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ews

PASADENA, CALIF.

A PUBLIC A TmN FOR MEMBERS OF THE WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD

.

VOL. VI, NO. 22

NOV. 6, 1978

HOW THE WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD CAME INTO BEING

By Herbert W, Armstrong

T o SET the record straight, once and fo r all , I give you here the actual FACTS

relating to my fe llowship-

ping with - the Church of

God,

Stanberry , Mo., and the A.N. Dugger "Chu rch of God , " Salem, W. Va.

Rumors have been started that Garner Ted Armstrong is now doing the precise thing his father did in the years 1933 to 1937. Like most rumors started for wrong reasons, thi s

one is FA LSE!

Mr. Armstrong's conversion

No biblically or:ganized

true Church still existed

Errors usually originate fro m a

Seventh

We are really in the third generation of the present era of the WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD. Few are still living who remember how God started it. HERE IS EYE-OPENING NEWS to most members of God's Church TODAY. And it corrects a false rumor concerning Herbert W. Armstrong and the "Sardis" era of the Church. Mr. ARMSTRONG DID NOT "LEAVE" THE CHURCH OF GOD (Sardis era) TO START THE PRESENT WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD. Nor did he ever seek to draw away any of their members after him! He was never a member of either of the two fac- tions of that church - though he fellowshipped and gave help to each of them. Mr. Armstrong's relation with "Sar- dis" was one of "GIVING" not "GETIING."

wa s founded

A . D .

31

founded on &SOIJD fOUND ."TION

- a spiritual foundation - the apostles (New Testament) and prophets (Old Testament) with

C hrist the act ual HEAD. Under the apostles and the very lew prophets after A.D. 31 were evangelists, pastors, other elders

and

re ac he rs .

d eaco ns

forced virtually to go under- ground, holding meetings se-

cretly. The apostle Polycarp (a disci- ple of the apostle John) and alater

apostle, Policrates, had heated

controversies with the Roman

bishops in the false "Babylonian

Mystery" religion (Revelation

17:5) , which , under Simon the

Sorcerer (Acts 8), had adopted

the name' 'C hristianit y

In Revelation 2 and 3 are the messages inspired by Christ from God' o throne.

The seven churches

The aJX>stle John relates , "I was in the Spirit on the Lord's

." (Revelation I:10) . In

day

other words, John was taken IN

VISION , by the Spirit of God, into

Day,

.

.•

by

Jesus Christ. lit was a SPIRITUAL ORGAN ISM - not a wo rldl y o r· ganiza tion - yet we ll o rgan ized

on GOO'S PATTERN.

God

and

deaconesses. It was truly the

" . hou sehold

of God

in

the far future DA Y OF THE LORD .

who m all the

building fitly

From the tirne of Adam to rrow -

framed together

unto an holy

approximately 6.()(X) years- we

temple in the Lord" (Ephesians

have been in the day of MAN.

2: 19-2 1), "

the whole body

deceived and led by Satan .

fitly joined together and com·

The period foreto ld in more

pacted by that which every joint

th an 30 prophecies

called the

supplicth . " (Ephes i ans

"Day of the Lord" is the time

4: 16) .

But after A.D. 33 viole nt per·

sec uti on set in (Acts 8: I). But

about A.D. 53 to 59 anot her gos·

pel was taking over the churches ,

and before A. D . 70 the Gospel

C hrist had preached was SUPPRESSED! The Church was

when God supernaturally inter- venes and begins taking over the

starting very shonly,

world -

perhaps one to three years . before

the second coming of Ch rist to

RULE ALL NATIONS.

The atx>stle John , in vision ,

(See HOW, page 31

'GOOD NEWS' TO CHANGE

FORMAT, 'WORLDWIDE NEWS' TO RESUME PUBLICATION

AS announced by Herbert W . Armstrong in a co-worker letter dated Oct. 16, The Good News will soon be changed into a full four-color magazine and the tabloid paper will continue publication under the name The Worldwide News. Work has already begun on the first two issues of The Good News magazine, and it should begin regular publication within the next few months. As explained by Mr. Armstrong, the new Good News will be devoted to biblical and spiritual food for members. The Worldwide News will resume its emphasis on news of the Work and its leaders throughout the world and continue its coverage of local church activities, an- nouncements of personal news, features on members and additional articles of a spiritual nature. We welcome your comments and look forward to sel\l- ing you with continued news and encouragementthrough

the pages of The Good News and The Worldwide News.

false

premise

ca re less ly

It was headed by Jesus Christ,

who already had asce nd ed to

God's throne in heaven.

It was

ASSUMED, unproved.

The

tru e

o ri g in a l C hurc h of

'78 Feast is 'spiritual revival'

PASADENA

-

Worldwide

Churc h of Gpd bret hren gathered at

75 site s thi s year from Anchorage ,

Alaska. to S uva . Fiji , for eight day s

(Ocl. 16to 23) of spiritual food. fe l-

lowship and fun. For the first time in the histo ry of

members

worldwide family had the opport u- nity to see a nd hear Herbert W , Arm-

the

God ' s

Feast

of

strong speak al the Feast. As the Festival gal under way the

even ing of Oct. 15 it was M r. Arm -

Feastgoers.

in

whether

greeted

strong

who

they

we re

meeting

coco nut-pa lm hut s o r Church-ow ned

tabernacles such as the ones 3t the

Lake of the O zark s . Mo

co nsin De ll s. Wi s . Films th at Mr. Arm strong had

and Wi s-

made before the Feast for this pur-

pose were s hi pped to all po int s of the

g lobe . For German-. French· and

Sp a ni sh· s peaking brethren the fi l m

was translated . So me attend in g the Feast in Afri- can site s had never seen Mr . Arm - Slrong before. Festival coordinators reported delight at being ab le to have

the film s . wi th many ca llin g the pre-

nta tion s the h ig hli ght of th e F~ sti­ va l.

se

him se lf made pe r- at three U.S. sites.

Acco mpanied by his assista nt. Stan-

ley Rader. he spoke before a com-

bined lotal of 28.000 brethren in SI.

Petersburg , Fla

and finally Tucson. Ariz. Mr. Rader

also gave lalks al the threc s it cs.

Mr . Armstrong ba iled the Feast as

(See FEAST 78, palle 8)

Mr, Arm strong sona l appearances

Big Sandy, Tex

FESTIVAL SERVICES -

Members watch Herbert

W . Armstrong 's opening nIght film

Ventana, Argentina, site, atx>ve, and Hsiao during

sel\lices at Fresno. Calif right. (Photos by Tom WiJ- Iiams and Dave Kn ight I

at the Sierra de la

Dexter Faulkner

Managing Editor

2

The GOOD NEWS

Monday,

Nov.

.6,1978

HOLY DAY OFFERING UPDATE

We ·are still in the proc~ss of entf;>ring all the HOly Dai offe~inginformation into ourfHes fo[ttje Feast of Tabernacles and Last Great Day, so we do not have final figures at this time, but wewolild like togive you theprefiminary numbers in -. thiS report (United States only).

BIG SANDY, TEX., PROPERTY -

Negotiations are being completed for

the sale of the· Work's Big Sandy, Tex., property. Aerial view shows the

formerAmbassadqrCollegecampus.

Inset: The Roy Han:>mer Memorial Library is a focal point on the grounds.

 

19n

1978

Chango

Total offering

$2.099,107.29

$2,205,465M

+5.1 percent

Average aHendance

66,072.00

66,555.00

+0.7 percent

Per person '

$31.43

$33.13

+'5.4 percent

Therewill be adpitionalofferingscoming from U.S. citizens who attended Festival sites in Canada and in the international areas, so ihese figures will go up slightly. ·Mr. Armstrong is encouraged by the.financial support of all the loyal membefs and wants 10 thank each of you for your part in this great Work of God.

Stanley R. Rader Treasurer

':Tre~urer.details campus sales·

By Stanley R. Rader

PASADENA -

Now that we are'

completing the negotiations for the sale of the two campuses (Brickel

Wood, England. and Big Sandy. Tex.) 1 would like ·to share some of the details with you.

As early as 1973, Mr', Herbert Armstrong bad determined that both

the Big Sandy and Brickel Wood col· leges should be dosed, This is a task that could not be 'accomplished over· night as there were a number of per-

sonnel and financial considerations to be' handled. The rest of the story

has alfeady been told .

In 1974 we closed the Brickel Wood college and approached the

flIm of Cluttons of London to assist us in the sale of the campus. We had a number of interested parties, both from England and foreign countries, but we were unable 10 come 10 a equitable agreement until the middle ofthis year. We fi~illlyagree~ on a

price "of 2 million pounds (approxi- mately $4 million) for the sale of the campus,. This is more than our in- vestment in the property , The Big Sandy campus,. closed in 1977 when all college operations were consolidated in Pasadena , ha s now received one offer of purchase that is being considered by'the execu-' tive committee. The offer is $)00,000 higher than our original asking price and about 25 percent higher than the estimated market ,value we had obtained in July. We have been carrying the campus' value on our books at approximately $8.4 million. We feel that we have been good' . stewards in these transactions. We have not lost money on these transac- tions nor have we obtained unreason- ably high returns. It is our intention _ to .utilize the funds rece),ved from 'these sa le s as an inve stment that will provide much-needed underpinning for our working capital , and at the

A Feast farewell

The Fea~t of Tabernacle s,

1978 , is over. For some it may have been their first ; for others ·their fifth, 12th or even 25th. For my family it was the 20th. From

indications as reports come in

all

The. Good News from around

to

the world others felt as we did - that it was a moving, encouraging and uplifting Feast. A Feast thl\t depicted peace and unity. One .that ~e will not soon forget. However, it is easy to slip back into our routine of life and forget the spiritual and physical lessons w~ learned during this past Festi- val season. The following poem, written by Michelle Briden of the To- ronto West churth, first-place winner in the 1977 Feast of Tabernacles Canadian YOU Tal- ent contest. was read on the Last Great Day at the Festival site we . attended. J felt it was worthy of sharing wit~ all our

Feast

Gather ye together now ,· _Here in the place .of God.

A place where angels guard your

sleep With ho ly s taff ana rod. _E !Jjoy this time of happine ss, Of peace, of joy, of love. Grow closer to your fellow man

And 10 the Lord above,

This issue's column was writ- ten by Dexter Faulkner. manag- ing edItor.of The Good News.

Take in the beauty of 'this time When summer turns to fall. The glory of the:changing .leaves, Of creatures large and smaIL

Drink in the words Of all the wise, Of heaven's holy men,. And understand old things anew Stir up your zeal again. Picture a time wilen life will be As it is ' now today . Remember, all you chosen ones. To study and 10 pray. Plug 'in your mind. Recharge your heart . Grow ~lid in thi s word. And when you go back to your home Remember what you've hear~L

.

.

For if yo.u do I'm sure you'll finel Your smile will never fade. ' And you will leave a happy heart In every place you've stayed. YOU'll find your feet have grown quite light ; . Your hand will work with ease_

faith will soon come : natu-

Your

rally. And lo ve will be aoreeze.

Remember , you mu st

God, Then He will reach for you. And when you know Him as your heart, Then He will know you too.

reach' for .

So

as you leave thi s place of God.

Re member what you've viewed. And go with love. with peace, with joy And with your faith renewed.

By Var J. Aspenns

With the singing of the final hymn

and a closing prayer , another Feast of Tabernacles becom.es history. ' We can easily recall the inspiring, mean- i.1gful messa'ges given from the pul-

pit and .can still savor the millenial-

like, abundam, joy(ui living experi-

enced during the eight days or more .

Probably-we all feel encouraged , up-

lifted and spiritually rejuvemited. And as a result of the Feast, we've come away with a greater sense of. commitment, dedicalion and resolve

. ~9w¥q~ . 9q~! r,H l: .vW~!k ,t~n_~ ~i(r in

generaL

'

~--

But will tliis resolve arid renewed

enthu sias m !ast?' Or will

short-lived as the proverbial New. Y~ar's resolution, which lasts .about as long as the hangover? Will this year's Feast give us an added spiritual boost that will raise us to a higher. spiritual p.lane of existence whereby we will personally reflect

and chara~ter of Jesus

as

it

be

the

image

Chfist more profoundly than ever be-

fore?

.

.

Knowl~ge put

t~ use

The answer lies ~ot so much in

seen·or.e:ltperi-

enc~d, but if).~hat we will personally · do right now and in the days ahead. , As Herbert W. Annstrong has often said, knowledge is of rio real value

espe -

-

cially true in respect to spiritual ·knowledge. What will we' do wit.h our Feast experience? Will we use it? Will we ponder over it. and build upon it, or will ~e let it lie dormant and die a slow death?

It's quite clear that unless we use

knowledge and apply it to our life

. and circumstances, it will be lost,

perhaps never to be regained. There

is

simple, yet so profound. When viewed in this light, it seems that our options are somewhat limited . It is hoped we' all will make the. right choice and with God's help will use the spiritual momentum of the Feast

successfully project us through

to

an old motto, "use it or lose it." It's

-

what we've heard 1 or

unless

it

is put

to

use . This is

the

another year, no maller what obsta- cles or trials this life may bring, indi- viduallr or as a Work.

Paul led the way

in anol_her set(jng ,

trod this same

a man

In another time,

named Paul

. Christian road before us·. He was nOI

unfamiliar with the trials and tests of life. Few can match his record "of labours, of beatings , of imprison:

ments, of perils', o'f fastings (see II Corinthians II). His life is a glowing example of how to be a

saine time provide interest , which can be added to our income in the years ahead.

Feast over., but challenge remains- what do we do with·what we learned?

Val Aspenns is a senior corres- , pondent with the Work's Personal Correspondence l)epartment 'in Pasadena,

Christian no matter the circum- stances, be it in poverty or wealth, in sickness or in health. If the stress of life is seemingly ioo much , take heart, Paul has been there. He over- came and freely gives us the benefit of his experience. Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ,

;'J"Predating.tlie.rece'ntjogging~fad;on a

.

, number ofo'ccasions used an7in(erest- ing,analogy comparing our calling to

. a race arid exhorted

us to ".

:

. run

and chosen to participate in this race for eternal life. To reject this oppor- tunity cou~d mean our salvation. So run we must, day by -day, week by week. Along the route we might stumble at times or have to stop momentarily at an aid station fat som.e thirst-quenching water , but remember that Paul. who wa s tried and tested in much the same manner . is_cheering us on; ' ~·so run , that ye may obtain (the prize]" (I Corin- thia~s 9:24). The Feast of 1'!)78'is over, but for

u s the challenges and 1\Ha I s !df''1lfe~­

·remain'.:;We 'have been' given the 1mowledg~ and we have the tools, It

is i now ounesponsibiiity to meditate

with patience the race thai is set be- fOle us" n~ebrews 12:1). To participate in this race ' you don't have to ,be a beautifully con- 'ditioned athlete." There is rio specific age qualification , ·· and the race· chairman doesn't even' discriminate _ against worn·en. But you (10 have to ~ aChristial1- willing to work hard

ran his race. He won his crown. We an.d put out, a lot of ef.fort: -', too have a crown prepared for, us.

.

apostle Paul met hi s chal-

lenges, accomplished his work and

on'the blessings we have been given" to assimilate the ric~ spirh uaJ nourishment received and renew our

. resofve and 'commitment to back up

Mr. Armstrong and this Work in it 's end-time commission.

The

"Behold.) come quickly: hold fast which thou hast , that no man take thy crown" (Revelation 3:11). So in the comjng year when the roa.d of life gets'toygh, remember Paul and keep , on running .

-"

CtRCULA'TlON: SUOO

The Good News is publshed blweeldy, ex- cept during the Church's annual Fall Festi- val, by the Wortdwlde Church of God. Copyright © 1978 Wor1dw1de Churcta ot

God. AII _rig,ts f.eserved.

Editor In chief: Herbert W. Armstrong Manlglng editor: Dexter H. Faulkner

A III.nt managing editor: Klaus 'Rothe;

auodete edHor: Sheila Graham ; layout

editor: Scott Ashley ; "Local Church

Newa" _or: Vivian Rothe; compoeitlon:

Km McAnally; drcuiRlon: RoIandAees

NOnCE: The Good News cannot be re- sporisible for the return of unsotlclted arti- cles and photographs. SUBSCRIPTIONS: Subscriptions ate sent automatically to th'e members ot the

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Postmaster: Please send Form 3579 to:

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A long.distanee run

The lace Paul alludes to is not a

short 60- or IOO-yard dash over a

perfectly level artificial running turf

enco.mpass~d by stands .filled

admiring, cheering fans. It is more

like a long distance cross-country run

winding over unpaved dirt or gravel roads as well as hard concrete, with stretches of level ground and hilly, gut-wrenching terrain. Because of the long distance, the

spreads out quickly

field of f1,

with

IOners

and you may_feel you're running all alone . At other times , you see run-

ners pass you and you'-re tempted to

. drop out in discouragement. After

all, who would know (or care)? And

then there's the pain of blisters orjust plainJatigue. What a relief it would be to quit. There's also the double threat of heat and humidity, which can sap your strength, but you go on. The drive and resolve has to come .

from within' as there are no cheering

tJ:lrongs to ' encourage . you along - but, finally, the long-awaited finish line. While only one can come in Tirst. when you've run hard a~d done your best, you' know yo u've won. Those who have experienced this know the

joy of rUl;ming , AI the end of hi s life

Ihe aposlle Paul expressed this Joy.

knowing he had run his spiritual marathon well and won the crown of righteousness (11 Timot.hy 4:8).

We must run

We Christians have been called

Monday, Nov. 6,1978

The GOOD NEWS

3

·r,

HOW·THEWORL.DWIDE CHU'RCH OF 'GOD CAME INTO BEING

(Continued from page 1)

was taken into this "qay of the Lord" called "the Lord' s day" in Revelation 1:10. This period, "the Day of the Lord," espe- cially that phase of it PRIOR to Christ's coming (although it shall continue through the millen- nium), is the ,THEME of tile book of Revelation . '

di~couraged- had lost their flIst

love . But, also, that has been true

of every era of the Church -

only not so dominant as in the fIrst two centuries. The Church did become scattered! Never again after the

flIst century

ORGANIZED, COMPACTED BODY! This is a fact that most today have not realized - and Perhaps most have su·pposed there existed a centrally organized closely knit Church from the first century

was ' it ONE lWELL-

by very disturbing dual chal- lenges. My wife, after nine years of happy marriage, had hegun k~eping the seventh-day Sab- bath. I was aghast! That, to me, was religious fanaticism! She claimed to have found this teach~ ing in the Bible. My first upsetting thought was, What will my business con- tacts and friends say? It was a dev- astating thought, humiliating! All theargum~ntscame quickly to my mind. They were of no

in Genesis. First I ' delved '- thoroughly into the works of Darwin, Lyell, Haeckel, Huxley, Spencer, Vog!, Chamberlin and Moore-t and even into the earlier . works of Lamarck and his theory of "Use and Disuse," which preceded Darwin's "survival of the fittest" hypothesis. Immediately ' those writings appeared conv~incing. They , necessarily are, to have won·vir- tual universal acceptance in the worldofhigher education. I read-

, Also I ,had the enjoyment of

·being able to cause my sister-in- law to '~at those words" brand-

ing me

All <>f

which was merely vanity on my

part, which I had not yet eradi-

. I i1ad proved tbe reality OfTHE GREAT MAJESTIC GOD! But my· wife's challenge was still tor- menting my mind. Already, in the evolutionary research, I had

cated.

as

"ignorant. "

.

I

(

\

j ;(

:->

~

I

;;1

,:'1

~I

,;

II

,'j

.j"

"

~

-

I

:/.

Continue in Revelation

.

.

.

and heard

I: 10:

behind me ,a

"

great voice. as of a "trumpet,

Saying, I am Alpha and Omega [A and Z], the flIst and the last:

and, Wnat thou seest, write in a book, and send it unto the seven

· studied Genesis . I knew each of the world's religions h~d tIieir own sacred writings. Once God's

· reality was prov~d, I had~ex-

_ peeted to contirtue in the pursuit

of compar.ative religions to see if

· any such sacred writings proved authoritative. Through which of these did GOD speak to mankind

"The Church did become scattered! Never again after the first century was it ONE WELL-ORGANIZED, COMPACTED BODY!"

NOT

TRUE . Yet. when Christ comes . He is coming 'to a Church that IS well- organized - .,the "

until now.

BUT

THAT IS

house~

hold of God

building fitly framed .together

groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord" (Ephesians 2:19-21).

in whom all the

THAT

IS

THE · TEMPLE

TO

WHICH CHR·IS·T SHALL COME. THAT is the one and only Church that shall. RESURRECTED, MARRY CHRIST! But, when I first was con- vened and came on the scene, the .Church,.(!lardis, er.a) was widely scattered. There was a U.S. headquarters at Stanberry, Mo. But there were a few very small .scattered groups, which w.e have discovered since, in Central and South America "nd. E\lfope. These brethren were still keeping

_"

the~ Sabbath, the Holy Days (which the Sardis people ' in America WERE ]\lOT), and -~till kept tbe NAME, Church of God. I They are now .part of the Worldwide Church of God.

NOW -

Herbert W. Arm·

strong ~and die Sardis era

~I was hom of stable and up- right parents with an ancestry in thi: Quaker faith that had emig- rated from England to Pennsyl- ' vania with William Penn . a hundred years before the United SHiles became a nation. At age 18 I dropped all butlhe most passive interest in religion. I had put myself through an in- tensive self-examination, cou- pled ·with a survey of the various occupations and profession~~to

determine~hereI helonged, to

-- avoid fitting the proverbia! square peg in the round hole. This led into tbe advertising pro- fession and a business life. I was unusually successful. I had con- tinued through the. years diligent study and . application . I had planned that ·my business con~ tacts were largely with the 'great and the near-great.

Then, at age 34, I was assailed

ily understood how ihe field of education had been gripped in the clutch of the evolutionary con' '

cept.

. Evolution, as I finally learned, is the atheists' attempted expla- nation of the presence ·of a crea~

tion withoutthe preexistence.of a

Creator. This initial stage of my re-

I know search rudely'shook my faith in

the existence of God . It brought the Bible teaches Sunday obser- me to realization that r had

avail.

teaching in the Bible.

She said she found

this ,

"But the Bible 'says," I pro-

tested , "thou shalt

observe Sun-

day ." " Can you show that to me in the Bible?" she asked.

" No,"

] replied,

"I don't

know much about the Bible. My interest and studies have been in

the area of business . But

assUlJIed the reality of God, be- 'cause from childhood I had heard _ and therefore assumed _ it.

,~ For a while my head was literally swimming ! Was aU I had ever

can show me where the Bible believed mere myth and error commands Sunday observance. after all? I was awakened to the I'll go back to it." realization I had. never seen

PROVED the reality of God! Now I

the

buttome'ex.asperatinglY.-:::.,'.5 .o u . i

vance, because all these chfTches =an'/ be wrong. and they receive their beliefs from the Bible."

,

" If ," she smiled sincerely -

There was no dodging the chaJ- lenge . My marriage d~pendedon it!

A second ~halIenge ,

Coincidentally, .a sister~in· law, newly married and fresh~out of college, hurled at me a second "

she

accused contemptuously, "you ·

are fust plain · ignorant! Everybody who has any e duca-

tion knows' human life has coroe by evoluti!>n.' ,

humil\ating challenge.

"Herbert Armstrong,"

I was p(oud.

I had

not

ne-

·

glected study and ' education . I thought I Knew the facts ahout evolution, and I didn ' t believe in it. But now I had to admit. I had never pursl;Jed a thorough, in-

depth research of the question. The dual challenge drove me into a de.termined almas, night~ • .and~day research. That intensiv.e study continued for six months before -I found ' the proved answer. Yet the stud y to this day

, was determined to

kilOW

TRUTH!. My mind was being cleaned out from ideas and be- liefs previously taken for granted. .Of all the writings on evolution Moore, alone, had culled out many discrepancies in the theory. Yet he, too, went along with the doctrine overall. But now I had , first of all , to prove or dispro;ve the existence of

God. It was no casual or superfi- cial ~tudy. I 'continued in this re-

search as if my life depended upon il- as in actual fact ifdid,

well as my marriage . I studied

books also on the other side of the coin.

God's existence proved

SuffIce it to say here that I did find irrefutable PROOf of the exis-

as

has riever ceased .

I was nol only humiliated and angered by these challenges, I . was determined to prove both my

wife and sister-in-law wrong . Both challenges focused on a oommon starting point, the~book

of Genesis in the Bible, although that was only the beginning, These challenges came at a ' period in life when I had ample time on my hands . I plunged with intense concentration into the

study. '

Evolutionary writings

researched

But I did not begin the research

churches which are in Asia"

Then Christ named the churches, , starting with Ephesus and ending with Laodicea. Then, in his vision John tumen 'and saw seven golden candle-

in the midst of the

sticks and

golden candlesticks one like unto

the Son of man [Christ]

And

he ' had i~,his right hand seven

-

if any?

 

"

Bible research~continued '

H

Since I had to researcb' tbe

Sabbath question anyway, and already , had delved into 'Genesis , I decided to continue my study in the Bible - intend-

ing to ' exapline in depth the writ- .

ings of other religions afterward.

In my biblical study I came. across early the passage in Ro-

mans 6:23:""

sin is death

amazed. W ;tges " is what one i~ paid for what one has'done. H,ete ] was staring aba statement diametrically ·opposite to .my Sunday. school teaching prior to age 18. " Why," I exclaimed, "bow can that be? I was taught in church that the w}iges of sin is EVERLASTING 'LIFE in an eternally burning hell ."

the wages of

.

."

I stopped,

Another shock came on read~

.

, ing tIW last part,of the same verse:

but the gift of God is,eter-

"

nal life through Jesus Christ ,our

Lord." "But, " I questioned in disillu- sionment , "I thought ,I already . had'eteroallife - I am, or I have, an iinmottal soul. Why should 1 need it as a gift?" I researched the word soul .by means, of aBible concordance.

Twice I found the y;ords, " the soul that sinneth, it shall die"

(Ezekiel 18:4 and Ezekiel 18:20). Then I' n;memhered I had read in Genesis~2 how God said to the first human, " But of the ~ee of

'~

.~

~

',I

~i

!,

:/

::)

,I

1\ I, I,

11

~;J

~I

~l ii

'I

~i

:1

;\

q {f

;1

jt

d

'l

:!

v~

\.

"

.- .~

!i

:1

;1,

I(

;~

-l

.' \I

I

ii

11

g

\i

'i

,

I

stars

.

.

Then He (Christ) said, " The mystery of the seven stars which thou sawest in my right hand; and the seven golden canclesticks. The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches: and the seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven chuiches" (Revela- '

, Then follow , in chapters 2 and 3, Christ' s messages to the angels .of these seven churches. I studied deeply into these . seven churches and Chrjst's mes- , sages to them 51 years ago . And I

concluded, on exhaustive fe·

.•_ ,tiqn );20),.

'."

'.

_

"But God's Church, though continuous

through all generation's from ~ D. 31, LOST much or all oUts originalorganiza-

tional patternestablished BY

,

.

from

search, that they rePresented the seven conditions that would be found in the Church of God at all

times,

Christ's coming - BUI tJ-So the s~venERAS of God's Church during these 'more than' 1,900 years. God showed me that the

Ephesus condit,ion here described wo uld he PREOOMINANT during the first era, the Laodicean condi- tion described in the last era just prior to' Christ's second coming , predominant just hefore Christ's coming. ):Iut definitely they de-

pict SEVEN SUCCESSIVE

Loss of first love

The predominate characteris- tic of the Ephesus era-the first , heginning A.D . 31 , -: was loss of its first love. The Church in

A .D : 31 on the day 'of Pentecos t started· out with great rejoicing and. deep spirituality. But by ap- proximately A .D. 59 to 59, they already were turning to ANOTHER

the GOSPEL MESSAGE

A.D .

31

until ,.

"I began to ask, "WHERE, then, is the real true Church which CHRISTfounded?"

~tenceof God the 'Creator , and I found proof positive of the fal- lacy of the evolutionary theory. I had the satisfaction of winning the admission oC one thorollghly

,steeped in evolutionary~lhought

having spent years in graduate

-

work at the University of Chicago and at Columbia - that

I had defInitely ~hopped down

the trunk of the evolutionary tree, .·

though like Dr. Moore, she had been so thoroughly brainwashed in it she had to continue in what she had seen and aCknowledged waS-rROOf. of itl fallily.

the ~nowledge of good and evil ; thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day tIiat thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die ." ~ In Genesis 2:7·I read how God formed man of the dust of

" the ground and breathed into his

nostrils the breath of life; and

, man [dust - matter] became .a

living soul." This stated plainly that a soul is physical -'- fonned

from matter . -I found that the En-

glish word soul is translated from the Hebrew nephesh and that in Genesis j' fowl, fish and animals,

I~" HIM, !"I' 41

ERAS

GOSPEL -

JESUS

OF

BEING SUPPRESSED!

A violent 'persecution had set in by A.D. 33. By~A.D . 70 the true Church was vinually forced to go underg round . They were

CHRIST

WAS

4

'The GOOD NEWS

Monday, Nov, 6, 1978

'HOW 'THE ~WORtDWIDE,CHURCH

OF GOD CAME INTO BEING

(Continued from page 3)

all three, were nephesh as Moses was inspired to write . Next, 1 hapPened to read where Jesus said, "And no man hath ascended up to-heaven. but

of nb world religious Ie.ader whO

arrived at his teachings in such

why

manner. Perhaps . thar is.

GOO'S INSPIRED WOitD alone

-

as I proved -

GOD

is infallibly

1 was brought,

is TRUTH

'

Only

. by the spring of

correct!" .

-

'1927, to a complete MIND- ; SWEEPING - my : mind swept clean of previo·us assumptions .and beliefs' - surrendered to thci : wORD OF GOD, which by tben I had proved TRUE,ami the SUPREME AUTHORITY. More, 1 had, been brought to realize my OWl'!' inadequacy and nothingness, 1 had been brought to a -real repentance' - CONQUERED by the GREAT MA- JESTIC GOD - an'd with a solid rock -based fAITH 'iii Jesus Christ. 1 was baptiied,'a~dthe infilling of God's Spirit opened mymirid to the JOY UNSPEAKABLE of. knowiQg God and Jesus Chdst- of knowing TRUTH and the' . warmt,h 'of God's divine LOVE!

and taught it to His first minis- ters: It is recorded in the fo ur books of Matthew, Mark, Luke

and John. At almost every p~:;int

of

tbe teachings of traditional Chris- tian bodies today are just the op-

posite.

THEY WERE NOT PREACHING T-HE SAME GOSPEL AT ALL, BUT A TOTALLY OPPOSITE MESSAGE! This was shocking - incredible

-

pelled to see it was true'! Jesus began the Work of preaching the very Gospel that GOD the Father had sent to man- kind through Him He commis-

unbelievable ! Yet I was com:.

teaching thafJesus enunciated,

.

.

sioned His disciples - His apos- tles - to carry the same Gospel

to

all the world, And He has said

l:le would never drop the ' Work He had begun! But WHERE was it

going on today?

~king an obedient Church

knew 'now ,that when I found

I

the one and oifly true Church, 1 would find a Church obedient to God - keeping His cornmand" ments - having the testimony of Jesus Christ, which is the TRUTH of the Scr:iptures.

. 1 had been much impressed by description of the tJ:ue Church,

a

. as it is ~o be f()un.~ i.n . pur tim~c­

ju~ before .t'he'sec~nd·"~o~ing~:)f

Christ Y'It i isqj'd"linrl.~:in"'t Revelation

is the time ··wh~n S~tan is

12.

" It

filled ' with, wrath

Church, .: 'because

that he hath but a short time" (Revelation 12: 12), Satan ismak-

ing'war with' 'the remnant of her

seed, "

very last generation 'in this age.

The

is those j"

keep the commandments' of God, anct ha-ye the testimony of

scribed. It

'agrunst God's

he knoweth

The

Church

remnant means the

is definitely'. de'

; • • .which

, Jesus Christ" (Revelation 1cZ.:

17),

My

intensive study had . re-

vealed one thing plainly: "Tbe commandments of God"

mean Sabbath keeping'! to most tra-

ditional denominations. They s.ay, "The commandments are done away!': They .reject "the :com:

. That automatically ruled out all churches observing SUQday.

So far as I could learn, it reduced the search to three small groups '

-

the Seventh-Day Baptists, and a •

little, almost ,.mheard-of church called the Church of God, which

maintained .a

small

mandm~nts .of God."

,

the Seventh-Day ,Adventists,

publishing-

, house' headq'uarters at Stanberry,

Mo,

So 1 examined Seventh-Day Adventist teachings - jl,ist as I did those of many other denomi- nations. 1 obtained ' their magazines, their booklets ",and pamphlets, their large book 'of

'

Bible ,readings or ,Bible "ho~e instructor. " The true Church is the one that lives by EVERY WORD of God -=- the words of the BIBLE!

Never an Adventist

necessary :-to add here

he that caqle

do'wo' from heaven",

even the Son of man, , ," (John 3: 13), 1 researched the heaven and hell teaching further, 1 saw

yvhete the inspired Peter. on the

day he received the Holy Spirit

said, "For David is not ascended

" (Acts

2:34),

'into -the heavens

Taught opposite of Bible

J was, in utter · astonishment, coming to realize that what 1 had

1;>een taught growirig up in church

was the precise op~site of what

/ the Bibie says in:'clear language,

~

a

lengthy, <Jetailed account of my intensive search in the Bible --- :

bent on proving ' iomy s "atisfaction

that " all these churches can ' t be

This is· not'the

place for

,1.

It 'seems

that I have never.been a member of the Seventh-Day Adventist denomination, False statements

h'ave appeared in various

or religious magazines~ pam- phlets or-tr~cts that I am a former Seventh-Day Adventist. 1did ob-

t.ain much of .their literature to compare with the Bible, 'I diliex- , ' amine and .study)t with ~ ppen . mind, and witho.ut . prejudice. I was happy to find that like most denominatiqns, they do pa;ve cer- tain ,points of .truth : None is 100 percent if) error But myfamil,iarify wit!) Ad-' ventist doctrines .,has come · en- tir~ly through 'their published lit- erature. I have never. attended a regular Sabbath church sen"ice of that denomination!

cht,JI:ch

"lwas, in-uttera~tonishrrient, co,ning to

realize that what I had been taught grow- ingupjn church was the precise opposite o~what"the Bible s<:,ys in c!,ear language."

Next, 1 looked ,jpto the teach- ing orthe Seventh-Day Baptists, I found it to be virtually identic'al,

except for observing· a different day of the week, with ot~er Pro-

testant denominations

cially the,:Baptists,

l;",:.But ;, of these th'ree!'chiu.ches to

which

~0~:e4" only ., 9t:te ha~ .·th~ figqt NAME for the true Church, This was, ihesmall,little-heard-of Church ,of GOd whose headquar- ters were at ~tanDerry, Mo. Twelve ti~esiii'tb~New 'fe.s- tament, I found the NAME of the Chu'rc h that Christ established

plainly

OF GOD/: '

-

espe~

.

'"

.

.

wrong,. for th~ir teachi.ngs came

from . t:h~ !BJ1?~f7/ ' The :~s~ntiaJ

p6irH here is'.tne ~iplple'fact ihat I did find irrefutaole PROOF 'of the

di~ine:·inspirat~o.n ar:t4' SUPREME

" AUTH081TYof the Holy Bible as}he revealed)Vord of God as ongmally written. Even all the so-callti:d ~contradictions evapo- rated upon unbiased study.

.to .my· utter . dismay and

chagriQ, I was f.orc~d. to " eat

crqw" ",in r~g¥d 'to· my wife's sup~j~d."fanaticism. " Jt . wa.s not what I ~anted to 'believe, nlEl'i! Sui by now 1 had taken a real beating 1 had proved tru,h contrary to wh.at I 'wanted to be- lieve.

.

,

_

What

l

once hate,d , \. ,p'ow,

LOVED. I found the. gre"ates~·.and' most abso~i~g joy of my life· in cont{nlfing to dig, mit those gq1d

nuggets of TRUTH from '

Now came a new enthusiasm . in ~iblicalst.udy a~~receiving tl)e, . REVEALED knowledge of God. I.began.to ask, "WHERE, then ;

is

CHRIS~ founded?"

God',s

,

'

Wo~d,

the

real

true Church w,hich

The true GOSPEL

My shocking, disappo'inting, - eye-opening discovery. upon looking into the Bible for myself, had revealed in stark plainness that teaching;' of traditional Christianity were, i!1' most basi~ points, the very ·opposite of the teachings of Christ" of Paul and of the original true 'Church! ,Co,uld the original and only true Church ' have disintegrated and 'disappeared? Could it have

No, for .J .read

\"her~.Jesus said the g~tesof the grave would never prevail against.it. 'Also He had said to His

His

Church, "1.0, 1 am with you al-

~he

ceased .to exist?

~is~iples

who , formed

ways."

Then

.

1 saw

that the very

PURPOSE of the C~urch was to preach Christ's GOSPEL! It is HIS"BODY - His instrument by which He carried on GOO'S WORK! - I looked carefully at that Gos- pel as Christ Himself preached

the~,sea~ch"had .,been liOar.::

Yet

•.

s~ated as., ~'TH~ ,CHU~CH

'.,

:.';-'.~ "w

':

.

,Could GOD'S Church lie fruitless?

' The only Church I had so far f~und th~t "kept the command- . roents pf God, and the testimony- of Jesus CQri~t," and at the same

time bore the NAME of the origi- nal true Church, was this almost , uflknown little Church of \Jod with its small pU.l;>lishing house .iri Stanberry, Mo, B!!t this. left me quite con-

was church, espe~ially compared 'to the Roman Catholic, the 'Methodist, tbe Baptist, tbe Pres- byterian, ' the ·Lutheran or other l.arge churches nuoibering mil-

of members : The'n I saw

where jesus called His_Church the "little flock," But still 1 was not completely -satisfied. 1 was deeply con~ cerned~1 prayed a great deal over it. For here >was a church, which, compared to t~e large-scale ac- tivities of the Catholic and big Protestant bodies, was ineffec-

a .little .

fused.

lions

Fo'r this

Let me

pause here to

add a,.

truisms ·

point to what I wrote above, say- ing ino-st people believe what

they have. repeatedly heard or , read or been taught. There are

tw~.other psychological

in regard to WHY people 'believe what ' they 00 : One 'is, people ' carelesSly .accept wl:lat those around them believe. MostTtuiis

are' Bu~d~ists.because. tho'se . around· them i'n Thairand are Buddhists , Ther'" is -the psychOlogical tendency to, go, along with one's

One other reason for people's beliefs is that human nature tends to ·cause one to believe what. he want.s t~ believ . e . and . re · fuse: · , re- gardless of proof, what he does'

not 'want to

old s;aying~ "One con'vinced against his- will is of the same .0pinioJl still.'"

God's Word alone

is' truth

That is why 1 have said the experience I was painfully sub- jected to in this six-months' in- tensive ' study was UNIQUE in hu~an life an~ condud. I know

believe. There is the

_ "This initial stage of my research rudely shook my faith in the existence of God. It brought me to realization that I had assumed the reality of God, because from childhood I had heard - and therefore assumed - it. For a while my head was literally swim- ming. Was all I had ever ,believed mere myth and error after all?"

tive. I could see 'that it was imper- fect. It wielded no great power. Jesus had said; ", , ,ALL roWER ' is ' given unto me In . heaven and earth" (Matthew 28:18), 1 read how Jesus Christ was to'beIN His ~hurcQ! He guides. it! H~ directs

"This , was

the

small -actually in~ finitesimal-start of what was desti(1ed to grow in 38 years to ' a major world- wide Gospel Work

reaching milli~f1s

every week.

,

it! He" EMPOWE,RS it! He said ,His Chu.rch w.as· to R_ECEI\'E' POW~R '

(Acts 1:8)"

' No person is even a'member of the true Church unless he has re,- ceived and is filled and led by the

Holy Spirit - and the Holy Spirit is the ~pir;!of roWER! This little church seemed to be powerless

-

s.ee' where it :Was be3J;ing

fail~d to

much if any fruit! Could a fruit:

1ess church be the ,ONE AND ONLY

~t:Ue C:'~UffP :9f. 92 ~ RJl .ft~,~ ? ,>

com.parati:ve~~ .impotent! J

, ,r,:,a~_qe~p)YJ,!;IJ'Je,~~d,l;teie was a little church, with scattered members probably>num1lering , less than 2,000, mostly in rural

Apparently, as nearly ,as 1

had:-·'(jiily': 'a very

areas,

could ' learn,

it

limitd:l ';''' 'numbe;r ·of , local

- ch1:lrche$, -none as Large .as -100

. As 1 began to come' in contact with some of its leader-s; .they

seemed to be 'men of little educa-

tion ·-

miQistry ' could hardly be de, scribed as an educated ministry. Their preaching haQ. a c~.rtain fire, yet seemed toiall y to lack the POWER that attracts sizable

ences, that moves people, slirs

and 'changeslives , I could

see n9 visable results.

and

only- true Churcfi on earth? The very question seemed preposter-

ous!

mdnbers.

no college degrees:-' its

audi~

.

".hearts,

Co~ld this be God ' s one

Bu~, whe~ else?

And' yet- Yes, anc;l yet, 'small, power~ less, resultless, impotent though it appeared to be •. h~re wa~ a church with the right name. "keeping the commandments of God and the testimony of Jesus

Christ

trines and teachings. to what God

had be,en opening my eyes to see plainly in His Word than any otber church of which 1 knew! Small and impotent though it ap- peared, it had' more Bible TRUTH tMn any church I ,could

closer, in its. doc- .

, "

and

jind!

'

, Meanwhile, what was I to do ?

I was not at all convinced this wag the one aqd only true Church, Yet, ifit was not, which one was? This one came closer to the Bible qualifications than any 1 knew, '

(See CHURCH; page 5)

Monday, Noy. 6, 1978

The GOOD NEWS

5

CHURCH

(Continued from page 41

Therefore, I hegan to fellow· ship with their scattered and few members in Oregon, while at the

same

time

refraining

from

acknowledging membership. We were living in Portland,

time . I knew of no

members of this church in Port-

land, but there was a sprinkling

of them through the Willamette

Valley between Salem and Eugene, in Oregon - mostly farmers or truck gardeners. They welcomed the fellowship of my· self and Mrs. Armstrong. We found· them to he simple ,

plain and humble people, hard

working and industrious, and

loving the Bible TRUTH - as much as they had - willing to suffer persecution for it. ~- And so it was, in this detached fellowship, that Mrs. Armstrong and I continued the fust 3~ ye';'s of my ceaseless night·and·day STUDY of the Bible - of history, ",specially as connected with bib· lical history and prophecy - and of pertinent allied subjects.

Ore . • at the

These , too,

were

ye~rs of

much ·and earnest prayer. Much . of the Bibh: study done at home

was

combining study with prayer.

M-uch time was spent during

these years , as it had been that first six months; at the public li· brary. I delved into intensive re·

search in the" commentaries,

Bible encyclopedias, Bible die·

t~onaries. comparing various

done

on

my

knees.

translations Gf the Bible, examin- ing Greek and Hebrew texts of

doubtful or questionable pas- sag~s. \" cheCKing . w~ni ' lexidms

Conference. I learned that they

were organized as a General Con-

ference, with elections ofofficers

held biannually. Most af the Oregon meinbers lived in the Willamette Valley in the vicinity of Jefferson. Most of them were .

in atte.ndance at this

business

meeting. About balf of them were op- posed to Elder Dugger. They wanted to organize a state con- ference. Some of the other states

'had state conferences. The pur· _ pose of this Oregon.State Confer- ence was to hold the tithes and church funds contributed by Oregon members in Oregon. But actually , it was born of opposition to and dissatisfaction . with the Stanherry membership and state conference. The other half were just ·as ' verbai in their loyalty and &upport of Elder Dugger and the Stanberry re· gime. The dispute over Stanberry politics and Elder Dugger's per· sonal fitness and integrity waxed more and more heated. One tall man who weighed considerably over 200, and was a leader, spoke' of "dirty politics" and called Elder Dugger a "ward·healer" An equally vociferous man on the oUier side of the· dispute rose to defend the honor of Mr. Dugger.

Words flamed hotter and hot~. Each side was sincere and In 'roused earnest. lJnder the tense pressure tempers were flaring. I . became afraid it was going to he settled (or unsettled) by fists. - At that instant I rose, and in a loud but cahn voice asked if I might say a word. Since I was a guest,"they didn't refuse. ~'Brethren," I- said, "you all , know h~w as recorded in the

we did not yet realize ourselves that . CHRISThad started; in us/the Philadel-

phia era of His .Church, committed with the

GREAT COMMISSION."

.

and Robertson' s GramrniJr ofthe Gruk New Testament. I made an intensive study of ancient history in connection with biblical his- ' tory and Meanwhile, on their urging, a few of these articles had been mailed in to The Bible Advocate

in Stanberry, Mo. These articles

began appearing on the front page.

The near flgbt at a meeting

Along in Novemher of 1930 the ·Runcoms, neighborS of my parents, asked me to go with them to a business meeting of brethren of the Church of Ood, being held in the home of Mrs. Ira Curtis, near Jefferson, Ore. Altbougb I was aguest - I had . never become a member of this church, wbose headquarters were

~t Stanherry, Mo. '- \hey asked

me to act as secretary and take

down the minutes of the meeting .

I learned that the meeting was

called for the purpose of organiz· ing these Oregon ~embers into

an Oregon Conference. , I sensed immediately there was a feeling of division 'among them. Elder ·A. N. Dugger was the real leader of the church at Stanherry. He was editor of the church ' s weekly paper sent to · members. He either was, or had heen, president of their General

first chapter of Jl'b, when thi:

sons of Gnd came together, Saran came also. You also know how,

in the 12th~hapterofRevelation,

we are told that the people Satan is most angry with are those wbo keep the commandments of God . and have the testimony'of Jesus

Christ. That means us. Satan 15

here. He · is stirring up rage and

anger in your heaps . ~ am going to drop to my knees right now and ask God Almighty.to cast Satan out of this bouse! All of you who wish may kneel with me and pray silently," Without another wo~d, I quickly'dropped te) my knees be· side my chair and began asking . God to rebuke Satan and this con- troversial spirit that -was rousing tbese men to anger and to~ drive Satan fro'm our presence and to giye us pea<;:e and love.,

When I rose tbere were some wet eyes, but there were no angry

voices. TheSe people were sin-

cere. They simply helieved what they believed and had allowed themselves to \le caught off guard

and rou~d to ~ngq.

R.L Taylor arrives

, In early sum~er of that -year,

1931, a former ~eventh·Day Ad-

ventist minister,

Taylor, came to Oregon ·from California. It was practice among these Church of Gnd people to

a -Robert

L.

"Jesus said we should KNOW 'by their fruits,' And now they were

split right down the middle. A house divided cannot stand, and their

two houses -

Stanberry and Salem ,- did NOT stand!"

.

.hold all·day meetings about qnce

was at one of these

meetings· that Mr. Taylor preached, We were all quite im- pressed.

. "He's a hetter preacher tban any of the leading ministers from Stanberry," seemed to he the common exclamation. Indeed we

, were all rather swept off our feet

a

montb . It

by his preaching.

After a few weeks, the breth· ren of this Oregon Conference, which had been formed the pre· ceding November, wanted to

. team Elder Taylor with me to

hold an evangelistic campaign. They were becoming anxious to see a little life in the work of the Church .

They fo';'d Elder Taylor v~ry receptive to the idea. By this time

a modest balance bad accumu-

' Iated in the new' conference treasury. You will remember that the object in forming this state conference was to create a local state treasury and keep their tithe,S and offerings in the state instead of being sent to Stan' herry, Mo. Tb(:se were days of rapidly <!escendingeconomic de· pression, but several of these brethreo were vegetable ··garden- ers. They were doing very well financially.

This made it necessary that the Oregon Conference ordain me to the ministry.

ORDAINED Cbrist's minister

l ' B~'i~g O~d~~~;d~~and;-~~~~eri~g

the ministry full time meant a complete change in my life. In former years the idea of becom- ing a minister was the very last thing I should have wanted to do. But by June, 1931, (had been preaching a great deal for 3 ~

By this time my· whole

years.

hean was in it.

I shall never forget that mo·

.merit of my The meeting was .heing held

, outdoors, I do not remember

where - except it· was in the general rural area of Jefferson. I do· not remember other circum- stanCes.

. But I do rememberlhe ordina·

tion itself. It was one of those

once-in-a-lifetime

like being married, and heing baptized. Only this seemed to me

to be the most momentous event of my entire life. All tIM, brethren -:- as many as could get their hands through to my head - laid their hands on me - on my head, my sboulders; my chest and my back (like Acts

experiences

13:1-3).

I am sure ii was the weight of

the experience,. from a spiritual ~nd emotional standpoint, rather than the physical weight of hands and anns - but it seemed I was entirely weighted down with the heaviest load I had ever stood up

under. To me ihis was symbolic of the tremendous responsibility that now eame dow.n on my head and shoulders. And let it be made plain here: I was ordained by, and under-the authority of the Oregon Confer· ence ofThe Church of God, sepa· rately incorporated; not by the

Stanberry, Mo., headquarters.

The Oregon campaigns

The campaign was held in Eugene in a tiny tent seating 50 people. R.L. Taylor there ttuned out to he Pentecostal. No results. came from the six-weeks" six- ,nights-a-week meetings, except

one nigbt when it was too stonny

Sunday night, July 9. The Fishers and I decided to start the meet· ings at the Firbutte scbool the

sarne night. I arrived at the Fisher farm, leaving my WIfe' and chil· dren at our home in Salem about

.July.5 or 6

-' _

SmaU start of

worldwide Work

to hold a service. This ~asthe small- actUally

One lone couple came that night ~ Mr. and Mrs . Elmer Fisher. They came with me to the room I had rented, and.that night Mrs. Fisher accepted the Sab·

bath. He already_helieved in jt. But if small, it started with a

After this, employed by the 'Oregon Conference, I team~'up

with a ' young , minister of the .- earnest ,private ptayer. To · the

Stanberry church, Roy Daily. : rear of the Fisher farm borne was

We held meetings at St. Helens,

a fair·sized hill. Running over this hilltop for exercise I discov~

Walla Walla, Wash. , .' . ered a rock about 14 inches

The only results came 'after high. It was ina secluded spot. It Mr. Daily left Umapine, on find~· came to mind bow Jesus had

burst of energy and inspiration. First,:it started with intensive and

infinitesimal- start of what was destined to grow in 38 years to a major worldwide ·Gospel Work reaching millions of people every week .

Ore., and Umapine. Ore .: neat

ing the conference. treasury was ab?ut gone, and saying, "I'm

gOlD8. back u.::.re to protect my .,., alone 'with God. I dropped to my

own mteres~s. , , " ~ , knees before this rock, which

seemed just the right beight to

terests in faith - and after he left . kneel hefore , and began praying

a small cburch wis raised up. · earnestly for the_success oLthe

But, like others raised.up by my preaching, there -was . nb "local minister and the chun;:h evapr

rated after a few weeks.

missed·the multitude and gone up into a I!lo,untain apart to pray-

I

said I would serve GOD ' S in·

meeiings -, It became son of a

daily '-pilgriinage, during my ,stay , at .Fishers', to this, which

.became-my prayerrock. I'm sure that I drailk iii much energy, · spiritual strength and inspiration at tl)e prayer rock

l!I:"l'l"ing for t!>e _m~ru,>g~ i. I , librrowedatypewriie,S"ithinktbe

Fishers arranged" this

through one of their relatives, With c.arbon paper, I typed out. some 30 notices, announcing the meetings, and the topics. of the sermons for the first week or 10 days.

.

InMarch," 1933, we planned a six-nights·a·week campaign in a small empty store buildingin the

Hollywopd , resi~nce · section · o , f .

Salem, ~re

. -

Now appeared on the scene t)\lO more former Seventh·Day Adventist ministers, A.J. Ray, and Sven A. Oberg. Oherg swept . the brethren off their feet with his superb preaching mOre than had R.L. Taylor. He was a man so perfect we wondered if he was not actually an angel in disguise .

':, .

'.

'''',.

,'

for· me

'

The first broadcast

He was in disg~iseall right! He, The six·weeks meetings in tb:

too, turned out to he PentecOstal.

Soon tbe Pentecostal people with carne to a close on Sunday night,.

Mr

over the meetings

Results? ·NONE! The shouiers -this apparently included the ' lO drove away others who had been . members of the Fisher and Ellis

interested. After

Mr. Oberg weill to Harrisburg, hefore the meetings staned.

a cliu.rch building was

leased, to hold a campaign of his own.

where

.but

Aug. 20, 1933. A total of more

one·room Firbutte

schOolbouse

Oberg.'s help were taking

than 20 had come with us -

the meetings, . families, members of the Church

The Oct.

1. 1933, Bulletin -

carries the repon that "with the Fisher -and Ellis families; more

"Here was a church, which, c.ompared to the large-scale activities ofthe Catholic and big Protestant bodies, was ineffective. ' I couldsee-ttiatitwas imperfect. Itwieldedno '

great power

POWER is given unto me in heaVen and

,Jesus

haa said,

ALL

earth

'"

I hid been invited to hold a six-weeks campaign in a country , scboolhouse, eight miles west of Eugene, Ore. First. however, Mrs. Armstrong and I visited pri-

vately in their homes 'some of the people who had attended the meeting in SaJem. Result? A new

church of close to 50 members

organized. I had asked AJ. Ray to pastor it. Under his "leader- ship" it lasted six weeks.

Mr. Oberg was staning his new meetings in Harrisburg on

than 20 signified their desire to establish a new Sabbath·keeping qurch of God in this district ." In September, the living Christ began opening ·doors for the MAss·proclaiming of His Gospel. It was then that someone brought to my attention the fact that the local radio station at ,Eugene ,. KORE, then the very smallest minimum-power of 100 watts, had a morning devotional pro- gram scheduled, but that they

(See CHURCH. pa

16)

:r§g

-

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1

I

6

The GOOD NEWS

Monday, Nov. 6, 1~78

WORLDWIDE - CHURCH OF GOD

BALANC-E''SHEET

WORLDWIDE CHURCH OF GOD

\I\IORLO HEAOOUARTER'S

F\IIo$A.DI!:N

,.CALF'ORNA,

9n~3

WORLDWIDE

CHUR'CH

OF

GOD/AHBASSADOR

BALANCE

SHEET

December

31,

1977

COLLEGE

Total

STNoII.HA . 1\.ODf.1I

-

 

12.-31-77

 

Current

assets:

 

Cash

and

Certificates

of ,Deposit

2,307,800

 

2.8

Short-term

investments

 

157,300

.2

Receivables,

current

794,300

1.0

Inventories

and

prepayments

1,614,800

1.9

 

Total

c urrent

assets

4,874,200

-,--:g

Plant assets~ net (Note 1)

61,713,000 .

74.3

Capital leas"es, net

2,475,300

3.0

Plant assets held for sale (Note 1) Ambassador College. United Kingdom

8 ,400, 000

10.1

(Note

Z)

3,979,100

4.8

Noncurrent

receivables

 

1,582,500

1.9

Depos i ts

, ll200

 
 

Total

assets

 

i83 , 025 , 300

 

l2.2.:.2

Liabili ties

and

Pund

Balances

 

Current

iiabi 1i ties:

 

Accounts

payable

1,652,200

7.5

2.0

Accrued

liabilities

 

481,500

2.2

.6

Current

portion

of

longO-term

debt

2,973,500

13'.5

3.6

Current

portion

of

obligations

under

capital

lea ses

 

358,000

1.6

.4

Deferred

amounts .

 

280,400

~. 3

.3

Other

c urrent"

liabilities

'

205,200

1.0

.3

.

Total

current

liabili ties

5, "950,800

27.T

-r.!

Long-ter.m debt (Note 3')

 

13,176,700

59.9

15.9

ObUga tions under capi tal

leases

 

2,819, ZOO

12.8

3.4

. Deposits

.owed

to

students

and

others

38,100

.2

;

Total' liabili t ies

 

.

- S2I,984

l 8IH'j

ll.!!,J!;

','26".5

Fund

balances: ·

use Invested in AC UK and plan"t assets

Available

for

current

3,800,5QO

of discontinued

operations

held

fo'r

sale

12.379,100

Net

investment

in

plant .

44,860,900

Total

fund

balances

$61 ,040 , 500

Total

liabilities and

fu'nd

balances

$83,025,300

\

4.6

14.9 -

54.0

73.5

l2.2.:!

NOTES TO FI NANCIAL STATEMENTS

"Our e5tm;rleel market lllllue 01 the Big Sandy campus is ·in excesS 01 $1 0

m~1ion.

t

Hotol

PLANT ASSETS

Not02

AMBASSADOR COLLEGE, UNITED KI,"?DOM

At Dec. 31, 1977, the book value of plant assets The Ambassador College real property in the United

• Kingdom has been sold for an amount in excess of $4 miltion.

\

other than those held10r sale as a ,result of the discon- tinuance of oper~tions at· the campus in Big Sandy, Tex., are as follows:

Land and improvements, net

 

$ 9.396,100

. Buildings and improvements, net

39,376,000

Business aircraft, net

(G-II and. Cessna Citation)

.

2,915,900' ,

' Equipment aM jurnis~ing, net

. 6,790,000

Libra:ry books' .

. •

1,237,100

Vehicles,

1,407,200

Construction in progress

349,500

Leasehold improvements, net.

 

' 241 ,200 .

Total

$61,713,000

Plan) assets located at the campus In Big Sanely are

presented below :

Land and improvements Buildings and improvements "Equipment and furnishings, net .

,

Library books

Vehicles, net .

AlreraH. nol

Total

'

$1,092,100

6,044,100

910,500

263,100

.66,700

23,500

,

$8,400;000"

. "OUf GlOmman Gulfstream 11 a"craft actuany appreciated I n value and

has a marlj:et value in excess of $5 millon. The Cess". Citation has slbse;quent!y been sold.

Note 3

LONG·TERM DEBT AND CREDIT AGREEMENTS

Long-term debt, excluding the portion due within one

yea~, out~tanding at Dec

31,

1977, is as follows:

Mortgages payable:

Ambassador Auditorium

 

$ 5,807,600

Student center, parking .structure

1,178,200

Press and transportation buildings

1,163,800

Hall of ~dministration

 

630,500

Grove

Terrace -

student dorm

.431,300

Other buildings .

 

2,189,100.

Total mortgage. payable

$110400,500

Loans payat>'e

,,1,776,200

Total mortgage. and loan8 payeble $13,176,700

CREDIT AGREEMENT

The Church's princip~1 bank line of credit agreement provides for loans of uf;! to $4 .3 million as folloW5i $1 million unsecured line of credit to support cash floW, interest at prime ; $2 million unsecured construction line _ of credit, interest rate at prime plus one-hatf percent,

repayable at ~75,OOO per month plus interest; $1 .3

million secl.{red motor-vehicle-fleet line of credit, in- terest at prime. plus three-fourths

In the Sept. 25 edition of. The Good News, a Statement of Income and Expenditures w~h accompanying charts was pub-

_ lished. Since ~ is customary that a Balance Sheet accompany the

foregoing statement, the following combined balance sheet of the Worldwide Church of God and Ambassador College for the year ended Dec. 31, 1977, is presented. This statement, however,

includes only our United States operations. The combined Balance Sheet w'¥3 derivBd by'combining finan- cial information contained in the certified' individual Balance Sheets of the Worldwide Church of God and Amoassador Col- "

lege. On behalf of Mr. Herbert W. Armstrong, WB want to Bxpress our deep and sincere appreciation for your continued sllpport of

God's Work.

-

NONCURRENT

/RECEIVABLES 1.9%

'.(111-.

OBLIGATIONS UNDER

CAPtTAL LEASES

. DEPOSITS OWED TO

STUDENTS AND OTHERS 0.2%

59.9%

LONG·TERM,

DEBT

,

. INVESTED IN

Pc ~CN¥~~S~~S

OF DISCONTINUED

OPERATIONS

HELD FO R SALE

---::-::'''7,

54.0%

FUND

 

I

BALANCES

,

 

I

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES

 

IAC/WCG COMBINEDI

14.9%

I

I

 

I

tNVESTMENT

 

I

IN PLANT

 

I

Monday, Nov. 6, 1978

The GOOD NEWS

7

Excerpts of Mr. Rader's 'tqJk on ,Last Great Day

I would like to announ"ce some- thing that gives me great pleasure. -I

had the choice of announcing it at tbe

e':ld of my sennan or at the begin-

ning, but it is the kind of thing Ideo ' ,

want to

My daughter

postpone.

Carol, whom Mr. lierbert W. Arm-

strong married last June at our home;

in Beverly Hills, Calif., has told Mr.

Armstrong and me that she wants to

be baptized. She is here today .with

her husband Mr. Larry Little and my wife. Immediately upOn our return to

the Pasadena area, she will be baptized by one of the ministers. This gives me a tremendous

amount of satisfaction, because al· though I really haven't tried to teach her about these things, which I feel are so pe-rsonal, between man and God, I have tried ' to set the right ex- ample and I have tried to inculcate in that way those values that have be- come important to you and those val- ues, that, of course, have become SQ ' important to me, All of my family', my chiJdren in particular, I would

say , have been very much influenced

by Mr, Armstrong. lust by what he does in their presence, what he says in their presence and what they have generally observed, and .they are leading the kind of lives indicative that much of what Mr" Armstrong stands for, and \Vhat the Church stands for has indeed rubbed off,

Five years ago at the Feast of Tabernacles I spok.e about the fact that the Work of God was I,mique, and I'm sure by now all of you under- stand that. As Mr, Armstrong's closest adviser, then as now, I could see many, many changes that would actually lie ahead for ' the Work, Changes that would be beneficial for the Work. Changes that I felt would be a sjg~ tha,t the gr~at.commission.

was ·-'being';::'fUIfiileCt.

.those ~hanges; I believe, were

foreseeable in the aftermath. of the

events of 1971 and 1972,-

felt

brethren of this Church to come to grips with the only reality - the real- ity that this was, and is, and will be the true Church and a Work of the living , God and not a Work of ,~ere men.

Television inte"iew

Just a few days ago I was inter- viewe.d by a television journalist for a program devoted to the Wo~k. its past, its present and its future. Once again I proved, I believe, to that journalist that the Work of the living God dOes not ex.ist to make a pro-tieu-. Jar radio program, with a particular frequency of airing, in' particular places and at particular times. The same for television. The Work does not exist to produce a television pro· gram with a particular format for air· ing at particular times and places. It doesn', even exist for the purpose of pro!iucing and distributing a magazine or any number of magazines with a particular format and frequency of publication. It doesn't exist to maintain one or two or three collegiate.·grade academic institutions in one or more places around the world. It does ex.ist, how- eve~, for one and only one purpose,

and that is, of course, ' to propagate

Aner some of

events I

would ultimately compel -the '

the Gospel of Jesus Christ - the Gospel of the coming Kingdom of God - to propagate. that message, that announcement for awitness to ali nations. If is this immutable' pur- JX>se that we hope is best being' served by the various activities of. the Work that Mr. Armstrong, as Christ's apostle, feels will best fulfill thai great commission. We know that our doctrines, as well as the basic purpose of the . Church, are immutable also : We know , or should know, that we can reach an understanding of what those doctrines are, as well as the resolu- tion of all of our problems, by.took-

ing to _one place primarily for a

sou~ce of great strength and knowl-

edge-the 'Yrinen Word of the living God, the Bible. We don't have to go to mana'gement tex:tbooks to learn how to govern God's Work. We don't have to go 10 graduate schools

of business and. finance to learn how

to govern God'·s Work.

have to go to academic and scholarly treatises of a theological nature to understand t~emessage in the written Word of the living God", and '?Ie know that we can rely on the faith that has been given to us and with hope and with ·Iove for God al}d our neighboiwe will be able to over.come any and all problems, as they arise. Changes have indeed takeQ place over the past.five years, and many changes have -taken place during the last five months. I am certain that you all realize, however, how necessary these changes have been. I am c.ertain th.at you are as grateful as I that we are ·back'on t~eright track, that God is on' His throne, that C hrist is head- ing thiS'Work and Mr. Armstrong, as C.hrist's apostle in this end time, is being led as always by God the Fatl)er and Christ the Son. God u:uly does work, however, in mys~erious ways. He gives us· faith, and we pray and we hope for the miracle that will save us from our most dreaded fears, 'from our worst ·afflictions ·. He has answered our prayers this time; a miraCle has oc- curred. He has Intervened to restore life and vigor to Christ's apostle. I would .like to share a little bit of

my own experience of witnessing the miracle tha~ unfolded before my eyes. I would like to share a bit of the drama, a bit of the story that now can and should be told. Little did Mr. Armstrong or I suspect"that conges- tive heart failure ' would st.rike him down So sudden'ly .1-4 months ago . when we returned after a worldwide journey from the middle of ,the Afri- can continent. -Little did we know thacmore than one time in a three- week- period he would be on the

threshold of death, that during this '

three-week period he wo uld in fact die 'as he has written to you, and that he would have · to be revived by mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and by manual heart massage. Little did we know that many ~' in high places, within the Work, would write him off as dead, would write him off as buried, would write him off as never to return. And little did' we-know that many in high places, seeming.ly free ' to abandon God's Way and God's

We don't

laws, would be SO willing to do so.

weeks of Mr.

Armstrong's illness were very criti- cal indeed. Yes, Mr. ~rmstrong did

Yes, the first few

die - yet he was revived. But the Jiving GOd in His mysterious ways saw fit to let some remain blinded to Mr. Armstrong's recovery, even while he caused Mr. Armstrong to give evidence of his recovery and to give everyone the opportunity to realize that the miracle had indeed ·occurred. But just as the Jews in Christ's time refused to recognize the Messiah so long awaited, SO too those in high places refused to believe Mr. Annstrong was alive and well.

strong ~elated much of what I have Board of Directors meeting , now told you about his miraculous

Mr. Armstrong finally returned to Pasaden.a, immediately following

New

chaired a meeting of the Board of Since January, Mr. Armstrpng has

point by point reJX>rted all subse· quent events to you in personal let- ters, in articles in The Good News and in sermons in Pasadena, Tucson, Phoenix and Big Sandy, Tex. lie has literally poured his heart ou.t to yo u, He has revealed much of what: he hoped ~would never have to be made known to many. He has been literally heartbroken, over the loss of a physi- cal son in whom he had placed so much hope, and from whom he has suffered so much pain and anguish.

the Father and Christ the Son back

again. What must be done to get God

recovery, and I spoke on the need for unity, love, harmony and coopera- tion in God's Work.

the right thing in God's eyes. Mr. Annstrong consented and said nothing about the rebellion and said nothing about the decisions. Mr. Armstrong was assured that he need not remain for the conference be- cause he was further assured that doc- trines ·of this Church would not be discussed and wo uld not in any way be involved at the ministerial confer- ence. Mr. Armstrong and I returned to Tucson, Ariz., after we each ad- dressed the ministers. Mr. Arm-

Yiar's Day,

and

lan. ' 3

he

Directors,."pf the Church. He an- nounced to the members of the board that he had indeed recovered, that he

had

been

restored to ' life by

the

gift of the living God. Ti;Jen he outlined what must be don~ to save the Work of the liVing God. What must be done to get the Work moving

into God's Work. Some of ' these board members were astounded, not only by Mr. Armstrong's recovery

but by the insight that he had as to ,Don 'I think for one moment that it

was easy for him; don't think for one moment that he has not suffered; don't think for one qtoment that he has not b~en sorely grieved and dis~

happily so. One person was resen~- appointed. I know better; I've lived

:with him e'very day, for all practical purposes, as he just said a few mo- ments ago, for the past 10 years. And

disrespect. But C hrist' s apostle was ' 1 myself have never worked so hard

and SO futile'ly, so unsuccessfully to

equal to the occasion. He calmly

reemphasized his points, gave over~ bring about a contrary result. all directions to the others to carry out Wharhas not been told in my opin·

the Policies that he had enunciated -ion is that there were two miracles as

and. to keep in touch with him over

ttte ensuing . ",!9~thS.~r

fut That one person shocked the others by his open and naked hostility and his unveiled and all too revealing

what was needed in God's Work, But , though astounded, they were happily astounded. Some might have ,been a bit incredulous, unbelieving but also

I view the events of the past 14 rnonlhs. The first miracle was, aS" r '- already stated, Mr. Armstrong was restored to life and vigor, restored with his faculties so necessary to carry on the Work of the living God, _ faculties that were bestowed upon him by the living God, undi- minished, undiminished, and Mr. Armstrong has been given the oppor- tunity to continue as Christ's apostle in this end lime. But the second mira- de was one that wedidnot prayior; it ~as one that we did not hope for; it

was one that we did not foresee, and

+;.,;::; 4

Arm'-

The

ne x.!' morning

"::,,,-'t1

Mr.

strong's son sent his wife _and an assistant to Mr. Armstro~ng's home, ~d they pleaded that Mr. Armstrong make no mention of the open rebel· lion that· had occurred the day before

and to make no mention of the momentous decisions thai Mr. Arm- strong had made, when he, Mr. Arm- strong, was scheduled to sp eak within the hour at the opening onhe ministerial conference in Pasadena.

A few moments later ,Mr.

Armstrong.!s son pleaded with hi s we did ' nol envision. God struck

father on his own behalf to .make no

announcements about the decisions that hl)d been made and to make no

mention before the ministers of the

rebellion. ' Mr.

once again at thai point to give his - fact, he were not to move to correct son one more chance. One more op- the mistakes that he had made in the port unity was thus given his son 10 do past in order to protec!" his son. In

down Mr. Armstrong in such a way as 10 pe~mil him after being restored to life to see -firsthand what Ihe Work would be like if he were no longer here, if, in fact, he were dead, if. in

Armstrong

decided

FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH - The Stanley R. Rader family poses with Herbert W. Armstrong lor an informal family portratt. From left are son Stephen, 23, daughter Janis, 26, Mr. and Mrs: Rader, daughter Carolli«le, 25, and Mr. . Armstrong. Mrs. little was baptized Oct. 27 after counseling with Mr. Armstrong. (See "Update," page 20.)

other words', God gave Mr. Arm" strong another chance to render to Him that accounting th.at Mr. Ann· strong always knew he would have .to

render, because he has always said he

is accountable to God. He gave him

another chance to render that ac- counting after making all of the cor-

rections that were necessary before the accounting would have 'to be ul- timately submi!ted and' he gave Mr. Arm.strong an opportunity to. take aU the steps neCessary to ensure that God's WOIk would be done, that God's ways would be preserved, even if God should decide in his wis- dom and 'mercy that Me. Arm&trong

will not be able to complete it in his

lifetime.

people

that he could very well outlive all of

. Mr.

Annstrong has

told

· us and· I believe that very, very strongly, and we all hope that Mr.

Armstrong will be able to complete

· the Work, if that is what God's over- all plan has provided for Me. Arm- strong. But, if not, Mr. Armstrong's

timely action, as a result of the two

· miracles as I have seen them, his timely measures, his timely actions 'will ensure that the Work will bedone.

. Faith enhailced

. So, brethren, there were tw'o mira- .

cles that the living God performed fQr

the direct benefit this time of His Work. Miracles 'perfor,med before our eyes, if we were simply of the mind to see them. Is there any won- der that my faith has been enhanced a ·. thousand-fold! Should there be. any dOllbt that t~ere is a living God in the '

minds of any of you. Is there any

· douht in your mind now that this is the true Church, the only Church and.

a Work.of the living God and not a

work of mere men. I-hav,e"a lofmore tflat I could. share"i with you, but I don't Y'ant to take the :

time now. I know that you're waiting as I have for so long to hear Mr. Armstrong sPeak here again 'in Tuc- son. 1 snail write more to you in the future in the pages of The Good News and from time to time maybe some of' my comments given in forums or else reach you by cassette or videotape. I cannot thank you en<:lUgh for your leners of encouragement. of suppOrt and of your prayers for me, for my wife, my children, for Mr : Arm- strong and Mrs. Armstrong. Please let me contin!Je to hear from you. I would like to share one letter that

I received just before I. left Pasadena, --:

-.1,0 days ago. From awoman signed Nettie. She says: "Hello, Stanley

Rader. After listening to the tape of your forum, I