Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 35

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FASHION TECHNOLOGY

ORTHOTICS
Industry Profile, Key Issue and Challenges of the
unorganized sector
Sarvottema Nagpal, Shradha Kochar
10/31/2014

Contents
LEATHER INDUSTRY-OVERVIEW.................................................................................................................... 3
Strengths of Indian leather sector ............................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.
ORTHOTICS INDUSTRY ................................................................................................................................ 10
CURRENT SCENARIO OF ORTHOTICS MARKET ............................................................................................ 24
UNEXPLORED INDIAN MARKET ................................................................................................................... 25
UNORGANIZED SECTOR OF ORTHOTICS ..................................................................................................... 28
INDIAN SCENARIO ................................................................................................................................... 28
INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO .................................................................................................................... 31
KEY ISSUES OF THE ORTHOTICS MARKET.................................................................................................... 33
ORTHOTICS ASSOCIATION OF INDIA (OAPI)................................................................................................ 34
REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................................ 35

LEATHER INDUSTRY-OVERVIEW

The Leather Industry holds a prominent place in the Indian economy. This
sector is known for its consistency in high export earnings and it is among the
top ten foreign exchange earners for the country.

With an annual turnover of over US$ 7.5 billion, the export of leather and
leather products increased manifold over the past decades and touched US$
4.86 billion in 2011-12, recording a cumulative annual growth rate of about
8.22% (5 years).

The Leather industry is bestowed with an affluence of raw materials as India is


endowed with 21% of world cattle & buffalo and 11% of world goat & sheep
population. Added to this are the strengths of skilled manpower, innovative
technology, increasing industry compliance to international environmental
standards, and the dedicated support of the allied industries.

The leather industry is an employment intensive sector, providing job to about


2.5 million people, mostly from the weaker sections of the society. Women
employment is predominant in leather products sector with about 30% share.
Though India is the second largest producer of footwear and leather garments in
the world, India accounts for a share of close to 3% in the global leather import
trade of US$ 137.96 billion (2010)

The major production centers for leather and leather products in India are
located in Tamil Nadu - Chennai, Ambur, Ranipet, Vaniyambadi, Vellore,
Pernambut, Trichy, Dindigul and Erode ; West Bengal Kolkata ; Uttar Pradesh
Kanpur, Agra, Noida, Saharanpur; Maharashtra Mumbai ; Punjab Jallandhar
; Karnataka Bangalore ; Andhra Pradesh - Hyderabad ; Haryana - Ambala,
Gurgaon, Panchkula, Karnal and Faridabad; Delhi; Madhya Pradesh Dewas
; Kerala Calicut and Ernakulam / Cochin

Strengths of Indian leather sector:

Own raw material source 2 billion sq ft of leather produced annually


Some varieties of goat / calf / sheep skins command premium position
Strong and eco-sustainable tanning base
Modernized manufacturing units
Trained / skilled manpower at competitive wage levels
World-class institutional support for Design & Product Development, HRD and R
& D.
Presence of support industries like leather chemicals and finishing auxiliaries
Presence in major markets Long Europe experience
Strategic location in the Asian landmass
Emerging strengths :

Design development initiatives by institutions and individuals


Continuous modernization and technology upgradation
Economic size of manufacturing units
Constant human resource development programme to enhance productivity
Increasing use of quality components
Shorter prototype development time
Delivery compliance
Growing domestic market for footwear and leather articles

Highlights of Leather Product Segments:

Tanning Sector Annual production 2 billion Sq.ft. Accounts for 10% of world
leather requirement. Indian colors continuously being selected at the
MODEUROPE Congress.
Footwear Sector - Second largest footwear producer after China. Annual
Production 2065 million pairs. Huge domestic retail market 1950 million pairs
(95%) are sold in domestic market. Footwear export accounts for 45.05% share
4

in Indias total leather & leather products export. The Footwear product mix
Gents 52%, Ladies 39% and Children 9%
Leather Garments Sector Second largest producer with annual production
capacity of 16 million pieces. Third largest global exporter. Accounts for 10.43%
share of Indias total leather export
Leather Goods & Accessories Sector including Saddlery & Harness - Fifth
largest global exporter. Annual production capacity - 63 million pieces of
leather articles, 52 million pairs of Industrial gloves & 12.50 million pieces of
Harness & Saddlery items. Accounts for 23.44% share of Indias total export
Product-wise Brands sourced from India:

Footwear

Acme, Ann Taylor, Bally, Charter


Club, Clarks, Coach, Colehann,
Daniel Hector, Deichmann, DKNY,
Double H, Ecco, Elefanten,
Etienneaigner, Florsheim, Gabor,
Geoffrey Beene, Guess, Harrods,
Hasley, Hush Puppies, Kenneth
Cole, Liz Claiborne, Marks &
Spencer, Nautica, Next, Nike, Cole
Haan, Nunn Bush, Pierre Cardin,
Reebok, Rockport, Salamander,
Stacy Adams, Tommy Hilfiger, Tony
Lama, Versace, Yves St. Laurent,
Zara, Johnston & Murphy,
Docksteps, Timberland, Armani,
Geox, Diesel, Ted Baker, Lacoste,
Kickers, Calvin Klein, Sioux, Brasher,
Zegna, Massimu Dutti, Buggatti,
Lloyd, Christian Dier, Salamander,

Leather Garments

Leather Goods / Accessories

Armani, Zegna,
Coach, Liz Claiborne,
Abercrombie & Fitch, Harrods, Yves St, Laurent,
Marco Polo, Mango, Tommy Hilfiger, Etienne
Colehaan, Andre
Aigner, Geoffrey Beene,
Maarc, Guess Pierre Marks & Spencer, Guess,
Cardin, Tommy
Next, Pierre Cardin,
Hilfiger, Versace,
Prada, GAP, Levis, H & M,
DKNY, Liz Claiborne, British Home Stores,
Ann Taylor, Nautica, Banana Republic, Furla,
Kenneth Cole, Charter American Eagle
Club, Daniel Hector Outfitters, Bracciliani,
Walmart etc.

Camper, Bata, Espirit, French


Connection, Legero, Mercedez, H &
M and many more famous brands

Besides, major brands are sourced from India, MNC brands are sold in India and Indian
brands sold in India.

Indian Brands sold


in India

MNC Brands Sold


in India
Aldo, Bally, Clarks, Ecco, Florshiem,
Ferragammo, Hush Puppies, Lee
cooper, Lloyd, Marks & Spencer,
Nike, Nine West,
New Balance, Reebok, Rockport,
Stacy Adams, Tods, Geox , Louis
Vuitton

Red Tape, Bata, Liberty,


Khadims, Lakhani, Metro,
Action

Indias export of leather and leather products for Five years


(Value in Million $)
2008-09
Finished Leather

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

807.19

673.37

627.95

841.13

1023.21

1489.35

1534.32

1507.59

1758.67

2077.27

Leather Garments

345.34

426.17

428.62

425.04

572.54

Leather Goods

800.46

873.44

757.02

855.78

1088.09

Saddlery & Harness

106.18

92.15

83.39

87.92

107.60

Total

3548.51

3599.46

3404.57

3968.54

4868.71

% Growth

15.99%

1.44%

-5.41%

16.57%

22.68%

Footwear

Source: DGCI&S

% Share of Leather Products in Export Performance (2012-13)

% share of various countries in Indias Leather & Leather Products Exports (2012-13)

Major Markets:
The major markets for Indian Leather & Leather Products are Germany with a
share of 15.01%, UK 11.15%, Italy 10.85%, USA 9.02%, Hong Kong 7.38%, France
6.25%, Spain 6.08%, Netherlands 4.07%, Belgium 2.32%, China 2.54%,
7

U.A.E.2.24%, Australia 1.39%, These 12 countries together accounts for nearly


78.30% of Indias total leather& leather products export.
Indias Export of Leather & Leather Products to the European Union touched US$
3116.52 mn in 2011-12, accounting for a share of 64.01% in Indias total leather
export trade of US$ 4868.71 mn.

(Value in million USD)


2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

% Share

COUNTRY
Germany

493.34

508.45

491.28

575.38

730.77

15.01%

Italy

490.77

461.56

398.56

455.76

528.39

10.85%

UK

417.64

413.24

456.59

505.20

542.99

11.15%

USA

311.21

359.22

296.37

348.13

439.27

9.02%

Hong Kong

280.97

237.72

251.53

325.20

359.51

7.38%

Spain

216.07

219.18

219.13

247.99

295.81

6.08%

France

198.52

221.33

255.29

280.04

304.23

6.25%

Netherlands

134.75

148.77

137.10

155.43

198.29

4.07%

U.A.E.

76.23

85.79

69.06

74.27

109.11

2.24%

Portugal

56.93

48.17

39.39

39.62

46.55

0.96%

Belgium

55.32

54.77

65.39

80.89

113.08

2.32%

China

55.46

49.96

48.58

75.48

123.78

2.54%

Australia

50.44

55.76

53.92

51.81

67.79

1.39%

Denmark

49.58

60.12

55.73

57.75

74.15

1.52%

Sweden

38.99

38.03

36.07

31.36

44.29

0.91%

Canada

36.92

35.29

27.66

29.32

40.01

0.82%

Korea Rep.

29.55

26.17

29.04

31.31

38.22

0.78%

South Africa

27.90

22.45

24.60

32.14

41.17

0.85%

Switzerland

25.79

26.07

27.10

25.02

33.52

0.69%

Austria

25.68

27.22

28.01

27.01

38.43

0.79%

Greece

23.57

17.82

12.77

10.05

10.88

0.22%

Saudi Arabia

15.96

19.28

21.01

22.14

40.89

0.84%

Japan

15.95

20.24

17.19

21.74

33.18

0.68%

Russia

15.77

12.01

6.68

19.99

33.05

0.68%

Indonesia

15.31

13.45

10.08

20.15

25.16

0.52%

Finland

14.39

15.52

9.96

14.57

22.14

0.45%

Ireland

8.15

6.44

5.79

5.36

7.56

0.16%

New Zealand

5.61

5.46

4.29

5.98

7.29

0.15%

361.74

389.97

306.42

399.45

519.20

10.68%

3548.51

3599.46

3404.57

3968.54

Others
Total

4868.71 100.00%

Region-wise Export of Leather & Leather Products 2011-12

ORTHOTICS INDUSTRY
About Orthotics:
Orthotics is derived from the greek worth ORTHO meaning straight, upright or
correct. It refers to a static or dynamic device and is preferable to splint or brace
which refers only to a static device.
Three point pressure principle forms the mechanical basis for orthotic correction;
a single force is placed at the area of deformity or angulation; two additional
counter forces act in the opposing direction
The functions of Orthotics are:
Prevent Deformity
Assist function of a weak limb
Maintain proper alignment of joints
Inhibit tone
Protect against injury of a weak joint
Allow for maximal functional independence
Facilitate Motion

Some Orthotic Considerations are:


Cost
Energy efficiency
Cosmesis
Temporary versus permanent

10

Dynamic versus static


Encourage normal Movement
Orthotic Intervention
Ensure continued proper fit
Donning/doffing orthosis
Implement progressive wearing schedule
Patient/caregiver teaching:
1. Skin Inspection
2. Care of orthosis
Mobility training with orthosis

Orthotic Goals
Maximize functional mobility skills with orthosis
Maximize independence with donning/doffing
Maximize independence with wearing schedule
Maximize independence with skin inspection
Maximize competence with care of orthosis

Alignment
Correct alignment permits effective function
a. minimizes movement between limb and orthoses (pistoning)
b. minimizes compression on pressure sensitive tissues
11

Lower limb orthoses


Components:
SHOES
The foundation for an orthosis; shoes can reduce areas of concentrated pressure
on pressure sensitive feet.
Shoes
Traditional leather orthopedic shoes or athletic sneakers can be worn with
orthoses; attachments can be external or internal. Blucher opening has vamps
(flaps contain the lace stays) that open wide apart from the anterior margin of the
shoe for ease of application. Bal (balmoral) opening: has stiched down vamps not
suitable for orthotic wear

Blucher opening

Balmoral opening

12

Foot Orthoses (FO)


A semi-rigid or rigid insert worn inside a shoe that corrects foot alignment and
improves function may also be used to relieve pain. Foot orthotics are custom
molded and are often designed for a specific level of functioning.
May be attached to the interior of the shoe (an inserted pad) or exterior to
the shoe (thomas heel)
Soft inserts (viscoelastic plastic or rubber pads or relief cut-outs) reduce
areas of high loading, restrict forces, and protect painful or sensitive areas
of the feet.
Metatarsal pad: located posterior to the metatarsal heads; takes pressure
off the metatarsal heads and onto the metatarsal shafts; allows more push
off in weak or inflexible feet
Cushion heel: cushions and absorbs forces at heel contact; used to relieve
strain on plantar fascia in plantar fasciitis

Heel-Spur pad.
Metatarsal Pad: Neuroma Pad

placed between the metatarsal shafts to relieve nerve pain ans is most commonly
placed between the 3rd and 4th met shafts commonly this is also used with a wider
shoe to achieve relief.
13

Cushion Heel

Heel Spur pad

Longitudinal Arch Supports


Prevent depression of the subtalar joint and correct for pes planus (flat foot)
UCBL (university of California biomechanics laboratory) insert: a semi
rigid plastic molded insert to correct for flexible pes planus
Scaphoid Pad: used to support the longitudinal arch
Thomas heel: a wedge with an extended anterior medial border used
to support the longitudinal arch and correct for flexible pes valgus
(pronated foot)

Scaphoid Pad

14

UCBL Heel

Thomas Heel

Posting
Rearfoot posting alters the position of the subtalar joint or rearfoot from
heel strike to foot flat. Must be dynamic, control but not eliminate STJ
function.
Varus Post (medial wedge): limits or controls eversion of the
calcaneus and internal rotation of the tibia after heelstrike. Reduces
calcaneal eversion during running
Valgus Post (lateral wedge): controls calcaneus and subtalar joint that are
excessively inverted and supinated at heelstrike.
15

Forefoot posting: suports the forefoot


Medial wedge prescribed for forefoot varus
Lateral wedge prescribed for forefoot valgus
Contraindicated for insensitive foot

16

Heel Lifts
Accommodates for leg length discrepancy; can be placed inside the shoe
(up to 3/8 inch) or attached to the outer sole.
Accommodates for limitation in ankle joint
dorsiflexion

Rocker bar & Rocker bottom


Rocker bar: located proximal to metatarsal heads; improves weight shift
onto metatarsals
Rocket bottom: builds up the sole over the metatarsal heads and improves
push off in weak or inflexible feet. May also be used with insensitive feet

17

Ankle-foot orthosis (AFO)


Consist of a shoe attachment, ankle control, uprights and a proximal leg band
Shoe attachments & Stirrups
Foot Plate: a molded plastic shoe insert; allows application of the brace
before insertion into the shoe, ease of changing shoes of same heel height.
Stirrup: a metal attachment riveted to the sole of the shoe; split stirrups
allow for shoe interchange solid stirrups are fixed permanently to the shoe
and provide maximum stability

Foot Plate and Split Stirrups

Solid Stirrups

Ankle Controls
Free motion: provides mediolateral stability that allows free motion in
dosiflexion and plantarflexion
Solid ankle: allows no movement indicated with sever pain or instability
Limited motion: allows motion to be restricted in one or both directions
18

Free Motion

Limited Motion

Spring Assist & Posterior Leaf Spring


Spring assist (Klenzak housing): double upright metal AFO with a single
anterior channel for a spring assist to aid dorsiflexion
Posterior leaf spring (PLS): a plastic AFO that inserts into the shoe; widely
used to prevent foot drop.

19

Knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO)


Knee stability
Sagittal stability achieved by bands or straps used to provide a
posteriorly directed force.
Anterior band or strap (knee cap): attaches by four buckles to
metal uprights; may restrict sitting, increases difficulty in
putting on KAFO
Anterior bands: pretibial or suprapatellar or both
Frontal plane controls: for control of genu varum or valgum
Posterior plastic shell
Older braces utilize valgum (medial) or varum (lateral)
correction straps which buckle around the opposite metal
upright; less effective as controls than plastic shell
Thigh bands
Proximal thigh band
Quadrilateral or ischeal weight bearing brim: reduces weight bearing
through the limb
Pattern bottom: a distal attachment added to keep the foot off
the floorl provides 100% unweighting of the limb; a life is
required on the opposite leg.
Specialized KAFOs
Craig-Scott KAFO: commonly used appliance for individuals with
paraplegia; consists of shoe attachments with reinforced foot plates
BiCAAL ankle joints set in slight dorsiflexion, pretibial band, pawl
knee locks with bail release, and single thigh bands

20

Oregon orthotic system: a combination of plastic and metal


components allows for triplanar control in three plans of
motion(sagittal, frontal, and transverse)

Scott-Craig

Oregon Orthotic System

Specialized Knee Orthoses (KO)


Articulated Kos

control knee motion and provide added stability.

Post surgery KO protects repaired ligaments from overload


Functional KO is worn long-term in lieu of surgery or during selected
activities
Examples include: Lenox Hill, Pro-Am, Can-Am, Don Joy
Swedish knee cage

provides mild control for excessive hyperextension of the knee

Patellar stabilizing braces


21

Improve patellar tracking; maintain alignment


Lateral buttress or strap positions patella medially
A Central Patellar cutout may help positioning and minimizes
compression

Lenox HIll

Donjoy

Upper limb orthoses


Passive (static) positioning devices: generally made out of a variety of low
temperature plastic; ie orthoplast, hexalite
Resting splint (cock-up splint): an anterior or palmar splint that
positions the wris and hand in a functional position
Dorsal splint: frees the palm for feeling and grasping by the use of
grips that curve around over the second and fifth metacarpal
heads; allows for the attachment of dorsal devices ie rubber
bands to make it a dynamic device

22

Airplane splint: positions the patients arm out to the side at


90degrees of abduction the elbow is also flexed to the same
degrees; the weight of the outstretched arm is borne on a padded
lateral trunk bar and iliac crest band; a strap holds the device
across the trunk; used to immobilize the shoulder following
fracture of injury when trapping to the chest is not desirable or
with burns

23

CURRENT SCENARIO OF ORTHOTICS MARKET


The market for Orthotic Devices has seen some changes in recent times. 2013 has
witnessed a surgein the number of innovations in the orthotic device industry,
owing to growing demand foraffordable and efficient orthoses, and the
development of modern modeling and manufacturing techniques for orthotic
devices has revolutionized the industry, enabling automation of the industryup to
a great extent. At present, the regulations for orthotic devices market should be
synchronized across the world to ensure uniformity in their quality and safety.
Manufacturers of orthotic devices in the developing countries are currently
exploring new markets to reduce their manufacturing and operational costs. The
nations which are currently targeted as potential production zone and marketare
countries in Asia Pacific, as the manpower supply is high, wages are low, and the
number of users growing by leaps and bounds as time goes by.In the near future,
innovations will include orthotic devices that can be printed and assembled by the
patients themselves within the comfort of their homes. At present, the orthotics
market is already experiencing novel modeling techniques and smart phone apps
that allow patients to get diagnosed through their phone and simultaneously
fabricate orthotic devices through a 3D printer.

24

UNEXPLORED INDIAN MARKET


The United States-based Comprehensive Prosthetics & Orthotics (CPO), which
primarily focuses on improving the lives of disabled through innovative devices
and techniques, has commercially launched its India operations following huge
response for its pilot project for people suffering from amputations, limb loss, as
well as lifestyle-related joint problems.
The company, started by Indian-origin American Amit Bhanti, had been operating
a series of clinics in the country on a pilot basis at seven locations, including in
Delhi, Noida and Hyderabad. The clinics will act as one-stop solution for prosthetic
and orthotic patients, offering technologically advanced and cutting-edge
products and services. CPO last started the state-of-the-art clinic in Jammu
recently.
CPO is the one of the premium providers of all prosthetics and orthotics products
and services in the US, where it has a network of 21 clinics across various
locations. The company strategizes to implement a similar patient-centric model
in India, where the sector is very fragmented and does not have many specialized
players.
The prosthetics and orthotics space in India is very unorganized and the sector is
in its early stages of growth. There is a huge potential for growth for the company
here. Also, we can offer customers our customized and high-end products along
with the support and guidance of our rehabilitation experts. Our aim is to restore
mobility and quality of life in those who have lost hope, says Amit Bhanti, Clinical
Director & Global Chief Executive Officer of CPO.
We have been running clinics on a pilot basis at various locations in India. Seeing
the huge response, we have commercialized our business and plan to launch 20
more clinics in the next one year. Our customized products help people get on
with their lives independently by making them resume their normal activities of
25

living. Our rehabilitation experts work with the patients and their near and dear
ones to understand their needs and recommend the best device that will
effectively meet their requirements, functions and lifestyle, Bhanti adds.
The experienced practitioners at CPO evaluate and measure custom orthoses and
prostheses for each patient and the technical experts fabricate the same using
state of the art CAD/CAM technology at its Centralized Fabrication Lab in Delhi. All
the products for patients all over India are solely fabricated at the lab to maintain
consistency in quality. Christopher Cummings, who is a member of American
Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists, heads the lab. He has more than 22 years
of experience of having worked worldwide.
The company offers a complete range of prosthetics, orthotics, pediatrics and
pedorthics (foot care) solutions to patients. CPO also offers Reciprocating Gait
Orthoses (RGO) device for paraplegics whose lower half body have become
paralyzed on account of some reasons. An RGO is a highly specialised device
which works on the principle of Reciprocating Gait, that is, the flexion in one hip
helps in the extension of other hip which gives the patient stability to stand
without support and allows him to walk.
In prosthetics, CPOs expertise comes into play in fitting the products on any
amputated, uneven or lost limb with the help of customized company-made
sockets, which are manufactured with precision at CPOs computer-aided
centralized fabrication facility. Such customized sockets are easy-to-wear by
patients and it is where the companys forte lies in. The company provides lifetime
support to patients once the fitting process is finished, thereby creating long-term
relationships based on trust and commitment. The unique fitting of the socket is
extremely crucial for long-term comfort of the patient and CPO excels in that.
Post fitting, patients are trained to use their new limbs with exactness.
In orthotics, besides providing solutions for lifestyle problems such as stiff neck,
tennis elbow, back pain, the company has fitted patients with complex orthoses
such as cranial remolding helmets for infants and RGO for paraplegics. The
experienced clinicians of CPO work with patients and their family, to evaluate
26

needs and recommend the best device to fit their needs, function and lifestyle.
Besides, it also provides prostheses for mastectomy cases, cosmetic restoration
and recompression therapy garments services.
The company has been remarkable in its treatment of problems related to flat
foot, mechanical low back pain and Diabetic foot, among others through its
customized high-end Foot Insoles, which it designs using the most advanced
technology, hence ensuring maximum accuracy.

27

UNORGANIZED SECTOR OF ORTHOTICS


INDIAN SCENARIO

The United States-based Comprehensive Prosthetics & Orthotics (CPO), which


primarily focuses on improving the lives of disabled through innovative devices
and techniques, has commercially launched its India operations following huge
response for its pilot project for people suffering from amputations, limb loss, as
well as lifestyle-related joint problems.
The company, started by Indian-origin American Amit Bhanti, had been operating
a series of clinics in the country on a pilot basis at seven locations, including in
Delhi, Noida and Hyderabad. The clinics will act as one-stop solution for prosthetic
and orthotic patients, offering technologically advanced and cutting-edge
products and services. CPO last started the state-of-the-art clinic in Jammu
recently.
CPO is the one of the premium providers of all prosthetics and orthotics products
and services in the US, where it has a network of 21 clinics across various
locations. The company strategizes to implement a similar patient-centric model
in India, where the sector is very fragmented and does not have many specialized
players.
The prosthetics and orthotics space in India is very unorganized and the sector is
in its early stages of growth. There is a huge potential for growth for the company
here. Also, we can offer customers our customized and high-end products along
with the support and guidance of our rehabilitation experts. Our aim is to restore
mobility and quality of life in those who have lost hope, says Amit Bhanti, Clinical
Director & Global Chief Executive Officer of CPO.
We have been running clinics on a pilot basis at various locations in India. Seeing
the huge response, we have commercialized our business and plan to launch 20
28

more clinics in the next one year. Our customized products help people get on
with their lives independently by making them resume their normal activities of
living. Our rehabilitation experts work with the patients and their near and dear
ones to understand their needs and recommend the best device that will
effectively meet their requirements, functions and lifestyle, Bhanti adds.
The experienced practitioners at CPO evaluate and measure custom orthoses and
prostheses for each patient and the technical experts fabricate the same using
state of the art CAD/CAM technology at its Centralized Fabrication Lab in Delhi. All
the products for patients all over India are solely fabricated at the lab to maintain
consistency in quality. Christopher Cummings, who is a member of American
Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists, heads the lab. He has more than 22 years
of experience of having worked worldwide.
The company offers a complete range of prosthetics, orthotics, pediatrics and
pedorthics (foot care) solutions to patients. CPO also offers Reciprocating Gait
Orthoses (RGO) device for paraplegics whose lower half body have become
paralyzed on account of some reasons. An RGO is a highly specialised device
which works on the principle of Reciprocating Gait, that is, the flexion in one hip
helps in the extension of other hip which gives the patient stability to stand
without support and allows him to walk.
In prosthetics, CPOs expertise comes into play in fitting the products on any
amputated, uneven or lost limb with the help of customized company-made
sockets, which are manufactured with precision at CPOs computer-aided
centralized fabrication facility. Such customized sockets are easy-to-wear by
patients and it is where the companys forte lies in. The company provides lifetime
support to patients once the fitting process is finished, thereby creating long-term
relationships based on trust and commitment. The unique fitting of the socket is
extremely crucial for long-term comfort of the patient and CPO excels in that.
Post fitting, patients are trained to use their new limbs with exactness.
In orthotics, besides providing solutions for lifestyle problems such as stiff neck,
tennis elbow, back pain, the company has fitted patients with complex orthoses
29

such as cranial remolding helmets for infants and RGO for paraplegics. The
experienced clinicians of CPO work with patients and their family, to evaluate
needs and recommend the best device to fit their needs, function and lifestyle.
Besides, it also provides prostheses for mastectomy cases, cosmetic restoration
and recompression therapy garments services.
The company has been remarkable in its treatment of problems related to flat
foot, mechanical low back pain and Diabetic foot, among others through its
customized high-end Foot Insoles, which it designs using the most advanced
technology, hence ensuring maximum accuracy.

30

INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO

The pace of growth slowed for the orthopedic prosthetics industry due to the
economic downturn in 2008 and 2009. The global knee and hip implants market
was greatly affected as more patients delayed their costly surgeries. According to
GIAs report, the knee and hip implant market is ready for an uptick in part to the
recession ending. The combination of an ending recession and the rising
awareness of the procedure will likely create long-term growth. Favorable
reimbursement scenarios and the surgeons familiarity of the surgical procedures
are likely to improve growth as well, according to the report. The report found
that minimally invasive hip surgeries are gaining popularity due to the patients
desire to maintain an active lifestyle as well as their desire to avoid major surgery.
Sales of knee prosthetics in the United States are driven by a shift towards
customized devices and the growing popularity of knee replacements in younger
patients, the report found. The development of advanced prosthetic implants
involving better design and wear-resistant materials will likely enhance the
growth impact of the industry, the report predicted.
Our heritage is innovation and developing clinically sound solutions for not only
diseases of the joints but the spine, cranial facial, dental, fractures, biologic and
sports medicine, Bill Kolter, senior vice president of corporate communications,
Biomet Inc. told O&P Business News. As long as bone and joint disorders
continue to be the number one source of disability in this country, we are going to
continue to find innovative ways to deliver solutions to patients.
Globally, India, China and Latin America offer growth potential in the prosthetics
market due to their economic growth and elderly population. The United States
and Europe account for the majority of the global orthopedic prosthetics market.
European countries were also hit hard by the recession. Like the United States,
31

European patients were likely to wait for surgical procedures. Patients


unwillingness for surgery impacted revenue streams in the prosthetic and
orthopedic markets, the report found.
Russia and Eastern Europe were found to be underserved in prosthetic and
orthopedic devices. The report indicated these countries offer potential growth
opportunities for the marketplace. Along with Russia and Eastern Europe, the
report predicted that Latin America will enjoy the fastest growth rate in the hip
prosthesis market. The report projects an 8.5% growth over the analysis period,
which was 2007 to 2015.

32

KEY ISSUES OF THE ORTHOTICS MARKET


The ankle marketplace is one of them taking into account recent
enhancements to orthosis and support designs in an effort to more
aggressively treat ankle injuries.
Cold therapy systems and infusion pumps for pain management are two
specialized market sectors that are feeling the effects of this increase as
well. Cold therapy in particular is growing and expected to continue on that
path despite the fact that consumers are not usually reimbursed if they
choose to use them.
Shifting demographics are changing all health care sectors. An aging
population, technological advancements, policy initiatives and changes in
the delivery and financing of health care are specifically driving the markets
for orthoses and supports.
Orthotic device manufacturers face significant pressure from general
reimbursement reductions that will intensify as proposed cuts to Medicare
continue through 2020, which is negatively affecting pricing. Pricing
pressures have been further heightened by product commoditization.
The proliferation of over-the-counter orthotics available through retail
channels has also stifled demand for products available by prescription
only.

33

ORTHOTICS ASSOCIATION OF INDIA (OAPI)


The National Professional body of Prosthetics & Orthotics was established in
the year 1979 under the Indian Societies Registration Act and was named as
Orthotics & Prosthetics Society of India (OPSI). Later the title was
restructured as Orthotics & Prosthetics Association of India (OPAI) for the
administrative conveniences functioning with avowed objectives of:

Increasing the number of avenues of P&O Services.

To Promote the Status of the P&O Profession & its Professionals.

Enhanced team approach to cater the needs of persons with disabilities.

34

REFERENCES
1.
2.
3.
4.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4yxBgQqUVo
http://www.opai.org.in/structure-of-opai/#
http://www.theorthoticgroup.com/
http://www.healio.com/orthotics-prosthetics/industrynews/news/print/o-and-p-business-news/%7Bc2d04446-465a-4c7d-944b21fd57603547%7D/new-report-offers-global-projections-for-orthopedicprosthetic-and-orthotic-markets
5. http://www.mrg.net/News-and-Events/Press-Releases/Orthotic-andProsthetic-Device-Markets-040214.aspx

35