as
[MTM].
Article II: Purpose
The purposes of this organization shall be:
! To entertain a diverse audience with performances of student, alumni,
employee and faculty submitted monologues, detailing their experiences in
relation to the formation of their respective identities
! To actively engage the Duke community, and create a safe space for dialogue
to emerge regarding concepts of identity, be it race, nationality, cultural
background, class, and so on
! To bring a wider scope of monologues and actors, that we might better
represent the diversity of Duke University

Article III: Membership
All undergraduate students at Duke University are eligible for membership. Members shall be
classified into two categories: Executive Board and Cast. Potential Executive Board members
must apply for an officer position, which will be voted on by the current board. Cast members
will be determined through an audition in the Fall semester, and will be voted on by the
Executive Board. The official roster shall be maintained on the DukeGroups website.

Article IV: Non-Discrimination
MTM shall not discriminate on the basis of political ideology, race, color, national and ethnic
origin, disability, sexual orientation or preference, gender, or age in its membership, activities,
and projects. MTM & Duke University shall not tolerate harassment of any kind.

Article V: Officers
Any member of MTM can become an officer after being listed on the official roster. Officers
shall be elected annually in the Spring semester by a majority vote of the current Executive
52
Board and shall take office thirty (30) days prior to the end of the semester. The officers of this
organization shall be:

Executive Producer
! Calls and presides over official meetings of the organization along with the Theatrical
Director
! Maintains accurate ledger and financial records
! Approves all expenditures from the organization financial account
! Approves (i.e. signs) all request for allocations from third-party sources
! Maintains organization in good standing with Duke University and sponsors via
communication with the University Center Activities and Events (UCAE) and/or other
interested University entities
! Acts as the tie-breaking vote in matters of business
! Maintains organization website and multimedia publications along with the Assistant
Producer and Graphic Designer
! Assists the Theatrical Director in show preparation, including but not limited to:
booking show venue, booking rehearsal spaces, reviewing show content, acquiring
monologues and actors, and finding sponsors.
! Serves as an ex-officio member of any committee that is created through By-law

Assistant Producer
! Maintains the official roster of the organization
! Records minutes of all official meetings of the organization
! Maintains official historical file for the organization (constitution, by-laws, minutes,
rosters, financial records, risk management records, etc)
! Contacts approved vendors for quotations and orders
! Assists the Executive Producer in her/his duties as requested
! Serves as an ex-officio member of any committee that is created through By-law

Publicity Manager
! Serves as a representative of MTM on campus and in neighboring areas
! Publicizes MTM and related events
! Attends sorority and fraternity chapter meetings, selected-living group meetings, and
extracurricular meetings to promote MTM
! Maintains organization in good standing with Duke University and sponsors via
communication with the University Center Activities and Events (UCAE) and/or other
interested University entities along with the Executive Producer
! Creates text blurbs for emailing listserves and strategic contacts
! Coordinates with the Graphic Designer on publicity materials, including but not limited
to: flyers, handouts, and MTM paraphernalia
53
! Serves as an ex-officio of member of any committee that is created through By-law

Graphic Designer
! Develops design and brand image with approval of Production Team
! Delivers design initiatives within desired deadlines
! Assists the Producers and Publicity Managers as requested
! Maintains website and multimedia publications along with Publicity Manager and
Producers
! Serves as an ex-officio of member of any committee that is created through By-law

Theatrical Director(s)
! Is responsible for the overall practical and creative interpretation of the monologues,
taking into account the budgetary and physical constraints of production.
! Works closely with the creative and production teams, the performers and the producer
to create a performance which connects with the audience.
! Encourages Duke Community to submit monologues, through conversation, workshops
or script development schemes as necessary
! Adapts a script as necessary
! Analyses and explores the script content and conducts relevant research;
! Conducts auditions for productions, selecting and hiring designers, light technicians,
etc.
! Manages time and organizes people and space
! Attends production meetings as requested
! Conducts rehearsals
! Attends all dress and technical rehearsals and prepares detailed notes for the cast,
creative and production teams
! Helps to publicize the production by giving interviews and leading discussions
! Gives tasks to the Assistant Director(s) as necessary
! Serves as an ex-officio member of any committee that is created through By-law

Assistant Director(s)
! Assists the Theatrical Director(s) with her/his duties as requested
! Keeps the production running smoothly
! Maintains rehearsal schedule
! Works with the director(s) during the audition process, and is present for all rehearsals
! Serves as an ex-officio member of any committee that is created through By-law

Article V: Advisors
A full-time faculty or staff member of Duke University shall be selected by the
54
executive board and serve as the organization advisor. The advisor shall be an ex-
officio member of the organization and all of its committees.
Advisor duties:
! Interpret University Policy for organization
! Direct membership to appropriate campus resources to accomplish the
organizations goals
! Act as the official university contact in matters of policy violation
Article VII: Removal of Officers
Officers may be removed with a two-thirds (2/3) vote of the general body. The officer in
question must be notified of the vote of removal at least one (1) week in advance and shall
have the opportunity to speak before the general body prior to the vote.

Article VIII: Executive Board
The executive board of MTM shall be composed of the organization officers, the advisor, and
any appointee deemed appropriate by the President. The executive board shall govern the
operations of the organization, and shall promote the mission of the organization.

Article IX: Meetings
Regular meetings of MTM shall be held at least monthly during the Fall and Spring
academic semesters and at the discretion of the President and Theatrical Director at
other times. Quorum shall consist of at least (3) members of the executive board and
50% of the general body.
Article X: By-laws
By laws shall be created to dictate the structure and procedures of the organization. By-
laws may be proposed by any member and must obtain a majority vote of the
membership. No by-law shall infringe on the authority of the constitution. Required
by-laws, which shall be ratified annually, include:
! Organization Committees
! Parliamentary Modification (ratified at first meeting of a new executive boards
term)
! Election of Officers
Article XI: Committees
Committees of the organization shall be created from time-to-time by the executive
55
board in order to organize and distribute the workload of the organization. Committees
shall be governed by by-law and shall not have authority over the executive board or
the general body.
Article XII: Parliamentary Authority
Meetings and voting shall be governed by a modified version of Roberts Rules of
Order Newly Revised, tenth edition.
Article XIII: Elections
Elections must be openly publicized for at least two (2) weeks and open to the membership of
the organization. Elections shall be structured by the Election of Officers by-law.

Article XIV: Amendment
Amendments to this constitution may be proposed by any member and must obtain two-thirds
(2/3) majority by a vote of the general body.

Document History:
Created: 04/16/2013
By: Cameron Thompkins, Tara Gavcovich, & Caralena Peterson






















56
Appendix B: Sample Rehearsal Schedule
Make Available before auditions to make sure all performers know what their commitments are

Me Too Monologues 2012-2013
Rehearsal Schedule

Fall Semester:
November 4, Sunday 4-7 PM 1
st
FULL CAST Rehearsal
November 7 or 8, Wednesday/Thursday Small Group Meetings
(about 4-5 actors each for an hour, split over those two days)
November 14 or 15, Wednesday/Thursday - Individual Rehearsals
November 28 or 29, Wednesday/Thursday Individual Rehearsals
December 1 or 2 TBA, Saturday or Sunday 1-3:30 PM FULL CAST Acting Workshop
Photo shoot for ad campaign
Lines memorized by workshop

Spring Semester:
January 9 or 10, Wednesday/Thursday small group/individual rehearsals
January 16 or 17, Wednesday/Thursday small group/individual rehearsals

January 21, Monday 12-5 PM (MLK DAY) FULL CAST REHEARSAL

January 22, Tuesday 6-10 PM FULL CAST Rehearsal
January 23, Wednesday 6-10 PM FULL CAST Rehearsal
January 24, Thursday 6-10 PM - FULL CAST Rehearsal

January 26, Saturday 10-4 FULL CAST Tech Week Rehearsal
January 27, Sunday 6-10 PM FULL CAST Tech Week Rehearsal
January 28, Monday 6-10 PM FULL CAST Tech Week Rehearsal
January 29, Tuesday 6-10 PM FULL CAST Tech Week Rehearsal
January 30, Wednesday 6-10 PM FULL CAST Final Dress Rehearsal/Photo shoot

Performance Dates:
January 31, Thursday 7:30 PM Performance
February 1, Friday 7:30 PM Performance
February 2, Saturday 7:30 PM Performance

Expectations:
- Keep all monologues strictly confidential. Do not share any details about any stories with
anyone who is not a part of Me Too Monologues.
57
- Respect all members of the cast and crew.
- Show up to all rehearsals on time. In the event that you are late, you need to call, text, or
email a member of the Me Too Monologues crew to give us a heads up.
- If you aware of any potential conflicts, please inform ____name___ (email) so that they can
plan rehearsals accordingly.
- HAVE FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!





































58
Appendix C: Sample Pre-Show Speech


Hello and Welcome to Me Too Monologues!

If you dont know by now, we are a student written, produced, directed and acted show,
focusing on identity. Students, alumni, and faculty submit stories of their experiences, which
are turned into documentary theatre performance. We began in 2009 as a show focused
primarily on race, ethnicity, and culture, but over the years have expanded to include a various
concepts of identity. Were so glad that youve decided to spend your Thursday night with us
as we honor our 5
th
year of MTM!
Id like to sincerely thank your sponsors Office for Institutional Equity, the Kenan
Institute for Ethics, the Womens Center, The University/Cultural Fund, the Center for
Documentary Studies, and of course the Center for Race Relations, where we function as one
of their programs.
I think we come here because we seek an understanding of our peers, faculty, and friends
that we dont get from our day to day interactions. This show is about a deeper understanding.
Im so proud of our cast theyve been working almost every day for the last month to get
these performances where they are today. Both The Production Team and cast have been
working extra hard this year to honor our peers words, as well as make this the best show
weve ever had.
So a disclaimer: The actors that you will see on stage tonight are not the writers. I repeat.
They are not the writers, nor did they write each others monologues. These stories are shared
by all of us, because we are one community. If you are concerned with the content in the show,
please find either myself, and [list other members of the production team].
That said, please turn off your cell phones. You can snapchat/instagram/tweet about the
show once its done.
There will be no intermission tonight, so please try to remain in your seats for the duration
of the show.
Thank you and we hope you enjoy the show!











59
Appendix D: Production Team Application


Me Too Monologues Production Team Application

1. Have you been involved in Me Too Monologues before? How?

2. Why do you want to be involved in Me Too?

3. What ideas do you have for improving Me Too Monologues? (Quality of the show, quality
of submissions, etc.)

4. What position(s) are you applying for?
Executive Producer
Assistant Producer
Theatrical Director
Assistant Director
Publicity Manager/Graphic Designer
Photographer
Videographer

Please also answer the following questions specific to the position(s) you are applying for:

What experience do you have? (Event planning, leadership roles, theatre/film/tv
production, grant writing experience, organizational roles, etc.)

What potential challenges do you foresee in your position, and how would you address
them?

We are always trying to get more administrators to come see Me Too Monologues. Write
a short email inviting an administrator to the show, explaining why they should attend.










60
Appendix E: Appeal for Funding









Proposal for Partnership with Me Too
Monologues 2013





Identity can seem so abstract. Me Too Monologues is about living it.







61






I. SUMMARY ........................................................................................................... 3

II. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 4

III. GOALS .................................................................................................................. 5

IV. PARTNERSHIP WITH ME TOO........................................................................... 5

V. TIMETABLE .......................................................................................................... 6

VI. BUDGET ................................................................................................................ 6

VII. ENDORSEMENTS ................................................................................................ 6

VIII. ADDITIONAL LINKS ........................................................................................... 6



















2

62

I. Summary

Me Too Monologues is an annual show about identity, written, performed, and produced by
members of the Duke community. Students and faculty submit stories of their experiences, and
we turn them into a documentary theatre performance. We began in 2009 as a show focused
primarily on race, ethnicity, and culture, but over the years have expanded to cover topics of
sexuality, class, gender, religion, disability, and community. And even these topics do not
adequately define who we are.

This year we are looking for partnerships and sponsorships to help us continue providing
students with outlets for reflection, increased understanding, and personal discovery.
Hopefully, you will join us in spreading social awareness through documentary-theatre
performance.

Me Too is looking for potential donors; our anticipated budget is $2100, which will be outlined
in the coming pages.






















3


63
II. Introduction

The purpose of the Me Too Monologues is to take audiences inside stories and experiences
that they might not otherwise have access to. These stories often feature conflicting viewpoints
that force the audience to reevaluate their perceptions. After each performance, we invite
audience members to engage in talk back dialogues with the production team and members
of the cast. Me Too Monologues invites audiences to listen, talk and actively engage with
complex moral and ethical issues of identity.

Me Too Monologues takes issues of identity out of the multitude of centers on campus The
Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, The Center for Multicultural Affairs, The LGBT
Center, The Freeman Center for Jewish Life, The Kenan Center for Ethics, etc.and brings
them to a new space and a new medium. While these centers serve a crucial purpose on
campus, not all students take full advantage of them. Some students may not even know that
the centers exist, while others may feel that they are not a part of the centers target
demographic.

There is no other venue on campus that allows students to explore such a wide range of critical
issues related to identity, while allowing the audience to absorb the content at their own pace.
At Duke, we often become passive observers of these issues in particular, and Me Too
Monologues encourages honest and sincere dialogue that is otherwise hard to generate. While
many may talk about identity with their closest friends, genuine and provocative conversation
that brings together so many varied and sometimes conflicting viewpoints is rarely obtainable
on a similar level.

Me Too Monologues has already collected submissions and will hold auditions from October
22-24th. Rehearsals will begin in early November and will continue at the start of next
semester. Performances are scheduled for January 31st, February 1st and 2nd of 2013, and will
take place in Nelson Music Room on East Campus.

We have a production team of five undergraduate students, one of whom helped direct last
years show, and we anticipate a cast of around 15 students. We also have a faculty advisor,
Jules Odendahl-James of the Theatre Studies department, and we function as a subsidiary of
the Center for Race Relations.

Me Too Monologues is targeted at the Duke community. Our audience is composed primarily
of students ages 18 to 24, but we anticipate faculty, staff, and members of the administration
will attend as well. We expect an attendance of roughly 1,000 over the course of the three sold-
out performances. After performances, videos are posted on YouTube, where we have
garnered over 7,250 hits on videos posted since February 2012. 4
64
III. Goals

" To entertain a diverse audience with performances of student, alumni, employee
and faculty submitted monologues, detailing their experiences in relation to
formation of their respective identities
" To actively engage the Duke community, and create a safe space for dialogue to
emerge regarding concepts of identity, be it race, nationality, cultural
background, class, and so on
" To bring a wider scope of monologues and actors, that we might better
represent the diversity of Duke University
" To maintain sustained discussion via our Tumblr, in order to continue with our
mission of providing a safe outlet for the Duke community

IV. Partnership with Me Too

We are offering three tiers of partnership with our program. Standard benefits that are provided
are:
" Mention in pre-show announcements, giving you placement of your organizations
name in front of 900-1100 students over the course of three days
" Access to a wide and diverse demographic of college students ages 18-24

For a donation of $250, you will receive these, in addition to:
" Placement of your organizations name in our program
" Signed programs from our cast
" Reserved Seating for 2 on Opening Night (Must RSVP)

For a donation of $500, you will receive these items in addition to:
" Placement of your organizations name on our t-shirts, banner, and Plaza board
" A Feature on our website, www.metoomonologuesduke.org
" Placement of your merchandise, your banner, and pamphlets for your organization on
our table outside of the Nelson Music Room, where the audience will be able to receive
more information about Me Too, buy t-shirts, as well as sign up for newsletters.

For a donation of $1000, you will receive these items, in addition to:
" Placement of your organizations name on our invitations, and our videos from the
2013 performance
" 2 Additional Reserved Seats for a night of your choosing (Must RSVP)
5
65
VII. Endorsements

Me Too Monologues functions as a subsidiary of the Center for Race Relations (CRR), which
operates out of the Center for Multicultural Affairs (CMA).

In the past, we have acquired funding from CRR, Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Womens
Center, and the LGBT Center, and our support base continues to grow.

VIII. Additional Links

http://metoomonologues.com/
http://metooblog.tumblr.com/
http://www.dukechronicle.com/article/me-too-monologues
6




66
Appendix F: Sample Program




67


68





















69
Appendix G: Sample Budget

Item Anticipated
Cost
1 Website Maintenance $120.00
2 T-Shirts (250) $2,000.00
3 Merchandising (Stickers,
buttons, ticketing)
$150.00
4 Videographer $100.00
5 Invitations $75.00
6 Advertising (flyers,
banners, printing, plaza
board(s))
$225.00
7 Show Tickets and
Supplies
$10.00
Total $2,680.00





70


Appendix H: Audition Blurb

Whether youre a seasoned veteran or have never graced the stage, we encourage you to
audition for our show. The audition packet will be released soon. Stay tuned!
Our audition sign-up sheet will be released on Wednesday, October 15th 2014 at 9:00PM.
The sheet will be available here as well as on our Facebook page. If all spots are filled on the
spreadsheet, email us at metoomonologues@gmail.com to secure a spot on our wait list. Do
not create new spots.
Audition Suggestions
" Pick one of the monologues from the packet to perform during your 15 minute audition
slot. Do not feel obligated to pick a monologue that lines up with your particular
identity/experiences.
" Memorize the monologue relatively well it is fine for you to still have the sheet in
your hand but you do not want to be reading from the page. Acting only begins when
you are memorized.
" Be open to receiving direction!
" If you saw the show last year or watched the monologues on YouTube great! But do
not feel compelled to copy what the particular actor/actress from last years show
brought to the monologue. Your take on the monologue will be just as valid as the one
presented at the show last year.
" Please arrive 15 minutes early so that we remain on schedule!
Note: If you acted in the show last year, please select a monologue that is different from the
one that you performed! We would love to see you try out something new.















71
Appendix I: Invites for Faculty & Special Guests

72

Appendix J: Graphics
Logos


Flyers

Facebook Cover Photo





73
Quarter Sheets
(to pass out when tabling & at student activities fair)

Banner


74
Flyer for Mini-Show
(Early September to get attention of first-years)



Photos from the Mini Show





75
MTM Shirts & Stickers















76
Monday Motivations via Facebook
(to get people writing)





77
Appendix K: Categorized Duke MTMs on Youtube (2011-2014)
Our Youtube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzVIidGMQv75Pp8e2t54u8wSZ9w-lmf5h
Race
Please Don't Touch Me (2014) - Stanley Yuan
In the Margins (2014) - Phillip McClure
Names (2013) - Lindsay Walton
White (2013) - Jordan Rodriguez
Convince Me (2012) - Jenny Sherman & Jessica Poku
Wasnt It Enough (2012) - Roxana Martinez
I Became Black (2011)
Being an Asian Woman (2011)
I (2011)
Standing By My Men (2011)
A Diatribe on Race (2011)

Socioeconomic Status/Money
The Other Closet (2014) - Maureen Dolan
First World Problems (2014) - Tre' Scott
Privilege (2013) - Lawrence Nemeh
Three Words (2012)
Smile (2011)

Sexuality
Surprised (2014) - Daisygreen Stenhouse
Detour (2013) - Tre' Scott
You Don't Know Me (2013) - Athelia Pauli
B (2012)
Really? (2012)
Baby Steps/Your Son/Aflutter (2012) - Sebastian Cifuentes, Justin Harris, & Jacob Tobia
Live! (2011)
Dear Mom (2011)
Unbreakable (2011)
Stuck Between a Rock and a Hard Place (2011)
The Garage and Me (2011)

Sex/Relationships
Nuts (2014) - Karley Jarin
Feed my Libido (2014) - Ali Bahrynian
Secret Society (2013) - Cortnay Cymrot
MRS Degree (2013) - Phoebe Noe
78
What Duke Hasn't Taught Me (2013) - Alpha Tessema
Ego (2012) - Neha Sharma
Intervention (2012) - Cara Peterson
5, 6, 7, 8 (2011)
The Sex Kitten Strikes Back (2011)

Mental Illness/Suicide
Third Time Around (2014)
Episodes (2013) - Georgia Swee
Silver-hemmed (2012) - Justin Harris

Religion
Keeping the Faith (2013) - Nick Chilson
Judgment Day (2012)

Rape/Sexual Harassment
UTI (2014) - Caroline Kiritsy
Stolen First Kiss (2014) - Faye Goodwin
What I Wish You'd Told Me/Support (2013) - Phoebe Noe & Neha Sabharwal
Why Me? (2013) - Tre' Scott & Ritza Calixte
Damn (2012) - Lexy Lattimore
Rip (2012) - Lexy Lattimore
Little One (2012) - Jenny Sherman
Different (2012) - Neha Sharma
It Wasnt My Fault (2011)

Gender
Borders (2014) - Zacch Fowler
Not a Feminist (2011)

Eating Disorder/Body Image
Push-Up Bra (2014) - Marc Osian
Lifted? Nah (2014) - J.P. Senter
Farmgirl's Wonderland (2014) - Madelaine Katz
Missing You (2013) - Cortnay Cymrot
#exile (2012) - Melissa Regalia
The Norm (2012) - Jacob Tobia
Weight On Me (2011)

Disease
Metastasize (2014) - Adesuwa Giwa-Osagie
79
Still Breathing (2013) - LeJean Williams

Physical Abuse
Delusion (2013) - Jaimie Woo

Pregnancy
Alone (2014) - Elizabeth Hoyler

Career/Academics
Great (2013) - Lawrence Nemeh
The 2% (2012) - Andrew Kragie

Duke Culture
Dear Freshman Girl (2013) - David Estrin
Finger's Crossed (2013) - Kari Barclay

Family
Haze (2013) - Imani Ifedi
Dear Family (2012) - Roxana Martinez

Greek Life
It's Nothing Personal (2013) - Georgia Swee





















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