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Chemistry 107 Fall 2013

Sections: 503, 504


Lectures: Section 503 Tu,Th 11:10 - 12:25, Rm. 100 Heldenfels Hall
Section 504 Tu,Th 2:20 - 3:35, Rm. 100 Heldenfels Hall
Instructor: Dr. Joanna Goodey Pellois
Office Hours: Tu, Th. 12:45 - 2:00, 3:35 - 4:15, or by appointment
F 2:00-4:00 (with course IA Jess DeMott)
Office: 123D Heldenfels (office hours), 34 Chemistry
E-mail: jpellois@tamu.edu
Course Objectives
Welcome to Chemistry 107. This course is intended to provide engineering students with a background in
important concepts and principles of chemistry, the study of the properties and behavior of matter. The
relevance of chemistry in solving technological problems will be emphasized. The topics covered in
Chemistry 107 are listed below.
atomic structure
chemical bonding
molecular structure

stoichiometry
thermochemistry
chemical equilibrium

reaction kinetics

The learning objectives for this course have been specifically tailored for engineering students. Many of
these objectives deal with particular topics or skills that will be introduced in the lectures. However, some
of the most important objectives are more general in nature and will be stressed throughout the entire
semester. These objectives are listed below. Please keep these objectives in mind as you study each topic.

Factual Knowledge Achieving basic chemical literacy requires familiarity with chemical terms,
structures and symbols.

Conceptual Understanding Learning to visualize, explain and predict the behavior and properties of
matter on the molecular scale is the basis of a conceptual understanding of chemistry.

Problem Solving Developing problem solving skills in chemistry involves practicing quantitative
calculations and applying acquired knowledge to solving specific problems.

Succeeding in Chemistry 107


My goal is to help you meet your individual expectations for Chemistry 107. Your goal should be to acquire
the skills necessary to meet the course learning objectives. I highly recommend formulating a plan to attain
these goals and would be happy to help you with this. Former first year chemistry students suggest that
your plan includes the following components: coming to class, participating in class, reading the textbook,
practicing problems, seeking help when you need it, and keeping the learning objectives in mind at all
times.

Required Materials:
Textbook Chemistry for Engineering Students, Lawrence Brown and Thomas Holme, 2nd Ed. This textbook
is designed for engineering students and was written by one of the Chemistry 107 instructors. There are
many different options for purchasing the textbook. Several of these options come with access to an
online homework program called OWL. This semester we will not be using OWL, however the cheapest
purchasing option often includes OWL. Textbook Purchasing Options The instant access e-book ($75 for
6 a month access code) contains OWL and is available through the link posted at
http://owl.cengage.com/partners/tamu/. A bundle containing a loose-leaf edition of the textbook and
OWL ($80, ISBN 978-1-133-64422-4) is also available at this website and in the MSC bookstore. New and
used hard copies of the textbook are available through bookstores (ISBN 978-1439047910). You may
also purchase the earlier edition of the textbook for less money.

Homework This semester we will be using the Sapling Learning online homework package. This
homework package was designed by chemistry instructors and includes questions, instant feedback and
tutorials to help you learn chemistry. Access to Sapling Learning will be free for Chemistry 107 students
enrolled in sections 503 and 504 during the Fall 2013 semester. Homework is a required component of
the Chemistry 107 grade. Follow the directions below from Sapling Learning to create an account and
access your homework assignments.
1. Go to http://saplinglearning.com and click on your country ("US Higher Ed" or "Canada") at the top right.
2a. If you already have a Sapling Learning account, log in and skip to step 3.
2b. If you have Facebook account, you can use it to quickly create a Sapling Learning account. Click the blue
button with the Facebook symbol on it (just to the left of the username field). The form will auto-fill with
information from your Facebook account (you may need to log into Facebook in the popup window first). Choose
a password and timezone, accept the site policy agreement, and click "Create my new account". You can then skip
to step 3.
2c. Otherwise, click the "Create an Account" link. Supply the requested information and click "Create My
Account". Check your email (and spam filter) for a message from Sapling Learning and click on the link provided in
that email.
3. Find your course in the list (you may need to expand the subject and term categories) and click the link.
4. If your course requires a key code, you will be prompted to enter it. KEYCODE: 107
Once you have registered and enrolled, you can log in at any time to complete or review your homework
assignments. During sign up or throughout the term, if you have any technical problems or grading issues, send
an email to support@saplinglearning.com explaining the issue. The Sapling Learning support team is almost
always faster and better able to resolve issues than your instructor.

A scientific calculator for use in class and on exams. Calculators may be either programmable or nonprogrammable. I expect you to bring your calculator to each class period.
i>Clicker 2 You can purchase your i>clicker 2 ($44) at the bookstore (ISBN 978-1429280471) or online at
iclicker.com. It is my hope that clickers will enhance the large class classroom experience by
encouraging participation and allowing for instantaneous assessment. Clickers can be registered using
the link at iclicker.com. When registering your clicker enter your UIN as your student ID. Your remote ID
can be found on a sticker at the bottom of the back of your remote. You will need to bring your clicker
and a spare set of batteries to each class.

Grading: The graded components of this course include: weekly homework (7%), clicker exercises (3%),
three midterm exams (20% each), and a final exam (30%). Letter grades will be assigned as follows: 90%
A, 80 % - 89% B, 70% - 79% C, 60% - 69% D, < 60% F. These cutoffs may be lowered, but will not be raised
under any circumstances. All grades will be posted on the course website (eCampus.tamu.edu).
Clicker Assignments: Clicker assignments will be given during each class period. Clicker questions are
designed to give you instantaneous feedback about your factual knowledge, conceptual understanding or
problem solving ability. Some clicker assignments will be graded according to participation while others will
be graded according to response accuracy. Students earning 80% or more of the possible clicker assignment
points will be given full credit for the clicker assignments. All grades below 80% will be adjusted (by
percentage) according to this scale. Please remember to bring an extra set of AAA batteries to class.
Homework: Weekly homework assignments will be assigned in Sapling Learning. Homework assignments
are designed to help you gauge your progress in Chemistry 107. Homework assignments will be posted on
Thursday and are due the one week later, on Friday at 6:00 pm. The lowest homework grade will be
dropped.
Exams: Exams in Chemistry 107 are designed to test factual knowledge, conceptual understanding and
problem solving ability. Three midterm exams and a final exam will be given during the semester. Exams
may include short answer, multiple choice, true/false and free response questions. Programmable scientific
calculators may be used on the exam. The exam dates are listed on the schedule included in this package.
Webpage: The class schedule, syllabus, course notes, grades, and other helpful information can be found
on the eCampus course website (eCampus.tamu.edu). Please check this website frequently for updates.
Communication: I will be happy to answer any questions before class, after class, in office hours or via email. I cannot guarantee a quick response via e-mail.
Absences: You are responsible for all material presented in class, even if you should happen to be absent.
Make-up examinations will be given only for University-excused absences provided the appropriate
documentation is provided within the time frame specified in the 2013-14 TAMU Student Rules and
Regulations. When possible you should discuss upcoming excused absences with me in advance of the
event.
Honor Code: The Aggie honor code states that An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal or tolerate those who
do. Upon accepting admission to Texas A&M University, a student immediately assumes a commitment to
uphold the Honor Code, to accept responsibility for learning, and to follow the philosophy and rules of the
Honor System. Students will be required to state their commitment on examinations, research papers, and
other academic work. Ignorance of the rules does not exclude any member of the TAMU community from
the requirements or the processes of the Honor System. For additional information please visit:
http://www.tamu.edu/aggiehonor.
Disabilities: The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides
comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation
requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for
reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an
accommodation, please contact Disability Services, Cain Hall, Room B-118 or call 845-1637. The Disability
Services office is very busy every fall, so please make an appointment with them immediately if you feel

you require assistance. I would be happy to meet with you to discuss any individual accommodations
required to help you succeed in this course.
Extra Help: There are many sources of extra help available to you on campus. Office hours, tutor.tamu.edu,
SI sessions and the tutoring center are all good sources extra help for this course.
SI Leader for Fall 2013: Laura Bonefas
SI Sessions for Fall 2013: Sun. 3:00 pm (Bloc 113), Mon. 6:00 pm (Hecc 200), Thur. 6:00 pm (Bloc 113).

Tentative Schedule for Chemistry 107 Fall 2013


Date

Chapter

Topic

Tu.

Aug.

27

Chp. 2

Atoms and Molecules

Th.

Aug.

29

Chp. 2

Atoms and Molecules

Tu.

Sep.

Chp. 3

Molecules, Moles, and Chemical Equations

Th.

Sep.

Chp. 3

Molecules, Moles, and Chemical Equations

Tu.

Sep.

10

Chp. 3

Molecules, Moles, and Chemical Equations

Th.

Sep.

12

Chp. 4

Stoichiometry

Tu.

Sep.

17

Chp. 4

Stoichiometry

Th.

Sep.

19

Exam 1

Covers Chapters 1 4

Tu.

Sep.

24

Chp. 5

Gases

Th.

Sep.

26

Chp. 5

Gases

Tu.

Oct.

Chp. 6

The Periodic Table and Atomic Structure

Th.

Oct.

Chp. 6

The Periodic Table and Atomic Structure

Tu.

Oct.

Chp. 6

The Periodic Table and Atomic Structure

Th.

Oct.

10

Chp. 7

Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure

Tu.

Oct.

15

Chp. 7

Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure

Th.

Oct.

17

Chp. 7

Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure

Tu.

Oct.

22

Chp. 8

Molecules and Materials

Th.

Oct.

24

Exam 2

Covers Chapters 5 7

Tu.

Oct.

29

Chp. 8

Molecules and Materials

Th.

Oct.

31

Chp. 9

Energy and Chemistry

Tu.

Nov.

Chp. 9

Energy and Chemistry

Th.

Nov.

Chp. 10

Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

Tu.

Nov.

12

Chp. 10

Entropy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

Th.

Nov.

14

Chp. 11

Chemical Kinetics

Tu.

Nov.

19

Chp. 11

Chemical Kinetics

Th.

Nov.

21

Exam 3

Covers Chapters 8-11

Tu.

Nov.

26

Chp. 12

Chemical Equilibrium

Th.

Nov.

28

Thanksgiving Holiday

Tu.

Dec.

Chp. 12

Chemical Equilibrium

Final Exams
Section 503 -- Fri. Dec. 5 3:00 pm 5:00 pm -- Covers Chapters 1-12
Section 504 -- Wed. Dec. 11 1:00 pm 3:00 pm -- Covers Chapters 1-12