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DEPARTMENT OF

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
Module Outline 2014/15

Code:
Title:
Credits:
Taught:

IP1018
Politics and Power in the
Twentieth Century
15 Credits
Period 1

Disclaimer
Every effort has been taken to ensure that the information in this Module Outline is
correct at the time of going to press. The University reserves the right, arising from
unforeseen events or circumstances beyond our control, to add to or remove
programmes and to make changes in regulations, syllabuses, programme options and
modules without prior notice.

Contents:
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15.

Introduction to Module Outline


Key Staff
Module Description
Aims and Objectives
Teaching Pattern and Timetable
Assessment
Word Limit
Submission of Coursework
Presentation of Coursework
Late Coursework
Study Skills Help
Summary of Module Content
Module Synopsis: Lectures and Tutorials
Reading List
Study Abroad Students

1.

INTRODUCTION TO MODULE OUTLINE

This Module Outline contains information about the objectives of the module, its structure,
content and assessment. Please read this handbook carefully and retain it for future reference.
You should also refer to the Module Specification available on Moodle. This contains more
detailed information about Learning Outcomes for the module.
Please refer to your Programme Handbook in the Common Room on Moodle for more detailed
information about your course and on assessment regulations, academic misconduct (including
plagiarism), referencing, submission of coursework and extenuating circumstances.
2.

KEY STAFF
NAME

Role

EMAIL ADDRESS

Dr Amin Samman

Module Leader

Amin.Samman.1@city.ac.uk

Dr Gemma Collantes-Celador

Module Lecturer

Gemma.Collantes-Celador.1@city.ac.uk

Dr Holly Ryan

Module Lecturer

Holly.Ryan.1@city.ac.uk

Mrs Yulia Sarno


Mr Giovanni Mangraviti
Mr Luke Bartrop

Module Tutor
Module Tutor
Administrator

Yulia.Sarno.1@city.ac.uk
Giovanni.Mangraviti.2@city.ac.uk
Luke.Bartrop.1@city.ac.uk

3.

MODULE DESCRIPTION

This module aims to introduce you to the dynamics of global politics and power, with a focus on
developments in the twentieth century. It will consider transformations in the major actors of
international politics including states, international governmental and non-governmental
organizations. It will also consider significant political issues in the twentieth century such as the
World Wars and Cold War, decolonization, and globalization. Theoretical insights will be drawn
from a diverse range of perspectives, including the levels of analysis, liberalism, realism, and
critical approaches.
4.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

On successful completion of this module, you will be expected to be able to:


Understand key debates about politics and power in the twentieth century
Understand the changing power of governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernmental actors in the twentieth century
Understand major international political issues of the twentieth century
Apply theory to understand politics and power in the twentieth century
Assess critically competing perspectives on the transformations of politics and power in
the twentieth century
5.

TEACHING PATTERN AND TIMETABLE

One lecture and one tutorial per week across one full teaching term. Students are reminded that
attendance at both lectures and tutorials is mandatory.
Lectures: Mondays 13.00-13.50 in room BG03
Tutorials: Each student is assigned to attend one of the five tutorials. The tutorial allocation is
on Moodle. Tutorial 1 takes place Mondays 14.00-14.50 in room A111; Tutorial 2 takes place
Mondays 15.00-15.50 in room A111; Tutorial 3 takes place Mondays 16.00-16.50 in room A111;
Tutorial 4 takes place Tuesdays 13.00-13.50 in room BM02; and Tutorial 5 takes place
Tuesdays 16.00-16.50 in room BLG08.
6.

ASSESSMENT

Pass Marks
In order to pass an undergraduate module and acquire the associated credit, a student must
normally achieve an aggregate module mark of no less than 40% and pass or be exempted
from all assessment components which have a pass mark.
A student who fails one or more assessment components at the first attempt may pass the
module if their performance in other components justifies this. However, a mark of less than
30% in any assessment component will result in a fail for that module.
Coursework (50% of module mark)
One assessed essay of 2,000 words.

Deadline: the essay must be submitted by 4.00 pm on 18 December 2014.


Examination (50% of module mark)
An unseen examination sat in the January examination period.
Essay Titles
You can choose any title from the list distributed in week two for your essay.
Essay Advice
Essays should be based on wide reading. The reading list in section 14 provides suggestions
based around each weeks tutorial topic. You should aim to look at as many of the relevant
further readings for your chosen essay topic as possible, as well as the core reading. You
should look at the textbooks and core readings first before moving on to the further readings.
You should also be prepared to look beyond the reading list when preparing your essays. Use of
materials in the Northampton Square library beyond those listed on the reading list is
encouraged. It is also recommended that you make use of Londons many other libraries for
further readings: you can obtain a SCONUL card to gain access to other libraries from the
Northampton Square library desk. Other libraries catalogues can be accessed through
www.copac.ac.uk. Some internet resources such as scholarly journal articles provided at
http://uk.jstor.org can be useful BUT you need to be very careful when using internet sources
to investigate their reliability and internet sources cannot be relied upon exclusively for your
essays. Further advice on essays will be given in the first class.
7.

WORD LIMIT

The word limit for the essays is 2,000 words (students may go over or under by 10%).
The word limit runs from the Introduction to the Conclusion of the assignment and will include
quotations and footnotes which appear in the body of the assignment. The word limit does not
include the following: abstracts, contents page, diagrams, graphs, images, reference list,
bibliography or appendices.
The lecturer will only mark an assignment up to the word limit. The part of the assignment
which exceeds this limit will not be marked. Feedback will be provided and it will be explained
that the penalty has been applied.
8.

SUBMISSION OF COURSEWORK

Students should refer to the Programme Handbook for information about coursework
submission. To summarise:
(a)

Deadlines are final: Your work should be ready for submission on the deadline. Please
do not leave submission until the last minute. Coursework will not be marked after the
deadline. If you are unable to submit your coursework on time due to Extenuating
Circumstances (ECs) you must submit these in accordance with the School Policy.

(b)

Coursework Coversheet: All coursework must have a completed coversheet attached


and should be secured (i.e. stapled, small plastic folder). Please avoid submitting work in
bulky folders.

(c)

Submission: Students must not submit coursework to the School Office or directly to
teaching staff. Students must not email coursework to staff to print off. Students must
submit an electronic copy of the assignment on the module on Moodle by the deadline (this
will be your coursework receipt). It is your responsibility to ensure that your
coursework is submitted on time and in the correct manner. If you have any
difficulties submitting on Moodle, please contact your Programme Administrator
immediately.

(d)

Plagiarism: By submitting coursework for assessment either in hard copy or electronically


you are agreeing to the following declaration: The work I have submitted is exclusively my
own work except where explicitly indicated (with quotations and citation). I have read and
understood the statement on plagiarism contained in the School Handbook and
understand that plagiarism is a serious academic offence and could result in my exclusion
from the University. Please note that your assignments may be submitted to the
plagiarism detection software.

9.

PRESENTATION OF COURSEWORK

Submitted work must be well presented, legible and, where appropriate, in good, standard
English. The use of word processing and spell checking is essential in producing written work.
As a rule of thumb, work should be presented in Arial font, point 11, double-spaced with a 2.5
cm margin on either side of the page. You should always include your student number and
module code in the header of the essay and the page number in the footer.
10.

LATE COURSEWORK

Coursework MUST be submitted by the set deadline in order for it to be marked and to receive
feedback on your performance. Missed deadlines cause disruption to work schedules and
resentment amongst those who observe the deadlines. You should aim to have your work
completed before the deadline in order to allow for any problems such as printing your work on
time. If you cannot submit by the deadline, due to circumstances beyond your control, you can
request a weeks extension to the deadline by submitting an Extenuating Circumstances Form to
the School Office. If the Extenuating Circumstances Panel accepts your claim your work will be
marked as normal. If, however, you do not have extenuating circumstances for the late or
non-submission of work you will receive a mark of 0 for the piece of work and will be required to
resit at a later date. Resit marks are capped at the minimum pass mark which is 40% for
undergraduate modules.
11.

STUDY SKILLS HELP

If you require help with your study skills such as referencing or essay writing, further information
can be found in your Programme Handbook. The Student Centre also provides a series of
workshops to help students with study skills. You can email them at the following address
academiclearningsupport@city.ac.uk.

12.

SUMMARY OF MODULE CONTENT

Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13.

Lecture Topic
Tutorial Topic
Introduction; Power & International Introduction
Order at the Start of the Twentieth
Century
The Two World Wars
Power & International Order at the Start
of the Twentieth Century
The Cold War
The Two World Wars
Decolonization and the Emergence The Cold War
of the Third World
From the League of Nations to the Decolonization and the Emergence of the
United Nations
Third World
Reflective Learning Week No Reflective Learning Week No Tutorial
Lecture
The
Rise
of
Regional From the League of Nations to the United
Organizations
Nations
Non-Governmental Organizations The Rise of Regional Organizations
in the Twentieth Century
Globalization in the Twentieth Non-Governmental Organizations in the
Century
Twentieth Century
The Post-Cold War Order
Globalization in the Twentieth Century
Revision / Exam Preparation
The Post-Cold War Order
MODULE SYNOPSIS: LECTURES AND TUTORIALS

Each week the tutorial covers the topic of the lecture of the preceding week. The below reading
list provides the questions that will help guide class discussion and core and further readings for
each topic. Each week students will be expected to have prepared for the tutorial by doing at
least the core reading and by thinking about the discussion questions. Students may be
expected to prepare presentations and other exercises for each tutorial. Active participation in
tutorial discussions is expected of every student.
14.

READING LIST

TEXTBOOKS
A very useful introduction to International Politics is: J. Baylis and S. Smith The Globalization of
World Politics
A particularly useful survey of the twentieth century is provided in:
J. Nye, Understanding International Conflicts aka Understanding Global Conflict and
Cooperation (any edition)
Further very helpful general books for this module include:
A. Best et al., International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond

I. Clark, Globalization and Fragmentation: International Relations in the Twentieth


Century
G. Lundestad, East, West, North, South
N. Woods (ed.), Explaining International Relations since 1945
D. Held et al, Global Transformations: Politics, Economics, Culture
M. Howard (ed.), The Oxford History of the Twentieth Century
W. Keylor, A World of Nations
R. Mansbach & K. L. Rafferty, Introduction to Global Politics
D. Reynolds, One World Divisible

TUTORIAL WEEK ONE: INTRODUCTION


Questions:
Why should we look at past developments in international politics?
Should we attempt to derive lessons from the past?
What makes for an effective essay on politics and power in the twentieth century? What
are the major challenges in writing an essay on this subject?
Further reading:
On the uses of history in the study of politics, see Dennis Kavanagh, Why Political
Science Needs History, article in Political Studies (1991).
On lessons of the past, see Ernest May, Lessons of the Past: The Use and Misuse of
History in American Foreign Policy, reviewed by Arthur Schlesinger in Journal of
American History (1974) (review available on JSTOR).
For general advice on essay-writing, you can try Peter Levin, Write Great Essays!, and
Kathleen McMillan and Jonathan Weyers, How to Write Essays and Assignments.
TUTORIAL WEEK TWO: POWER AND INTERNATIONAL ORDER AT THE START OF THE
TWENTIETH CENTURY
Questions:
How is power exercised in international politics? How does this differ from the exercise of
power in domestic politics?
How can we explain why actors in international politics gain and lose power?
How did international politics in 1900 compare with international politics in the present
day?
Which were the most powerful actors in international politics at the onset of the twentieth
century? How did they exercise power? Does this differ from the exercise of power in
international politics in the present day?
Core reading:
R. Mansbach and K. Rafferty, Introduction to Global Politics, The quest for power and influence
pp. 270-278
A. Best et al., International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond, Introduction and The
Great Powers, Power Politics and the State System, pp. 5-15

Further reading on power:


D. Beetham, The Legitimation of Power
B. Barnes, The Nature of Power
N. Barry, An Introduction to Modern Political Theory, chap. 4
R. Dahl, Modern Political Analysis, chap. 3
K. Dowding, Power
A. Heywood, Political Theory: An Introduction, chap. 5
S. Lukes, Power: A Radical View
J. Edkins and M. Zehfuss, Global Politics a new introduction, chap. 6
M. Foucault, Power/Knowledge: selected interviews and other writings 1972-1977
A. Heywood, Key Concepts in Politics, chap. 2
A. Heywood, Political Theory: An Introduction, chap. 5
B. Hindess, Discourses on Power: From Hobbes to Foucault
G. Ponton and P. Gill, Introduction to Politics, chap. 5
D. Wrong, Power
Wider further reading:
I. Clark, Globalization and Fragmentation: International Relations in the Twentieth Century
M. Howard (ed.), The Oxford History of the Twentieth Century
R. Mansbach & K. L. Rafferty, Introduction to Global Politics, esp. chap. 1
F. S. Northedge & M. J. Grieve, A Hundred Years of International Relations
J. Nye, Understanding International Conflicts aka Understanding Global Conflict and
Cooperation, chaps. 1-2
L. Scott, International History, 1900-90, in J. Baylis and S. Smith, The Globalization of World
Politics (2008 edition)
A. Watson, The Evolution of International Society
N. Woods, Explaining International Relations since 1945
TUTORIAL WEEK THREE: THE TWO WORLD WARS
Questions:
What are the levels of analysis and how do they explain the origins of the First and
Second World Wars?
Were the factors contributing to the onset of the First World War the same as those
contributing to the onset of the Second World War?
Was the balance of power the most important factor in explaining the onset of the two
World Wars?
Si vis bellum, para pacem (If you want war, prepare for peace). Having reflected on the
origins of the two World Wars, to what extent do you agree with this statement?
Core reading:
J. Nye, Understanding International Conflicts aka Understanding Global Conflict and
Cooperation, chaps 2-4
Further reading on origins of WW1:
A. Best et al, International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond, chap. 1
D. Calleo, The German Problem Reconsidered: Germany and the World Order 1870 to the
Present Day

N. Ferguson, Germany and the Origins of the First World War: New Perspectives, article in
Historical Journal (1992)
F. Fischer, World Power or Decline: The Controversy over Germanys Aims in the First World
War
P. Gellman, The elusive explanation: balance of power theory and the origins of World War I,
article in Review of International Studies (1989)
M. Hewitson, Germany and the Causes of the First World War
R. Jervis, A Political Science Perspective on the Balance of Power and Concert, article in
American Historical Review (1992)
J. Joll, The Origins of the First World War
H. Kissinger, Diplomacy, chaps. 7-8
H. W. Koch, The Origins of the First World War
P. W. Schroeder, The Nineteenth Century System: Balance of Power or Political Equilibrium?,
article in Review of International Studies (1987)
H. Strachan, The First World War: Causes and Course, review article in Historical Journal
(1986)
M. Trachtenberg, History and Strategy, chap. 2
S. R. Williamson, Austria-Hungary and the Origins of the First World War
Further reading on origins of WW2:
W. G. Beasley, Japanese Imperialism, 18941945
A. Best et al, International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond, chaps. 3, 7 & 8
P.M.H. Bell, The Origins of the Second World War in Europe
I. Clark, The Spoils of War and the Spoiling of Peace, article in Journal of Contemporary History
(2003)
R. Dallek, FDR and American Foreign Policy, 19321945
R. Davis, Anglo-French Relations before the Second World War: Appeasement and Crisis
M. Gilbert, The Roots of Appeasement
A. Iriye, The Origins of the Second World War in Asia and the Pacific
M. Jonas, Isolationism in America, 19351941
G.F. Kennan, American Diplomacy, 19001950
I. Kershaw, Hitler, 18891936: Hubris and Hitler, 19361945: Nemesis
J. M. Keynes, The Economic Consequences of the Peace
S. Marks, The Illusion of Peace: International Relations in Europe, 19181933
I. Nish, Japanese Foreign Policy in the Interwar Period
A. Offner, The Origins of the Second World War: American Foreign Policy and World Politics,
19171941
R. A. C. Parker, Chamberlain and Appeasement: British Policy and the Coming of the Second
World War
G. Roberts, The Soviet Union and the Origins of the Second World War
R. Schweller, Deadly Imbalances: Tripolarity and Hitlers Strategy of World Conquest
G. Weinberg, Germany, Hitler and World War II
J. Wright, Germany and the Origins of the Second World War
R. J. Young, France and the Origins of the Second World War
TUTORIAL WEEK FOUR: THE COLD WAR
Questions:
Did the Cold War begin because of vacuums of power in Germany and Korea?
Did nuclear weapons calm or exacerbate international tensions during the Cold War?

US power or people power? Which bore greater responsibility for the end of the Cold
War?

Core reading:
J. Nye, Understanding International Conflicts, chap. 5
For more detailed introductory reading, try:
A. Best et al, International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond, chaps. 9-12 & 20
J. Gaddis, The Cold War
Further reading on the origins of the Cold War:
P. Calvocoressi, World Politics Since 1945, chap. 1
A. Deighton, The Cold War in Europe, 1945-1947: Three Approaches in N. Woods (ed.),
Explaining International Relations since 1945
A.W. DePorte, Europe Between the Superpowers
J. Gaddis, The United States and the Origins of the Cold War
J. Gaddis, We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History
M. Kramer, Ideology and the Cold War, article in Review of International Studies (1999)
W. LaFeber, America, Russia and the Cold War, 1945-92
M. P. Leffler, A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration and the
Cold War
M. Leffler, Inside Enemy Archives: The Cold War Reopened, article in Foreign Affairs (1996)
V. Mastny, The Cold War and Soviet Insecurity: The Stalin Years
A. Milward, Was the Marshall Plan Necessary?, article in Diplomatic History (1989)
D. Reynolds, (ed.), The Origins of the Cold War in Europe
A. Shlaim, The Partition of Germany and the Origins of the Cold War, article in Review of
International Studies (1985)
M. Trachtenberg, A Constructed Peace: The Making of the European Settlement, 19451963
D. Yergin, Shattered Peace: The Origins of the Cold War and the National Security State
J. Young and J. Kent, International History since 1945, intro.; part 1
V. Zubok, & C. Pleshakov, Inside the Kremlins Cold War: From Stalin to Khrushchev
Further readings on nuclear weapons in the Cold War:
G. Allison, Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis.
A. Fursenko & T. Naftali, One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Kennedy, Castro and the Cuban
Missile Crisis, 1958-1964
J. Gaddis, Cold War Statesmen Confront the Bomb
J. Gaddis, The Long Peace, chaps. 5, 8
J. Gaddis, The United States and the End of the Cold War, chap. 6
R. Garthoff, Reflections on the Cuban Missile Crisis
R. Jervis, The Political Effects of Nuclear Weapons, article in International Security (1988)
J. Mueller, The Essential Irrelevance of Nuclear Weapons, article in International Security
(1988)
J. Mueller, Retreat from Doomsday: the Obsolescence of Major War
Further reading on the end of the Cold War:
C. D. Blacker, Hostage to Revolution: Gorbachev and Soviet Security Policy, 1985-1991
A. Brown, Seven Years that Changed the World: Perestroika in Perspective
A. Brown, The Gorbachev Factor, chaps. 7-8
J. F. Brown, Surge to Freedom.

10

R. Crockatt, The End of the Cold War, in J Baylis and S Smith, The Globalization of World
Politics (in the THIRD EDITION of 2001 not in the newer fourth edition of 2008)
K. Dawisha, Eastern Europe, Gorbachev and Reform
D. Deudney & G. J. Ikenberry, The International Sources of Soviet Change, article in
International Security (1991/2)
R. English, Power, Ideas, and New Evidence on the Cold Wars End, article in International
Security (2002)
M. Evangelista, Transnational Relations, Domestic Structures, and Security Policy in the USSR
and Russia in T. Risse-Kappen (ed.), Bringing Transnational Relations Back In
M. Evangelista, Unarmed Forces: The Transnational Movement to End the Cold War
J. Gaddis, International Relations Theory and the End of the Cold War, article in International
Security (Winter 1992/3)
J. Gaddis, The United States and the End of the Cold War
R. Garthoff, The Great Transition
R. K. Herrmann and R. N. Lebow (eds.), Ending the Cold War
M. Hogan (ed.), The End of the Cold War
G. Lundestad, East, West, North, South, chap. 6
A. Pravda, Perestroika: Soviet Domestic and Foreign Policies
G. Schopflin, The End of Communism in Eastern Europe, article in International Affairs (1990)
D. C. Thomas, The Helsinki Effect: International Norms, Human Rights, and the Demise of
Communism
J. Young and J. Kent, International History Since 1945, chap. 19
V. Zubok, A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to Gorbachev
TUTORIAL WEEK FIVE: DECOLONIZATION AND THE EMERGENCE OF THE THIRD
WORLD
Questions:
To what extent did colonies contribute to their own independence?
Why did Asian decolonization take place before African decolonization?
In what ways did decolonization alter the nature of international politics?
Explain the impact of the Non-Aligned Movement on world politics.
Core reading:
G. Lundestad, East, West, North, South, chaps. 11 & 12
Further reading on decolonization:
A. E. Afigbo, Making of Modern Africa, Vol. 2: The Twentieth Century
A. Best et al, International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond, chaps. 4, 10 & 17
H. Bull & A. Watson (eds.), The Expansion of International Society, esp. chaps. 14, 15
P. Calvocoressi, World Politics since 1945, chapters on Asian and African independence
M. Chamberlain, Decolonization: The Fall of the European Empires
C. Cross, The Fall of the British Empire
J. Darwin, Africa in World Politics since 1945 in N. Woods (ed.), Explaining International
Relations since 1945
J. Darwin, The End of the British Empire: The Historical Debate
J. Darwin, After Tamerlane: The Global History of Empire
M. Doyle, Empires
D. K. Fieldhouse, Black Africa 1945-1980
P. Gifford & W. R. Louis, The Transfer of Power in Africa, Decolonisation 1940-1960
11

H. Grimal, Decolonization
J.D. Hargreaves, Decolonization in Africa
R. Jackson, Quasi-States: Sovereignty, International Relations and the Third World
E. Kedourie (ed.), Nationalism in Asia and Africa
B. Lapping, End of Empire
W. Louis, American anti-Colonialism and the Dissolution of the British Empire, article in
International Affairs (1985)
W. Louis, Imperialism at Bay
D. F. McHenry The United Nations: Its Role in Decolonization, in G. M. Carter et al, African
Independence: The First Twenty Five Years
H. Spruyt, Ending Empire: Contested Sovereignty and Territorial Partition
United Nations, United Nations and Decolonization
P. Willetts, The United Nations and the Transformation of the Inter-State System in B. Buzan
and R. J. B. Jones, Change and the Study of International Relations
Further reading on the Third World:
M. Ayoob, The Security Problematic of the Third World, article in World Politics (1991)
K. Barkey and M. Hagen (eds), After Empire: Multi-Ethnic Societies and Nation-Building
A. Best et al, International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond, chap. 13
W. Brandt et al, North-South: A Programme for Survival
H. Bull and A. Watson (eds.), The Expansion of International Society conclusion and chap. 15
C. Clapham, Africa and the International System
R. Cox, Ideologies and the NIEO, article in International Organization (1979)
A. Hurrell, and N. Woods (eds.), Inequality, Globalization, and World Politics, esp. intro, chap. 1
and chap. 9
J. Gaddis, We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History, chap. 6
R. Gilpin, The Political Economy of International Relations, chap. 2
R. Jackson, Quasi-States: Sovereignty, International Relations and the Third World, chap. 5
S. Krasner, Structural Conflict: The Third World against Global Liberalism
Millennium, special issue on Poverty in World Politics in the Global Era, (1996)
R. Mortimer, The Third World Coalition in International Politics
R. Rothstein, The Weak in the World of the Strong
R. Rothstein, Epitaph for a Monument to a Failed Protest? A North-South Perspective, article in
International Organization (1988)
C. Thomas, Poverty, Development and Hunger, J Baylis and S Smith, The Globalization of
World Politics
A. Tickner, Seeing IR Differently: Notes from the Third World, Millennium (2003)
P. Willetts, The Non-Aligned Movement
P. Willetts, The Non-Aligned in Havana
TUTORIAL WEEK SEVEN: FROM THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS
Questions:
Compare and contrast the structure, aims and achievements of the League of Nations
and the United Nations.
Did the League of Nations fail because it was more ambitious than the United Nations?
Core reading:
D. Armstrong, L. Lloyd & J. Redmond, International Organization in Global Politics, chap. 2

12

P. Taylor and D. Curtis, The United Nations, in Baylis, Smith and Owens, The Globalization of
World Politics
Further reading on the League of Nations:
I. L. Claude, Swords into Plowshares
R. Henig (ed.), The League of Nations
F. H. Hinsley, Power and the Pursuit of Peace, chap. 14
T. J. Knock, To end all wars: Woodrow Wilson and the quest for a new world order
G. Niemeyer, The Balance Sheet of the League Experiment, article in International
Organization, 1952
C. Thorne, The Limits of Foreign Policy: The West, the League of Nations and the Far Eastern
Crisis
F. P. Walters, A History of the League of Nations
M. Wight, Power Politics, chap. 19
Further reading on the United Nations:
D. Armstrong, L. Lloyd & J. Redmond, International Organization in Global Politics, chaps. 3-7
L. M. Goodrich, From League of Nations to United Nations International Organization (1947)
P. Kennedy, The Parliament of Man
V. Lowe et al, The United Nations Security Council and War
E. Luard, A History of the United Nations
M. Mazower, No Enchanted Palace
T. Weiss, The United Nations and Changing World Politics
T. Weiss and S. Daws, The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations
C. F. Alger, The United States in the United Nations International Organization (1973)
C. Archer, International Organizations (2nd Edition), chaps. 1,2,4
P. R. Baehr and L. Gordenker, The United Nations: reality and ideal, chapters 1 and 3
D. Bourantonis, The History and Politics of UN Security Council Reform
B. Conforti, The law and practice of the United Nations
S. M. Finger, Your man at the UN: people, politics and bureaucracy in making foreign policy
A. Grigorescu, Mapping the UN-League of Nations analogy: are there still lessons to be learned
from the League? Global Governance (2005)
R. Hiscocks, The Security Council: a study in adolescence
I. Hurd, International Organizations: Politics, Law and Practice, chap. 5
J. Kaufman, United Nations decision-making
W. A. Knight, A changing United Nations: multilateral evolution and the quest for global
governance
E. C. Luck, UN Security Council: practice and promise
E. T. Rowe, The United States, the United Nations and the Cold War, International
Organization (1971)
D. Sarooshi, The United Nations and the development of collective security
D. J. Whittaker, United Nations in a contemporary world
Z. B. Yehuda, Eroding the United Nations Charter
TUTORIAL WEEK EIGHT:

THE RISE OF REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Questions:
What are the principal factors explaining the creation and growing power of regional
organizations in the twentieth century?

13

For any one regional organization of your choice, describe and explain its principal
achievements in the twentieth century.

Core reading:
N. Nugent, The Government and Politics of the European Union, part one
D. Armstrong, L. Lloyd & J. Redmond, International Organization in Global Politics, chap. 12
Further reading:
D. Armstrong, L. Lloyd & J. Redmond, International Organization in Global Politics, chaps 8-11
O. Dabne, Politics of Regional Integration in Latin America
M. Dedman, The Origins and Development of the European Union
C. Dent, The Asia Pacific, Regionalism, and the Global System
D. Dinan, Ever Closer Union, part one
D. Dinan, The Origins and Evolution of the European Union
L. Fawcett and A. Hurrell, Regionalism in World Politics
A Gamble and A. Payne, Regionalism and World Order
G. L. Gardini, Origins of Mercosur
W. Kaiser, European Union History
W. Kaiser et al, Transnational Networks in Regional Integration
S. Makinda, The African Union
E. Mansfield and H. Miller, The New Wave of Regionalism, International Organization (1999)
A. Milward, The European Rescue of the Nation State
G. Tsebelis and G. Garrett, The institutional foundations of intergovernmentalism and
supranationalism in the European Union International Organization (2001)
OECD, Regional Integration in the Asia Pacific
D. Urwin, The Community of Europe
W. F. V. Vanthoor, A Chronological History of the European Union
A. Wiener and T. Diez, European Integration Theory
M. Eilstrup-Sangiovanni, Debates on European Integration: A Reader
E. Haas, Turbulent Fields and the Theory of Regional Integration International Organization
(1976)
J. McCormick, Understanding the European Union
A. Moravcsik, The choice for Europe
O. Nrgaard, et al, The European Community in World Politics
JP Olsen, The many faces of Europeanization, Journal of Common Market Studies (2002)
M.A. Pollack, The engines of European integration
I. Hurd, International Organizations: Politics, Law and Practice, chap. 10
C.S. Bajo, The EU and Mercosur: a case of inter-regionalism Third World Quarterly (1999)
MT Berger, APEC and its enemies: the failure of the new regionalism in the Asia-Pacific Third
World Quarterly (1999)
M Boas, et al The weave-world: regionalisms in the South in the new millennium Third World
Quarterly (1999)
P. Bowles, ASEAN, AFTA and the new regionalism Pacific Affairs (1997)
B. Bull, New regionalism in Central America Third World Quarterly (1999)
R. Falk, Regionalism and world order after the cold war in B Hettne et al (eds) Globalism and
the New Regionalism
LLG Gomez-Mera, How new is the new regionalism in the Americas? The case of Mercosur
Journal of International Relations and Development (2008)
P. Harts, The Middle East: a region without regionalism or the end of exceptionalism Third
World Quarterly (1999)

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B. Hettne, Globalisation and the new regionalism in B Hettne et al (eds) Globalism and the New
Regionalism
R. Higgott, Regionalism in the Asia-Pacific: two steps forward, one step back? in R. Stubbs and
G. Underhill (eds) Political Economy and the Changing Global Order
S.J. Maclean, Peacebuilding and the new regionalism in Southern Africa Third World Quarterly
(1999)
E. Mansfield and H. Milner, The new wave of regionalism International Organization (2003)
M. Marchand, The political economy of new regionalisms Third World Quarterly (1999)
R. May, and G. Cleaver, African peacekeeping: still dependent? International Peacekeeping
(1997)
T. Shaw, New regionalism in Africa in the new millennium New Political Economy (2000)
S. Soderbaum, Modes of regional governance in Africa Global Governance (2004)
I. Taylor, Globalization and regionalization in Africa: reactions to attempts at neo-liberal
regionalism Review of International Political Economy (2003)
TUTORIAL WEEK NINE: NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS IN THE TWENTIETH
CENTURY
Questions:
How do non-governmental organizations wield power in international politics?
Explain the evolution of non-governmental organizations influence in world politics in the
twentieth century.
Core reading:
T. Davies, The Rise and Fall of Transnational Civil Society in L. Reydams (ed.), The Global
Activism Reader (available as a working paper on the Departmental website)
Further reading:
C. Chatfield, Intergovernmental & Nongovernmental Associations to 1945 in J. Smith, R.
Pagnucco & C. Chatfield, Transnational Social Movements & Global Politics
S. Ahmed & D. Potter, NGOs in International Politics, chap. 2
S. Batliwala and L. D. Brown, Transnational Civil Society, chap. 4
J. Boli & G. Thomas, Constructing World Culture
J. Boli & G. Thomas, World Culture in the World Polity, article in American Sociological Review
(1997)
I. Clark, International Legitimacy and World Society
T. Davies, NGOs: A New History of Transnational Civil Society
A. Iriye, Global Community
M. Kaldor, Global Civil Society: An Answer to War
J. Keane, Global Civil Society?, chap. 2
J. Khagram, S. Riker & K. Sikkink, Restructuring World Politics
F. S. L. Lyons, Internationalism in Europe, 1815-1914
W. Martin, Making Waves: Worldwide Social Movements, 1750-2005
J. Matthews, Power Shift: The Rise of Global Civil Society, article in Foreign Affairs (1997)
B. Reinalda, Routledge History of International Organizations
B. Seary, The Early History in P. Willetts, The Conscience of the World
K. Sikkink and J. Smith, Infrastructures for Change: Transnational Organizations, 1953-2003, in
Khagram, Riker and Sikkink, Restructuring World Politics
K. Skjelsbaek, The Growth of International Non-Governmental Organization in the Twentieth
Century, article in International Organization (1971)

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J. Smith and D. Wiest, Social Movements in the World System


P. Willetts, Non-Governmental Organizations in World Politics
TUTORIAL WEEK TEN: GLOBALIZATION IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Questions:
What is globalization?
What were the principal driving forces of globalization in the twentieth century?
Did globalization cause fragmentation in the twentieth century?
Core reading:
I. Clark, Globalization and Fragmentation: International Relations in the Twentieth Century, esp.
chaps. 1, introduction & conclusion
G. Lundestad, Why does Globalization Encourage Fragmentation?, article in International
Politics (2004)
Further reading:
D. Held et al, Global Transformations: Politics, Economics, Culture
D. Held, The Global Transformations Reader
S. Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations, article in Foreign Affairs (Summer 1993)
A. Iriye, Global Community
R. Keohane and J. Nye, Transnational Relations and World Politics
J. Mearsheimer, The False Promise of International Institutions, article in International Security
(1994-5)
A. McGrew, Globalization and Global Politics in Baylis et al, The Globalization of World Politics
F. S. Northedge & M. J. Grieve, A Hundred Years of International Relations, esp. chap. 15
J. Nye, Understanding International Conflicts, chaps. 6-7
T. Risse-Kappen, Bringing Transnational Relations Back In
J. Scholte, Globalization: A Critical Introduction
A. Watson, The Evolution of International Society
TUTORIAL WEEK ELEVEN: THE POST-COLD WAR ORDER
Questions:
Did the decade immediately following the end of the Cold War witness a new world
order?
To what extent was military power superseded by economic and moral power in the
decade following the end of the Cold War?
Core reading:
M. Cox, From the Cold War to the War on Terror (or From the Cold War to the World Economic
Crisis) in J Baylis et al, The Globalization of World Politics
Further reading:
K. Booth and M. Cox, The Interregnum: Controversies in World Politics, 1989-1999
I. Clark, The Post-Cold War Order: The Spoils of Peace
F. Fukuyama, The End of History and the Last Man
R. Keohane, J. Nye & S. Hoffman, After the Cold War
J. Kent & J. Young, International Relations since 1945, part 6
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J. T. Matthews, Power Shift: The Rise of Global Civil Society, article in Foreign Affairs (1997)
A.M. Slaughter, The Real New World Order, article in Foreign Affairs (1997)
K. Waltz, The Emerging Structure of International Politics, article in International Security
(1993)
15.

STUDY ABROAD STUDENTS

Study Abroad students do not follow the usual undergraduate pattern of assessment. Study
Abroad students are required to complete:

One piece of coursework (same length and topics as other students).


One examination of two hours duration.

The examination timetable and deadline for coursework submission are set by the International
Office in conjunction with the School of Social Sciences. Coursework should be handed in to the
School of Social Sciences Office. Students should refer to the International Office for the
coursework deadlines and details about the examination timetable.

END OF MODULE OUTLINE

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