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MONITORING OF THE PHILIPPINE DEPARTMENT OF

EDUCATIONS MODEL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL


PROGRAM

Senior High School Modelling: Moving Towards the New K to 12 Curriculum

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

Philippine Copyright 2014


SEAMEO INNOTECH
ISBN XXX-XXX-XXXX-XX-X
All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or any means
or stored in a database or retrieval system without prior written permission of SEAMEO
INNOTECH.
www.seameo-innotech.org

Table of Contents

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................ 3
List of Tables ............................................................................................................................... 5
List of Figures .............................................................................................................................. 7
List of Acronyms .......................................................................................................................... 8
Acknowledgement .................................................................................................................... 10
Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 11
1. Guidelines/Policies........................................................................................................ 19
2. Sources of Funds........................................................................................................... 20
3. Capacity Building .......................................................................................................... 20
4. Linkages ........................................................................................................................ 21
5. Curriculum Development .............................................................................................. 21
6. SHS Program Management ........................................................................................... 23
Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 24
Objectives of the Study ............................................................................................................. 29
Method of Study ....................................................................................................................... 29
The SHS Curriculum ................................................................................................................... 31
Core Subjects ........................................................................................................................ 33
Track Subjects ....................................................................................................................... 34
Academic Track ................................................................................................................. 35
Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track ............................................................................... 37
Sports Track....................................................................................................................... 38
Arts and Design Track ........................................................................................................ 38
General Trends.......................................................................................................................... 40
A. Pre-implementation Experiences ....................................................................................... 40
1. Rationale ...................................................................................................................... 41
2. Linkages ........................................................................................................................ 43
3. Curriculum Development .............................................................................................. 44
4. Capacity Development .................................................................................................. 45
5. Certifications ................................................................................................................ 45
B. Implementation Experiences ............................................................................................ 46
1. Inputs ........................................................................................................................... 46
Table of Contents

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

2. Processes ...................................................................................................................... 49
3. Output .......................................................................................................................... 51
4. Challenges and Potentials ............................................................................................. 52
C. Recommendations (Moving Towards K-12 Implementation) ............................................. 55
1. Guidelines/Policies........................................................................................................ 55
2. Sources of Funds........................................................................................................... 56
3. Capacity Building .......................................................................................................... 57
4. Linkages ........................................................................................................................ 57
5. Curriculum Development .............................................................................................. 58
6. SHS Program Management ........................................................................................... 60
Profiles of Model Senior High Schools ....................................................................................... 61
A. San Pedro Relocation Center National High School ............................................................ 61
B. Sangley Point National High School.................................................................................... 70
C. Bacolod City National High School ..................................................................................... 74
D. Sum-ag National High School............................................................................................. 81
E. Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School .................................................... 88
F. Palo National High School .................................................................................................. 96
G. Merida Vocational School................................................................................................ 101
Annex 1: Duration of Pre-University Programs in Southeast Asia ............................................. 110
Annex 2: List of Key Informants ............................................................................................... 111
References .............................................................................................................................. 113

List of Tables

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: General Profile of SHS Model Schools, SY 2012-2013 .................................................... 27
Table 2: SHS Model Schools Specializations................................................................................ 27
Table 3: List of SHS Model Schools Included in the Monitoring Study .......................................... 31
Table 4: Proposed SHS Curriculum (2012) .................................................................................. 31
Table 5: SHS Core Subjects ......................................................................................................... 34
Table 6: Common Track Subjects ............................................................................................... 35
Table 7: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - ABM Strand) ........................................... 35
Table 8: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - General Academic Strand) ....................... 36
Table 9: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - HUMSS Strand*) ..................................... 36
Table 10: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - STEM Strand) ........................................ 36
Table 11: Specialized Track Subjects (Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track*) ........................... 37
Table 12: Specialized Track Subjects (Sports Track) .................................................................... 38
Table 13: Specialized Track Subjects (Arts and Design Track) ..................................................... 38
Table 14: Summary of Revised SHS Curriculum (2014)................................................................ 39
Table 15: List of Selected Model SHS .......................................................................................... 40
Table 16: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 62
Table 17: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 63
Table 18: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 63
Table 19: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013........................................................ 64
Table 20: Program Schedule for Grade 11, First Semester .......................................................... 75
Table 21: Program Schedule for Grade 11, Second Semester...................................................... 75
Table 22: Program Schedule for Grade 12, First Semester .......................................................... 76
Table 23: Program Schedule for Grade 12, Second Semester...................................................... 76
Table 24: Area of Specialization ................................................................................................. 76
Table 25: Curriculum Design Senior High School, Grade 11...................................................... 77
Table 26: Curriculum Design Senior High School, Grade 12...................................................... 78
List of Tables

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

Table 27: Proposed Curriculum Grade 11 ................................................................................... 83


Table 28: Proposed Curriculum for Grade 12 .............................................................................. 83
Table 29: Sum-ag NHS SHS Area of Specialization, Description and Number of Hours................. 84
Table 30: Additional Competencies inputted by industries ......................................................... 84
Table 31: Class Program of Grade 11 ......................................................................................... 89
Table 32: SHS Area of Specialization, Description & Number of Hours ........................................ 89
Table 33: Additional Competencies Inputted by Industries ......................................................... 90
Table 34: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism ................ 97
Table 35: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism ................ 97
Table 36: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism ................ 97
Table 37: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism ................ 98
Table 38: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT ........................ 98
Table 39: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT ........................ 98
Table 40: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT ........................ 99
Table 41: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT ........................ 99
Table 42: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum, SY 2012-2013............................................ 102
Table 43: Proposed Senior High Curriculum, SY 2012-2013....................................................... 102
Table 44: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 103
Table 45: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 103
Table 46: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2012-2013 ................................................. 104
Table 47: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2012-2013 ................................................. 104
Table 48: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 105
Table 49: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014 ................................................. 105

List of Tables

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: DepEds Enhanced Basic Education Program ............................................................... 24
Figure 2: The K to 12 Graduate .................................................................................................. 25
Figure 3: Framework of Study .................................................................................................... 30
Figure 4: Revised Senior High School Curriculum (2014) ............................................................. 32
Figure 5: SHS Core and Track Subjects ....................................................................................... 33
Figure 6: SHS with Indigent/Very Poor Students ......................................................................... 41
Figure 7: SHS with Working Students ......................................................................................... 42
Figure 8: SHS with Overaged Students ....................................................................................... 42
Figure 9: SHS Program Track ..................................................................................................... 45
Figure 10: Learning Materials Used in SHS ................................................................................. 48
Figure 11: Teaching-Learning Strategies Used in SHS ................................................................. 50
Figure 12: Type of Student Assessment Used in SHS ................................................................... 51

List of Figures

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

LIST OF ACRONYMS
ABM
ADM
APEX
BESRA
BPO
CHED
CLIMBS
COA
CSC
DepEd
DMLMNHS
DO
DOLE
Edukasyon 2Ps
EFA
EIM
ERIO
EVSU
FBS
FGDs
GE
HE
HEIs
HESS
HRM
ICOT-P
ICT
IETI
IRR
KASVs
KIIs
LET
LGUs
LNU
LTLDPC
MAPEH
MBCCI
MOA
MOOE
National Certificate
NHS
NORIA
NSSC

Accountancy, Business, Management


Alternative Delivery Mode
Applied Academics for Excellence
Basic Education Sector Reform Agenda
Business Process Outsourcing
Commission on Higher Education
Coop-Life Mutual Benefit Services Association
Commission on Audit
Civil Service Commission
Department of Education
Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School
DepEd Order
Department of Labor and Employment
Edukasyon Pantulay Pangkabuhayan
Education for All
Electrical Installation and Maintenance
Educational Research and Innovation Office (SEAMEO INNOTECH)
Eastern Visayas State University
Food and Beverage Service
Focus Group Discussions
General Education
Home Economics
Higher Education Institutions
Humanities, Education, Social Sciences
Hotel and Restaurant Management
Income-Creating Opportunities thru Technology Projects
Information and Communications Technology
International Electrical and Technical Institute
Implementing Rules and Regulations
Knowledge, Attitude, Skills, and Values
Key Informant Interviews
Licensure Examination for Teachers
Local Government Units
Leyte Normal University
Leyte Technology Livelihood Development Productivity Center
Music, Arts, Physical Education, and Health
Metro Bacolod Chamber of Commerce and Industries
Memorandum of Agreement
Maintenance and Other Operating Expenses
National Certificate
National High School

Negros Organic Rice Industry Association


Naval Sea System Command
List of Acronyms

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

NSTP
OCCI
OHSP
OISCA
OJT
PCCI
PD
PEIs
PESO
PNP
PRC
Project EASE
PUP
RA
RBEC
RPL
RSU

2014

National Service Training Program

Metro Ormoc Credit Cooperative, Inc.


Open High School Program
Organization for Industrial, Spiritual, and Cultural Advancement
On-the-job Training
Philippine Call Center Institute
Presidential Decree
Private Educational Institutions
Public Employment Service Office
Philippine National Police
Professional Regulations Committee
Project Effective Alternative Secondary Education
Polytechnic University of the Philippines
Republic Act
Revised Basic Education Curriculum
Recognition of Prior Learning
Research Studies Unit
(SEAMEO INNOTECH, under ERIO)
SARDOs
Students at Risk of Dropping Out
SBM
School-Based Management
SEAMEO INNOTECH Southeast Asia Ministers of Education Organization
Regional Center for Educational Innovation and Technology
SEAU
Solutions Evaluation and Adaptation Unit
(SEAMEO INNOTECH, under ERIO)
SHS
Senior High School
SMAW
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
SPRCNHS
San Pedro Relocation Center National High School
STEM
Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics
STVEP
Strengthened TechVoc Education Program
TESDA
Technical Education and Skills Development Authority
TechVoc
Technical-Vocational
TLE
Technology and Livelihood Education
TR
Training Regulations
TVET Institutions
Technical Vocational Educational Training Institutions
TVL
Technical-Vocational-Livelihood
TWG
Technical Working Groups

List of Acronyms

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Our deepest gratitude goes to the Department of Education (DepEd), Bureau of
Secondary Education under the former leadership of Dr. Lolita Andrada for providing the
overall direction, context and expectations of DepEd about the Senior High School
Modelling Program.
The Center significantly extends its gratitude to the school principals, teachers, students,
parents of the seven SHS model schools included in this monitoring study for sharing
their experiences, achievements and challenges during the first year of implementation.
This report was prepared under the general guidance of SEAMEO INNOTECH Center
Director Ramon C. Bacani, and Educational Research and Innovation Office Manager
Philip J. Purnell. Led by Senior Specialist Yolanda C. De Las Alas, the research team
include Lauren Nerisse S. Bautista, Senior Associate, Eugene L. Tecson, Project Research
Associate, and Rhio DC Dilag, Program Assistant. Special thanks goes to Ms. Evelyn D.
Juan for copy editing the report.
We salute all the SHS learners, especially including those who have successfully
graduated from the program and now enjoying the fruits of their hardwork in their
chosen careers.

Acknowledgement

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In early 2013, the Solutions Evaluation and Adaptation Unit (SEAU) under the
Educational Research and Innovation Office (ERIO) of the Southeast Asian Ministers of
Education Organization Regional Center for Educational Innovation and Technology
(SEAMEO INNOTECH)1 undertook a monitoring study to document the developments on
the first year of implementation of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling in selected
SHS model schools in the country. The research study was funded through SEAMEO
INNOTECHs Educational Research and Innovation Fund as part of the Centers
complimentary set of program interventions to support the Department of Education
(DepEd)s need for sustained technical support in operationalizing the new K to 12 Basic
Education Program.
The study aimed to generate knowledge drawn from the experiences of model schools
that can serve as a good resource for refining the guidelines for the full implementation of
SHS beginning SY 2016-2017. Specifically, the study aimed to 1) determine the preimplementation considerations, and actual implementation needs and processes under
the SHS Modeling; 2) identify strengths and innovations of the selected SHS model
schools; 3) ascertain challenges and potentials for improvement; and 4) formulate policy
recommendations based on the lessons learned by the selected SHS model schools.
Key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with
school heads, teachers and SHS students to obtain relevant information on the SHS
Modeling. Included in the monitoring study are four general public high schools,
namely, 1) Sangley Point National High School (NHS) in Sangley Point, Cavite City,
Cavite; 2) Bacolod City NHS; 3) Sum-ag NHS in Bacolod City, Negros Occidental; and 4)
Palo NHS in Palo, Leyte; and three public technical-vocational (TechVoc) high schools,
namely, 5) San Pedro Relocation Center NHS in San Pedro, Laguna; 6) Doa Montserrat
Lopez Memorial NHS in Silay City, Negros Occidental; and 7) Merida Vocational School
in Merida, Leyte.
The study also utilized data generated from a survey administered by the Research
Studies Unit (RSU) of SEAMEO INNOTECH. The survey, conducted from February to
March 2013, was part of a research project that aimed to generate case studies of
Alternative Delivery Mode (ADM) models in selected provinces of the Philippines that
would allow for deeper understanding of the implementation of appropriate and
effective ADMs for the SHS stage of the K to 12 program.
A review of related literature was also conducted to provide contextual background to
the study.

SEAMEO INNOTECH is one of the three (3) SEAMEO regional centers hosted by the Government of the
Philippines (GOP).
Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

General Findings
The general findings of the monitoring study paid attention to pre-implementation and
implementation experiences of the seven SHS model schools. Challenges and
recommendations were likewise drawn from the experiences of the schools in SHS
Modeling.
A.

Pre-Implementation Experiences

Based on the data obtained from the KIIs and FGDs conducted, the seven schools
engaged in SHS Modeling to contribute to achieving Education for All (EFA). Particularly,
the schools aim to provide poor, working, and mostly overaged students greater access
to senior high school education while they are unable to enroll in college. These schools
also envisioned to strengthen the employability of the SHS students through the
provision of quality education.
Initially, the SHS model schools consulted the academe, labor-related government
agencies, industry partners, and local government units (LGUs) in preparation for the
SHS Modeling implementation. They sought technical support from DepEd from the
central office down to the division level, the Commission on Higher Education (CHED),
and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to determine the specialization that they could
engage in and to help develop their curriculum and other academic requirements.
On the other hand, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), Technical
Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), and the industry partners oriented
them on labor market, the career pathways that they could offer and focus on, and the
training, capacity building, and certification requirements to strengthen the
employability of SHS students. For example, TechVoc schools usually provided National
Certificate (NC) I for junior high school and NC II for senior high school which can be
obtained by passing the assessment tests administered by TESDA.
At the same time, the SHS model schools met with either provincial or city/municipal
LGUs recognizing their key role as links to the industries as well as for the financial and
logistical support they can provide to help sustain the SHS implementation.
Partnerships of the SHS model schools with industries depended on the type of
specialization that they engage in. The specialization offered by the schools depended
on various considerations such as the type of industries and economic/business
activities that are prevalent in their area, the type of jobs that the industries require, and
the capacity of the school itself to undertake such career pathway offering.
Partnerships with industries were formalized through a Memorandum of Agreement
(MOA). The signed MOAs explained the nature of the K to 12 Program, the objectives of
SHS Modeling, and the roles and responsibilities of each party related to the
implementation of SHS Modeling.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

The school heads and teachers were oriented and trained on the K to 12 Program and
SHS Modeling. Most of the teachers were either holders of a Masters degree or had
completed a number of Masters degree units. In some SHS model schools, the teachers
conducted their own research studies to build their capacities and enrich the learning
materials that they use.
The LGUs and industries partners were likewise oriented on the K to 12 Program and
SHS Modeling to ensure their awareness of their roles and responsibilities in the
modeling program.
B.

Implementation Experiences

The success or failure of the SHS Modeling depended on a number of factors including
human resources, funding, facilities, curriculum, learning modules, and guidelines or
policies. Intervention programs, teaching methodologies, and student assessment were
also identified as crucial in sustaining the program.
1.

Inputs

a.

Human Resources, Funds, and Facilities

Different SHS model schools have different human resource and other resource
requirements depending on their program strategies.
Teachers that are hired for SHS teaching are often either holders of a Masters degree or
have completed a number of Masters degree units. While some schools employ SHS
teachers from their own faculty roster, other schools tap teachers from HEIs or trainers
from their industry partners.
Given that the school head is busy in overseeing the schools day-to-day operations and
the teachers are already swamped with their teaching load, some SHS model schools
hire a full-time industry coordinator to assist in tapping prospective industry partners,
coordinate on-the-job training (OJT) of the students, and facilitate job placement of SHS
graduates.
Only two of the seven SHS model schools interviewed were given PhP 1 million each by
the DepEd for SHS Modeling since they were part of the original pilot schools. They were
able to use the said fund to purchase school facilities and equipment. The rest of the SHS
model schools did not receive the same funds because they were only identified later.
Since the program is still in its modeling stage, these schools are unable to cover
expenses for their SHS modeling through their regular fund for maintenance and other
operating expenses (MOOE).
As it is, most of the SHS model schools make use of whatever resources or facilities that
the schools have. For instance, some schools alternate the use of classrooms for junior
high school (first to fourth year) and senior high school (Grades 11 and 12) students. One

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

school even uses its computer laboratory to hold classes for SHS. In some cases,
teachers had to shoulder some expenses of students.
To help augment their financial requirements, the schools sought assistance from
government officials, LGUs, or industry partners.
b.

Curriculum

The SHS model schools implement a curriculum that they developed in consultation with
DepEd, CHED, HEIs and industry partners.
Most of the SHS model schools follow a common academic curriculum, with a few
additional subjects that are relevant to the specializations the schools offer, such as
TechVoc or entrepreneurship courses. They align the curriculum with the General
Education subjects in college to prepare the SHS students for possible entry to second or
third year college.
The curriculum includes core subjects such as English, Filipino, mathematics, science,
social studies, and music, arts, physical education, and health (MAPEH). Two new
subjects, literature and philosophy, were added based on the General Education
curriculum of CHED.
The SHS model schools covered four areas: 1) Entrepreneurship/Business; 2) TechnicalVocational; 3) Humanities (Sports, Arts, Music, Languages, Journalism); and 4) Science,
Technology, and Engineering.
Students specializing in entrepreneurship or TechVoc can take the National Certification
(NC) II exams administered by the TESDA which they can use in applying for jobs.
c.

Learning Modules

As of SY 2012-2013, no instructional materials had been developed by the DepEd for SHS
Modeling. To compensate, the SHS model schools used: 1) printed modules or digitized
resources (83%); 2) printed text or workbooks (67%); and 3) online resources (50%).
d.

Guidelines or Policies

Among the governing policies used by the SHS model schools in relation to the K to 12
Program and SHS Modeling are 1) DepEd Order (DO) No. 36 s. 2012 entitled, Guidelines
on the 2012 Implementation of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling in Selected
Technical and Vocational and General Secondary Schools under the K to 12 Basic
Education Program; 2) DO No. 71 s. 2012 entitled, Additional Information to and
Changes in DepEd Order No. 36, S. 2012; and Presidential Decree (PD) No. 42, as
amended, entitled, A Decree Instituting a Labor Code thereby Revising and
Consolidating Labor and Social Laws to Afford Protection to Labor, Promote Employment
and Human Resources Development and Insure Industrial Peace based on Social Justice,
particularly its provisions on apprenticeship with business organizations.
Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

In the case of Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS, they made use of DO No. 48 s.
2007 to be able to hire contractual teachers to help address the lack of teachers. The
said department order authorizes TechVoc school heads to hire contractual teachers.
2.

Processes

a.

Intervention programs for disadvantaged learners and/or students at risk of


dropping out (SARDOs)

The SHS model schools employ various intervention programs depending on the needs
of disadvantaged learners and/or SARDOs. In some cases, local officials offer scholarship
programs to deserving students. There is also the adopt-a-child program for teachers
who can afford to support a student. The schools also employ the Open High School
Program (OHSP) to address the constraints of some students in attending daily classes.
Learning materials used under such arrangements include modules or workbooks. Some
SHS model schools also implement feeding, health, and nutrition programs. In addition,
the school encourages parents to support their students whenever possible.
b.

Teaching Methodologies

The SHS model schools apply various learning strategies and approaches depending on
their preferences and the needs of the SHS students. Face-to-face teaching, mediaassisted teaching and work-oriented teaching are the most commonly employed
teaching strategies; of the seven schools, six (86%) identified at least one of these three
as part of their teaching methodology. Five schools (71%) mentioned using flexible
learning, group or cooperative learning, or process-oriented learning. Three schools
(43%) have individualized learning methods.
Except for the Bacolod City NHS, which only uses face-to-face learning, all other schools
use a combination of two or more teaching strategies. The Doa Montserrat Memorial
NHS employs all strategies mentioned above, including pure web-based learning.
c.

Student Assessment

The RSU survey showed that all seven SHS model schools make use of the traditional
type of assessment for SHS students. Next to this, 71.42 percent said that they conduct
performance assessment to evaluate the students. On the other hand, 57.14 percent
mentioned that they use either portfolio or self-assessment in assessing the SHS
students.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

3.

Output

a.

Innovations

2014

Among the innovations disclosed during the interviews are the following:
1)

Establishing a strong and sustained partnerships with LGUs, industries, and


HEIs to help provide the needed assistance for the Program;

2)

Undergoing on-the-job (OJT) training programs as early as Grade 11 to


accommodate all students and prevent congestion of trainees at the end of
the SHS term;

3)

Screening of incoming SHS students through qualification tests, scholastic


grades and interviews;

4)

Making the school accessible to indigent students by strictly implementing a


zero collection policy;

5)

Giving consideration and flexible timeframe to students who are deployed in


OJT program to comply with requirements; ICT was likewise used for
consultation;

6)

Using real life scenarios, skill-oriented learning and treating students as


adults to motivate and challenge them to do well in school;

7)

Designating a teacher as industry coordinator, one who had been in the


industry for a long time to facilitate the OJT program of the students;

8)

Encouraging SHS teachers to earn a Masters degree or units, have a NC Level


II, or attend TESDA training programs and competency assessment;

9)

Encouraging SHS teachers to conduct action research and develop their own
instructional materials to help enrich existing instructional materials;

10) Hiring contractual teachers to help mitigate the lack of teachers; and
11) Providing laboratory access for SHS students through the Public Employment
Service Office (PESO) to augment the schools limited resources.
b.

Student Tracking

The SHS model schools are yet to develop a system of tracking since all of their SHS
students are only in Grade 11.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

Challenges and Potentials


The interviews with the seven SHS model schools revealed that SHS Modeling has a
number of challenges and potentials with respect to guidelines or policies, resources and
LGU and parental support, awareness, and linkages.
A.

Guidelines/Policies

One of the challenges raised with respect to guidelines in the hiring of teachers is the
continued implementation of the Localization Law, which prevents schools from hiring
qualified teachers.
In the case of SHS model schools that offer call center service as a specialization, they
are faced with the fact that call centers do not allow on-the-job training (OJT) for
prospective call center agents and technical support staff. Instead, they only provide
training for personnel that they have initially screened for hiring.
Another challenge in terms of guidelines is that in some SHS model schools, Grade 11
students are not required to join extracurricular activities.
One area of potential or opportunity related to policy is DepEd Order (DO) No. 48 series
of 2007 which authorizes TechVoc principals to hire contractual teachers.
B.

Resources

Many challenges and concerns raised by the SHS model schools were related to
resources. These resource-based challenges and concerns include the following:
1) TESDA examination fee for National Certification (e.g., PhP 550 examination fee
per student, uniforms and other paraphernalia required by TESDA in the case of
NC exam for security services as noted by Sangley Point NHS)
2) Transportation cost of students who are undergoing their OJT programs
3) Accommodation expenses of students who need to stay near their workplaces
for their OJT programs
4) Cost of insurance premium for SHS students who are undergoing their OJT
programs
5) Some of the SHS students do not have their own classroom.
6) In some SHS model schools, there is insufficient number of computer units for
SHS students.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

7) Since SHS is to be fully implemented only starting in 2016, some of the SHS
model schools have no budgetary allocation from its MOOE for SHS Modeling.
This situation forces the teachers to personally pay for some of the students
requirements for the SHS Program.
C.

LGU support

Based on the interviews and the survey research, LGUs may provide various types of
support to SHS model schools such as infrastructure support, financial assistance,
technical assistance including provision of computer laboratory training, and advocacy
and promotion. While the SHS model schools are able to access such support from LGUs,
they are constrained under COA regulations to purchase equipment/gadgets with a
value not exceeding PhP 10,000.
D.

Parental support

Parents, based on the findings of the study, may help address students concerns, help
motivate students, provide financial support, and assist in advocacy and promotion of
the SHS Modeling Program.
E.

Awareness

Since the SHS Modeling Program employs a stakeholder approach in its implementation,
awareness building and promotion of the Program may be done in a collaborative way
among the school, the LGUs, the industry partners, the HEIs, the parents, and the
students.
F.

Linkages

One of the challenges with respect to linkages was on the possible mismatch between
specialization and labor demand, particularly agriculture or crop production as a
specialization. Sum-ag NHS explained that with their consultations with HEIs and
industry groups, they do not see much potential in crop production in helping SHS
students obtain jobs. They said that agriculture in their area seems to be declining in
terms of importance and job demand.
On the other hand, there is a lot of potential in fostering linkages between SHS model
schools and industries especially if the partnerships end up as being mutually beneficial
for them.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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Recommendations
The following are the recommendations based on the findings of the study:
1. Guidelines/Policies
1.1

San Pedro Relocation Center NHS recommended amending the Localization Law in
the hiring of teachers so SHS model schools will be able to hire qualified teachers.
Section 1 of Republic Act (RA) No. 8190 or the Localization Act 0f 1996 entitled, AN
ACT GRANTING PRIORITY TO RESIDENTS OF THE BARANGAY, MUNICIPALITY OR
CITY WHERE THE SCHOOL IS LOCATED, IN THE APPOINTMENT OR ASSIGNMENT OF
CLASSROOM PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS provides that, In the appointment or
assignment of teachers to public elementary and secondary schools, priority shall
be given to bona fide residents of the barangay, municipality, city or province
where the school is located: Provided, That the teacher possesses all the minimum
qualifications for the position as required by law.

1.2

It is recommended that regional/division ranking of teachers be done based on


time requested by the school. The Professional Regulations Committee (PRC)
should provide temporary assignment of new graduates of science, mathematics,
technology and engineering courses who are qualified to teach in SHS since they
have the newest/latest technology inputs. The need for a policy on hiring teachers
for provisional appointment was identified. However, for those teaching in TLE, the
NC qualification and industry experience should be highlighted. Industry experts
and university professors should be allowed to teach part-time in SHS.

1.3

It is recommended that the designation or hiring of industry coordinators for SHS


model schools be institutionalized. Industry coordinators can help significantly in
coordinating with existing industry partners and in tapping additional industry
partners. They can also assist the students in the preparation and conduct of their
OJTs, particularly in contracting on OJT terms, providing for
mobility/transportation of OJTs, scheduling of assessment and monitoring of OJTs.

1.4

It is suggested that senior high schools adopt the following considerations in


selecting specialized TechVoc programs:
Availability of basic technical facility and resources needed to teach and train
students;
Availability of instructors-trainers who have the necessary competencies,
education and training to teach the technology;
Integration of a strong career guidance program to guide the students in
selecting their preferred specialized track/electives;
Availability of funds for the operating expenses of the school and supplemental
funds particularly for TechVoc high schools;
Enhancement of the job or trade to attract students to consider it as their
career; and
Identification of one or two jobs that can be readily offered by the schools as a
pilot program/course.
Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

1.5

2014

It is suggested that conflicts in policy issues be addressed. While the Civil Service
Commission (CSC) rules that students should be in school for eight hours, SHS
students are required to have two hours of paper work/OJT outside of their
schools. This seems to violate the CSC rule. Policies which can be addressed by the
Legal Office of DepEd were already brought up to the Regional/Division Offices.
However, as of date, a resolution is yet to be taken by school authorities.

2. Sources of Funds
2.1

Sufficient budgetary support for the provision of additional classrooms, training


facilities for hands-on activities and equipment such as LCD projectors and laptops,
and learning materials of the SHS students should be made available. This can be
done by increasing the allocated funds from Maintenance and Other Operating
Expenses (MOOE), providing TechVoc Funds which is usually at PhP 1 million per
school, or requesting for financial or in-kind support from Local Government Units
(LGUs) or the business sector.

2.2

It is recommended that assessment fees for TESDA should be shouldered by the


School Division and not by schools. OJT should be covered by TESDA if the school is
given the fiscal autonomy to encourage students to undergo industry immersion.

2.3

It is further recommended that GAA funds disbursement be released directly to


schools and not through several channels. Effective 2013, the new DepEd Memo
Order stipulates that K to 12 funds will have to be downloaded from the Regional
Office and Schools Division to TESDA before it goes to the school level.

3. Capacity Building
3.1

There is a need to provide skills training to build the capacities of SHS teachers.
These training programs include TESDA training for the specialization subjects that
they will teach, in-school training and orientation sessions on new curriculum for
academic subject and career pathway teachers, and leadership training for schools
heads and SHS/industry coordinators on how to properly administer and
implement SHS Modeling. They should also be given scholarship opportunities by
TESDA to improve their technical competencies and their perspectives/styles in
teaching SHS students.

3.2

Enhancement training for guidance counselors on Career Preparation and


Counseling should also be conducted. In this way, the guidance counselor would
have the necessary knowledge and capacity to advise SHS students on proper
career preparation.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

4. Linkages
4.1

Multi-stakeholder partnerships between the academe, the industries, and national


and local government institutions should be encouraged and promoted. Building
strong linkages provides access to accredited Technical Vocational Educational
Training Institutions (TVET) trainers, equipment and facilities, workshops, training,
and seminars, resource materials, etc. At the same time, the partnerships can help
mobilize financial and other related resources needed to sustain SHS Program
implementation. Moreover, requirements for learner assessment and
qualifications can be addressed through the partnerships fostered. Working
together with HEIs provides clarity and direction in the needed academic subjects
and types of assessments for learners in order for SHS students to be at least at par
with freshmen and sophomore college students. Developing the curriculum handin-hand with TESDA helps spell out the requirements for career pathway
qualifications to improve the chances of SHS graduates in getting jobs.

4.2

There is a need to come up with innovative partnerships with LGUs and other
related government or private agencies that would help subsidize transportation
costs, rent fees, testing fees, and uniform and paraphernalia.

5. Curriculum Development
5.1 Incorporate a strong career guidance component in the curriculum, coupled with
ardent counseling from the Guidance/SHS Counselor, beginning at Year 10, to guide
students in selecting their preferred specialized track/electives.
5.2 SHS model schools in coordination with the DepEd, CHED and other HEIs, and
TESDA should work together to review the planned SHS curriculum and incorporate
lessons learned from its SHS Modeling experience. There is a need for greater
flexibility in the implementation of the said curriculum, particularly in adopting
General Education (GE) subjects from college, hiring of SHS teachers, trainers from
industry partners and coordinators, allowing academic subjects to be credited in
college, and using flexible delivery options (such as modules for OHSP) for students
who cannot attend school regularly due to work commitments. As recommended
by some of the SHS model schools, flexible time may be applied, for example, to
self-paced working students to allow them to complete their academic
requirements. Learners and instructors may meet once or twice a week as they may
agree on.
5.3 Best practices of SHS model schools with respect to curriculum development should
be adopted. This includes aligning academic subjects with knowledge relevant to
career pathways, utilizing general education subjects from college, maximizing
options for dual credit in partnership with HEIs and TESDA, and providing ample
number of units and hours needed to complete the core and specialized learning
areas.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

5.4 Technical-Vocational skills alignment should be subject to labor market priorities


and not driven by supply. Schools might overlook the importance of checking
whether TechVoc programs could address the labor requirements of the community
and simply ensure that the graduates could contribute to the local economy. As
such, schools may be producing skilled graduates but there may not be enough
business enterprises to employ them in within the community. This may result in
underemployment and school-industry mismatch, which may lead to manpower
displacement and migration of graduates for employment in other communities.
5.5 SHS students should be given more exposure to hands-on learning activities to
facilitate skills development and application of knowledge, attitude, skills, and
values (KASVs).
5.6 School-community partnerships should be considered as a viable option for SHS
Program implementation. This means that SHS can be implemented through flexible
delivery options such as OHSP, particularly by tapping community resources. For
instance, Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS explained that a SHS student
taking Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC I can use in his project a neighbors welding
machine, and the teacher can then evaluate the project completed. On the other
hand, Sum-ag NHS is contemplating on establishing partnerships with other
barangays where their SHS students from distant areas can do farming practicum.
And in Palo National High School, the school partnered with the provincial
government for the provision of financial and technical assistance to SHS students
and to provide funding support for the SHS faculty.
5.7 Given that many SHS students will need to spend time contributing to their families,
priority flexible learning opportunities through self-instructional materials are
encouraged. Students could study auxiliary subject matter via self-instructional
modules and only report to school periodically for practical activities (e.g.,
laboratory work in science), skills training and completion of assessment tasks. This
would reduce the strain on SHS classroom-based facilities. Experiences of these SHS
model schools that also integrated its OHSP into their SHS Program should be
carefully studied for possible replication and upscaling.
5.8 Students should be given access to insurance services (i.e., PHILHEALTH, Coop-Life
Mutual Benefit Services Association or CLIMBS of Metro Ormoc Credit Cooperative,
Inc. or OCCI) to secure their protection for their mobility during the dual training
program, apprenticeship, or job immersion program.
5.9 Learner assessment and certification maximize links with TESDA certificate
mechanism and also HEIs for cross credit recognition and recognition of prior
learning (RPL). The ladderized curriculum of the K to 12 Program makes it more
crucial for SHS Schools to closely work together with TESDA to ensure that the SHS
students will be able to complete their career pathway competencies and
certification. At the same time, collaboration with the HEIs facilitates the crediting
of SHS academic subjects in preparation for the SHS students entry to college.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

5.10

The formation of Technical Working Groups (TWGs) and the conduct of


consultations should be sustained because these provide guidance and areas for
cooperation in sustaining SHS Program implementation.

5.11

DepEd, in partnership with TESDA and DOLE, should draft different training
regulations for the K to 12 SHS program. As a policy, every school should identify
its field of specialization in at least four trades to allow students to focus on their
career choice.

5.12

SHS model schools should focus on work readiness values and attitudes since
these are priority requirements of business and industries. The importance of
these soft work readiness skills should be highlighted in the curriculum.

5.13

Limit the TLE programs for Grades 7 to 10 from 23-24 TLE programs to two
specialized programs by the end of Junior HS and two to three specializations for
SHS students.

6. SHS Program Management


6.1 Application of school-based management (SBM) approach (DepEd Order No. 48) will
provide the school with greater autonomy to manage its SHS program based on the
needs of business community. The success of SHS program lies in the political will of
the school principal to implement education reforms. But the school policies (i.e.,
Basic Education Sector Reform Agenda or BESRA) are not truly decentralized to
allow the schools to have some flexibility in conducting regular classes for SHS (e.g.,
ADM application such as Open High School Program). Also, the practice of
reshuffling school principals is not necessary if the school head is performing well.
6.2 It is recommended that monitoring of SHS be done by the Schools Division so that
they would know whats happening in SHS modeling; however, they currently have
no specialized staff to do it.
6.3 In reality, not all public secondary schools can offer SHS. As a macro strategy for SHS

implementation, the 140 TechVoc schools should first be strengthened to enable


them to lead and guide the 40,000 public secondary schools as they serve as model
schools or training centers for SHS. DepEd should allocate funding to model SHS
schools to build their capacities as leader schools in every region before the SHS is
done massively by 2016. If possible, there should be at least one SHS model school
per province or one high school offering the SHS program in every municipality.

Executive Summary

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

INTRODUCTION
The Philippine Department of Education (DepEd) is currently undertaking a series of
major reforms anchored on the implementation of a new K-12 system as it seeks to
improve basic education outcomes for Filipino children and achieve its national
Education for All commitments. The new K-12 Basic Education Program2 (Figure 1)
involves the introduction of a new 12-year basic education curriculum, plus a year of
mandatory kindergarten, benchmarked on international standards3. The 12-year
curriculum includes six years of elementary education (Grades 1 to 6), four years of
junior high school (Grades 7 to 10), and two years of senior high school (Grades 11 to 12)
marked with multiple pathways and elective subjects supported by a comprehensive
career guidance program.4
Figure 1: DepEds Enhanced Basic Education Program

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

The Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013 (Republic Act 10533) was signed in May 2013.
The Philippines, prior to the K-12 reform agenda, was the only country in Asia and one of the only three
countries in the world (together with Djibouti and Angola in Africa) with a 10-year pre-university program.
See Annex 1.
4
SEAMEO INNOTECH Technical Support Program for the Philippine Department of Education K-12 Reform
Agenda
3

Introduction

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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With the addition of the multifaceted curriculum to be offered in senior high school,
graduates are expected to holistically develop and possess these 21st century skills:
1. Information, media and technology skills visual and information literacies;
media literacy; basic, scientific, economic, and technological literacies; and
multicultural literacy and global awareness
2. Learning and innovation skills creativity and curiosity; critical thinking, problem
solving and risk-taking; adaptability, managing complexity and self-direction; and
higher order thinking and sound reasoning
3. Effective communication skills teaming, collaboration and interpersonal skills;
personal, social and civic responsibility; and interactive communication
4. Life and career skills flexibility and adaptability; initiative and self-direction;
social and cross-cultural skills; productivity and accountability; and leadership
and responsibility
A K to 12 graduate (Figure 2) will be ready to take on higher education or middle level
skills development, or enter the world of entrepreneurship or employment.
Figure 2: The K to 12 Graduate

Source: SEAMEO INNOTECH, 2012

Introduction

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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In anticipation of the full implementation of SHS starting June 2016, DepEd has
undertaken the Senior High School Modeling Program or SHS Modeling beginning SY
2012-2013.
The Guidelines on the 2012 Implementation of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling5
provides that prior to the implementation of the senior high school, a research and
development process will be explored by implementing a Senior High School Modeling
Program in selected public technical-vocational (TechVoc) and general secondary
schools as participants or model schools ahead of the projected nationwide
implementation of the SHS in 2016-2017. The modeling started in June 2012 for selected
model high schools (Grades 11). The enrollees were the fourth year high school (Grade
10) completers of SY 2011-2012.
The implementing guidelines (D.O. No. 36 s. 2012) further indicate the following
objectives:
1. introduce and prepare the concerned model schools for the implementation of
the Grades 11 and 12 through the provision of appropriate interventions, e.g.,
training of teachers, and provision of support facilities and instructional
materials;
2. generate actual learning experiences of the different participating/volunteer
secondary schools in order to come up with different modalities as vital inputs in
the implementation of the SHS; and
3. prepare and carry out the communication plan to generate support from the
media, civil society, academe, local government units (LGUs), and private sectors.
Technical support for the SHS Modeling was provided by SEAMEO INNOTECH in
developing a sustainable model for Grades 11 to 12 by evolving a comprehensive
education system linking education tiers with businesses and industries, and by drawing
from the innovative work completed under the Centers Applied Academics for
Excellence (APEX) project experience. The Center assisted selected DepEd Regional
Offices in modeling the senior high school program through adaptation of existing APEX
models.

DepEd Order (D.O.) No. 36 series of 2012: Guidelines on the 2012 Implementation of the Senior High
School (SHS) Modeling in Selected Technical and Vocational Education and General Secondary Schools
under the K to 12 Basic Education Program
Introduction

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

2014

DepEd identified selected schools to be part of the modeling program based on a set of
criteria. Prior to modeling, a school must have the following:
1. an established post-secondary education;
2. a strong school-local industry partnership, e.g., its graduates are prioritized by
the neighboring/local industries for employment;
3. available functional workshop laboratories;
4. available qualified teachers; and
5. established linkages with local colleges/higher education institutions for possible
recognition of subject units taken in SHS if and when the student chooses to
continue academic advancement.
Table 1 describes the general profile of the selected SHS model schools.
Table 1: General Profile of SHS Model Schools, SY 2012-2013
School Type
Public High Schools

No. of Schools

No. of Enrollees

8
14

260
1,012

7
1

5,268

30

6,540

General High Schools


Technical-Vocational High Schools

Higher Education Institutions (HEIs)


Private HEIs
Local University/College

Total
Source: Yolanda S. Quijano, 2012

Specializations offered by some of the SHS model schools are enumerated in Table 2.
Table 2: SHS Model Schools Specializations
Region/Division

School

General Public High Schools


IV-A Batangas
Pinagtongulan National High
School
IV-A Cavite
Sangley Point National High School
VI Bacolod City
Bacolod City National High School
VI Negros Occidental
Negros Occidental National High
School
VI Bacolod City
Sum-ag National High School
VIII Leyte
Palo National High School
X Bukidnon

Bukidnon National High School

XII Cotabato City

Notre Dame Village National High


School

Specialization
Coffee Course
Security and Peacekeeping
Call Center
Call Center
Agricultural
Tourism and Information and
Communication Technology
Automotive
Food Trade
Electric Wiring Installation

Introduction

27

Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

Region/Division

School

Public TechVoc High Schools


III Bulacan
Balagtas National Agricultural High
School
IV-A Laguna
San Pedro Relocation Center
National High School
VI Silay City

Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial


National High School

VII Mandaue

Subangdaku Technical Vocational


School

VIII Leyte

Merida Vocational School

Higher Education Institutions


NCR Makati City
University of Makati

NCR Caloocan City


NCR Makati City

Manila Central University


ADM Consortium

V Naga City

Ateneo de Naga University

XI Davao

Philippine Womens College of


Davao City

2014

Specialization
Agriculture
Electronics
Automotive
Garments
Food Technology
Food and Beverage
Welding
Housekeeping
Electricity
Welding
Garments
Commercial Cooking
Automotive Service, Metals
and Engineering
Tech Voc Basic Technology
Business Education
Call Center / BPO
Information Technology
Art Education
Performing and Broadcast Arts
Dance and Sports
Citizenship and Leadership
Training
Allied Health / Caregiving
Athletics
Optical Laboratory Technician
Information Technology,
Journalism and Medical
Technology

Information Technology
Early Childhood Teacher-Aide
Program
Bread and Pastry Production
Commercial Cooking
Computer Programming
Clothing Technology
Drafting Technology
Entrepreneurship
Food and Beverage Service
Graphic and Digital Animation
Tourism

Source: Yolanda S. Quijano, 2012

The modeling involved developing a curriculum, designing and organizing a set of


appropriate instructional materials, and identifying and using varied teaching and
learning strategies all at the school level, based on the needs of its students and the
demands of local businesses or industries.
Introduction

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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This monitoring study looks into the status of and experiences on SHS Modeling in
selected schools in the country in preparation for its full implementation by 2016. The
study was funded by SEAMEO INNOTECH under its Educational Research and Innovation
Fund as part of the Centers commitment to support DepEds K to 12 Basic Education
Sector Reform Agenda.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY


The monitoring of model senior high schools forms part of SEAMEO INNOTECHs
complimentary set of program interventions to support DepEds need for sustained
technical support in operationalizing the new K to 12 Basic Education Program.
The study aims to generate knowledge drawn from the experiences of model schools that
can serve as a good resource for refining the guidelines for the full implementation of SHS
beginning SY 2016-2017.
Specifically, the study aims to:
1. determine the pre-implementation considerations and actual implementation
needs and processes under the SHS Modeling;
2. identify strengths and innovations of the selected SHS model schools;
3. ascertain challenges and potentials for improvement; and
4. formulate policy recommendations based on the lessons learned by the selected
SHS model schools.

METHOD OF STUDY
The study consisted of the various stages of the SHS Modeling, from pre-implementation
to implementation, and including the challenges schools have experienced thus far in
relation to modeling (Figure 3).
The pre-implementation stage considered the factors that influenced the school to take
part in the SHS Modeling program. Activities that had to be undertaken prior to
implementation were likewise looked into. These include establishing linkages with local
government units and local businesses and industries; developing appropriate
curriculum; building capacity especially among teaching personnel; and acquiring
necessary certifications particularly for teaching technical-vocational subjects.
The implementation stage included the necessary inputs such as human and financial
resources, adequate facilities, curriculum, and learning materials, including policy
guidelines; processes that take place such as intervention programs, use of different
teaching methodologies, and student assessment; and outputs such as innovations, and
student employment as on-the-job trainees generated during the first year of SHS
modeling.
Objectives of the Study

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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Challenges related to policies and implementing guidelines; available resources; level of


community support, including LGUs and parents; level of awareness; and community
linkages were also examined.
The good practices and lessons learned from the first year of modeling were taken in
consideration before recommendations were crafted to help address the challenges and
maximize any potential for improvement of the program.
Key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted from
February to March 2013 with school heads, teachers and SHS students to obtain
relevant information on the SHS Modeling.
Figure 3: Framework of Study

The study also utilized data generated from a survey administered by the Research
Studies Unit (RSU) of SEAMEO INNOTECH. The survey, also conducted from February to
March 2013, was part of a research project that aimed to generate case studies of
Alternative Delivery Mode (ADM) models in selected provinces of the Philippines that
would allow for deeper understanding of the implementation of appropriate and
effective ADMs for the SHS stage of the K to 12 program.
The draft report was distributed to SHS model schools during a conference held in
Baguio City in June 2013 to solicit comments and suggestions.
Of the total number of SHS model schools, four general public high schools and three
public TechVoc high schools were included in the monitoring study. Due to limited
resources, selection of SHS model schools included in the monitoring study was based
on a plan of action that would optimize the Centers available resources.
Method of Study

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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The list of the seven SHS model schools included in the study can be found in Table 3.
Table 3: List of SHS Model Schools Included in the Monitoring Study
Region/Division
School
Type of School
IV-A Laguna
IV-A Cavite City
VI Bacolod City
Vi Bacolod City
VI Silay City
VIII Palo
VIII Leyte

San Pedro Relocation Center NHS


Sangley Point NHS
Bacolod City NHS
Sum-ag NHS
Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial
National High School
Palo National High School
Merida Vocational School

Public TechVoc HS
General Public HS
General Public HS
General Public HS
Public TechVoc HS
General Public HS
Public TechVoc HS

THE SHS CURRICULUM


While the SHS Modeling program allows the model schools to innovate and develop
their own curriculum, DepEd had proposed a senior high school curriculum when the
program started in 2012. The proposed curriculum consisted of the following: a) core
subjects spanning seven learning areas, namely, language, literature, mathematics,
philosophy, natural sciences, social sciences, and the national service training program
(NSTP); and b) career pathways subjects which cover the areas of entrepreneurship or
business, technical-vocational, humanities (i.e., sports, arts, music, languages,
journalism), and science, technology and engineering (Table 4).
Table 4: Proposed SHS Curriculum (2012)
Learning Areas

Subjects

Grade 11

Grade 12

1st Sem

2nd Sem

54

1st Sem

2nd Sem

Total
Hours

Core Curriculum
Language
Literature

English or Filipino or other


Philippine and
World Literature

54

Mathematics
Philosophy

Mathematics
Philosophy

54

Natural Sciences

Life/Physical Sciences

Social Sciences
NSTP

Contemporary Issues
Community Service

108
108

54
54

54
54
54
216

54
54
54
216

270

270

108
54
108
108
108
972

Total Hours

486

486

432

270

1,674

Hours/Day

5.4

5.4

4.2

3.0

Career Pathways, including immersion or practicum

54
54

entrepreneurship or business;
technical-vocational;
humanities (sports, arts, music, languages, journalism);
science, technology and engineering

Source: Yolanda S. Quijano, 2012


The SHS Curriculum

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DepEd has since then modified the proposed SHS curriculum. As of February 2014, the
revised senior high school curriculum consists of the following: a) core subjects covering
eight learning areas, namely, language, humanities, communication, mathematics,
philosophy, science, social science, and P.E. and health; and b) track subjects
encompassing the areas of academic, technical-vocational-livelihood, sports, and arts
and design (Figure 4).
Figure 4: Revised Senior High School Curriculum (2014)

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

As compared to the former proposed curriculum (2012) where one subject consists of 54
class hours in a semester, a subject under the revised proposed curriculum (2014)
consists of 80 class hours in a semester. DepEd has also clearly identified the specific
core and track subjects under the revised curriculum. The SHS will have 15 core subjects
and 16 track subjects, where seven are common subjects and nine are specialization
subjects, totalling 31 subjects to be taken up in Grade 11 and Grade 12 (Figure 5).
The career pathways or tracks have also been redefined under the revised
curriculum. One of the more salient changes is how the Academic Track lumps together
accountancy, business, management (ABM); liberal arts (General Academic); humanities,
education, social sciences (HESS/HUMMS); and science, technology, engineering,
mathematics (STEM). The ABM was formerly one of the main career pathways (i.e.,
entrepreneurship or business); STEM was also formerly one of the main career
pathways; humanities was likewise identified as one of the main career pathways, and
includes sports, arts and music, among others, which were later specified as main tracks
under the revised curriculum.
The SHS Curriculum

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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Figure 5: SHS Core and Track Subjects

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

CORE SUBJECTS
The 15 core subjects are spread among the eight learning areas. Language takes up four
subjects, humanities has two subjects, communication consists of only one subject,
mathematics, science, and social science cover two subjects each, while philosophy and
PE and health have one subject each. All 15 subjects will be taken up by SHS students
regardless of the track they opt to take.
Table 5 lists in details the 15 core subjects.

The SHS Curriculum

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Monitoring of the Philippine Department of Educations Model Senior High School Program

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Table 5: SHS Core Subjects


CORE SUBJECTS
Language

1. Oral Communication
2. Reading and Writing
3. Komunikasyon at Pananaliksik sa Wikang Filipino at
Kulturang Pilipino
4. Pagbasa at Pagsusuri ng Ibat-ibang Teksto Tungo sa
Pananaliksik
Humanities
5. 21st Century Literature from the Philippines and the World
6. Contemporary Music and Visual Arts
Communication 7. Media and Information Literacy
Mathematics
8. General Mathematics
9. Statistics and Probability
Science
10. Earth and Life Science (Lecture and Laboratory)*
11. Physical Science (Lecture and Laboratory)*
Social Science 12. Personal Development
13. Understanding Society, Politics and Culture
Philosophy
14. Introduction to Philosophy of the Human Person
PE and Health 15. Physical Education and Health

Hours per
semester
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80

CORE Total Number of Hours


TRACK Total Number of Hours
Total Number of Hours (CORE + TRACK)
Total Hours / Number of School Days in SHS (400)

1,200
1,280
2,480
6.2
hours/day
*Students in the STEM Strand will take Disaster Readiness and Risk Reduction and Earth Science
instead of these subjects
Source: Department of Education, February 2014

TRACK SUBJECTS
Track subjects comprise seven common track subjects and nine specialization or
specialized track subjects. Similar to the core subjects, the common track subjects will be
taken up by all SHS students regardless of their track. However, the common track
subjects are contextualized as appropriate to specific tracks. All strands under the
Academic Track (i.e., ABM, Liberal Arts or General Academic, HESS/HUMMS, and STEM)
have the same list of common track subjects. On the other hand, the TechnicalVocational-Livelihood, Sports, and Arts and Design Tracks share the same list of common
track subjects.
Table 6 contains the list of common subjects for all tracks.

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Table 6: Common Track Subjects

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Contextualized Track Subjects


Academic Track
Technical-Vocational-Livelihood / Sports /
Arts and Design Tracks
English for Academic and Professional
1. English for Academic and Professional
Purposes
Purposes
Research 1: Qualitative Research in Daily
2. Research 1: Qualitative Research in Daily Life
Life
Research 2: Quantitative Research in Daily 3. Research 2: Quantitative Research in Daily
Life
Life
Pagsulat sa Filipino sa Piling Larangan
4. Pagsulat sa Filipino sa Piling Larangan
(Akademik)
(Isports, Sining at TechVoc)
Empowerment Technologies (E-Tech): ICT 5. Empowerment Technologies (E-Tech): ICT for
for Professional Tracks
Professional Tracks
Entrepreneurship
6. Entrepreneurship
Research Project
7. Research Project / Culminating Activity
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester
Source: Department of Education, February 2014

The specialization track subjects differ from one track to another, and even from one
strand or mini-course to another. This will be illutrated in the following sections.
Academic Track
The Academic Track includes four strands: accountancy, business, management (ABM);
liberal arts (General Academic); humanities, education, social sciences (HESS/HUMMS);
and science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM). The specialized track
subjects under this track differ depending on the strand. These are detailed in Tables 710.
Table 7: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - ABM Strand)
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

ABM Strand 1
ABM Strand 2
ABM Strand 3
ABM Strand 4
ABM Strand 5
ABM Strand 6
ABM Strand 7
ABM Strand 8
ABM Strand 9

Applied Economics
Business Ethics and Social Responsibility
Fundamentals of Accountancy, Business and Management 1
Fundamentals of Accountancy, Business and Management 2
Business Math
Business Finance
Organization and Management
Principles of Marketing
Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy
i.e., Business Enterprise Simulation
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

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Table 8: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - General Academic Strand)


8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Liberal Arts Strand 1 Humanities 1


Liberal Arts Strand 2 Humanities 2
Liberal Arts Strand 3 Social Science 1
Liberal Arts Strand 4 Applied Economics
Liberal Arts Strand 5 Organization and Management
Liberal Arts Strand 6 Disaster Readiness and Risk Reduction
Liberal Arts Strand 7 Elective (from any Track/Strand)
Liberal Arts Strand 8 Elective (from any Track/Strand)
Liberal Arts Strand 9 Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy/Culminating Activity
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester
Source: Department of Education, February 2014

Table 9: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - HUMSS Strand*)


8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

HUMMS Strand 1
HUMMS Strand 2
HUMMS Strand 3
HUMMS Strand 4
HUMMS Strand 5
HUMMS Strand 6
HUMMS Strand 7

Creative Writing
Creative Non-Fiction: The Literary Essay
World Religions and Belief Systems
Megatrends and Critical Thinking in the 21st Century Culture
Philippine Politics and Governance
Community Involvement and Social Issues
Introducing the Social Sciences (Anthropology, Economics, History,
Psychology, Sociology, Political Science)
HUMMS Strand 8
Introducing the Applied Sciences (Communication, Journalism,
Guidance and Counselling, Social Work)
HUMMS Strand 9
Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy/Culminating Activity
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester
*For finalization
Source: Department of Education, February 2014

Table 10: Specialized Track Subjects (Academic Track - STEM Strand)


8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

STEM Strand 1
STEM Strand 2
STEM Strand 3
STEM Strand 4
STEM Strand 5
STEM Strand 6
STEM Strand 7
STEM Strand 8
STEM Strand 9

Pre-Calculus
Basic Calculus
General Biology 1
General Biology 2
General Physics 1
General Physics 2
General Chemistry 1
General Chemistry 2
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

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Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track
The Technical-Vocational-Livelihood (TVL) Track has four mini-courses: home economics
(HE), information and communications technology (ICT), agri-fishery arts, and industrial
arts. Each mini-course has sub-specialization subjects that are based on the TESDA
training regulations (Table 11).
Table 11: Specialized Track Subjects (Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track*)
TVL Track Subjects
Subjects
Example
8. TechVoc Track 1
9. TechVoc Track 2

Beauty
Care/
Nail
Care

10. TechVoc Track 3

TESDA Training Regulations-Based Specializations


HE
ICT
Agri-Fishery
Industrial
Arts
Arts
Hairdressing
Bread and
Pastry
Production
Tailoring

Cable TV
Installation
Visual Graphic
Design
Animation

11. TechVoc Track 4

Tour Guiding
Services

12. TechVoc Track 5

Travel Services

Horticulture

Caregiving

Animal
Production
Aquaculture

13. TechVoc Track 6


14. TechVoc Track 7
15. TechVoc Track 8
16. TechVoc Track 9

Hairdressing

Food and
Beverage
Services
Housekeeping
Attractions and
Theme Parks
Tourism
Handicraft:
Fashion
Accessories
Handicraft:
Paper Craft
Handicraft:
Woodcraft
Handicraft:
Leathercraft

Medical/Judicia
l Transcription

Rice Machinery
Operation
Landscape
Installation and
Maintenance
Organic
Agriculture
Production
Rubber
Production

Food Processing
Crop Production

Automotive
Servicing
Refrigeration
and Air
conditioning
Carpentry

Consumer
Electronics
Servicing
Electrical
Installation and
Maintenance
Plumbing
Shielded
Metal- Arc
Welding
Masonry

Each subject will have 80 hours per semester


*For Finalization
Source: Department of Education, February 2014

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Sports Track
The Sports Track includes two specializations: a particular sports or fitness. The
specialized track subjects under this track are shown in Table 12.
Table 12: Specialized Track Subjects (Sports Track)
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Sports Track 1
Sports Track 2
Sports Track 3
Sports Track 4
Sports Track 5
Sports Track 6
Sports Track 7
Sports Track 8
Sports Track 9

Safety and First Aid


Understanding Human Movement
Fundamentals of Coaching
Sports Officiating and Activity Management
Fitness, Sports and Recreation Leadership
Psychosocial Aspects of Sports and Exercise
Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescription
Practicum (In-Campus)
Work Immersion/Research/Career Advocacy/Culminating Activity
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

Arts and Design Track


The specialized track subjects for Arts and Design Track are listed in Table 13.
Table 13: Specialized Track Subjects (Arts and Design Track)
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Arts Track 1
Arts Track 2
Arts Track 3
Arts Track 4
Arts Track 5
Arts Track 6
Arts Track 7
Arts Track 8
Arts Track 9

Creative Industries I: Arts and Design Appreciation and Production


Creative Industries II: Performing Arts
Physical and Personal Development in the Arts
Developing Filipino Identity in the Arts
Integrating the Elements and Principles of Organization in the Arts
Leadership and Management in Different Arts Fields
Apprenticeship and Exploration of Different Arts Fields
Apprenticeship and Exploration of Different Arts Fields
Exhibit for Arts Production (Media Arts, Visual Arts and Literary Arts)/
Performing Arts Production (Music, Dance, Theater)
Each subject will have 80 hours per semester except Apprenticeship and Exploration of Different
Arts Fields which will have 160 hours (i.e., 80 hours + 80 hours)
Source: Department of Education, February 2014

To summarize, the 15 core subjects, which are mostly taken up in Grade 11, and the 16
track subjects, which are generally taken up in Grade 12, under the revised proposed
SHS curriculum are presented in Table 14.

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Table 14: Summary of Revised SHS Curriculum (2014)


Core Subjects
Language

Humanities
Communication
Mathematics
Science
Social Science
Philosophy

Oral Communication/
Reading and Writing
Talastasang Filipino sa Lipunang
Pilipino/
Pagbasa, Pagsulat, Pananaliksik sa
Wika at Kulturang Filipino
21st Century Literature from the
Philippines and the World
Philippine Music and Arts
Media and Information Literacy
General Math/
Statistics and Probability
Life Sciences Lecture and Laboratory
Physical Sciences Lecture and
Laboratory
Personal Development/
Understanding Society and Culture
Intro to Philosophy of the Human
Person
Physical Education and Health

PE and Health
CORE Total Number of Hours
TRACK Total Number of Hours
Total Number of Hours (CORE + TRACK)
Total Hours (CORE + TRACK) divided by Number
of School Days in a Semester (100) = hours/day

Grade 11

Grade 12
1st Sem

Total

1st Sem

2nd Sem

2nd Sem

80

80

160

80

80

160

80

80
80
80

80

80

80
80
160

80
80

80
80

160
160

80

80

160
80

20
500
160
660
6.6

20
500
160
660
6.6

20
180
480
660
6.6

80
20
180
480
660
6.6

80
1,360
1,280
2,640

Source: Department of Education, February 2014

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GENERAL TRENDS
The following are the general findings based on the interviews conducted in the seven
SHS model schools and the survey results conducted by SEAMEO INNOTECH.
Table 15: List of Selected Model SHS
Name of
School

Division

Type of
School

Specialization

1. San Pedro
Relocation
Center NHS
2. Sangley
Point NHS

Laguna

Electronics, Automotive,
Garments, Food
Technology
Security and
Peacekeeping

3. Bacolod
City NHS

Bacolod
City

Public
TechVoc
HS
General
Public
HS
General
Public
HS
General
Public
HS
Public
TechVoc
HS

General
Public
HS
Public
TechVoc
HS

Cavite
City

4. Sum-ag NHS Bacolod


City
5. Doa
Montserrat
Lopez
Memorial
National High
School
6. Palo
National High
School
7. Merida
Vocational
School
Total
Enrollees

Silay
City

Palo

Leyte

Enrollees
(SY 2012-2013)
Male Female Total
295
249
544

27

34

Call Center

26

18

44

Agricultural

10

14

Electricity, Shielded
Metal Arc Welding
(SMAW), Housekeeping,
Food and Beverage
Service

42

66

108

Tourism, Information
and Communication
Technology
Automotive Service,
Metals and Engineering

69

33

102

16

77

93

459

480

939

Source: SEAMEO INNOTECH RSU Survey on ADM, 2013

A. PRE-IMPLEMENTATION EXPERIENCES
The pre-implementation stage is one of the most crucial stages of SHS Modeling. This
stage allows for schools to hold consultations with key stakeholders to determine their
specialization, develop their curriculum, and determine the human resource and
certification requirements needed to fully implement SHS Modeling.

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1. Rationale
Based on the data obtained from the KIIs and FGDs conducted, most of the seven SHS
model schools engaged in SHS Modeling not only to contribute in achieving education
for all but to provide poor and working students greater access to senior high school
education as well as employment opportunities and quality education while they are
unable to enroll in college. At the same time, most of the schools engaged in SHS
Modeling to accommodate overaged students.
To illustrate, the survey shows that 85.71 percent or six out of seven respondents said
that most of their senior high school students are indigent or are very poor. At the same
time, the same survey showed that 100 percent or seven out of seven respondents said
that their students are mainly working students. In addition, 71.42 percent or five out of
seven respondents said that most of the students are overaged students (see Figures 6,
7, and 8).
Figure 6: SHS with Indigent/Very Poor Students

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Figure 7: SHS with Working Students

Figure 8: SHS with Overaged Students

The KIIs and the FGDs validate these findings. In most Senior High School Model Schools
like Sangley Point NHS in Cavite, Sum-ag NHS in Negros Occidental, and Palo National
High School in Leyte, most of the senior high school student-respondents mentioned
that they enrolled in the SHS Modeling Program because they are unable to enroll in
college due to financial constraints but wanted to continue to study. They also said that
they wanted to be able to work so they can save money to be able to study in college.
Others simply wanted to go to work after finishing SHS to be able to help their families.
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On the other hand, other TechVoc Schools, such as San Pedro Relocation Center NHS in
Laguna, Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS in Negros Occidental, and Merida
Vocational School in Leyte, wanted to test their capacities and competencies as TechVoc
schools in engaging in SHS Modeling.
2. Linkages
Initially, the SHS model schools held consultations with the Department of Labor and
Employment (DOLE), the Local Government Units (LGUs), and prospective industry
partners to help determine the type of specialization that they could engage in. LGUs
were seen by the schools as their links to the industry partners. On the other hand, they
sought advice from the DOLE and the industries on the possible specializations that they
could engage in while taking into consideration job availability in their area.
Partnerships of the SHS model schools with industries depended on the type of
specialization that they engaged in. For instance, Sangley Point NHS which engaged in
security services partnered with the Philippine Navy and the Philippine National Police
(PNP) because these institutions specialize in sustaining maritime security in the case of
the Philippine Navy and domestic peace and order in the case of the PNP.
On the other hand, the Bacolod City NHS partnered with the Negros Occidental
Language and Information Technology Center since they saw this institution would be
able to help enhance the skills of the students in their prospective call center work.
Because of their various specialization offerings, Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS
established partnerships with different industries including Hawaiian Philippine
Company, Mel Ken Restaurant, Baldevia Pension House, Sunburst Bay Resort, and Royal
Am Rei Hotel.
In Leyte, the Merida Vocational School established a partnership with MAC Builders
because it provided OJT and employment opportunities to SHS students that engaged in
automotive services. They also partnered with Yakal Construction to provide OJT and job
opportunities with the students under the Metals and Engineering Program.
In most cases, the partnerships of the SHS model schools with the industries were
formalized through the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The MOA
helped in clarifying the nature of the SHS Modeling Program and the roles and
responsibilities of the partner institutions under the said program.

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3. Curriculum Development
As provided under Item Number 4 of DepEd Order (DO) No. 36 series of 2012, the
model schools are given the flexibility to innovate and develop their own curriculum
based on the needs of students and demands of the local industries
On the other hand, Enclosure No. 1 to DO 36 series of 2012 provides that, The Grades
11 and 12 Curriculum or the Senior High School Curriculum is based on two (2) tracks:
For the academic track, the curriculum is based on College Readiness Standards given by
the Commission on High Education (CHED). For the technical-vocational track, it is based
on the learning outcomes and performance criteria stipulated in the Training
Regulations (TR) of TESDA. Other specializations not found in the TR may be offered
provided these address the demands of local industry and that the school has the
qualified faculty and the facilities required.
Most of the SHS model schools have a common academic curriculum, with a few
additional specialized academic subjects that were selected based on the relevance to
their TechVoc or entrep specializations. In consultation with the Department of
Education (DepEd), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) and other Higher
Education Institutions (HEIs), they align the academic curriculum with the General
Education Subjects in college to prepare the SH students for possible entry to second
year or third year college.
The academic subjects include core subjects such as English, Filipino, mathematics,
science, social studies, and music, arts, physical education, and health (MAPEH). Two
new subjects, literature and philosophy, were added based on the General Education
Curriculum of CHED.
In San Pedro Relocation Center NHS, they offer 34 units of academic subjects for 43
hours, plus 300 hours of OJT per student. They explained that the academic subjects that
they developed were designed to prepare the students for entry into third year college.
Additional subjects were determined based on their relevance to specializations. For
instance, Sangley Point NHS included Political Science to their academic curriculum
because they saw it as being relevant to their specialization on Security Service. As for
Sangley Point NHS, they likewise added Taekwondo and Gun Safety and Firing as
additional subjects to enhance the students knowledge and skills and build their
confidence in security service.
In the survey conducted by RSU, only 28.57 percent or two out of seven respondents
said that they had an academic program track. It should be clarified that all seven
schools based on the interviews indicated that they had a core academic curriculum on
top of the specializations that they offered. On the other hand, 85.71 percent or six out
of seven respondents mentioned that they had a TechVoc program track. Only 14.29
percent or one out of seven respondents said that its program was under Others
(Bacolod NHS which offered call center services) (see Figure 9).
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Figure 9: SHS Program Track

4. Capacity Development
The SHS Modeling school heads and teachers were oriented and trained on the K to 12
Program (i.e., key changes in secondary education, career pathways, and adjustments in
time allotment per learning area) and SHS Modeling (i.e., pertinent provisions of DepEd
Order 36 series of 2012 on the nature and objectives of SHS Modeling, roles and
responsibilities of SHS model schools, and implementation scheme). In the case of San
Pedro Relocation Center NHS and Merida Vocational School, the training programs were
held in one day. The other SHS model schools did not indicate the number of days for
their K to 12 Program and SHS Modeling training and orientation sessions. Most of the
teachers have either earned their Masters degree or some units. In some SHS model
schools, the teachers also conducted their own researches to build their capacities and
enrich existing learning materials.
SHS Modeling partners, such as the LGUs and the industries were likewise oriented on
the K to 12 Program and SHS Modeling to prepare them for their roles and
responsibilities under the Program. The orientation sessions were usually held twice
half day during consultations and half day prior to the signing of MOAs. These sessions
were also held whenever the SHS model schools would meet other prospective industry
partners.
5. Certifications
Based on the RSU survey on ADM, 71.42 percent or five out of seven respondents said
that they offered certificate of competencies, 85.71 percent or six out of seven
respondents mentioned that they offered national certification provided by TESDA, and
71.42 percent or five out of seven respondents indicated that they provide SH graduates
with a high school diploma. Only 14.29 percent or one out of seven respondents (i.e.,
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Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS) said that they gave an OJT certification and a
certificate of training.
The observations on the type of certifications used were consistent with the number of
schools that had TechVoc program specializations. TechVoc program schools usually
provide NC I for junior high school and NC II for senior high school which are obtained by
passing the assessment administered by TESDA.

B. IMPLEMENTATION EXPERIENCES
1. Inputs
a. Human resources
Different SH Model Schools have different human resource requirements depending on
their program strategies. With respect to SHS teachers, the schools usually employ those
who have Masters degree or units.
While some schools employ SHS teachers from their own faculty roster, other schools
tap teachers from Higher Learning Institutions (HEIs) or their industry partners. Palo NHS
is an example of a SHS Model School that taps teachers from HEIs. On the other hand,
Sangley Point NHS seeks the assistance of its industry partners including the Philippine
Navy and the Philippine National Police (PNP) in providing training.
Given that the school head is busy in overseeing the schools day-to-day operations and
the teachers are already swamped with their teaching load, some SHS model schools
such as Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS hire a full-time industry coordinator to
assist in tapping prospective industry partners, coordinate OJTs of the students, and
facilitate the possible hiring of SHS graduates.
Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS also hires contractual teachers to address
instances of unavailability of the designated SHS teachers.
b. Funding and facilities
Only two of the seven SHS model schools interviewed were given PhP 1 million each by
the DepEd for SHS Modeling since they were part of the original pilot schools. These
include San Pedro Relocation Center NHS and Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS.
They were able to use the said funds to purchase school facilities and equipment.
The rest of the SHS model schools did not receive the same funds because they were
only identified later. Since the Program is still in its Modeling stage, there seems to be a
confusion among the SHS model schools whether they could use funds from their
Maintenance and Other Operating Expenses (MOOE) or not. Some SHS schools do not
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allocate funds from their MOOE for SHS Modeling, saying that they have not been
programmed for such purpose.
As it is, most of the SHS model schools make use of whatever resources or facilities that
the schools have. For instance, some schools alternate the use of classrooms for junior
high school and senior high school students. One school even doubled the use of its
computer laboratory as the classroom for SH students. Some cases were also reported
that the teachers had to shoulder the expenses of the students who did not have
money.
To help augment their financial requirements, the schools sought the assistance either
of some government officials, LGUs, or industry partners.
In Sangley Point NHS, one of its partner computer companies provided computer units
for the SHS students. However, only 3 out of the 20 computers were actually functional.
In Bacolod City NHS, the city mayor provided funds for reconstructing the SHS classroom
which had gotten burned down.
In Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS, a senator donated funds for the construction
of a facility for Food and Beverage Service (FBS).
In Palo NHS, the mayor subsidizes the transportation fare of the students from the
school to the OJT site.
c. Curriculum
The SHS model schools implement a curriculum that they developed in consultation with
the DepEd, the CHED, HEIs and industry partners. Most of the SHS model schools have a
common academic curriculum, with a few additional specialized academic subjects that
were selected based on the relevance to their career pathway specializations. They align
the academic curriculum with the General Education Subjects in college to prepare the
SHS students for possible entry to second year or third year college.
Among the core academic subjects are English, Filipino, mathematics, science, social
studies, and music, arts, physical education, and health (MAPEH). Literature and
philosophy were included based on the General Education Curriculum of CHED.
It is in the career pathway specializations where the SHS model schools differ. San Pedro
Relocation Center NHS offers electronics, automotive, garments, and food technology.
Sangley Point NHS provides specialization in security and peacekeeping. Call center
services is the specialization of Bacolod City NHS. Sum-ag NHS offers agriculture as its
career pathway. Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS provides specialization in
electricity, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), housekeeping, and food and beverage
service (FBS). Tourism and information and communication technology are offered by

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Palo NHS as their specialization, and Merida Vocational School offers automotive service
and metals and engineering as their career pathway.
d. Learning modules
As of SY 2012-2013, no instructional materials had been developed by the DepEd for SHS
Modeling. To compensate, the SHS model schools use the following learning materials:

printed modules or digitized resources used by 83.33 percent or five out of six
respondents
printed text or workbooks used by 66.66 percent or four out of six respondents
online resources used by 50 percent or three out of six respondents

See Figure 10 for the summary.


Figure 10: Learning Materials Used in SHS

Bacolod City NHS explained that they use reference books. Meanwhile, Doa Montserrat
Lopez Memorial NHS clarified that they utilize tools, equipment, materials, ingredient,
improvised materials, and multimedia.

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e. Guidelines/Policies
Among the governing policies used by the SHS model schools in relation to the K to 12
Program and SHS Modeling are the following:
1) DepEd Order (DO) No. 36 series of 2012 entitled, GUIDELINES ON THE 2012
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL (SHS) MODELING IN SELECTED
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL AND GENERAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS UNDER THE
K TO 12 BASIC EDUCATION PROGRAM;
2) DepEd Order (DO) No. 71 series of 2012 entitled, ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
TO AND CHANGES IN DEPED ORDER NO. 36, S. 2021; and
3) Presidential Decree (PD) No. 42, as amended, entitled, A DECREE INSTITUTING A
LABOR CODE THEREBY REVISING AND CONSOLIDATING LABOR AND SOCIAL LAWS
TO AFFORD PROTECTION TO LABOR, PROMOTE EMPLOYMENT AND HUMAN
RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND INSURE INDUSTRIAL PEACE BASED ON SOCIAL
JUSTICE, particularly its provisions on apprenticeship with business and
industries.
In the case of San Pedro Relocation Center National High School, they make use of
DepEd Order (DO) No. 48 series of 2007 to be able to hire contractual teachers to help
mitigate the lack of teachers. DO 48 series of 2007 authorizes TechVoc principals to hire
contractual teachers.
2. Processes
a. Intervention programs for disadvantaged learners or SARDOs
The SHS model schools employed various intervention programs depending on the
actual needs of the disadvantaged learners or SARDOs. In some cases, local officials may
offer scholarship programs to deserving students. There is also the adopt-a-child
program for teachers that can afford to support a student. The schools may also employ
the Open High School Program (OHSP) or home visitation to address the limitations or
constraints of some students. Among the SHS model schools interviewed, Bacolod City
NHS, which has 39 OHSP students as of SY 2012-2013, has so far implemented the OHSP.
Related to this, the learning material used may be modules or workbooks. For students
that have financial problems, most of the SHS model schools implement a feeding,
health, and nutrition program. The school also encourages parents to support the
students whenever possible.

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b. Teaching methodologies
The SHS model schools applied various learning strategies and approaches depending on
their preferences. For instance, 85.71 percent or six out of seven respondents said that
they either apply face-to-face teaching, media-assisted teaching, or work-oriented
teaching. On the other hand, 71.42 percent or five out of seven respondents said that
they employ flexible learning, group or cooperative learning, or process-oriented
learning. Generally, the schools make use of blended learning strategies, particularly the
dual learning strategy, to harmonize academic learning and practical learning or skills
development (see Figure 11).
Figure 11: Teaching-Learning Strategies Used in SHS

c. Student assessment
Based on the RSU survey, 100 percent or seven out of seven respondents make use of
the traditional type of assessment for SHS students. Next to this, most of the
respondents (71.42 percent or five out of seven) said that they conduct performance
assessment to evaluate the students. On the other hand, 57.14 or four out of seven
respondents mentioned that they use either portfolio or self-assessment in assessing the
SHS students (see Figure 12).

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Figure 12: Type of Student Assessment Used in SHS

Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS clarified that they apply skills test and
demonstration in assessing their SHS students.
3. Output
a. Innovations
Among the SHS model schools interviewed, San Pedro Relocation Center NHS and Doa
Montserrat Lopez Memorial NHS provide the most number of innovations, some of
which include the following:
1) Establishing strong and sustained partnerships with LGUs, industries, and HEIs to
help provide the needed assistance for the Program.
2) As early as Grade 11, students undergo OJT by batches. This new practice was
introduced in order to accommodate all and prevent congestion of trainees at
the end of the SHS term. Apprenticeship was justified using the Labor Code.
3) The SHS students were screened through qualification tests, scholastic grades,
and interviews.
4) The school is accessible to indigent students since it strictly implements a zero
collection policy.

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5) Students who are deployed in OJT are given consideration and flexible timeframe
to comply with requirements. ICT was likewise used for consultation and added
efficiency.
6) Use of real life scenarios, skill-oriented learning and treatment of students as
adults motivate and challenge students to do well in school.
7) The school designated a teacher as industry coordinator, who had been in the
industry for a long time. This facilitates the OJT of the students. Other functions
include contracting on OJT terms, providing for mobility/transportation of OJTs,
scheduling assessment and monitoring of OJTs.
8) SHS Teachers have either Masters degree or units. At the same time, they are
NC II holders that were trained on K to 12 and TESDA training methodologies and
competency assessment.
9) Some SHS Teachers research and develop their own instructional materials to
help enrich existing instructional materials
10) The hiring of contractual teachers help mitigate the lack of teachers. This is
justified by DepEd Order (DO) No. 48 series of 2007 that authorizes TechVoc
principals to hire contractual teachers. Fortunately, the DBM approved the
budget for contractual teachers.
11) The provision of laboratory access to SHS students by the Public Employment
Service Office (PESO) augments the SHS model schools resource limitations.
b. Student tracking
The SHS model schools are yet to develop a system of tracking since all of their SHS
students are only in Grade 11.
4. Challenges and Potentials
a. Guidelines/Policies
One of the challenges raised with respect to guidelines in the hiring of teachers is the
continued implementation of the Localization Law, which prevents schools from hiring
qualified teachers.
In the case of SHS model schools that offer call center service as specialization, call
centers do not allow OJT for prospective call center agents and technical support staff.
Instead, they only provide trainings for personnel that they have initially screened for
hiring.
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Another challenge in terms of guidelines is that in some SHS model schools, Grade 11
students are not required to join extracurricular activities.
One area of potential or opportunity related to policy is DepEd Order (DO) No. 48 series
of 2007 which authorizes TechVoc principals to hire contractual teachers.
Another area of potential or opportunity is the recently signed Republic Act (RA) No.
10533 or the Enhanced Basic Education Act or 2013. Section 8 of RA 10533 provides that
the DepEd and private educational institutions (PEIs) may hire graduates of degree
courses with shortages in qualified Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET) to teach in
their specialized subjects. DepEd and PEIs may likewise hire graduates of technicalvocational courses to teach in specialized subjects provided that these graduates
possess the necessary certification issued by the TESDA. Faculty of HEIs may also be
allowed to teach in their general education or subject specialties provided that they are
holders of relevant Bachelors degrees. In addition, the DepEd and PEIs may hire
practitioners with expertise in their specialized learning areas.
b. Resources
Many challenges and concerns raised by the SHS model schools were related to
resources. These resource challenges and concerns include the following:
1) TESDA examination fee for National Certification (e.g., PhP 550 examination fee
per student, uniforms and other paraphernalia required by TESDA in the case of
NC exam for security services as noted by Sangley Point NHS)
2) Transportation cost of students who are undergoing their OJT programs
3) Accommodation expenses of students who need to stay near their workplaces
for their OJT programs
4) Cost of insurance premium for SHS students who are undergoing their OJT
programs
5) Some of the SHS students do not have their own classroom.
6) In some SHS model schools, there is insufficient number of computer units for
SHS students.
7) Since SHS is to be fully implemented only starting in 2016, some of the SHS
model schools have no budgetary allocation from its MOOE for SHS Modeling.
This situation forces the teachers to personally pay for some of the students
requirements for the SHS Program.

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c. LGU support
Based on the interviews and the survey research, LGUs may provide various types of
support to SHS model schools such as infrastructure support, financial assistance,
technical assistance including provision of computer laboratory training, and advocacy
and promotion. While the SHS model schools are able to access such support from LGUs,
they are constrained under COA regulations to purchase equipment/gadgets with a
value not exceeding PhP 10,000.
d. Parental support
Parents, based on the findings of the study, may help address students concerns, help
motivate students, provide financial support, and assist in advocacy and promotion of
the SHS Modeling Program. The study also shows that prior to K to 12 orientation, most
parents were reluctant to support the SHS Program. But after being oriented, most
parents of the SHS students no longer objected or opposed SHS Modeling because it has
been clearly explained to them that studying under SHS Modeling is for free, that their
children may be able to go to work already after finishing SHS and after passing the
required certification from TESDA, and that the academic subjects of the children may
be credited in college.
e. Awareness
Since the SHS Modeling Program employs a stakeholder approach in its implementation,
awareness building and promotion of the Program may be done in a collaborative way
among the school, the LGUs, the industry partners, the HEIs, the parents, and the
students.
f. Linkages
One of the challenges with respect to linkages was on the possible mismatch between
specialization and labor demand, particularly noting agriculture or crop production as a
specialization. Sum-ag NHS explained that with their consultations with HEIs and
industry groups, they do not see much potential in crop production in helping SHS
students obtain jobs. They said that agriculture in their area seems to be declining in
terms of importance and job demand.
On the other hand, there is a lot of potential in fostering linkages between SHS model
schools and industries especially if the partnerships end up as being mutually beneficial
for them.

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C. RECOMMENDATIONS (MOVING TOWARDS K-12 IMPLEMENTATION)


Based on the findings of the study, the following are the key recommendations:
1. Guidelines/Policies
1.1

San Pedro Relocation Center NHS recommended amending the Localization Law in
the hiring of teachers so SHS model schools will be able to hire qualified teachers.
Section 1 of Republic Act (RA) No. 8190 or the Localization Act 0f 1996 entitled,
AN ACT GRANTING PRIORITY TO RESIDENTS OF THE BARANGAY, MUNICIPALITY
OR CITY WHERE THE SCHOOL IS LOCATED, IN THE APPOINTMENT OR
ASSIGNMENT OF CLASSROOM PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS provides that, In the
appointment or assignment of teachers to public elementary and secondary
schools, priority shall be given to bona fide residents of the barangay,
municipality, city or province where the school is located: Provided, That the
teacher possesses all the minimum qualifications for the position as required by
law.
The DepEd has so far amended the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of
the Localization Law under DepEd Order (DO) No. 3 series of 2013 entitled
AMENDED IMPLEMENTING RULES AND REGULATIONS (IRR) OR REPUBLIC ACT NO.
8190. DO 3 of 2013 provides that, In the appointment or assignment of teachers
to public schools and other learning centers with vacant teaching positions,
priority shall be given to bona fide residents of the barangay, municipality, city or
province where the school is located, in no particular order. Provided, that the
teacher possesses all the qualifications for the position as required by law and
DepEd Orders. Provided, further, that among the bona fide residents of the
barangay, municipality, city or province where the school or learning center is
located, the most qualified shall be given priority.

1.2

It is recommended that regional/division ranking of teachers be done based on


time requested by the school. The Professional Regulations Committee (PRC)
should provide temporary assignment of new graduates of science, mathematics,
technology and engineering courses who are qualified to teach in SHS since they
have the new/latest technology inputs. The need for a policy on hiring teachers
for provisional appointment was identified. However, for those teaching in TLE,
the NC qualification and industry experience should be highlighted. Industry
experts and university professors should be allowed to teach part-time in SHS.

1.3

It is recommended that the designation or hiring of industry coordinators for SHS


model schools be institutionalized. Industry coordinators can help significantly in
coordinating with existing industry partners and in tapping additional industry
partners. They can also assist the students in the preparation and conduct of their
OJTs, particularly in contracting on OJT terms, providing for
mobility/transportation of OJTs, scheduling of assessment and monitoring of OJTs.
Based on the interviews, industry coordinators usually come from and have a long
professional experience with industries. If there is a teacher or guidance
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counselor in the school that also has broad industry experience, he/she may be
designated as an Industry Coordinator. If there is none, the school should hire an
Industry Coordinator on a full-time basis to sustain building industry partnerships
and ensuring that SHS students are able to undergo OJTs. The proposal is still
relevant even with the passage of RA 10533 or the Enhanced Basic Education Act
given that most of the schools that will implement the SHS Program may not have
any background on the industries and the labor market.
1.4

It is suggested that senior high schools adopt the following considerations in


selecting specialized TechVoc programs:
Availability of basic technical facility and resources needed to teach and train
students;
Availability of instructors-trainers who have the necessary competencies,
education and training to teach the technology;
Integration of a strong career guidance program to guide the students in
selecting their preferred specialized track/electives;
Availability of funds for the operating expenses of the school and supplemental
funds particularly for TechVoc high schools;
Enhancement of the job or trade to attract students to consider it as their
career; and
Identification of one or two jobs that can be readily offered by the schools as a
pilot program/course.

1.5

It is suggested that conflicts in policy issues be addressed. While the Civil Service
Commission (CSC) rules that students should be in school for eight hours, SHS
students are required to have two hours of paper work/OJT outside of their
schools. This seems to violate the CSC rule. Policies which can be addressed by the
Legal Office of DepEd were already brought up to the Regional/Division Offices.
However, as of date, a resolution is yet to be taken by school authorities.

2. Sources of Funds
2.1

Sufficient budgetary support for the provision of additional classrooms, training


facilities for hands-on activities and equipment such as LCD projectors and
laptops, and learning materials of the SHS students should be made available. This
can be done by increasing the allocated funds from Maintenance and Other
Operating Expenses (MOOE), providing TechVoc Funds which is usually at PhP 1
million per school, or requesting for financial or in kind support from Local
Government Units (LGUs) or the business sector.

2.2

It is recommended that assessment fees for TESDA should be shouldered by the


School Division and not by schools. OJT should be covered by TESDA if the school
is given the fiscal autonomy to encourage students to undergo industry
immersion.

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It is further recommended that GAA funds disbursement be released directly to


schools and not through several channels. Effective 2013, the new DepEd Memo
Order stipulates that K to 12 funds will have to be downloaded from the Regional
Office and Schools Division to TESDA before it goes to the school level.

The study revealed that schools actually need 1.5 million per year for the assessment
but as of the moment, no funding support is being provided by the DepEd Central Office.
The schools are paying for the assessment fees using their available funds.
3. Capacity Building
3.1

There is a need to provide skills training to build the capacities of SHS teachers.
These include TESDA training for the specialization subjects that they will teach,
in-school training and orientation sessions on new curriculum for academic
subject and career pathway teachers, and leadership training for schools heads
and SHS/industry coordinators on how to properly administer and implement SHS
Modeling. They should also be given scholarship opportunities by TESDA to
improve their technical competencies and their perspectives/styles in teaching
SHS students.

3.2

Enhancement training for guidance counselors on Career Preparation and


Counseling should also be conducted. In this way, the guidance counselor would
have the necessary knowledge and capacity to advise SHS students on proper
career preparation.

4. Linkages
4.1

Multi-stakeholder partnerships between the academe, the industries, and


national and local government institutions should be encouraged and promoted.
Building strong linkages provides access to accredited Technical Vocational
Educational Training Institutions (TVET) trainers, equipment and facilities,
workshops, training, and seminars, resource materials, etc. At the same time, the
partnerships can help mobilize financial and other related resources needed to
sustain SHS Program implementation. Moreover, requirements for learner
assessment and qualifications can be addressed through the partnerships
fostered. Working together with HEIs provides clarity and direction in the needed
academic subjects and types of assessments for learners in order for SHS students
to at least be at par with freshmen and sophomore college students. Developing
the curriculum hand-in-hand with TESDA helps spell out the requirements for
career pathway qualifications to improve the chances of SHS graduates in getting
jobs.

4.2

There is a need to come up with innovative partnerships with LGUs and other
related government or private agencies that would help subsidize transportation
costs, rent fees, testing fees, and uniform and paraphernalia.

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5. Curriculum Development
5.1

Incorporate a strong career guidance component in the curriculum, coupled with


ardent counseling from the Guidance/SHS Counselor, beginning at Year 10, to
guide students in selecting their preferred specialized track/electives.

5.2

SHS model schools in coordination with the DepEd, CHED and other HEIs, and
TESDA should work together to review the planned SHS curriculum and
incorporate lessons learned from its SHS Modeling experience. There is a need for
greater flexibility in the implementation of the said curriculum, particularly in
adopting General Education (GE) subjects from college, hiring of SHS teachers,
trainers from industry partners and coordinators, allowing academic subjects to
be credited in college, and using flexible delivery options (such as modules for
OHSP) for students who cannot attend school regularly due to work
commitments. As recommended by some of the SHS model schools, flexible time
may be applied, for example, to self-paced working students to allow them to
complete their academic requirements. Learners and instructors may meet once
or twice a week as they may agree on.

5.3

Best practices of SHS model schools with respect to curriculum development


should be adopted. This includes aligning academic subjects with knowledge
relevant to career pathways, utilizing general education subjects from college,
maximizing options for dual credit in partnership with HEIs and TESDA, and
providing ample number of units and hours needed to complete the core and
specialized learning areas.

5.4

Technical-vocational skills alignment should be subject to labor market priorities


and not driven by supply. Schools might overlook the importance of checking
whether TechVoc programs could address the labor requirements of the
community and simply ensure that the graduates could contribute to the local
economy. As such, schools may be producing skilled graduates but there may not
be enough business enterprises to employ in them within the community. This
may result in underemployment and school-industry mismatch, which may lead to
manpower displacement and migration of graduates for employment in other
communities.6

5.5

SHS students should be given more exposure to hands-on learning activities to


facilitate skills development and application of knowledge, attitude, skills, and
values (KASVs).

5.6

School-community partnerships should be considered as a viable option for SHS


Program implementation. This means that SHS can be implemented through
flexible delivery options such as OHSP, particularly by tapping community
resources. For instance, Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School

Yolanda C. De Las Alas. 2012. Documentation of Implementation Experience in the Establishment of a


Responsive Senior High School Program under the K to 12 Education Framework.
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explained that a SHS student taking Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC I can use in his
project a neighbors welding machine, and the teacher can then evaluate the
project completed. On the other hand, Sum-ag NHS is contemplating on
establishing partnerships with other barangays where their SHS students from
distant areas can do farming practicum. And in Palo National High School, the
school partnered with the provincial government for the provision of financial and
technical assistance for students and to provide funding support for the SHS
faculty.
5.7

Given that many SHS students will need to spend time contributing to their
families, priority flexible learning opportunities through self-instructional
materials is encouraged. Students could study auxiliary subject matter via selfinstructional modules and only report to school periodically for practical activities
(e.g., laboratory work in science), skills training and completion of assessment
tasks. This would reduce the strain on SHS classroom-based facilities. Experiences
of these SHS model schools that also integrated its OHSP into their SHS Program
should be carefully studied for possible replication and upscaling.

5.8

Students should be given access to insurance services (i.e., PHILHEALTH, Coop-Life


Mutual Benefit Services Association or CLIMBS of Metro Ormoc Credit
Cooperative, Inc. or OCCI) to secure their protection for their mobility during the
dual training program, apprenticeship, or job immersion program.

5.9

Learner assessment and certification maximize links with TESDA certificate


mechanism and also HEIs for cross credit recognition and recognition of prior
learning (RPL). The ladderized curriculum of the K to 12 Program makes it more
crucial for SHS Schools to closely work together with TESDA to ensure that the SHS
students will be able to complete their career pathway competencies and
certification. At the same time, collaboration with the HEIs facilitates the crediting
of SHS academic subjects in preparation for the SHS students entry to college.

5.10 The formation of Technical Working Groups (TWGs) and the conduct of
consultations should be sustained because these provide guidance and areas for
cooperation in sustaining SHS Program implementation.
5.11 DepEd, in partnership with TESDA and DOLE, should draft different training
regulations for the K to 12 SHS program. As a policy, every school should identify
its field of specialization in at least four trades to allow students to focus on their
career choice.
5.12 SHS model schools should focus on work readiness values and attitudes since
these are priority requirements of business and industries. The importance of
these soft work readiness skills should be highlighted in the curriculum.
5.13 Limit the TLE programs for Grades 7 to 10 from 23-24 TLE programs to two
specialized programs by the end of Junior HS and two to three specializations for
SHS students.
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6. SHS Program Management


6.1

Application of school-based management (SBM) approach (DepEd Order No. 48)


will provide the school with greater autonomy to manage its SHS program based
on the needs of business community. The success of SHS program lies on the
political will of the school principal to implement education reforms. But the
school policies (i.e., Basic Education Sector Reform Agenda or BESRA) are not truly
decentralized to allow the schools to have some flexibility in conducting regular
classes for SHS (e.g., ADM application such as Open High School Program). Also,
the practice of reshuffling school principals is not necessary if the school head is
performing well.

6.2

It is recommended that monitoring of SHS be done by the Schools Division so that


they would know whats happening in SHS modeling; however, they currently
have no specialized staff to do it.

6.3

In reality, not all public secondary schools can offer SHS. As a macro strategy for
SHS implementation, the 140 TechVoc schools should first be strengthened to
enable them to lead and guide the 40,000 public secondary schools as they serve
as model schools or training centers for SHS. DepEd should allocate funding to
model SHS schools to build their capacities as leader schools in every region
before the SHS is done massively by 2016. If possible, there should be at least one
SHS model school per province or one high school offering the SHS program in
every municipality.

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PROFILES OF MODEL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS


A. SAN PEDRO RELOCATION CENTER NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Background
San Pedro Relocation Center National High School (SPRCNHS) is a public technicalvocational high school located in San Pedro, Laguna, that offers electronics, automotive,
garments, and food technology as specialization or career pathways for their SHS
Modeling Program. It started as a general high school for relocated low-income families
before it became one of the APEX (Applied Academics for Excellence) pioneering schools
in the country. As an APEX school, it was recognized as one of the 282 technicalvocational schools in the country that implements the Strengthened TechVoc Education
Program (STVEP) And now, it is one of the Senior High School model schools. They have
544 SHS students, including 295 male students and 249 female students as of SY 20122013.
Pre-implementation
Prior to the implementation of the program, the students and teachers were oriented on
the K-12 Program and SHS Modeling. Consultations with colleges and industries were
also conducted. Parents likewise attended the fora. After understanding that it was
advantageous for their children to go to SHS, the parents became amenable to the K-12
Program and the SHS Modeling. They were also given orientation about the on-the-job
training requirements. To get the support of parents and other stakeholders, the school
had to bring out the actual situation, letting them understand their significant role in
achieving the school vision of improving the quality of education in the country.
The school was given autonomy in designing the curriculum and implementing the SHS,
but only monthly reports on SHS are being submitted to the DepEd Schools Division.
Students are categorized by career interests (71% are college-bound based on school
survey and 29% are geared towards TechVoc careers), thus the school can not reject
students for choosing their own course.
1.

Curriculum

SPRCNHS designed its own SHS curriculum in consultation with business and industries
as the end users of the program. This practice started way back when it was developing
project APEX for Laguna. The core curriculum plus technical and entrepreneurship were
developed by the Technical Working Group on Curriculum Planning. The curriculum was
designed in such a way that after finishing Grade 12, students would be able to go to
third year in college. Thus, all general education subjects of the four partner colleges
plus OJT in industry of the area of specialization of the learners comprise the content of
the SHS curriculum. Some SHS students even claim that they are ahead of their
batchmates who are in college in terms of learning.
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For the Junior High School, students of Grade 7 must explore four to eight technical
competencies including hard trades such as automotive, electricity, civil technology,
plumbing and welding. The field of specialization starts in Grade 8. Grades 7 and 8 are
considered exploratory and offer enough time for hands-on compared to a regular TLE in
the old (i.e., Revised Basic Education Curriculum or RBEC) curriculum.
For the SHS, Grade 11 students in SPRCNHS take 34 units of academic subjects for 43
hours in the first semester and 32 units of academic subjects for 41 hours in the second
semester. As a basic industry requirement, 300 hours of OJT have to be rendered by the
students and to be finished within second semester in Grade 11 and second semester in
Grade 12 (see Tables 16 and 17).
Table 16: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013
Grade 11, First Semester
Course Code
Descriptive Title
Unit Hours/Week
English 101
Oral/Speech Communication
3
3
Filipino 101
Komunikasyon sa Akademikang
3
3
Filipino
Math 101
College Algebra
3
3
Natural Science 101
Life/Biological Science
3
3
Contemporary Issues
Social Studies
2
2
101
PE 101
Gymnastics & Physical Fitness
2
2
Social Science 101
Gen. Psychology with Drug Addiction
3
3
Literature 101
Philippine Literature
3
3
Statistics 101
Business Statistics
3
3
Entrep 101
Entrepreneurial Management
3
3
TechVoc
6
15
Total Units
34
43
Source: San Pedro Relocation Center National High School, 2013

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Table 17: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013


Grade 11, Second Semester
Course Code
Descriptive Title
Unit Hours/Week
English 102
Writing in the Discipline
3
3
Filipino 102
Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo sa
3
3
Pananaliksik
Math 102
Plane & Spherical
3
3
Trigonometry
Environmental
Environmental Science
3
3
Science 102
Logic 101
Logic
3
3
Literature 102
World Literature
3
3
Computer 101
Entrep 102
PE 102
TechVoc
Total Units

Computer Tech w/ MS Office


Retail and Advertising
Management
Rhythmic Activities

3
3

3
3

2
6
32

2
15
41

2014

Prerequisite
English 101
Filipino 101
Math 101

Literature
101
Entrep 101

Source: San Pedro Relocation Center National High School, 2013

For Grade 12 students, they are required to take 28 units of academic subjects for 37
hours in the first semester and 25 units of academic subjects for 34 hours in the second
semester (see Tables 18 and 19).
Table 18: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013
Grade 12, First Semester
Course Code
Descriptive Title
Unit Hours/Week
English 201
Public Speaking
3
3
Filipino 201
Retorika (Masining na
3
3
Pananaliksik)
Social Science
Introduction to Sociology
3
3
201
Physical Science Physical Science
3
3
201
Humanities 201 Art, Man & Society
3
3
Philosophy 201 Philosophy of Human Being
3
3
NSTP 1
National Service Training
2
2
Program
PE 201
Dual Sports
2
2
TechVoc
6
15
Total Units
28
37

Prerequisite
English 102
Filipino 102
Social
Science 101

Source: San Pedro Relocation Center National High School, 2013

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Table 19: Curriculum for Senior High School, SY 2012-2013


Grade 12, Second Semester
Course Code
Descriptive Title
Unit
Hours/
Week
English 202
Technical Writing
3
3
PhilGov 202 Philippine Politics, Government, &
3
3
Constitution
Rizal 101
Life and Works of Rizal
3
3
Social
Society and Culture w/ Family
3
3
Science 203 Planning
Economics
Economics & Taxation
3
3
204
PE 202
Group Sports
2
2
NSTP 2
National Service Training Program
2
2
TechVoc
6
15
Total Units
25
34

2014

Prerequisite
English 103

Social
Science 102

NSTP 101

Source: San Pedro Relocation Center National High School, 2013

Open system or flexible learning is allowed in consideration of those undergoing OJT. For
instance, those training for office work only come to class once a week during their dayoff. To be able to catch up, they rely on modules which are given every Saturday and/or
Sunday. In other instances, ICT is used to communicate with the teachers and to obtain
additional learning materials.
2.

Learning Resources

Library and reference materials are available for SHS students. Through the PhP 1 million
granted to the school, facilities and equipment such as TV were purchased for the SHS
Modeling Program. Regular classes were converted to SHS-TechVoc classes with 1:25
class size. The school ideally needs 48 classrooms and 8 workshops including one
building for welding class/welding booths. The school estimated that it would cost them
PhP 5 million per workshop to build the lavatory, handwashing area, electrical
requirements and be fully equipped with machines. The school would need 4.8 million
to upgrade its electrical requirements. However, welding and electrical technologies
would require high cost electric bills for MERALCO and consumables (e.g., welding rod
and equipment).
The school has 14 teachers for TechVoc programs but they need two teachers for every
specialization. The school has a temporary appointment for a licensed engineer to teach
TechVoc.
3.

Linkages

A Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed by the school, the four Higher
Education Institutions (HEIs), and 294 industry partners for the SHS Modeling Program.
After completing Grade 12, SHS students will still take the college readiness test as part
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of the MOU with HEIs. But the agreement stipulates that all Grades 11 and 12 units will
be credited to HEI programs and NSTP. The MOU also grants the school the authority to
use the HEI grading system to avoid problems in accrediting their SHS units in college. In
this set-up, the HEI allows the school to download the first and second year college
subjects to be taught in SHS.
The local government was likewise significantly involved in the K to 12 Program since the
mayor became the link between the industry and the school. The mayor has the
authority and power to call for a meeting with business and industries to support the
SHS program. According to the school principal, in reality the LGUs have more funds
than the national government to support education projects.
Technical drafting using Auto CAD for Grade 11 is highly in-demand in business and
industries.
Learning Outcomes
Each student can get at least two to four qualifications upon completing the SHS. March
2013 saw the deployment of 56 students in IT-related services in government and
private institutions beginning with PNB and LBP. Eighteen percent (18%) of the 56 OJT
students are now gainfully employed as working students in various industries (i.e.,
welding, IT services) in Laguna after passing the NC I and II assessments.
Good Practices
SHS Program Management:
The school is accessible to indigent students since it strictly implements the zero
collection policy.
APEX and TechVoc exposure and international experience, plus the open-mindedness of
the school head, facilitated the piloting of SHS in the school.
The SHS students were screened through qualification tests, scholastic grades and
interviews. Starting Grades 9 and 10, the students will learn the basics of
entrepreneurship as a separate subject, for example commercial cooking. By the end of
Grade 9, students will be required to submit a business proposal signed by their parents
and/or their business partner from the community. They will implement their business
proposal in Grade 10. However, based on experience, some proposals are rejected if the
parents could not provide financial support.
On-the-Job Training:
As early as Grade 11, students already undergo OJT by batches. This new practice was
introduced in order to accommodate all and prevent congestion of trainees at the end of
the SHS term. Apprenticeship was justified using the Labor Code. OJT has to start early in
October 2012 and send 10 students per batch because not all industries can
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accommodate all OJTs during summer. The OJT schedule is done on semestral basis
which is patterned after the HEIs. For Grade 10 OJTs, the assessment is done by the end
of February or March to get NC II certification.
The school designated a teacher as industry coordinator, one who had been in the
industry for a long time. This facilitates the OJT of the students. The coordinators
functions include contracting on OJT terms, providing for mobility/transportation of
OJTs, and scheduling assessment and monitoring of OJTs. Students who are deployed in
OJT are given consideration and flexible timeframe to comply with requirements. ICT
was likewise used for consultation and added efficiency.
Assessment:
The school is now an assessment center because they have a pool of TESDA-accredited
assessors and trainers. Hence, students from private TVET institutions can go to
SPRCNHS for assessment at a cost of PhP 500 per student. This provides another source
of income for the school.
SHS Teaching and Learning:
The hiring of contractual teacher helps mitigate the lack of teachers. This is justified by
DepEd Order (DO) No. 48 series of 2007 that authorizes TechVoc principals to hire
contractual teachers. Fortunately, the DBM approved the budget for contractual
teachers.
The use of real life scenario, skill-oriented learning and treatment of students as adults
motivates and challenges students to do well in school.
The school sustained quality provision of learning by designating teachers with Masters
degree as teachers for SHS. The school hired on a contractual basis 17 teachers who are
presently teaching in Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP).
Challenges
The SHS teachers are not trained in TechVoc courses.
One of the challenges identified by the school is that the Grade 11 students are not
encouraged to join extracurricular activities. There is also a need to improve the 2:1
ratio of personal computer (PC) per student. Teachers also required one laptop and one
LCD projector for teaching.
Getting autonomy from the Schools Division to allow the school principal to fully
innovate without restraint is a big challenge. There is a need to apply school-based
management (SBM) approach to provide the school with greater autonomy to manage
the SHS program with full trust and confidence in the accountable school administrator.

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The Localization Law in the hiring of teachers prevents the school from hiring the
qualified teachers. The school needs additional 42 teacher items but they could not hire
technology teachers within the Schools Division. They can hire from other provinces but
under the Localization Law, the first priority is to look for its own incumbent employees.
There is a great problem in hiring teachers for SHS because the ranking of applicants at
the regional/division levels is done only once a year and fresh graduates are not
included. The school currently needs 10 new teachers for SHS.
Recommendations
Based on the interviews conducted, the following are the recommendations to help
improve SHS implementation:
1. SHS Faculty:
Skills training to upgrade the competencies of SHS teachers should be conducted
for one year per area of specialization and the needed equipment should be
made available for students;
Every SHS offering TechVoc programs must create an item for industry linkage
coordination.
The Localization Law on the hiring of teachers should be amended as this
prevents the school from hiring qualified teachers. Regional/Division ranking of
teachers must be done based on time requested by the school. The Professional
Regulations Committee (PRC) should provide temporary assignment of fresh
graduates of science, mathematics, technology and engineering courses who are
qualified to teach in SHS for they have the newest/latest technology inputs.
There should be a policy on hiring teachers for provisional appointment. But for
those teaching in TLE, the NC qualification and industry experience are
important. Another way is to allow industry partners and university teachers to
teach part-time in SHS.
2. Job Immersion:
A mechanism to credit working students work experience should be provided.
This would help spare the working students from being required to undergo OJT
on top of their regular job. There should be clear policy guidelines on OJT
because not all provinces have business and industry partners. Insurance
contract and transportation allowance (i.e., 75% of minimum wage) for OJTs
must be provided by industries under a MOA.
Dual training system should be adopted by SHS model schools. This would help
make academic subjects taught in schools relevant to career pathways. At the
same time, it could help enhance the capacities and employability of SHS
students by allowing them to undergo industry immersion.

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3. SHS Program Management:


Application of school-based management (SBM) approach (DepEd Order No. 48)
could provide the school with greater autonomy to manage its SHS program
based on the needs of business community. The success of SHS program lies in
the political will of the school principal to implement education reforms. But the
school policies (i.e., BESRA) are not truly decentralized to allow schools to have
some flexibility in conducting regular classes for SHS (e.g., ADM application such
as Open High School Program). Also, the practice of reshuffling school principals
is not necessary if the school head is performing well.
Monitoring of SHS should be done by the Schools Division so that they would
know whats happening in SHS modeling; however, the Division has no
specialized staff to do this work.
In reality, not all public secondary schools can offer SHS. As a macrostrategy for
SHS implementation, the 140 TechVoc schools should first be strengthened to
enable them to lead and guide the 40,000 public secondary schools as they serve
as model schools or training centers for SHS. DepEd should allocate funding to
model SHS schools to build their capacities as leader schools in every region
before the SHS is done massively by 2016. If possible, there should be at least
one SHS model school in each province or one high school offering the SHS
program in every municipality.
4. On SHS Curriculum Development:
DepEd, in partnership with TESDA and DOLE, should draft different training
regulations for the K to 12 SHS program. As a policy, every school should identify
its field of specialization in at least four trades to allow students to focus on their
career choice.
SHS model schools should focus on work values and attitudes because this is a
priority requirement of business and industries. This should be taken into
consideration by DOLE. Getting NC I and II certification is secondary but likewise
important in measuring the level of proficiency and readiness of students for the
world of work.
TESDA should design an accreditation program for SHS model schools to enable
them to offer NC III and IV. This would be possible if the Junior High School is
already offering skills that qualify students to earn NC I and II.
The TLE programs for Grades 7 to 10 should be limited from 23-24 TLE programs
to two specialized programs by the end of Junior HS and two to three
specializations for SHS students.

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5. On Funding Support:
The assessment fees for TESDA should be shouldered by the School Division and
not by schools. OJT should be covered by TESDA if the school is given the fiscal
autonomy to encourage students to undergo industry immersion.
GAA funds disbursement should be released directly to schools and not through
several channels. But effective 2013, the new DepEd Memo Order stipulates that
K to 12 funds will have to be downloaded from the Regional Office and Schools
Division to TESDA before it goes to the school level.
The school actually needs 1.5 million per year for the assessment but as of the
moment, no funding support is being provided by DepEd Central Office. As such,
the school is paying for the assessment fees using their available funds.
The SHS students should be trained to become technopreneurs as practiced in
Science High Schools where they have to make a feasibility study anchored on
their field of specialization. But this is expensive and would require more funding
support.

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B. SANGLEY POINT NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


Background
Sangley Point National High School (NHS) is a general public high school located in Cavite
City, Cavite, that offers security and peacekeeping as specialization or career pathways
for their SHS Modeling Program. The school has 34 SHS students, including 27 male
students and 7 female students as of SY 2012-2013.
The school was identified for Senior High School Modeling because it was deemed as a
special high school for military services skills development. It was also chosen because it
is strategically located within a naval base and because of the industries surrounding the
school.
Pre-Implementation
To prepare for Senior High School Modeling, the school head and teachers conducted a
series of meetings with naval officers as well as exploratory talks with the Department of
Education (DepEd) and the Philippine Naval Fleet. It was determined that the Navys
participation in the SHS Modeling would come from the conduct of training sessions to
be done by the Naval Sea System Command (NSSC).
Establishment of SHS Modeling in Sangley Point NHS
As a result of the series of meetings and exploratory talks conducted, an agreement was
reached to form a Technical Working Group (TWG) to help develop the curriculum. The
SHS Modeling in Sangley Point NHS was envisioned to be based on the Training
Regulations (TR) of TESDA.
A partnership was made with the Philippine National Police (PNP) because many of the
skills would come from the expertise of the PNP, notably security services. The school
also coordinated with the TESDA to help provide SHS students with skills on appliance
repair.
Subsequently, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed to define the roles and
responsibilities of agencies concerned with SHS modeling, namely, the school, industry
partners, Philippine Naval Fleet, and PNP. The task of the Philippine Naval Fleet, in
particular, was to provide equipment, facilities, and an instructor. It was also stipulated
under the MOA that there would be a need to build the capabilities of the instructor.
The school also sought the assistance of a Higher Education Institution (HEI), particularly
San Sebastian College of Cavite City. This school helped them obtain consolidated
prospects from different universities.

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Skills development, SHS teachers, and some observations on SHS students


Aside from security service, students under the SHS Program learn PC hardware
servicing. They are able to apply this skill in the repair and maintenance of their
computers at home. At the same time, they can earn from the use of their skills when
they are hired to repair and maintain other computers.
With respect to the teaching of academic subjects, the school strives to ensure and
maintain the quality of teaching by employing teachers who are either MA graduates or
have earned minimum MA units.
The teachers observed that the SHS students, compared to high school students in the
lower batch, learn faster with respect to learning application and are more enthusiastic
in studying the applied portion of their academic subjects.
Advocacy/promotion of SHS Program
To advocate and promote SHS modeling in the school, the school head and teaching
staff held meetings with parents and barangay officials and their constituents. In these
meetings, two concerns were surfaced: that those students who became interested in
the SHS Program and wanted to continue studying did not have the means to enroll into
college, and that among these students were children and nephews or nieces of soldiers.
In the case of Sangley Point NHS, they offered a course on security services, which the
teachers said was comparable with the course on criminology in college. This was in
contrast with the specialization of San Sebastian College, which includes mass
communications, hotel and restaurant management (HRM), and tourism.
Plans to improve SHS implementation
To help improve the implementation of its SHS Program, the school plans to administer
an entrance exam for the selection of students. This plan is based on the schools
observation that some students later backed out from the program because they were
not interested in military or security service.
On the other hand, they also see the importance of administering TESDAs entrance or
assessment exam to help provide TESDA certification in the hope that students will work
in security or military service.
Challenges
One of the main challenges of the school is how to make the financial cost of taking the
TESDA examination affordable. With 32 SHS students and PhP 550 exam fee per student,
it would cost a total of PhP 17,600 for all the students to be able to take the exams. The
DepEd has so far manifested that they will help shoulder the expenses. At the same
time, the school has sought the support of the Division Office for additional funds. Also,
the school is looking into how to provide the students with the uniforms and

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paraphernalia that are required by the TESDA. It would also incur financial expenses for
the students to be able to obtain the said uniforms and paraphernalia.
Since SHS is to be fully implemented only starting in 2016, the school also has no
budgetary allocation from its MOOE for SHS Modeling. This situation forces the teachers
to oftentimes personally pay for some of the students requirements for the SHS
Program.
The SHS students also do not have their own classroom, As it is, they are using the AV
room as their classroom. Accenture, a private call center firm that the school sought as
one of its industry partners, donated 20 computers. But of these, only three are
currently functional and the rest need hardware replacements and repairs.
Generally, the school is concerned that it is still in its trial-and-error stage or
nangangapa pa. They also believe that there should also be linkages with other
related educational institutions such as the Commission on Higher Education (CHED).
Interview with Students
The Grade 11 Senior High School (SHS) students of Sangley Point National High School
are taking Security Service as their skills development specialization in preparation for
their possible recruitment to the Philippine Navy. Some of them are full-time students
while others are part-time students. One of them, in particular, had to stop studying
because of conflict in work schedules. Some of the SHS students live within the naval
base while others live outside. But only few of them are dependents of naval officers.
While there are no dedicated books or modules for Grade 11, the students feel that they
are already taking subjects for college students like political science, math, and science.
According to them, they also read college-level textbooks and have to maintain an
average grade of 75 percent to have a good standing in class.
Most of the SHS students may be poor, but they work hard to find ways to get hold of
the needed books or learning materials. They buy, borrow, or photocopy the learning
materials. Because of the limited number of computers, they have to share among
themselves the available computer units. Since SHS is still in its modeling stage, the lack
of budget for SHS also requires the students to share school facilities with the junior high
school students. To help augment their income, the Air Force has offered them work,
particularly computer repair and maintenance, where they are paid PhP 2,500 a month.
The SHS students are also required to take an NC 1 exam on computer security. They
recounted that the schedule of these exams are sometimes in conflict with their
academic schedules.
In terms of skills development, the SHS students found their subjects interesting and
skills-enhancing and that the acquired knowledge will help them in their plans to join the
military service. In terms of security services skills, they are also trained on gun-firing

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and taekwondo. Before they are taught how to actually fire a gun, they are oriented on
gun safety. As for taekwondo, this may also be taught to junior high school students.
For their taekwondo classes, they are required to wear a shirt, jogging pants, and a
yellow belt. They are required to spend for their own uniforms. Since some of them are
poor, the teachers sometimes pay for the acquisition of their uniforms.
With respect to extracurricular activities, the SHS students said that they are not
included in the conduct of proms. Compared to Junior High School, they said that their
leadership is developed in SHS, and they feel that they have more responsibilities.
The SHS students are excited about heading for Grade 12 because of the prospects of
learning new subjects. Because of the knowledge that they have gained, they said that
they are now more confident in protecting civilians and in maintaining peace and order.
While the classroom is enough to accommodate the current batch of SHS students,
there is a need to provide extra rooms for the subsequent batch.

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C. BACOLOD CITY NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


Background
Bacolod City National High School is a general public high school located in Bacolod City,
Negros Occidental, that offers call center services as specialization or career pathway for
their SHS Modeling Program. There are 44 SHS students enrolled under the program,
including 26 male students and 18 female students as of SY 2012-2013.
Students are admitted after presenting the requirements including an employee
certificate (for those employed) and undergoing an interview.
Pre-implementation
Prior to implementation of SHS Modeling, Bacolod City NHS held a series of meetings
and consultations with LGUs, industry partners, and Higher Education Institutions (HEIs).
It was during these meetings and consultations that the school identified call center
services as its specialization. At the same time, they partnered with the Negros
Occidental Language and Information Technology Center to help them in the
prospective hiring of their students.
Subsequently, the school signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with Bacolod City
College, Central Philippine University-Iloilo City, Binalbagan City College, and Colegio de
San Agustin. It also consulted the Riverside College and Visayan Maritime Global College
so that they could conduct internal and external planning for the implementation of the
K to 12 Program in 2016.
Likewise, Bacolod City NHS established a partnership with the city government for the
provision of training programs and infrastructure improvement. So far, the city mayor
has provided PhP 4.9 million for Phase I building construction for the SHS building, which
had gotten burned down. In addition, the school plans to have the Philippine Call Center
Institute (PCCI) as its additional partner.
The school plans to have a minimum offering of four courses. In areas where they do not
have the specialization, they plan to partner with schools offering seafarer course and
Riverside College which offers health services. They also plan to offer commercial
cooking and welding after a trip to Silay City to study the TechVoc offering.
Curriculum
The curriculum of Bacolod City NHS underwent a rigorous series of consultations before
it was developed. On separate occasions in February, April, and September 2012, the
school met with the DepEd Regional and Division Offices, TESDA, Bacolod City College,
Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) companies such as Teletech and Convergys, Negros
Occidental Language and Information Technology Center, and SEAMEO INNOTECH. The

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consultations resulted in the provision of an academic curriculum for SHS students with
career pathway in Contact Center Services NC II.
Under the curriculum, Grade 11 students are required to render 1,400 hours and earn
45 units of academic subjects including PE I and II, English 1 and 2, Math 1 and 2, Filipino
1 and 2, Science 1 and 2, Social Science 1 and 2, and Computer I and 2. On the other
hand, Grade 12 students have to render 1,256 hours and earn 36 units comprising of
Social Studies 3 and 4, Math 3 and 4, Science 3 and 4, PE 3 and 4, NC II on Contact
Center Services 1 and 2, and 300 hours of On-the-Job Training (OJT). However, call
centers only provide training upon hiring. (See Tables 20 to 24.)
Table 20: Program Schedule for Grade 11, First Semester
Course Number
English 1
Filipino 1
Science 1
Math 1
Social Science 1
Computer 1
PE 1
Total

Descriptive Title
Study and Thinking Skills in English
Komunikasyon sa Akademikong Filipino
Physical and Earth Science
College Algebra
Principle of Economics
Windows OS and Word Processing
Physical Fitness

Hours
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
700

Unit
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

Table 21: Program Schedule for Grade 11, Second Semester


Course
Number
English 2
Filipino 2
Science 2
Math 2
Social Science
2
Computer 2
PE 2
Total

Descriptive Title

Hours Unit

Writing in the Discipline


Pagbasa at Pagsulat Tungo sa Pananaliksik
Biology
Plane Trigonometry
Taxation

100
100
100
100
100

3
3
3
3
3

Fundamentals of Typewriting/Keyboarding, and


Spreadsheets
Rhythmic Activities

100

100
700

3
24

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

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Table 22: Program Schedule for Grade 12, First Semester


Course Number
NC II
Math 3
Science 3
Social Science 3
PE 3
Total

Descriptive Title
Contact Center Services I
Business Mathematics
Applied Physics
Geography
Individual/Dual Sports

Hours
178
75
75
75
75
478

Unit
3
3
3
3
3
15

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

Table 23: Program Schedule for Grade 12, Second Semester


Course Number
NC II
Math 4
Science 4
Social Science 4
PE 4
Practicum
Total

Descriptive Title
Contact Center Services 2
Mathematics of Investment and Probability & Statistics
Human Anatomy
Rizal Life, Works and Writings
Team Sports
Field Study/Related Learning Experiences

Hours Unit
178
3
75
3
75
3
75
3
75
3
300
6
778
21

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

Table 24: Area of Specialization


Area of Specialization
Contact Center Service NC
II

Course Description
The course is designed to
enhance the knowledge,
skills and attitudes of a
Contact Center Services
Provider in accordance with
industry standards. It covers
competencies that a person
must achieve to interact
with customers to provide
information about products
and services. It also covers
handling of customers
complaints, inbound
customer service, order
taking and inquiry response
handling, and outbound
telemarketing.

No. of Hours
356

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

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Bacolod City NHS likewise focuses on specialized competencies designed to build the
capacities of SHS students as prospective call center agents. The proposed curricula
developed by Bacolod City NHS are for Grade 11 and Grade 12 students. There is a total
or 30 weeks for Grade 11 and 41 weeks for Grade 12 for the total duration of all related
training. For Grade 11, students start training on symbols and end with simulation
activities on computer-assisted drills. In the case of Grade 12, they begin with rendering
quality customer service and conclude with types of communication networks within the
organization (see Tables 25 and 26).
Table 25: Curriculum Design Senior High School, Grade 11
Competencies
Symbols
Computer Menus
Computer Practical Dos and
Donts
Basic Computer Operations
Applications
Use of Computers with
Peripherals
American Accent Trng.
Speech Drills
American Accent Trng.
Fluency Drills
Voice Drills
Communication Activities
Multi-tasking web-surfing,
typing, encoding, answering
call
Computer-Assisted Drills
Using Communication Cues
Computer-Assisted Drills
Simulation Activities
Total Number of Weeks

Grade Level and Grading


Period Taken
Grade 11 1st Grading
Period
Grade 11 1st Grading
Period
Grade 11 2nd Grading
Period
Grade 11 2nd Grading
Period
Grade 11 2nd Grading
Period
Grade 11 2nd Grading
Period
Grade 11 3rd Grading
Period
Grade 11 3rd Grading
Period
Grade 11 3rd Grading
Period
Grade 11 3rd Grading
Period

Grade 11 4th Grading


Period
Grade 11 4th Grading
Period

Duration of Training
(in Weeks)
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2

2
3
30

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

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Table 26: Curriculum Design Senior High School, Grade 12


Competencies
Active Listening
Active Listening includes
Recognizing Non-Verbal
Communication
Active Listening includes
Showing Listening Signals
Benefits of Active Listening

Grade Level and Grading


Period Taken
Grade 12 1st Grading
Period
Grade 12 1st Grading
Period

Duration of Training
(in Weeks)
2
1

Grade 12 1st Grading


Period
Grade 12 1st Grading
Period
Grade 12 1st Grading
Period
Grade 12 1st Grading
Period
Grade 12 2nd Grading
Period

Grade 12 2nd Grading


Period

Grade 12 3rd Grading


Period
Elements of a Communication Grade 12 3rd Grading
Process
Period
Reducing Interference
Grade 12 3rd Grading
Period
Effective Communication
Grade 12 3rd Grading
Period
Dynamics of Communication Grade 12 4th Grading
Period
Barriers to Effective
Grade 12 4th Grading
Communication
Period
Overcoming the Barriers to
Grade 12 4th Grading
Interpersonal Communication Period
Types of Communication
Grade 12 4th Grading
Networks within the
Period
Organization
Total Number of Weeks

Effective Listening
Effective Speaking
The Importance of
Communication Skills in
Organizational Performance
Benefits of Effective
Communication in the
Workplace
Communication Process

2
2
1
5

2
3
2
3
2
3
2

41

Source: Bacolod City National High School, 2013

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Resources and Facilities


Students are given a hard copy of the modules for free and the CD-format. They could
use the school facilities but because of time constraints they could not avail of this
opportunity. They have quizzes every week and test every end of quarter.
Teachers
Teachers are available to students for assistance or tutorials. They also give students
considerations such as make-up test when they are absent.
Strength
The strength in the program lies in the fact that some of the subjects taken during senior
high school may be credited in college. Also, it is clarified to the students and the
parents at the orientation sessions that education under the SHS Modeling Program is
free.
Challenges
One of the main challenges for the school is the expenses of setting up the laboratories,
which should be TESDA-compliant.
Another challenge for them is how to keep up with the standards. They see that the
Program should be assessed carefully.
They also see the need to hire an industry coordinator or OJT adviser/supervisor that
can work beyond office hours as well as a Human Resource Personnel.
They also see the need to partner with BPO companies. Related to this, one big
challenge is that call centers do not allow OJT for prospective call center agents and
technical support staff because accounts are treated as confidential and all transactions
are considered official and duly documented and should be handled professionally. They
only provide training for personnel that they have initially screened for hiring.
To address this challenge, the school has made some efforts to strengthen their
employability program by hiring former call center agents as English teachers.
Recommendations
Among the recommendations that Bacolod City NHS provided include the following:
1. SHS model schools in coordination with the DepEd, CHED and other HEIs, and
TESDA should work together to revise and upgrade the curriculum. There is also
a need for greater flexibility in its implementation, particularly in allowing college
General Education (GE) subjects to be applied and credited, non-education
graduates to teach, and employment hours to be credited as OJT hours.
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2. There is a need to integrate technical and academic competencies and gaps to


help enhance the employability of SHS students while at the same time ensuring
alignment with labor market priorities.
3. Consider offering SHS to night school students.
4. LCD projectors and laptops should be provided so that students could easily
grasp the lessons presented.
5. Provide funds for the construction of additional classrooms. In some SHS model
schools, students use an open space with no roof.
6. Provide allowance for students, particularly for transportation expenses.
7. Provide training programs to help build the capacities and competencies of SHS
teachers.

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D. SUM-AG NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


Background
Sum-ag National High School is a general public high school located in Bacolod City,
Negros Occidental, that offers agriculture as specialization or career pathway for their
SHS Modeling Program. They have 14 SHS students, including 4 male students and 10
female students as of SY 2012-2013.
The Senior High School Modeling Program in Sum-ag National High School aims to
develop and enhance the technical knowledge, skills and values of students in
agriculture particularly in rice production, organic farming, and nursery management.
Students are encouraged to engage in this program believing that performance is far
advanced and more satisfying than theories alone. It serves as a laboratory where
agriculture students can gain actual experience at the same time earning while learning.
Profile of Students
There were originally 21 students that enrolled in SHS Modeling in Sum-ag NHS, but
seven have left for various reasons such as financial problems, difficulty in getting
exposed to sunlight and heat, and lack of interest in agriculture.
For the 14 SHS students that remained, most of them belonged to poor rural-based
families. Their parents worked as small farmers, farmworkers, fisherfolk, drivers,
househelpers, or construction workers.
Since some of the students also worked as farmers or farmworkers, they said that they
enrolled in the program to continue crop cultivation started by their parents and learn
new and proper crop production techniques and farm tools. Most of them also got
attracted to the SHS Program because they do not have money to enroll in college. After
SHS, some of them plan to go to an agricultural college so they can also teach
agriculture.
Because of the students poor economic conditions, the school helps them in their food
and transportation fares. Instructional handouts are also given for free to the students.
Pre-implementation
Prior to program implementation, Sum-ag NHS conducted consultations with the
University of Negros Occidental - Recoletos and the Central Philippines State University
in cooperation with TESDA and the DepEd Regional Office and SDS from February to
April 2012 to help them determine their specialization, obtain copies of curriculum and
to guide them in preparation for SHS Modeling.

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The school was identified as an agriculture SHS because it had a rice field and a TechVoc
offering in junior high school. On the other hand, the school received a training on
curriculum that was jointly conducted by DepEd Schools Division Superintendent
Bacolod City, DepEd Regional Office, and TESDA.
The school also held consultations with prospective industry partners such as the
Organization for Industrial, Spiritual, and Cultural Advancement (OISCA), the Metro
Bacolod Chamber of Commerce and Industries (MBCCI), and the Negros Organic Rice
Industry Association (NORIA), which had an organic ricefield as a demo farm.
In addition, the school consulted with the city LGU. Through these meetings, the city
LGU allocated PhP 2 million for the construction of a school building for SHS.
Subsequently, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed by the school, the HEIs,
the city LGU, and the industry partners explaining their roles and responsibilities related
to SHS Modeling. Another MOA with the HEIs is yet to be signed between Sum-ag NHS
and the HEIs for the possible provision of financial assistance.
Curriculum
Sum-ag NHS requires a total of 52 units with laboratory for Grade 11 students to
complete all the academic subjects. These subjects include English, Filipino, Math,
science, social science, humanities, Rizal, National Service Training Program (NSTP), and
MAPEH. Some of the subjects have been aligned with general education subjects in
college. Other subjects are also aligned with the career pathway. For instance, Business
Math is taught in math, and Contemporary Issues in Agriculture is provided in Social
Studies (see Table 18).
For Grade 12, SHS students are required 25 units to finish all the academic subjects.
These subjects include math, Social Science, Natural Science, MAPEH, and computer (see
Table 19).
Academic classes for SHS students are held from Monday to Friday, from 7:30 am to
12:00 noon. On the other hand, the practicum is conducted in the ricefield within the
school premises either five days a week or when needed in the field from 1:00 to 5:00
pm. The school provides the SHS students with farm tools for their field work.
On the other hand, 33 units of laboratory and 520 hours of industrial immersion are
devoted to finish the career pathways in agriculture. The subjects include Agriculture
101, 102, and 103 for Grade 11, and Agriculture 201, 202, 203, 204, and 205. Lessons
start with the fundamentals of crop science and progresses to post harvest handling,
seed technology, and industrial immersion (see Tables 27 to 29).

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Table 27: Proposed Curriculum Grade 11


Subject
English 102
Mathematics 1
Natural Sciences
102
Filipino Language
102
Social Science 101

Humanities 101
Rizal
NSTP
MAPEH 101
Agriculture 101
(Crop Science)
Agriculture 102
(Animal Science)
Agriculture 103

Descriptive Title
Study and Thinking Skills in English and Writing in
Discipline
College Algebra and Business Math
General Biology, General Organic and Inorganic
Chemistry
Sining Pakikipagtalastasan/Pagbasa at pagsulat sa ibat
ibang Disiplina
Contemporary Issues in Agriculture with Philippine
History, Government Politics, General Economics and
Taxation
Introduction to Humanities with Landscaping and
Urban Gardening
Life and works of Rizal with Philippine Literature
National Service and Training Program
Physical Education 1 and 2
Fundamental of Crop Science (Principles and Practices
of Crop Production)
Introduction to Animal Science/Introduction to
Livestock and Poultry Production
Industrial Immersion

Units
6
10
9 w/ lab
6
6

3 w/ lab
6
6
4
6 w/ lab
6 w/ lab
260 hrs

Source: Sum-ag National High School, 2013

Table 28: Proposed Curriculum for Grade 12


Subject
Math 201
Social Science 201
Natural Science
202
MAPEH 201
Computer 201
Agriculture 201
Agriculture 202
(Soil Science)
Agriculture 203
(Crop Protection)
Agriculture 204
Agriculture 205

Descriptive Title
Plane trigonometry and Statistics
Society and Culture with Family Planning, Psychology
and Anthropology
Physics and Fundamental of Agricultural Engineering

Units
6
6

Physical Education 3 and 4


Basic Computer Concept and Application
Introduction to Enterprise and Entrepreneurship with
Philosophy and Ethics
Principles of Soil Science, Soil Fertility, Conservation
Management and Organic Farming
Fundamentals of Crop Protection, Approach and
Practices in Pest Management
Post Harvest Handling and Seed Technology
Industrial Immersion

4
3
6

6 w/ lab
6 w/ lab
3 w/ lab
260 hrs

Source: Sum-ag National High School, 2013

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Table 29: Sum-ag NHS SHS Area of Specialization, Description and Number of Hours
Area of
Course Description
Specialization
Agriculture
This course is designed to enhance desirable attitudes and
skills of an agriculturist in accordance with industry standard.
(Agricultural It covers core competencies such as application of safety
Crops) NC I
measures in farm operation and use of farm tools and
equipment.

No. of
Hours
920

Source: Sum-ag National High School, 2013

In addition, the industry partners proposed for an NC I on Crop Production and


instructions on the concept of Farmer Field School as provided under Republic Act (RA)
No. 10068 (see Table 30).
Table 30: Additional Competencies inputted by industries
Specialization
Crop Production (NC I)

Competencies
Organic Farming

Proposed Organic Field School (RA 10068


Agriculture Act)

Four (4) principles of organic


farming
1. Principle of Fairness
2. Principle of Ecology
3. Principle of Health
4. Principle of Care

Source: Sum-ag National High School, 2013

SHS Teachers
SHS teachers, except for the English 101 teacher and the science teacher, on the average
have 29 hours of teaching load per week. They teach both in junior high school and in
senior high school. Teachers I-III render 25 hours of teaching while Master Teachers
render 30 hours of teaching. In addition, they have 5 hours of advisory work.
The schools agriculture teacher is a female graduate of agriculture from Central
Philippines State University. She said that she is a small rice farmer that loves to teach
agriculture, particularly crop production. However, she, along with three other
agriculture teachers, has yet to obtain NC II in agriculture from Cebu, Leyte, or Davao.
Students Eligible in the SHS Program
The SHS Modeling Program in Sum-ag NHS is open to all qualified and interested
students. The applicants fill out an application form during enrollment. Students
Orientation on the SHS Program is conducted on the first week of the start of classes.

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Status of SHS Students in Sum-ag NHS


The SHS students of Sum-ag NHS are satisfied with their schooling under the program.
They said that they learn new things in their academics and in their OJT and practicum.
They are also able to make new friends.
The SHS students also appreciate the support of their SHS teachers. Because most of
them are poor and have financial problems, the school and particularly the SHS
teachers, provide them with various learning materials including handouts, handouts
lifted from textbooks, college-level materials, and reference materials obtained through
internet research.
The school strictly monitors students attendance. This coming summer, they are
required to render 500 OJT hours at the Organization for Industrial, Spiritual, and
Cultural Advancement (OISCA) which serves as their training center.
The SHS students enjoy SHS but are very serious in their studies. Part of their
requirements is to choose report topics and provide reports and presentations. There is
also a critiquing session after every report presentation wherein the SHS students can
give their insights on the presentations. In their English class, they are taught about the
levels of comprehension to help develop their communication skills. Their agriculture
classes, on the other hand, are instruction-guided.
The SHS students do not have a dedicated classroom; as for their attire, they just wear
white T-shirts and have no school uniform. They recently had a field trip to a provincial
demo farm production in Bago City, Negros Occidental.
For the SHS students, studying under the SHS Modeling Program in Sum-ag NHS is a
great opportunity to learn because it provides free education.
Advocacy and Promotion
The school provides students with an orientation on SHS Modeling and the teachers with
a conference on how students will undergo OJTs. Students and parents also help in
promoting the program.
Challenges
Sum-ag NHS through its school head mentioned a number of challenges in its SHS
Modeling Program. One is the concern of the school that its career pathway offering of
agriculture may not be able to provide the jobs needed by prospective SHS graduates. As
a result, there is possible misalignment between specialization and labor market
demand. This is exacerbated by government policy on not supporting agriculture and
instead liberalizing agricultural importation.

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They said that there is a need to reconcile the needs of communities on food security
while at the same time linking the sector with industries to provide more employment
opportunities. The school likewise said that advocacy and education is needed to attract
more students to take agriculture as a career pathway. On the practical side, the school
thinks that financial problems of students can be addressed by the specialization
through an earning-while-planting program.
The school also needs financial assistance from DepEd so the University of Recoletos can
help enhance the implementation of the progam. They are still waiting for a response
from DepEd; they are also hoping that the MOA with SUCs can be expedited.
The school is also waiting for meetings to be held between the DepEd and the CHED to
discuss the possibility of crediting the academic subjects in SHS in college.
Another challenge for them is how to compensate SHS teachers who do overtime work.
As it is, the school is not allowed to provide honorarium. Since the program is still at its
modeling stage, they also could not allocate funds from their MOOE.
They are also concerned that NC II in Agriculture is not readily available in their area and
they have to take it in Cebu, Leyte, or Davao.
Lastly, they said that there is a need to provide more enriched instructional materials for
SHS.
Recommendations
Based on the interviews, the following are the recommendations to help improve SHS
Program implementation in Sum-ag NHS:
1. Specialization teachers should take NC II in Agriculture in Cebu or Leyte to further
professionalize them;
2. Provide transportation and allowances for SHS students;
3. Provide more classrooms for SHS students; and
4. Provide additional school facilities such as laptops and LCD projectors to help
improve learning techniques.
5. Sum-ag NHS believes that OHSP can be applied to SHS Modeling. In particular,
they suggest that working students can take SHS in night school. Their only
concern is the schedule of OJTs and practicum for agriculture.

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6. The school should be informed by DepEd Central Office on the status of MOA
with higher education institutions/state colleges. The MOA needs approval from
CHEDs Board of Regents. This will help clarify the issues on credit banking and
articulation of units earned from SHS to third year in college.
7. There is a need to come up with training regulations on college-based curriculum
and instructional materials for both agricultural and academic subjects from
TESDA.
8. There is a need to modify the Grade 11 curriculum to ensure its alignment with
the requirement of business community and state colleges/universities.

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E. DOA MONTSERRAT LOPEZ MEMORIAL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


Background
Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School (DMLMNHS) is formerly a
general high school but in 2009, it became one of the 282 technical-vocational high
schools in the country. In 2011, the school was identified as the first SHS model school in
Region VI; the SHS program was officially launched in SY 2012-2013. Located in Silay City,
Negros Occidental, the school offers Electrical Installation and Maintenance, Shielded
Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Housekeeping, and Food and Beverage Service (FBS) as
specialization or career pathways for their SHS Modeling Program. Based on the school
profile submitted, there are 108 SHS students, including 42 male students and 66 female
students as of SY 2012-2013.
The school is one of the two schools in the country that piloted SHS a year ahead of
other SHS model schools. Grade 11 students were encouraged to enroll because it was
free and the school offered courses which were in demand. Because it was in the
experimental stage, students were accepted without screening. They were merely
asked what major they would like to take. But for enrolment, they had to submit their
NSO birth certificate for age verification and high school report card for fourth year
graduates.
Pre-Implementation
The school strengthened their advocacy campaign among parents to reach out for the
unschooled who are mostly working in the farms or as vendors. Enrollees for SHS consist
of 25% from other schools and 75% from DMLMHS. They ensure that the parents and
students are well-oriented on SHS program prior to enrollment.
Curriculum
The school reported that they developed its SHS curriculum around the needs/demands
of industries operating in Silay City through a consultation meeting with majority of
industry leaders, parents, other school administrators, LGU, and religious organizations.
Grade 11 students are required to take 12.6 units of academic subjects for 42 hours. The
academic subjects include science and technology, Filipino, English, mathematics, social
science, and TVE (Specialization) (see Table 31).

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Table 31: Class Program of Grade 11


Subjects
Science & Technology
Filipino
English
Mathematics
Social Science
TVE (Specialization)
Career Pathways
(with Immersions/OJT)
Total Hours & Units

Hours per Week


5
4
4
5
4
20

Unit
1.5
1.2
1.2
1.5
1.2
6

42

12.6

Source: Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School, 2013

For the Junior High School, students are free to take dressmaking/garments, commercial
cooking, electricity and computer servicing. On the other hand, there are four
specializations that SHS students could take: food and beverages services (FBS),
housekeeping, electrical installation and maintenance and shielded metal arc welding
(SMAW). The curriculum is based on TESDA in preparation for NC II. Even the hours per
subject are TESDA Training Regulations (TR)-compliant (see Table 32 and 33).
Classes are held Mondays to Saturdays from 7:30 AM to 4:30 PM. The first two hours on
weekdays are spent on their major subjects for hands-on and on Saturdays they discuss
theories. The rest of the time is divided among core subjects using college level
textbooks: Filipino, English, Business Math, biology, and geology.
The school provides more hands-on learning and discussions of real life issues (e.g.,
abortion, euthanasia, etc.) that are connected to the core learning areas. The students
of FBS spent their on-the-job training every day for one hour in the school canteen, and
in a hotel owned by the city mayor. The NC II holders provided catering and wine
services in hotels, bakery and for the official functions of the Schools Division Office in
Silay City. The SMAW Grade 11 students take their OJT at the TESDA-accredited IETI
school in Bacolod City. About 25 percent or 6 out of 24 SHS students enrolled in SMAW
are female. They do repair of furniture and fixtures through welding. On the other hand,
students of housekeeping are able to practice cleaning of rooms, floors and toilet
facilities and do laundry using washing machine.
Table 32: SHS Area of Specialization, Description & Number of Hours
Area of Specialization
Food and Beverage Services
Electrical Installation and Maintenance
Shielded Metal Arc Welding

No. of Hours
356
360
360

Source: Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial High School, 2013

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Table 33: Additional Competencies Inputted by Industries


Specialization/Qualification
Food and Beverage Services
The Food and Beverage Services NC II
Qualification consists of competences
that a person must achieve to provide
food and beverage service to guests
in hotels, motels, restaurants, clubs,
canteens, resorts and luxury liners.

Linkages

Competencies

Aid Agency
Mel Ken Restaurant
Baldevia Pension House
Windbel Pension House
Sunburst Bay Resport
Royal Am Rei Hotel

Provide link between


kitchen and service area
Provide food and
beverage service
Provide room service
Develop and update food
and beverage knowledge

Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC I


The Welding NC I (SMAW)
Qualifications consists of
competencies that a person must
achieve to weld carbon steel plates as
specified by layout, blueprints,
diagrams, work order, welding
procedure or oral instructions using
SMAW welding equipment.

Hawaiian Philippine
Company

Weld carbon steel plates


using SMAW

Hawaiian Philippine
Company
Silay City Engineers
Office/LGU

Prepare electrical power


and hydraulic tools
Perform roughing-in
activities for
communication and
distribution systems
Install wiring devices for
floor and ground fault
current interrupting
outlets
Install electrical
protection system for
lighting and grounding
Install electrical lighting
systems on auxiliary
outlets and lighting
fixtures
Install communication,
signaling devices and
remote control systems
on auxiliary equipment
Install commissioned
electrical systems

Electrical Installation and


Maintenance Service NC II
The Electrical Installation and
Maintenance Service (EIMS) NC II
Qualifications consists of
competencies that a person must
achieve to perform installation,
maintenance and commissioning of
electrical wiring and related
equipment where the voltage does
not exceed 600 volts in residential
houses and buildings.

Source: Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School, 2013

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Resources and Facilities


The school was allotted PhP 1 million as part of the budget given to TechVoc schools
implementing SHS. The amount provides students with transportation allowance on the
first day, but on the succeeding days, students have to shoulder it personally. As a
TechVoc school, its expertise of TechVoc and school facilities, including the library, could
be used by the students. A one-storey building was constructed for the FBS and
housekeeping practical learning. The whole school became a training ground for
practical training of students. For welding, some students tap the facilities of the
International Electrical and Technical Institute (IETI).
Three transformers were transferred without cost by the Regional Office to the Doa
Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School, thus augmenting the power supply
and separating the power lines of electrically-driven machines in SMAW to avoid
damaging computers.
Teachers
All SHS teachers are NC II holders and have been trained on K to 12 and TESDA
methodologies and competency assessment. They were trained on the least mastered
competencies and on new technical subjects. This is being complimented by the
teachers' own researches to advance their teaching practice. Thus, they developed their
own course outline using online resources and library materials. There are no textbooks
for SHS but they maximized the use of online resource materials for teaching. The
teachers are dedicated and patient to ensure that optimum learning will take place in
two hours per class/subject using demonstrations.
Teachers teach in both Junior and Senior High Schools. As additional incentive, an
honorarium is given to teachers who teach on Saturdays. With prior approval from COA,
the amount is charged to MOOE funds.
Assessment
The rating system to measure student performance consists of skills test (50%), paper
test (25%), projects (20%) and work attitude (5%). The teachers evaluate each project
and how it is done by the students to ensure that only original projects are submitted.
The school principal conducts on-the-spot/non-standard evaluation of student learning
in addition to formative assessment. Upon SHS completion, the students are expected to
pass at least one technical competency assessment to qualify for graduation and OJT
certification.
Linkages
The school is accredited by DOLE-Region VI and thereby trained by DOLE. As stipulated
in their MOA with the school, the Public Employment Service Office (PESO) provides
laboratory access to students. Through a solicitation letter, the school was able to tap
the School Education Fund of the LGU to support the students OJT requirements.
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Under the MOA, the school tied up with industries for the OJT and job placement of
students. These include the Hawaiian Philippine Company (sugarcane industry), and
HRM service providers such as Mel Ken Restaurant, Baldevia Pension House, Sunburst
Bay Resort, and Royal Am Rei Hotel. The school reported that 10 students per batch are
taking their OJT in SMAW and EIM for four days (30 hours) in Hawaiian Philippine
Company and housekeeping in Baldevia and Windbell Pension House. EIM students are
holding their OJT in Silay City Engineers Office/LGU and FBS in Aid Agency.
Meanwhile, the TechVoc Department is conducting a survey among students whose
parents are working abroad and who can be tapped to become Resource Speakers
whenever they come home to their family in Silay City.
At the same time, alumni abroad are informed of the advocacy of the school to generate
funds for the purchase of equipment through the schools email and Facebook account.
Good Practices/Strengths
Guided by DepEd Order No. 36, ss. 2012, the school is empowered to do school-based
innovations to take into consideration the condition of SHS students who are working
and are teenage mothers.
Inspiring teachers effectively impart knowledge to students. A case in point is the
teacher in SMAW. Although he suffers from Parkinson disease, this does not affect the
quality of his teaching because he has both the expertise and passion for teaching.
Collaborative teaching could be attributed to the NC II success of the students as English
teacher uses Food and Beverage Service (FBS) as topic to improve the communication
skills among students. The school allows extension of learning time for English from I
hour to 1.5 hours to address the skills gap. They use Facebook to connect with students
and for quick feedback on students projects.
Contextualized and integrated learning makes learning more relevant and easier for
students to grasp and remember the lessons. For instance, in studying history, they
discuss history of housekeeping; in mathematics, they discuss measurement or
percentages in food. They generally appreciate the application of science, mathematics
and Araling Panlipunan in their TechVoc classes and group study method which expose
them to cooperative learning and peer mentoring (i.e., two fast learners will assist one
slow learner).
The students are also trained to become technopreneurs because they can sell their
projects in SMAW and electrical technology on a job-order basis. Curriculum enrichment
is continuously done by reviewing the existing learning materials and developing
localized/indigenous materials.
The school employs a 60-40 intervention in favor of hands-on learning activities and
skills application with less lecture-discussion. The said intervention involves 60 percent
for attendance at school and 40 percent for industry-related training which is quite rigid.
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Students need to acquire full mastery of the necessary processes and steps in their
chosen trades. Part of the OJT process is to check whether the job description of the OJT
jibes with TESDA Training Regulations and to require that the industry supervisor has full
knowledge and approval of the OJTs performance. This is being done by the school
industry coordinator.
Learning Outcomes
It is noteworthy to know that the school has 100 percent NC passing rate for food and
beverage service (FBS). As such, five students will be hired for work in FBS industries
with full salary benefits. It is hoped that the same will happen to students of SMAW and
housekeeping who will take their NC I and NC II assessments, respectively. The more NC
II assessments that SHS students will pass means better and wider work opportunities
for them.
The Junior High School students have high regard for SHS students because they
perceive them to be serious in completing their chosen courses. But some teachers
notice that some SHS students sometimes act as Junior HS because they are still playful
and physically not fully mature and confident to assume work responsibilities.
Challenges
One of the challenges faced by the school is in terms of getting the cooperation of the
LGU (i.e., barangay council) without any strings attached. Nevertheless, the school
principal was able to capitalize on this situation by turning adversities into opportunities.
One instance was when the school needed a welding machine transformer. The school
was able to solicit some funds from DepEd Central Office and from a
congressman. However, the school could not purchase equipment/gadgets that is worth
more than PhP 10,000 since this is prohibited under COA regulations.
Majority of SHS students are average learners. One of the difficulties shared by the
Grades 7 and 12 students is their use of the English/technical language at the workplace
(e.g., while providing FBS/hotel services). But they believe they can master it because
they love their course and aspire to acquire an in-depth OJT experience. To help
students enhance their language skills, the school conducts mock interviews, coaching
on written tests, how to memorize the script in providing customer service, and
confidence building. The interview results showed that students are not used to verbal
screening.
Another issue is absenteeism, tardiness and delayed submission of projects/assignments
especially among working students, pregnant students and those who are focused on
computer games. Hence, the teachers have to conduct home visitations to monitor
these learners.
The school has two SMAW teachers (male and female) but needs more teachers of
welding, preferably female teachers, for they deliver the finest product. The school also
needs basic materials for FBS and consumable supplies for individual SMAW learners
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and to raise funds to purchase an LCD projector intended for SHS. They plan to construct
a state-of-the art SMAW building and a simulated TESDA booth for electrical installation
and maintenance (EIM) NC II with complete electrical gadgets. The school aspires to
serve as an accredited training center of TESDA by 2016 with state-of-art facilities at par
with TESDA provincial l training center.
Recommendations
Based on the testimonies of teachers and students, students should be given more
exposure to hands-on learning such as repairing electrical facilities outside the school
that pays for student services. The students in FBS also want to extend the NC
preparations. They could finish the FBS NC II course in one semester and take
Housekeeping NC II in the second semester. However, others do not plan to proceed to
housekeeping for they prefer to enroll in higher level FBS/HRM related courses.
For advanced learners, the school should offer higher level competencies on EIM for NC
III certification such as Industrial Electricity. But as it is, NC III is not allowed by TESDA.
DepEd and TESDA agreed that National Certification is limited only to NC II since NC III is
supervisory in nature.
There should also be enough facilities and equipment particularly for welding, ICT
facilities, etc. The school needs 10 new SMAW cubicles with 8 sets of welding machines
and materials to attain the student ratio of 2:1 where two students can use the facility at
a time. Currently, the school has three welding machines and the whole class is only
using one equipment/machine for housekeeping and this is being shared with Junior
High School students. A lot of time is wasted for waiting which could be used to provide
equal opportunities for students practicum.
In addition, SHS students should be screened for their competencies particularly on
basic communication skills for FBS enrollees. As for the assessment fee, this should be
subsidized by the schools for students who belong to poor families.
The teachers' technical skills should be updated and enhanced through continuing
professional training and development. Provide incentive to the TLE coordinator who
also serves as the SHS industry coordinator. Lastly, the school should open its eyes to
new trends and possibilities for innovation without waiting for DepEd orders from
Manila.
Regarding K to 12, the school principal proposes the "bring down and bring
up" approach wherein college courses will be taught in high school but actual college
courses have to be strengthened by CHED.
For SHS modeling, the specialization of the students should begin as early as Grade 5.
The school needs to provide TechVoc orientation in Grade 4 so that students can avoid
culture shock and peer influence. At the beginning of the school year, there must be a
one-month probationary/exploratory period to test if the students have the interest and

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skills to purse the TechVoc course. They should be given freedom to experience and
choose the final course in preparation for high school.
On the other hand, the teachers believe that it is possible to offer SHS through OHSP to
reach out to students at risk of dropping out as a stop gap measure. But the OHSP may
be limited to academic subjects as the students will need more time for hands-on in
TechVoc subjects and special arts projects. OJT for OHSP could be possibly done by
tapping community facilities. For instance, in welding, a student may use a neighbor's
welding machine for his project, and the teacher checks the project output.

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F. PALO NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


Background
Palo National High School is a general public high school located in Palo, Leyte, that
offers tourism and information and communication technology (ICT) as specialization or
career pathways for their SHS Modeling Program. They have 102 SHS students, including
69 male students and 33 female students as of SY 2012-2013.
Profile of SHS students
The SHS students in Palo NHS are mostly poor, overage, and are working students.
Pre-implementation
Prior to SHS Modeling, the school conducted consultations with DepEd, CHED and HEIs
including Leyte Normal University, TESDA, PTA, LGU, DOLE, and prospective industry
partners such as Helping Foundation, the Leyte Technology Livelihood Development
Productivity Center (LTLDPC), Oriental Hotel, and Asian Development Foundation. It was
during these consultations that tourism and ICT were identified as their career pathway
offerings. The LGU also committed to provide vehicles to transport the students from
the school to their OJT site.
Subsequently, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed by the school, the HEIs,
the industry partners, and the LGU. The MOA explained the roles and responsibilities of
each of those involved related to SHS Modeling.
Curriculum
Palo NHS developed its academic and specialization subjects in consultation with Leyte
Normal University. The SHS teachers also come from Leyte Normal University (LNU). The
academic subjects include English, Filipino, math, science, Social Studies, Personality
Development, and Physical Education. They follow the course description of subjects in
LNU. As such, the same subjects can be credited if the SHS students decide to pursue
college in LNU.
The academic subjects are taught in the morning. In the afternoon, the students travel
either to Helping Foundation or the LTLDPC for their practicum.
Tourism students are taught how to enhance their communication skills. Grade 11
students can obtain NC II in commercial cooking and bread and pastry while Grade 12
students can get NC II in food and beverage service (FBS) and bartending. They also learn
about front office work and housekeeping by doing OJTs at Oriental Hotel (see Tables 34
to 37).

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On the other hand, ICT students are taught computer hardware servicing, programming,
call center work, and software development (see Tables 38 to 41).
Table 34: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism
Grade 11, First Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 101
Communication Arts
1
3
Math 105
Mathematics of Investment
1
3
Science 148 Personal & Community Health
1
3
Humanities
Art Appreciation
1.5
3
103
HRM 102
Personality Development, Social Graces, Work Ethics and
1.5
3
Values Development
Filipino 103
Masining na Pagpapahayag
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: Tourism Sector / Commercial Cooking NC II
(Basic-18 hrs & Core 400 hrs.)
418
24
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

Table 35: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism
Grade 11, Second Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 121
Interactive English
1
3
Math 113
Elementary Statistics
1
3
Science 124
Household Chemistry
1
3
Soc Sci 101
General Psychology
1.5
3
Management 101
Principles of Management
1.5
3
Filipino 106
Literaturang Pambansa at Pambata
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: Tourism Sector / Bready and Pastry Production NC II
(Basic-18 hrs., Common-18hrs. & Core-105 hrs.)
141
9
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

Table 36: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism
Grade 12, First Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 117
English for Specific Purpose
1
3
English 106
World Literature
1
3
(Lit.)
HRM 101
Principles of Tourism
1
3
Soc Sci 126
Philippine History, Government & Constitution
1.5
3
HRM 103
Human Resource Management in the Hospital
1.5
3
Industry
Tourism 101
Tourism Planning Development & Sustainability
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: Tourism / Food and Beverage Services NC II
(Basic-18 hrs., Common-18 hrs., & Core-300 hrs.)
336
18
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

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Table 37: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, Tourism
Grade 12, Second Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 111
Business Correspondence
1
3
Math 101
Accounting Appreciation for Non-Accountants
1
3
PE 104
Health and Recreation (with First Aid and CPR)
1
3
Soc Sci 104
Basic Economics with Taxation
1.5
3
HRM 101
Principles of Marketing
1.5
3
Tourism 104
Philippine Tourism & World Tourism
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: Tourism / Bartending NC II
286
15
(Basic-18 hrs., Common-18 hrs., Core-250 hrs.)
On-the-Job Training for the 2 qualifications:
1. Food and beverage service
1 month
2. Bartending
1 month
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

Table 38: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT
Grade 11, First Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 101
Communication Arts
1
3
Math 106
College Algebra
1
3
Science 101
Biological Science
1
3
Soc Sci 126
Phil. History, Government & Constitution
1.5
3
Humanities 104
Appreciation Visual Arts
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: ICT / Computer Hardware Servicing NC II
(Basic-18 hrs., Common-18 hrs., Core-320 hrs.)
356
15
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

Table 39: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT
Grade 11, Second Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 121
Interactive English
1
3
Math 108
Trigonometry
1
3
Filipino 101
Komunikasyon sa Akademikong Filipino
1
3
Soc Sci 103
Politics & Governance with Phil. Constitution &
1.5
3
Human Rights
IT 403
Multimedia Systems
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: ICT / Programming NC IV
(Basic-18 hrs., Common-18 hrs., Core-216 hrs.)
252
15
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

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Table 40: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT
Grade 12, First Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 103
Writing in the Discipline
1
3
Math
Business Math
1
3
Science 102
General Science with Environmental Science
1
3
Soc Sci
Geography
1.5
3
IT 204
Accounting Principles
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: ICT / Software Development Java
240
12
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

Table 41: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum (Revised), SY 2012-2013, ICT
Grade 12, Second Semester
Subject
Descriptive Title
Hours Units
English 149
Business Correspondence
1
3
Filipino 102
Pagbasa at Pagsulat tungo sa Pananaliksik
1
3
Science 148
Personal Community Health
1
3
Soc Sci 106
Issues & Problems in Contemporary Society
1.5
3
IT 104
Networking Servicing
1.5
3
TechVoc Program: ICT / Finishing Call Center Agents
100
6
100 training hours with emphasis on communication skills
OJT for Software Development & Finishing Call Center Agents
Source: Palo National High School, 2013

Learning Strategies and Learning Materials


The school applies almost all types of learning strategies to SHS students from face-toface teaching to work-oriented teaching. They make use of online resources, printed
modules, and digitized resources in teaching the students.
Student Assessment and Certification
The school also applies all types of student assessment including traditional assessment,
performance assessment, portfolio assessment, and self-assessment.
As for SHS graduates, they are able to take NC II for tourism and ICT.
Challenges
The school is concerned with the security and safety in transporting students to LNU and
for their OJT. Another concern is that the SHS students still do not have their own
classroom so they are only using the gymnasium as their classroom.
Another challenge is how to improve the academic performance of their students
because 30 percent of their students are average while the rest are below average.
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In addition, unlike the TechVoc schools, some pilot SHS model schools were not
provided with PhP 1 million support from the DepEd Central Office.
Recommendations
Based on the interviews, the following are the recommendations to help improve SHS
Program implementation in Palo NHS:
1. The SHS curriculum should be reviewed based on students interests and
capabilities and requirements of business and industries. Experts in the field of
tourism and ICT should be involved in curriculum planning together with business
and industries, TESDA, CHED and DepEd to address the job-skills mismatch.
2. Provide SHS students with their own classroom and training facilities for handson activities to minimize frequency of travel.
3. SHS teachers should have a Masters degree to qualify them to teach the core
subjects as well as advanced courses in SHS. They should be given scholarship
opportunities by TESDA to improve their technical competencies and their
perspectives/styles in teaching SHS students.
4. Prepare students from elementary and junior high school for the rigors of SHS
studies.
5. Allocate funds (e.g., PhP 1 million) for pilot SHS model schools. The available
MOOE funds can only cover for the overhead expenses of the school. The school
needs funds to construct new classroom, repair roofs and pay for
carpentry/labor services.
6. Oftentimes, the top-down approach in policy-making does not work because the
situation in Manila is far different from that in Leyte. For instance, it is important
to consult the school principals about DepEds no uniform policy. The school
has to discuss this new policy with parents who advocate the need to have
school uniform. The school principal remarked that, Sometimes we have to take
the risk to listen and remain accountable to all our stakeholders.
7. Address the conflict in policy issues. Civil Service Commission (CSC) rules that the
students should stay in school for 8 hours, but for SHS, students are required to
have 2 hours paper work/OJT outside of schools, which violates the CSC rule.
Policies which can be addressed by the Legal Office of DepEd were already
brought up to the Regional/Division Offices, but as of date, no action has been
taken by school authorities.
8. Provide Philhealth/travel insurance to SHS students as they have to move from
school to workplace for their OJT and academic subjects taken in LNU.

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G. MERIDA VOCATIONAL SCHOOL


Background
Merida Vocational School is a public technical-vocational high school located in Merida,
Leyte, that offers automotive service, and metals and engineering as specialization or
career pathways for their SHS Modeling Program. They have 93 SHS students as of SY
2012-2013, including 77 male students and 16 female students. For SY 2013-14, they
have 50 Grade 11 students, including 47 male students and 3 female students, and 56
Grade 12 students, including 50 male students and 6 female students.
The development of Grades 11 and 12 Senior High School Modeling in Merida
Vocational School in Merida, Leyte, was built upon the project of former Leyte Governor
and current Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Jericho Petilla called, Edukasyon
Pantulay Pangkabuhayan (Edukasyon 2Ps) or the Income-Creating Opportunities thru
Technology Projects (ICOT-P).
The SHS Modeling of the school aims to develop the skills of students in Automotive
Service and Metals and Engineering, thereby making them assets to the different sectors
established locally and internationally. It is a tripartite partnership program of the
Department of Education (DepEd), the Technical Education and Skills Development
Authority (TESDA), and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED).
Curriculum
The TechVoc programs offered by the school were identified based on student profiling
and skills assessment and the types of services that the community needs.
Automotive Sector
The school provides automotive servicing needs of the clients outside the school such as
engine repair, engine tune-up, and repair and maintenance of motorcycles. The students
may also provide home service particularly car wash, engine tune-up, and electrical
lighting system repair and troubleshooting as may be requested by clients. Academic
subjects for SHS students include English, science, math, Filipino, humanities, social
science, computer, literature, and entrepreneurship. Teachers from Merida Vocational
School are the academic subject teachers for Grade 11 during the first semester. Upon
the recommendation of the DepEd Region 8 director, the academic subject teachers for
the second semester come from a higher education institution (HEI), particularly from
Eastern Visayas State University (EVSU) (see Tables 42 to 45).

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Table 42: Proposed Senior High School Curriculum, SY 2012-2013


Grade 11 (First Semester), Automotive
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
English 101
Science 101

Mathematics 101
Filipino 101
Humanities 101

Speech
Communication
Life Science 1 (Man,
Society &
Environment)
Plane & Solid
Mensuration 1
Masining na
Pagpapahayag
Philosophy of Human
Person

2014

Schedule

8:30 9:30

MWF

7:30 9:00

TTH

7:30 8:30

MWF

9:30 10:30

MWF

9:00 10:30

TTH

280

1:00 5:00

Daily

TECHVOC PROGRAM: Automotive Sector


Automotive Servicing NC I
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 242 hrs)
Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

Table 43: Proposed Senior High Curriculum, SY 2012-2013


Grade 11 (Second Semester), Automotive
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
English 102

Business English &


Technical Writing
Science 102
Life Science 2
(Environmental
Science)
Mathematics 102
Plane & Solid
Mensuration 1
Social Science 101
Contemporary Local
Issues
Computer 101
Automobile Computer
System & Auto
Diagnostic Tools
Advancement
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Automotive Sector
Automotive Servicing NC II
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 242 hrs)

OntheJob Training

Schedule

8:30 9:30

MWF

7:30 9:00

TTH

7:30 8:30

MWF

9:30 10:30

MWF

9:00 10:30

TTH

244
7
1:00 5:00
Daily
Automotive Servicing NC I & NC II: 160 hrs

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

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Table 44: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014


Grade 12 (First Semester), Automotive
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
English 103

English for Specific


Purposes and
Advanced Technical
Writing
Literature 101
Philippine Literature
Mathematics 103
Analytic Geometry
Filipino 102
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
Science 101
Physical Science
(Physics 1)
Entrepreneurship 101
Entrepreneurial
Management 1
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Automotive Sector
a. Automotive Servicing NC II Phase 2
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 124 hrs)

2014

Schedule

8:30 9:30

MWF

3
3
3

3
3
3

7:30 -9:00
7:30 8:30
9:30 10:30

TTH
MWF
MWF

9:00 10:30

TTH

10:30 11:30

MWF

162

1:00 5:00

Daily

b. Driving NC II
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 80 hrs)

Total Training Hrs.

118
280

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

Table 45: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014


Grade 12 (Second Semester), Automotive
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
Literature 102
Science 102

World Literature
Physical Science
(Physics 2)

Mathematics 104
Social Science 102

Business Math
Contemporary Global
Issues
Entrepreneurship 101
Entrepreneurial
Management 2
(Business Planning)
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Automotive Sector
Motorcycle/Small Engine Servicing NC II
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 240 hrs)

On the Job Training

3
3

3
3

3
3

3
3

8:30 9:30
7:30 8:30
Lecture
8:30 -10:00
Lab
7:30 8:30
9:30 10:30

10:00 11:30

Schedule
MWF

TTH

TTH

MWF
MWF

278
7
1:00 5:00
Daily
Driving NC II Motorcycle/Small Engine
Servicing NC II: 160 hrs.

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

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Metals and Engineering


Under Metals and Engineering, the students with teacher supervision learn how to
fabricate flower pots, trashcan stands, and window grills in the classrooms for free. The
students also weld steel trusses of the new multi-purpose workshop/laboratory to
enhance their skills and expose them to the real world of welders. Outside the school
premises, the students weld window grills, trashcan stands, and other home fabrications
as may be requested by prospective clients. (See Tables 46 to 49.)
Table 46: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2012-2013
Grade 11 (First Semester), Metals and Engineering
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
English 101
Science 101

Speech Comm
Life Science 2
(Environmental Sc)
Mathematics 101
Plane & Solid
Mensuration 1
Filipino 101
Masining na
Pagpapahayag
Humanities 101
Philosophy of Human
Person
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Metals & Engineering
Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC I
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 242 hrs)
Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

3
3

3
3

9:30 10:30
9:30 10:30

MWF
TTH

8:30 9:30

MWF

7:30 8:30

MWF

7:30 9:00

TTH

280

1:00 5:00

Daily

Table 47: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2012-2013


Grade 11 (Second Semester), Metals and Engineering
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
English 102

Business English &


Technical Writing
Science 102
Life Science 2
(Environmental Sc)
Mathematics 102
Plane & Solid
Mensuration 1
Social Science 101
Contemporary Local
Issues
Computer 101
Computer Aided
Drawing (AutoCAD)
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Metals & Engineering
Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC II
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 242 hrs)

OntheJob Training

Schedule

Schedule

9:30 10:30

MWF

9:30 11:10

TTH

8:30 9:30

MWF

7:30 8:30

MWF

7:30 9:00

TTH

280
7
1:00 5:00
Daily
Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC I & NC II:
160 hrs

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

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Table 48: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014


Grade 12 (First Semester), Metals and Engineering
Subject
Descriptive Title
Total Units
Time
Hours
English for Specific
Purposes and
Advanced Technical
Writing
Literature 102
Philippine Literature
Mathematics 103
Analytic Geometry
Filipino 102
Pagbasa at Pagsulat
Tungo sa Pananaliksik
Science 101
Physical Science
(Physics 1)
Entrepreneurship 101
Entrepreneurial
Management 1
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Pipe Fitting NC II

2014

Schedule

English 103

(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 160 hrs)

7:30 -8:30

MWF

3
3

3
3

7:30 9:00
8:30 -9:30
10:30 -11:30

TTH
MWF
MWF

3
3

3
3

9:00 -11:00

TTH

9:30 10:30

MWF

202

1:00 5:00

Daily

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

Table 49: Proposed Senior High Class Schedule, SY 2013-2014


Grade 12 (Second Semester), Metals and Engineering
Subject

Descriptive Title

Literature 102

World Literature

Science 102

Physical Science
(Physics 2)

Total
Hours
3

Units

Time

Schedule

9:30 10:30

MWF

9:00 10:00
Lecture

TTH

10:00 11:30

Mathematics 104
Social Science 102

Business Math
Contemporary Global
Issues
Entrepreneurship 102
Entrepreneurial
Management 2
(Business Planning)
TECHVOC PROGRAM: Metals & Engineering
Pipe Fitting NC II Phase 2
(Basic 18 hrs, Common 20 hrs & Core 160 hrs)

OntheJob Training

3
3

3
3

Lab
8:30 9:30
7:30 8:30

7:30 9:00

202

MWF
MWF
TTH

7
1:00 5:00
Daily
Pipe Fitting NC II: 160 hrs

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

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Good Practices
The schools good practices include the following:
1. The school fostered a multi-stakeholder partnership with the DepEd, CHED,
TESDA, LGU, HEIs, and industry to ensure that the SHS Program can be fully
implemented and sustained.
2. It gets continued support from the stakeholders and transparency on every
transactions.
3. Modular/self-paced learning and practical work and hands-on were employed by
the senior high TVE teachers.
4. The assessment tools used for senior high TVE teachers are rubrics, learning
objectives checklist and behavioral checklist.
5. The senior high TVE teachers are National Certificate NC holders in their fields of
specialization.
6. The school sustained the Community of Practice among teachers and Community
of Learners among students.
7. The layout of the laboratory rooms is in accordance with TESDA regulations
following the 5S practice of good housekeeping.
8. The school accepts requests for automotive and welding services from teachers
and the community.
9. The school uses the EASE modules for SHS students who needs to catch up if they
miss some academic subjects due to absences.
10. Due to lack of teachers, the head teachers also teach full time at 6 hours daily in
the exigency of the service.
11. The school keeps track of their high school graduates through the help of the
guidance counselor.
Stakeholder Support to SHS Program
The school signed a MOA with MAC Builders and Yakal Construction to ensure On-theJob-Training for industry immersion, and with Eastern Visayas State University (EVSU) to
provide HEI instructors to hold classes and share their expertise through training in
terms of teaching strategies, methodologies and other relevant activities necessary.

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The Leyte Provincial Governor Hon. Mimieta S. Bagulaya headed the inauguration of the
two-classroom building which is presently being used by the Senior High School Model
students.
The Local Government Unit of Merida, Leyte, has granted a check amounting to PhP 567
thousand for the tools and equipment as pledged by the municipal officials headed by
the Hon. Mayor Marcos Antonio D. Solaa.
HEI instructors already received their monthly honorarium from the Provincial School
Board.
Issues and Concerns
The schools issues and concerns include the following:
1. With its increasing enrollment, the school needs PhP 1,000 per student, but the
MOOE funds are not enough to support the SHS financial requirements.
2. Parents will provide for the transportation fare of those students who will go
home every day from their On-the-Job Training (OJT).
3. Parents will shoulder the fee for house rental of students who will reside near
the workplace since agencies cannot provide boarding houses for them.
4. Students have paid the insurance to the partner insurance provider Coop-Life
Mutual Benefit Services Association (CLIMBS) of Metro Ormoc Credit
Cooperative, Inc. (OCCI).
5. Memoranda of Agreement with PASAR and Philphos are still in progress since the
MOAs were forwarded to the Regional Office for endorsement.
6. Upon the recommendation of the DepEd Region 8 Director, academic subject
teachers for Grade 11 students during second semester come from a Higher
Education Institution (HEI), specifically from Eastern Visayas State University
(EVSU). However, there is the lack of budget to transport the said teachers and
there is insufficient teacher items. In addition, there are not enough funds to
provide training for SHS teachers. As it is, the cost to transport the HEI teachers
has already exhausted the schools MOOE.
7. The ratio of equipment for automotive repair and metals engineering to the
number of SHS students is currently at 1:4. To cope with this situation, they
provide a schedule on the utilization of the tools and equipment. But this
contributes to delays in hands-on learning and in the completion of school
projects.

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Recommendations
Merida Vocational School and its business partners need to come up with an agreement
to shoulder the transportation fee and house rent of students undergoing OJT, and the
agreement must be supported by the Department of Education. Also, DepEd should
provide counterpart for students OJT insurance.
There is a need to sustain the linkage with industries already established through MOAs
or MOUs. In particular, a linkage or industry coordinator should be designated to help
provide students with easy access to immersion in local industries. The coordinator
should be trained possibly by TESDA or the industry partner. Sustaining strong linkages
with the industry also provides clarity in the industrys needs in terms of skills and labor
demand.
There is also the need to keep an open communication line with the stakeholders. The
stakeholders are supportive of the SHS Program so long as they are kept abreast of the
developments in the implementation of the program and the significance of their roles
in program implementation is clarified. This can be done by conducting quarterly
convergence meetings.
The school should promote the adopt a student program to help indigent families.
Teachers from Merida Vocational School should be allowed to teach academic subjects
for SHS students during second semester to help minimize the transportation cost
incurred for the HEI teachers. Another option is to provide additional budget or request
support from LGUs to subsidize the transportation of the HEI teachers.
Laboratory rooms for SHS students must follow TESDA rules and regulations in terms of
set-up and safety measures. In the case of Merida Vocational School, one example is
that they transferred the welding booth to the back of the welding laboratory room to
prevent fires and other related occupational hazards.
The municipal and provincial LGUs should provide budgetary support for the provision of
tools and equipment for SHS students. In this way, the SHS students can master their
skills if there is a 1:1 student-equipment ratio.

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Other problems and actions taken by Merida Vocational School related to SHS modeling
include the following:
Problem/Concern
1. Difficulty in setting assessment
dates with assessors
2. Some parents are not agreeable to
the K to 12 program

3. Delayed release of the HEIs


honoraria
4. Program requires sufficient funds
(i.e., PhP 1 million subsidy)
5. Meager MOOE release
6. Unavailable alternate for absent
industry partners in charge of
students immersion
7. Overlapping schedule of immersion
and assessment

Action Taken
Meet the TESDA Provincial Director seeking
assistance for the date of assessment
Keep advocating the program though radio
broadcast, posters, flyers, assembly
meetings, publication of success stories on
the K to 12 SHS implementation
Follow-up the Office of the Provincial
Governor
Communication letter was sent to the
Central Office
Seek support from stakeholders through
solicitations and resolutions
Reschedule the dates of immersion

Sit en banc with the industry in charge of the


schedule and date

Source: Merida Vocational School, 2013

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ANNEX 1: DURATION OF PRE-UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS IN SOUTHEAST


ASIA
Country

Total Duration of Basic


Education

Total Duration of PreUniversity Program

Brunei

11/12

13/15

Cambodia

12

13

Indonesia

12

13

Lao PDR

12

14

Malaysia

11

14/15

Myanmar

11

12

Philippines

10

10

Singapore

10/11

12/14

Thailand

12

12

Timor-Leste

12

12

Vietnam

12

14/15

Source: SEAMEO INNOTECH 2011

Annex 1: Duration of Pre-University Programs in Southeast Asia

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ANNEX 2: LIST OF KEY INFORMANTS


San Pedro Relocation Center National High School
1. Victorio N. Medrano (Principal IV)
2. Alenie B. Dualan (Industry Linkage Coordinator/Teacher)
3. Emerlita D. Goyun (Head Teacher)
4. Lorenzo Y. Baldovino, Jr. (Planning Officer Designate)
5. Mirasol F. Dasig (Drafting Coordinator/Master Teacher I)
6. Zoila K. Pentecoste (Soft Trades Coordinator/Master Teacher II)
7. Annabelle T. Madrid (Master Teacher II - Science)
8. Ruby P. Favis (Master Teacher I)
9. Kimberly P. Reoganes (Student)
10. Kim Euzielle M. Silva (Student)
11. Joren N. Sanchez (Student)

Sangley Point National High School


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Randie L. Salonga (Head Teacher III)


Russel V. Bautista (Teacher I)
Louise Mae D. Suan (Teacher I)
Myra D. Suan (Teacher III)
Ivy Camille Pacul (Grade 11 Student)
John Patrick Escote (Grade 11 Student)
Stephanie B. Gonzales (Grade 11 Student)

Bacolod City National High School


1. Jose G. Dayot III (School Principal IV)
2. Inocentes V. Tupas, Jr. (Teacher III)
3. Nenette M. Treyes (Master Teacher I)
4. Ma. Cristina T. Doriman (Teacher III)
5. Rolando E. Martinez (Teacher I)
6. Yolly Vingno (Teacher II)
7. Ma. Victoria L. Solitano (Master Teacher I)
8. Allan M. Pomada (Teacher III)
9. Florida G. Gargalicano (Teacher II)
10. Judith L. Vargas (Teacher II Grade 12 Adviser)
11. Reycint Aresgado (Grade 12, 18 years old)
12. Daisy P. Villamor (Grade 12, 18 years old)
13. Ernel Gentapanan (Grade 12, 18 years old)

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Sum-ag National High School


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Warlito D. Rosareal (School Principal IV)


Clark Canlog (SST I)
Annabel Villaruel (Master Teacher I)
Leticia Fran (Head Teacher III)
Rosemarie P. Demabildo (Head Teacher III)
Teresa B. Magalona (Master Teacher I)
Grace Junas (SST III)
Nelia Bellosillo (Head Teacher III)
Selected SHS students

Doa Montserrat Lopez Memorial National High School


1. Wilfredo O. Hermosura, Principal IV
2. Federico B. Espinosa, MT I
3. Nanette D. Sudayan, MT I
4. Sabrina D. Janagap, MT I
5. Debbie Ann Y. Valladarez, T2
6. Gayzell Mae O. Saison, T1
7. Mary Lailani G. Javines, T1
8. Angelica A. Lapastora, Grade 11 student (FBS)
9. Alvin G. Camaria, Grade 11 student (EIM)
10. David Lester G. Apilo, Grade 11 student (Housekeeping)
11. Leila Mai A. Lisbo, Grade 11 student (SMAW)

Palo National High School


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Michael A. Regis (School Principal IV)


Melba A. Palamos (SST III)
Marive P. Repulda (Guidance Counselor)
Anjanette C. Delio (17-year old Grade 11 student specializing in Tourism)
Joemark O. Patan-ao (20-year old Grade 11 student specializing in Tourism)
Dexter B. Fumar (19-year old Grade 11 student specializing in ICT)
Jonna Mae C. Margallo (17-year old Grade 11 student specializing in ICT)

Merida Vocational School


1. Noel P. Del Pilar (Head Teacher I; Teacher on TechVoc Program on Metals and
Engineering)
2. Antonio Dacatimbang, Jr. (Teacher III)

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REFERENCES
Department of Education. DepEd Order No. 36 s. 2012: Guidelines on the 2012 Implementation
of the Senior High School (SHS) Modeling in Selected Technical and Vocational Education
and General Secondary Schools under the K to 12 Basic Education ProgramDepartment
of Education.
Department of Education. Senior High School Curriculum. Presentation at the 2014 National
Conference on the Educational Paradigm Shift for Grades 11 and 12. February 2014.
Department of Education. Updates on the K to 12 BEP Implementation.
Department of Education. The DepEd Reform in Secondary Education: The Grades 11 and 12
Tracks and Its Challenges. Presentation at the 2014 National Conference on the
Educational Paradigm Shift for Grades 11 and 12. February 2014.
Department of Education and SEAMEO INNOTECH. K to 12 in Southeast Asia: Regional
Comparison of the Structure, Content, Organization, and Adequacy of Basic Education.
2012
SEAMEO INNOTECH. K to 12 in Southeast Asia: Benchmarking for ExcellenceSEAMEO INNOTECH
Research Update. 2011
SEAMEO INNOTECH. K to 12 Toolkit: Reference Guide for Teacher Educators, School
Administrators and Teachers. 2012

References

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