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NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY WARANGAL

SCHEME OF INSTRUCTION AND SYLLABI


FOR M.TECH POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Effective from 2014-15

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY WARANGAL

VISION
Towards a Global Knowledge Hub, striving continuously in pursuit of excellence in
Education, Research, Entrepreneurship and Technological services to the society

MISSION

Imparting total quality education to develop innovative, entrepreneurial and ethical future
professionals fit for globally competitive environment.

Allowing stake holders to share our reservoir of experience in education and knowledge
for mutual enrichment in the field of technical education.

Fostering product oriented research for establishing a self-sustaining and wealth


creating centre to serve the societal needs.

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

VISION
To excel in education, research and technological services in electrical engineering in tune with
societal aspirations.
MISSION

Impart quality education to produce globally competent electrical engineers capable of


extending technological services

Engage in research & development in cutting edge and sustainable technologies.

Nurture scientific temperament, professional ethics and industrial collaboration.

GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES
The Graduate Attributes are the knowledge skills and attitudes which the students have at the
time of graduation. These attributes are generic and are common to all engineering programs.
These Graduate Attributes are identified by National Board of Accreditation.
1. Engineering knowledge: Apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering
fundamentals, and an engineering specialization to the solution of complex engineering
problems.
2. Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, research literature, and analyze complex engineering
problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural
sciences, and engineering sciences.
3. Design/Development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems and
design system components or processes that meet the specified needs with appropriate
consideration for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and environmental
considerations.
4. Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge and research
methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis
of the information to provide valid conclusions.
5. Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and
modern engineering and IT tools including prediction and modelling to complex engineering
activities with an understanding of the limitations.
6. The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to assess
societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities
relevant to the professional engineering practice.
7. Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering
solutions in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and
need for sustainable development.
8. Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and
norms of the engineering practice.
9. Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader
in diverse teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.
10. Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the
engineering community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and
write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give
and receive clear instructions.
11. Project management and Finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the
engineering and management principles and apply these to ones own work, as a member
and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.
12. Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in
independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change.

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


M.TECH IN POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
PEO1.

Design and develop innovative products and services in the field of


electrical power systems

PEO2.

keep abreast with the latest technology and toolset.

PEO3.

Communicate effectively to propagate ideas and promote teamwork

PEO4.

Attain intellectual leadership skills to cater to the changing needs of power


industry, academia, society and environment

Mapping of Mission statements with program educational objectives


Mission Statement

PEO1

PEO2

PEO3

PEO4

Impart quality education to produce globally


competent electrical engineers capable of
extending technological services
Engage in research & development in cutting
edge and sustainable technologies.
Nurture scientific temperament, professional
ethics and industrial collaboration.

Mapping of program educational objectives with graduate attributes

PEO

GA1

GA2

GA3

GA4

GA5

GA6

GA7

GA8

GA9

GA10

GA11

GA12

PEO1

PEO2

PEO3

PEO4

PROGRAM OUTCOMES: At the end of the program the student will be able to:
PO1
PO2
PO3
PO4
PO5
PO6
PO7
PO8
PO9

Design and develop electric power and energy systems


Deliver technological solutions in the field of power systems by assimilating
advances in allied disciplines
Simulate and experiment in the field of power systems using modern tools
Design renewable energy systems to protect environment and ecosystems
Practice professional ethics with social sensitivity
Develop innovative and entrepreneurial solutions
Develop an attitude to learn with self motivation
Communicate effectively at all levels and demonstrate leadership qualities
Pursue research to enhance the existing pool of knowledge

Mapping of program outcomes with program educational objectives


PO

PEO1 PEO2 PEO3 PEO4

SCHEME OF INSTRUCTION
M.Tech. (Power Systems Engineering) Course Structure
I - Year I - Semester
S. No.

Course
Code

Course Title

L T P Credits

Cat.
Code

EE 5201 Advanced Computer Methods in Power Systems

PCC

EE 5202 HVDC & FACTS

PCC

EE 5203 AI Techniques in Power Systems

PCC

EE 5204 Power System Lab

PCC

EE 5205 Power System Computation lab

PCC

Elective I

EC

Elective II

EC

Elective III

EC

PCC

21 0

26

EE 5241 Seminar I
TOTAL

30

I - Year II - Semester
S. No.

Course
Code

EE 5251

Credits

Cat.
Code

Advanced Power System Protection

PCC

EE 5252

State Estimation and Security Analysis

PCC

EE 5253

Power System Stability and control

PCC

EE 5254

AI Lab

PCC

EE 5255

Power Systems Simulation Lab

PCC

Elective IV

EC

Elective V

EC

Seminar II

PCC

18

23

EE 5291

Course Title

TOTAL

27

II - Year I Semester
S. No.

Course
Code

Course Title

Credits

Cat.

EE 6242 Comprehensive Viva-Voce

PCC

EE 6249 Dissertation Work Part A

PRC

TOTAL

12

II - Year II - Semester
S. No.
1

Course
Code

Course Title

EE 6299 Dissertation Work - Part B


TOTAL

P Credits

Cat.

PRC

18
18

List of Electives
I Year I Semester
EE 5111

Modern Control Theory

EE 5112

Microprocessors and Microcontrollers

EE 5113

Digital Signal Processors

EE 5211

Design and Testing of HV Apparatus

EE 5212

Advanced Topics in Power Systems

EE 5213

Distribution System Planning and Automation

EE 5214

Economic Operation of Power Systems

EE 5215

Power System Reliability and Planning

MA5013

Optimization Techniques

I Year II Semester
EE 5165

Power quality

EE 5166

Alternative Sources of Electrical Energy

EE 5261

Power System Deregulation

EE 5262

EHV AC Transmission

EE 5263

Power System Transients

EE 5264

Smart Electric Grid

DETAILED SYLLABUS

EE5201

Advanced Computer Methods in Power


Systems

PCC

400

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Develop proper mathematical models for analysis of a selected problem like load
flow study or fault analysis.

CO2

Prepare the practical input data required for load flow or fault calculations.

CO3

Select and identify the most appropriate algorithm for loadflow and short circuit
studies.

CO4

Develop power system software for static power system studies

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed syllabus
Incidence and network matrices introduction graphs incidence matrices formation Ybus
by singular transformation introduction to load flow analysis Gauss-Seidel Newton
Raphson and FastDecoupled method algorithms for formation of Zbus matrix Short Circuit
(SC) studies introduction SC calculations using Zbus Zfabc Yfabc Zf012 yf012 matrices for
various faults :example of SC calculations using Zbus for LLL and LG faults Power Flow
(PF)solutions sparsity technique comparison of GS NR FDC methods review of AC/DC
load flow solutions NR load flow study with FACTS devices Power Flow analysis using
MATLAB.
Reading:
1. Stagg G.Ward, ElAbiad: Computer methods in power system analysis, McGraw Hill
ISE, 1986.

2. HadiSaadat: Power System Analysis, 3rd edition, PSA publishers, 2010.


3. J.Arrilaga and C.P. Arnold: Computer Modeling of Electric Power Systems, John Wiley &
Sons, N.Y., 1st edition, 2001.

EE 5202

HVDC and FACTS

PCC

400

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Compare the HVDC Transmission and EHVAC transmission

CO2

Identify and analyze converter configurations used in HVDC and list the
performance metrics.

CO3

Understand controllers for controlling the power flow through a dc link

CO4

Compute the filter parameters for elimination of voltage and current harmonics
in HVDC system.
Understand the role of impedance control, phase angle control and voltage
control in controlling real and reactive power in transmission systems
Identify configuration of FACTS controller required for a given application

CO5
CO6

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

CO5

CO6

Detailed syllabus
HVDC Transmission:
Need for power system interconnections Evolution of AC and DC transmission systems
Comparison of HVDC and HVAC Transmission systems Types of DC links relative merits
Components of a HVDC system Modern trends in DC Transmission systems Pulse number
choice of converter configurations Analysis of Graetz circuit with and without overlap voltage
waveforms Analysis of two and three valve conduction mode Converter Bridge characteristics
Inverter mode of operation voltage waveforms Principles of DC link control Converter Control
characteristics system control Constant current Control CEA Control firing angle control of
valves Starting and stopping of a dc link Power control Harmonics & Filters Ill effects of
Harmonics sources of harmonic generation Types of filters Design examples Power flow

Analysis in AC/DC systems Modelling of DC links solutions of AC-DC Power flow


Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS):
Power flow in AC systems Relative importance of controllable parameters Basic types of FACTS
controllers shunt and series controllers Current source and Voltage source converters
Objectives of shunt compensation Methods of controllable VAR generation Static Var
Compensator its characteristics TCR TSC FC TCR configurations STATCOM basic
operating principle control approaches and characteristics Objectives of series compensator
variable impedance type of series compensators TCSC TSSC operating principles and control
schemes SSSC Power Angle characteristics Control range and VAR rating Capability to
provide reactive power compensation external control Introduction to Unified Power Flow
Controller Basic operating principles Conventional control capabilities Independent control of
real and reactive power

Reading:
1. HVDC Power Transmission Systems Technology and System Interactions .R.Padiyar
New Age International Publishers, 2012
2. Understanding FACTS Concepts and Technology of Flexible AC Transmission
Systems Narain G. Hingorani, Laszlo Gyugyi, Wiley India publications 2011

EE 5203

AI Techniques in Power Systems

PCC

400

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3

Differentiate between Algorithmic based methods and knowledge based


methods.
Use the soft computing techniques for power system problems.
Use appropriate AI framework for solving power system problems.

CO4

Apply GA to power system optimization problems

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed syllabus
Artificial Neural Networks:
Introduction Models of Neuron Network Architectures Knowledge representation Artificial
Intelligence and Neural networksLearning process Error correction learning Hebbian learning
Competitive learning Boltzman learning Supervised learning Unsupervised learning
Reinforcement learning learning tasks.
ANN Paradigms:
Multi layer perceptron using Back propagation Algorithm (BPA) Self Organizing Map (SOM)
Radial Basis Function Network Functional Link Network (FLN) Hopfield Network.
Fuzzy Logic:
Introduction Fuzzy versus crisp Fuzzy sets Membership function Basic Fuzzy set
operations Properties of Fuzzy sets Fuzzy Cartesian Product operations on Fuzzy relations
Fuzzy-logic Fuzzy QuantifiersFuzzy Inference Fuzzy Rule based systemDefuzzification
methods.
Genetic Algorithms:
IntroductionEncoding Fitness FunctionReproduction operatorsGenetic Modeling Genetic
operatorsCross over Single site cross over Two point cross over Multi point cross over
Uniform cross over Matrix cross overCross over Rate Inversion & Deletion Mutation operator

Mutation Mutation RateBitwise operators Generational cycle convergence of Genetic


Algorithm.
Applications of AI Techniques:
Load forecasting Load flow studies Economic load dispatch Load frequency control Single
area system and two area system Small Signal Stability (Dynamic stability) Reactive power
control speed control of DC and AC Motors.
Reading:
1. S.Rajasekaran and G.A.V.Pai Neural Networks, Fuzzy Logic & Genetic Algorithms,
PHI, New Delhi, 2003.
2. Rober J. Schalkoff, Artificial Neural Networks, Tata McGraw Hill Edition, 2011

EE 5204

Power System Lab

PCC

003

2 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Carryout experiments ensuring the safety of equipment and personnel.

CO2

Interpret the experimental results and correlating them with the practical
power system.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

Detailed syllabus:
PQ Control of Synchronous machine Simulation of faults for multi machine system on DC
network analyzer Reactive power control of artificial transmission line Sequence reactances
and fault studies on synchronous machine Reactive control by tap changing transformers
Testing of Static relays 3 zone distance Protection scheme Digital Mapping of distribution
Networks Measurement of High AC voltages using sphere gap Determination of breakdown
strength of oil Generation of different impulse waveforms.

EE 5205

Power System Computation Lab

PCC

003

2 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Analyze the power system data for load-flow and fault studies.

CO2
CO3

Apply computational methods for large scale power system studies.


Develop software for power system industry

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed syllabus:
Solution of simultaneous Algebraic equations by GaussElimination Crouts method and
Cholesky method Solution of Simultaneous differential equations by RK4 and Modified
Eulers method Program to read and print out the power system load flow data of 5 BUS IEE
14 Bus and IEEE 30 Bus systems Formation of Ybus using two dimensional arrays by
inspection method Formation of Ybus using Sparsity Technique Load flow by Gauss Seidel
Newton Raphson and Fast Decoupled methods using two dimensional arrays sparsity
techniques and MATLAB AC/DC load flow study NR load flow study with FACTS.

EE 5111

Modern Control Theory

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Develop mathematical models of dynamic physical systems.

CO2
CO3

Design optimal controllers for physical systems including power electronic and
power systems.
Determine the stability of linear and nonlinear control systems.

CO4

Linearize a given nonlinear system

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed syllabus
Introduction to state and state variables system representation in state variable form
transformations Phase variable form Canonical forms Physical systems Plant models
Representation using state function Lagrange linearization. State transition matrix Properties
and methods of valuation Time response of linear systems State diagrams Resolvant
matrix Resolvant algorithm. Definition and concepts Criteria for controllability and
observability State variable feedback Pole placement Luenberg observer design.
Introduction definition of stability stability in the sense of Lyapunov stability of linear
systems transient response Behavior of estimation stability of nonlinear systems
generation of Lyapunov functions. Formulation of the optimal control problem method of
calculus of variations use of Hamiltonian method Pontryagins minimum principle Optimal
control, problem Hamilton Jacobi approach Continuous time linear state regulator matrix
riccati equation Methods of solution State variable feedback design.
Reading:
1. Katsuhiko Ogata: Modern control Engineering, PrenticeHall of India, 2010

2. M. Gopal: Modern Control Systems Theory, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi, 2005

3. Schultz and Melsa: State functions & linear control systems McGraw Hill Book Co...
New York, 1998.
4. Chidambara and Ganapathy: An Introduction to control of dynamic systems, Sehgal
Educational consultants and publishers Pvt. Ltd. Faridabad

EE5112

Microprocessors and Microcontrollers

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Understand the basic architecture of a 8086 microprocessor

CO2
CO3

Write the assembly language program for a given application.


Write interrupt sub routine program for all interrupt types.

CO4

Interface memory and peripheral devices

CO5

Interface external devices including serialdevices with


microcontrollers

8051 and PIC

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

Course
Outcomes
CO1
CO2

PO1
1
-

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO3

CO4

CO5

Detailed syllabus
Detailed Syllabus:
8086 Architecture internal operation addressing modes instruction formats Evolution of
Processor architectures Review of 80386 80486 and Pentium architectures Assembler
instruction format Instruction setData transfer Arithmetic Branch and Loop instructions
Directives and operators Byte and string manipulation Number format conversion Table
translation Stacks and Subroutines Macros Procedures Procedure calls from high level
language programs Programmed I/O Interrupt I/O Structure of interrupts in 8086 Block
transfer and DMA Structure of computer system Hardware foundations Bus standards
Types of Buses 8bit ISA and PC Bus standard Bus timing access and arbitration
Minimum and maximum mode configurations of 8086 Memory interfacing interfacing of
memory with wait states Serial communication interface 8251A and RS 232 standard
Parallel communication interface 8255A A/D and D/A conversion interfacing examples
Programmable timers and event counters 8254 DMA controllers (8257) and Interrupt
controller (8259) and Interrupt priority management 8087 Interrupt system interfacing to

the 8086/8086 system 16bit Micro controller architecture simple programs and
applications.
Reading:
1. Yu Cheng Liu and Glenn A.Gibson: Microcomputer Systems: The 8086 / 8088 family
Architecture, Programming and Design, PHISecond Edition, 2009.
2. Douglas V. Hall: Microprocessors and Interfacing, TMHRevised Second Edition, 2005.
3. Barry B.Brey: The Intel Microprocessors, 8086 to Pentium Pro Processor Architecture,
Programming and Interfacing, Pearson publishers, 2010.

EE 5113

Digital Signal Processors

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Understand the architecture of TMS320 LF 2407A processor

CO2
CO3

Write Assembly Language Programs for the Digital Signal Processors


Configure and use Digital I/Os, ADCs, Interrupts and Event Managers for
realtime control applications
Synthesize digital controllers for power converters

CO4

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed syllabus
Introduction to the TMSLF2407 DSP controller: Peripherals physical memory types software
tools. C2XX DSP CPU and instruction set: C2xx DSP Core and code generation mapping
external devices assembly programming. GPIO functionality: Pin multiplexing (MUX) and
GPIO Overview and its control registers. Interrupts on the TMS320LF2407: Introduction
Interrupt Hierarchy and its Control Registers. ADC: Overview Operation and programming
modes. Event managers: Overview Interrupts Timers Compare Units PWM Signal
Generation with Event Managers.
Reading:
1. Hamid A. Tolyat, DSP Based Electro Mechanical Motion ControlCRC press, 2004.
2. Application Notes from the webpage of Texas Instruments.

EE5211

Design and Testing of High Voltage


Apparatus
Pre-requisites: - None

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3
CO4

Design a compact and economical insulation structure for high voltage


equipment.
Estimate electric field intensity of various electrode configurations for high
voltage power equipment.
Understand the testing methods of High Voltage Equipment
Understand the methods to diagnose the partial discharge activity in a power
equipment

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed syllabus
History of high voltage engineering Overhead lines Towers and supports conductors
dampers foundations Insulator design. Components of insulated power cable design
features Testing diagnostics. Types of bushings Bushing design Bushing applications
Testing maintenance and diagnosis. HV Power transformerInsulation design concepts
winding short circuit forces and testing. Methods of generation of high direct voltages
alternating voltages and impulse voltages insulation coordination Test conditions.
Introduction Measuring system Amplitude measurement of direct voltage alternating
voltage impulse current measurement of time parameters optical fiber based monitoring of
high voltage power equipment.
Reading:
1. H.M. Ryan: High Voltage Engineering & Testing, IEE Press
2. Ravindra Arora & Wolfgang Mosch: High voltage Insulation Engineering, New Age
International Publishers, 2011.

EE 5212
Advanced Topics in Power Systems
Pre-requisites: - None

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2

CO3

Develop proper mathematical models, related to rotor angle Stability, Voltage


Stability and multiphase elements of transmission system.
Prepare the input data required for case studies related to Stability aspects,
Power Quality issues and Congestion management in Deregulated
environment.
Execute project works related to market pricing schemes followed in Indian
context and suggest novel Algorithms for designing effective pricing schemes

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed syllabus
Introduction to voltage stability factors affecting Voltage instability and collapse integrated
analysis of Voltage and angle stability deregulation of the electricity supply industry benefit
from competitive electricity market. power system operation in competitive environment role of
independent system operator(ISO) unit commitment in deregulated environmenttransmission
open access and pricing issues Congestion management in deregulationancillary services
managementhierarchical levels reliability and deregulation power quality issues Harmonics
distortion transient overvoltages voltage steps and voltage fluctuations. Application of power
system stabilizers (PSS) design of PSS Recent developments and feature trends multiphase (sixphase) systems demand side management and energy auditing.
Reading:
1. Kankar Bhattacharya Math H.J. Bollen, Jaap E. Daalder: Operation of Restructured
Power Systems, Springer publishers, 2001.
2. K.R. Padiyar: Power System Dynamics Stability and Control, BS Publications, 2nd
edition, 2002
3. Loi Lei Lai : Power system Restructuring and Deregulation: Trading, Performance and
Information Technology, Jhon Wiley & Sons, Pvt. Ltd., 2001

EE 5213

Distribution System Planning and


Automation

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3
CO4

Understand and distinguish characteristics of distribution systems from


transmission systems
To design, analyze and evaluate distribution system design based on
forecasted data
Identify and select appropriate substation location
Design and evaluate a distribution system for a given geographical service
area from alternate design alternatives

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed Syllabus:
Distribution System Planning:
Planning and forecasting techniques Present and future Role of computers.
Load Characteristics:
Definitions Load forecasting methods of forecast regression analysis correlation analysis
and time series analysis Load management tariffs and metering of energy.
Distribution Transformers:
Types Three phase and single phase transformers connections Dry type and selfprotected type transformers regulation and efficiency.
Sub Transmission Lines And Distribution SubStations:
Distribution substations Bus schemes description and comparison of switching schemes
Substation location and rating.
Primary Systems:
Types of feeders voltage levels radial type feeders.

Voltage Drop And Power Loss Calculations:


Three phase primary lines Copper loss Distribution feeder costs Loss reduction and
Voltage improvement in rural networks.
Capacitors In Distribution Systems:
Effects of series and shunt capacitors justification for capacitors Procedure to determine
optimum capacitor size and location.
Distribution Sytem Protection:
Basic definitions types of over current protection devices. Objective of distribution system
protection.
Distribution System Automation:
Reforms in power sector Methods of improvement Reconfiguration Reinforcement
Automation Communication systems Sensors Automation systems Basic architecture of
Distribution
automation system software and open architecture RTU and Data
communication SCADA requirement and application functions GIS/GPS based mapping of
Distribution networksCommunication protocols for Distribution systems Integrated sub
station metering system Revenue improvement issues in multiyear tariff and availability
based tariff.
Grounding:
Grounding system earth and safety nature and sizes of earth electrodes design earthing
schemes.
Reading:
1. Turan Gonen : Electric Power Distribution Engg., Mc-Graw Hill,1986.
2. A. S. PABLA : Electric Power Distribution, TMH,2000.

EE 5214

Economic Operation of Power Systems

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3

Analyze Thermal and Hydro generator characteristics and their economic


operation.
Solve the Unit Commitment problem with various constraints using
conventional optimization techniques.
Solve ELD, UC and AGC problems using Heuristic techniques.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed syllabus
Economic dispatch problem and methods of solutions Economic importance Characteristics
of steam units.
Economic dispatch of Thermal Units and methods of solutions problem considering and
neglecting transmission losses.
Iterative and noniterative methods of solutions economic dispatch using dynamic
programming.
Unit Commitment Definition Constraints in Unit CommitmentUnit Commitment solution
methods PriorityList Methods Dynamic Programming Solution.
Economic dispatch versus Unit Commitment constraints in thermal and hydrounits hydro
thermal coordination.
Long range and shortrange hydroscheduling dynamic programming solution to hydro
thermal scheduling.
Control of generation models of power system elements single area and multi area block
diagrams generation control with PID controllers implementation of Automatic Generation
control (AGC) AGC features.
Economic dispatch by ANN and GA approaches.
Reading:
1. Allen J. Wood & B.F. Woolenberg: Power Generation, Operation and Control, Wiley
India Pvt. Ltd., 2nd edition, 2006.
2. John J. Grainger and William D Stevenson: Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill ISE,
1st edition 2003.

3. PSR Murthy: Operation & Control in Power System, BS Publications, 2nd edition, 2009.

EE 5215

Power System Reliability and Planning

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

CO3

Understand the importance of maintaining reliability of power system


components
Apply the probabilistic methods for evaluating the reliability of generation and
transmission systems.
Assess the different models of system components in reliability studies.

CO4

Assess the reliability of single area and multi area systems.

CO2

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

Detailed syllabus
Basic Reliability Concepts:
The general reliability function. The exponential distribution Mean time to failures series and
parallel systems. Markov process continuous Markov process Recursive techniques
Simple series and parallel system models.
Generating Capacity Basic Probability Methods:
The generation system model Loss of load indices Capacity expansion analysis scheduled
outages. Load forecast uncertainty Loss of energy indices. The frequency and duration method.
Transmission Systems Reliability Evaluation:
Radial configuration Conditional probability approach Network configurations State
selection.
Generation Planning:
Comparative economic assessment of individual generation projects Investigation and
simulation models Heuristic and linear programming models Probabilistic generator and load
models.
Transmission Planning:

Deterministic contingency analysis Probabilistic transmission system reliability analysis.


Reliability calculations for single area and multiarea power systems.
Distribution Planning:
Network configuration designconsisting of schemes security criteria configuration synthesis.
Reading:
1. Roy Billinton and Ronald Allan Pitam: Reliability Evaluation of Power Systems,1996.
2. R.L. Sullivan: Power System Planning, McGraw Hill International, 1977.
3. Wheel Wright and Makridakis: Forecasting methods and Applications, John Wiley,
1992.
4. J. Endremyl: Reliability Modelling in Electric Power Systems, John Wiley, 2005.

MA 5013

OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3

Recognize the importance and value of Optimization Techniques in solving


practical problems in industry
Understand Optimization models and apply them to real life problems
Design new models to improve decision making and develop critical thinking
and objective analysis of decision problems

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed syllabus
Linear Programming:
Introduction and formulation of models Convexity simplex method BigM method two
phase method degeneracy nonexistent and unbounded solutions duality in LPP dual
simplex method sensitivity analysis revised simplex method transportation and assignment
problems traveling salesman problem.
Nonlinear Programming:
Classical optimization methods equality and inequality constraints Lagrange multipliers and
KuhnTucker conditions quadratic forms quadratic programming problem and Wolfes
method.
Search Methods:
One dimensional optimization sequential search Fibonacci search multidimensional
search methods univariant search gradient methods steepest descent/ascent methods
conjugate gradient method FletcherReeves method penalty function approach.
Dynamic Programming:
Principle of optimality recursive relations solution of LPP simple examples.

Integer Linear Programming:


Gomorys cutting plane method Branch and bound algorithm Knapsack problem linear 01
problem.
Reading:
1. J.C. Pant : Introduction to Optimization, Jain Brothers,2004
2. S.S. Rao :Optimization Theory and applications, Wiley Eastern Ltd. 2009
3. K.V.Mittal : Optimization Methods, Wiley Eastern Ltd. 2005

EE 5241

SEMINAR - I

PCC

0 0 0

1 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Analyse and develop a thought process for presentation.

CO2
CO3

Improve his language and communication skills


Understand other points of view, thereby encouraging team work

CO4

Be conversant with the latest developments in power systems

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed Process:
Students will be allotted to the faculty members. On the advice of the faculty students will
select a topic of interest which is not covered in the regular class work and which enhances the
students knowledge in modern power systems. Student will explore the recent publications and
prepare a presentation and share it all the students. Faculty ice will monitor the presentations
along with the other faculty members.

EE 5251

Advanced Power System Protection

PCC

4 0 0

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3
CO4
CO5

Understand the various types of comparators and their realization using static
circuits.
Understand the realization of over current, distance and differential relays
using comparators.
Estimate the current and voltage magnitudes from the sampled
measurements.
Realize the various dynamic characteristics of digital relays for protection of
transmission lines, transformers.
Identify the new developments in protective relaying and applications.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

CO5

Detailed Syllabus:
Static Relays:
Basic Block diagram Advantages of Static Relays Comparators Phase and amplitude
Comparators General Equations of Comparators Analysis of Amplitude and Phase Comparators
Operating principlesStatic Overcurrent relays Differential relays distance relays Pilot
relaying and Carrier current protection schemes Protection of Transmission lines 3zone
protection schemes carrier aided distance schemes switched distance schemes Transformer
protection mal operation of relays Harmonic Restraint relay Wavelet applications in
transformer protection Multi Input Comparator circuits realization of Elliptical and Quadrilateral
characteristics
Digital Protection:
Developments in computer relaying mathematical basis for protective relaying algorithms, Fourier
Transforms Discrete Fourier transforms Wavelet transforms Kalman filtering Digital
protection of transformers Fourier based algorithms finite duration impulse response filter based
algorithms least square curve fitting based algorithms flux restrained current differential relay

Digital protection of transmission lines current based differential schemes composite voltage
and current based schemes New developments in relaying principles fundamentals of travelling
wave protection principle of travelling wave distance relay adaptive relaying fault location
algorithms
Reading:
1. Power System Protection Static relays T.S.MadhavaRao, TMH, 2010.
2. Digital Protection for Power Systems A.T.Johns and S.K.Salman, 1995.
3. Computer Relaying for power Systems A.G.Phake, James S.Thorp, JohnWiley and
sons
4. Protective relaying principles and applications J.Lewis Blackburn, Marcel & Dekker

EE 5252

State Estimation and Security Analysis

PCC

4 0 0

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - Advanced Computer Methods in Power System


Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

CO2
CO3
CO4

Develop mathematical models for analysis of linear and nonlinear State


Estimation, Observability, and Contingency analysis of any practical Power
System.
Prepare the practical input data required for linear and nonlinear State
Estimation methods and Contingency studies.
Select and identify the most appropriate algorithm for State Estimation and
Contingency Evaluation.
identify the strategic locations for measurements to analyses the state of the
system

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed Syllabus:
State Estimation of Power Systems:
Introduction to State Estimation (SE) in Power Systems: Maximum likelihood Weighted Least
Square Estimation Weighted Least Square (WLS) SE. SE of AC networks: Types of
measurements Linear WLSSE theory DC Load flow based WLSSE Linearized model of
WLSSE of Nonlinear AC power systems Sequential and nonsequential methods to
process measurements typical results of SE on an Ac network. Types of SE. Detection and
Identification of bad measurements Network Observability and Pseudomeasurements
observability by Graphical technique and Triangularisation approach Optimal meter placement
Application of Power System SE.
Security Analysis of Power System:
Concept of security Security analysis and monitoring factors affecting Power System
Security Contingency Analysis for Generator and Line Outages by Fast Decoupled Inverse
Lemmabased approach Network Sensitivity factors. Contingency selection. Computer control
of Power Systems: Need for Real Time and Computer control of Power Systems operating

states of a Power System Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system (SCADA)
implementation considerations energy control centers software requirements for
implementing the above functions.
Reading:
1. Allen J. Wood and Bruce Woolenberg: Power System Generation, Operation and Control,
John Wiley and Sons, 1996.
2. John J. Grainger and William D Stevenson Jr.: Power System Analysis, McGraw Hill ISE,
1994.
3. IEEE Proc. July 1974, Special Issue on Computer Control of Power Systems.

EE 5253

Power System Stability and Control

PCC

4 0 0

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Develop mathematical models of power system for dynamic studies

CO2

Analyze the performance of single and multi-machine systems under


transient, steady state and dynamic conditions.
Design stabilizers, dynamic resistors and SMES for the power system.

CO3

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed Syllabus:
Synchronous Machine Modeling:
Parks transformation of flux linkages Voltage Current equations and physical interpretation;
dq0 equivalent circuits; Synchronous transient subtransient and operational impedances;
time constants Power and torque field & armature current due to sudden short circuit; phasor
diagrams.
Basic Models For Power System Studies:
Low and high order models; excitation systems; exciter voltage regulator models; Hydraulic and
steam turbine models; Low frequency oscillation studies action of proportional and forced
action AVR.
Steady State Dynamic Stability Criteria:
Normal conditions Direct and indirect steady state stability criteria of simple and multi
machine systems practical stability criteria; Dynamic stability of SMIB system & MMP
Systems.
Transient Stability Studies:
Stability analysis of multi machine systems Effect of exciter and governor models Computer
solution and flow charts.
Methods To Improve Stability:
Methods to improve steady state Dynamic stability /PSSs/transient and voltage stability.

Readings:
1 P.M. Anderson & A.A. Fouad: Power System Control and Stability, Iowa State University
Press.
2 Prabha Kundur: Power Systems stability and Control, McGraw Hill Inc. New York,
1994
3 K R Padiyar: Power System Dynamics Stability and Control, BS Publications,
Hyderabad, 2008.

EE 5254

Artificial Intelligence (AI) Lab

PCC

0 0 3

2 Credits

Pre-requisites: - AI Techniques in Power Systems


Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3

Analyze and pick the best artificial intelligence technique for a given Power
System problem.
Identify and use modern tools like fuzzy logic, artificial neural networks and
ANFIS for power system problems.
Use ANN, Fuzzy, GA toolboxes of MATLAB.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed Syllabus:
Load Flow analysis using Neural Network State Estimations using Neural Network
Contingency Analysis using Neural Network Power system Security using Neural Network
Fuzzy Logic based AGC Single area system Two area system Fuzzy Logic based small
signal stability analysis Simulation and verification of fuzzy Logic experiments using fuzzy
logic trainer.

EE 5255

Power System Simulation Lab

PCC

0 0 3

2 Credits

Pre-requisites: - Advanced Computer Techniques in Power Systems


Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Asses the different state estimation techniques.

CO2

Evaluate the economic dispatch of coordinated thermal unit.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

CO1

CO2

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

Detailed Syllabus:
Simulation of Single Area and Two Area Systems using MATLAB Package. Study of load
frequency control problem of (i) uncontrolled and (ii) controlled cases Economic Dispatch of (i)
Thermal Units and (ii) Thermal Plants using Conventional and ANN & GA algorithms MVAR
Compensation studies on normal and heavily loaded power systems using Mipower package
Contingency evaluation and analysis of power systemDevelopment of single line diagram of
power system componentsState estimation of power systems.

EE 5165
Pre-requisites: - None

Power Quality

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Assess the severity of power quality problems in distribution system;

CO2

Analyze current and voltage related power quality issues

CO3

Suggest the methodology to improve the power quality for sensitive loads by
various mitigating custom power devices;

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed Syllabus:
Introduction- Power Quality Voltage Quality. Terms and definitions: General Classes of Power
quality Problems. Voltage sags and interruptions: Sources of Sag and Interruptions Estimating
voltage Sag Performance. Transient over voltages: Utility CapacitorSwitching transients.
Fundamentals of harmonics: Voltage versus Current Distortion. Longduration voltage
variations: Principles of Regulating the Voltage. Power Quality monitoring: Monitoring
considerations
Reading:
1. Electrical Power Systems Quality, Dugan Roger C, Santoso Surya, McGranaghan , Marks
F. Beaty and H. Wayre, McGraw Hill
2. Power Systems Quality Assessment, J.Arillaga, N.R.Watson, S.Clon, John Wiley
3. Power Quality, C.Sankaran, CRC Press
4. Understanding power quality problems, Math H. Bollen, IEEE press.

EE 5166

Alternate Sources of Electrical Energy

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Assess the cost of generation for conventional and renewable energy plants

CO2
CO3

To design suitable power controller for wind and solar applications


Design charge controllers for efficient operation of storage systems

CO4

Develop mathematical models of renewable energy sources

CO5

Design an appropriate system for standalone and grid connected operation


and apply energy storage devices.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

CO5

Detailed Syllabus:
Introduction:
Renewable Sources of Energy GridSupplied Electricity Distributed Generation
Renewable Energy Economics Calculation of Electricity Generation Costs DemandSide
Management Options SupplySide Management Options Modern Electronic Controls of
Power Systems.
Wind Power Plants:
Appropriate Location Evaluation of Wind Intensity Topography Purpose of the Energy
Generated General Classification of Wind Turbines Rotor Turbines MultipleBlade Turbines
Drag Turbines Lifting Turbines Generators and Speed Control Used in Wind Power Energy
Analysis of Small Generating Systems.
Photovoltaic Power Plants:
Solar Energy Generation of Electricity by Photovoltaic Effect Dependence of a PV Cell
Characteristic on Temperature Solar Cell Output Characteristics Equivalent Models and
Parameters for Photovoltaic Panels Photovoltaic Systems Applications of Photovoltaic Solar
Energy Economical Analysis of Solar Energy.

Fuel Cells:
The Fuel Cell Low and HighTemperature Fuel Cells Commercial and Manufacturing
Issues Constructional Features of Proton ExchangeMembrane Fuel Cells Reformers
Electrolyzer Systems and Related Precautions Advantages and Disadvantages of Fuel Cells
Fuel Cell Equivalent Circuit Practical Determination of the Equivalent Model Parameters
Aspects of Hydrogen as Fuel.
Induction Generators:
Principles of Operation Representation of SteadyState Operation Power and Losses
Generated SelfExcited Induction Generator Magnetizing Curves and SelfExcitation
Mathematical Description of the SelfExcitation Process Interconnected and Standalone
operation Speed and Voltage Control Economical Aspects.
Storage Systems:
Energy Storage Parameters LeadAcid Batteries Ultra capacitors Flywheels
Superconducting Magnetic Storage System Pumped Hydroelectric Energy Storage
Compressed Air Energy Storage Storage Heat Energy Storage as an Economic Resource
Reading:
1. Felix A. Farret, M. Godoy Simo`es, Integration of Alternative Sources of Energy, John
Wiley & Sons, 2006.
2. Remus Teodorescu, Marco Liserre, Pedro Rodrguez, Grid Converters for Photovoltaic
and Wind Power Systems, John Wiley & Sons, 2011.
3. Gilbert M. Masters, Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems, John Wiley &
Sons, 2004

EE 5261

Power System Deregulation

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Understand the developments of restructuring worldwide.

CO2
CO3

Identify the roles and responsibilities of different entities in power market.


Explore issues like congestion management, Transmission pricing, Ancillary
Services Management.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

CO1

CO2

CO3

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

Detailed Syllabus:
Overview of key issues in electric utilities:
Introduction Gencos DiscomsIndependent system operator (ISO) power exchange.
Restructuring models:
Models based on Trading Models based on transactions Hybrid model market operations
market power standard cost.
Transmission pricing:
Cost Components Postage Stamp method Megawatt Mile method Contract Path Method.
Congestion pricing Preventive and corrective measure management of inter zonal/intra
zonal congestion.
OASIS:
Open Access Sametime Information System structure of oasis pooling of information
transfer capability on OASIS.
Definitions transfer capability issues:
ATC TTC TRM CBM calculations methodologies to calculate ATC.
Electricity Pricing:
Introduction electricity price volatility electricity price indexes challenges to electricity pricing
construction of forward price curves shorttime price forecasting ANN based price

forecasting.
Power system operation in competitive environment:
Introduction operational planning activities of ISO the ISO in pool markets the ISO in
bilateral markets operational planning activities of a Genco.
Ancillary services management:
Introduction reactive power as an ancillary service a review synchronous generators as
ancillary service providers.
Reading:
1. Kankar Bhattacharya, Math H.J. Bollen and Jaap E. Daalder: Operation of Restructured
Power Systems, Springer Publishers, 2001.
2. Mohammad Shahidehpour and Muwaffaqalomoush Restructured Electrical Power
Systems, 1st Edition, Marcel Dekker, Inc., 2001.
3. Loi Lei Lai, 'power system restructuring and Deregulation' , John Wiley & Sons Ltd.,
England

EE 5262

EHV AC Transmission

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

understand issues of concern with EHVAC transmission

CO2
CO3

identify and calculate the various parameters of EHV line for modeling
assess the effects of corona and methods to limit the audible noise

CO4

Estimate the overvoltages in EHV AC systems.

CO5

design grounding system for EHVAC systems

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

CO5

Detailed Syllabus:
Introduction to EHV AC Transmission
Calculations of line and ground parameters:
Properties of bundled conductors inductance and capacitance calculations line parameters for
modes of propagation resistance and inductance of ground returns equivalent circuit of line
model.
Corona:
Corona corona loss formula factors affecting corona. Audible noise its characteristics limits for
audio noise relation between single phase and 3phase AN levels radio interference limits for
radio interference fields CIGRE formula.
Over Voltage in EHV Systems:
Switching surges causes of switching surge over voltages recovery voltage restriking transients
over voltages caused by interruption of low inductance currents line energization transients

Ferroresonance over voltages lightning over voltages protection against switching and lightning
surges insulation coordination design example.
Theory of reactive power control:
Theory of steady state reactive power control in transmission system uncompensated
transmission lines fundamental transmission line equation surge impedance loading
uncompensated line on open circuit / under load. Passive shunt compensation control of open
circuit voltage with shunt reactors voltage control with switched shunt compensation Midpoint
shunt reactor or capacitor. Series compensation objectives and limitations symmetrical line with
midpoint series capacitance and shunt reactor.
Power System Grounding:
Analysis of simple grounding systems body currents due to touch and step voltages grounding
system safety assessment Basic design of grounding Mitigation of touch and step voltages
Design example of a substation grounding.
Reading:
1. Rakesh Das Begamudre: Extra High Voltage Ac Transmission Engineering, PHI (pub) 1991.
2. T.J.E.Miller : Reactive Power Control in Electric Systems, John Wiley & Sons, 1986
3. TuranGonen: Electric Power Transmission System Engineering Analysis and Design,
McGraw Hill (Pub) .
4. A Chakraborti, D.P. Kothari and A.K. Mukhopadyay: Performance, Operation and
Control of EHV Power Transmission Systems, T.M.H, 1999.
5. AP SakisMeliopoulos: Power System Grounding and transients, 1988.

EE5263

Power System Transients

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - Advanced Computer Methods in Power Systems


Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Model generators, transformers, transmission lines for transient studies.

CO2
CO3

Estimate transients for designing of power system components


Assess the travelling wave transients using Bewley Lattice diagram.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Detailed Syllabus:
Introduction to Power System Transients
Simple Switching Transients:
The circuit closing transient Recovery transient initiated by removal of short circuit double
frequency transient Damping of transients.
Abnormal switching transients:
Current chopping Capacitance switching Re-striking phenomena Ferro Resonance
Switching off of capacitor banks and reactor banks Symmetrical components for solving three
phase switching transients.
Electromagnetic Phenomena under transient conditions:
Introduction steady state penetration of magnetic flux and current into conductors transient
penetration of magnetic flux and current electromagnetic shielding Implications
Travelling waves on transmission lines:
Wave equation reflection and refraction of travelling waves BewleyLattice diagram
switching operations of transmission lines.
Modelling of power apparatus under transient conditions:
Modelling of transformers Generators Motors Overhead lines and cables case studies.

Protection of system against transients:


Lightning shielding Surge Suppressors Lightning arrester Surge capacitors Effect of
grounding practices.
Reading:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Allen Greenwood: Electrical Transient in Power Systems McGraw Hill, 1991.


Harold A Peterson: Transient in Power Systems, McGraw Hill, 1966.
Kuffel and Abdullah: High Voltage Engineering, PHI, 2000.
Rakesh D. Begamudre: EHV AC Transmission Engineering, PHI, 2006.

EE 5264

Smart Electric Grid

EC

3 0 0

3 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Understand features of Smart Grid in the context of Indian Grid.

CO2
CO3

Assess the role of automation in Transmission/Distribution


Apply Evolutionary Algorithms for the Smart Grid/Distribution Generation.

CO4

Understand operation and importance of PMUs, PDCs, WAMS, Voltage and


Frequency control in Micro Grids.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed Syllabus
Introduction to Smart Grid:
What is Smart Grid? Working definitions of Smart Grid and Associated Concepts Smart Grid
Functions Traditional Power Grid and Smart Grid New Technologies for Smart Grid
Advantages Indian Smart Grid Key Challenges for Smart Grid.
Smart Grid Architecture:
Components and Architecture of Smart Grid Design Review of the proposed architectures for
Smart Grid. The fundamental components of Smart Grid designs Transmission Automation
Distribution Automation Renewable Integration
Tools and Techniques for Smart Grid:
Computational Techniques Static and Dynamic Optimization Techniques Computational
Intelligence Techniques Evolutionary Algorithms Artificial Intelligence techniques.
Distribution Generation Technologies:
Introduction to Renewable Energy Technologies Micro grids Storage
Technologies
Electric Vehicles and plug in hybrids Environmental impact and Climate Change Economic
Issues.

Communication Technologies and Smart Grid:


Introduction to Communication Technology SynchroPhasor Measurement Units (PMUs)
Wide Area Measurement Systems (WAMS).
Control of Smart Power Grid System:
Load Frequency Control (LFC) in Micro Grid System Voltage Control in Micro Grid System
Reactive Power Control in Smart Grid. Case Studies and Test beds for the Smart Grids.
Reading:
1. Stuart Borlase, Smart Grids, Infrastructure, Technology and Solutions, CRC Press,
2013
2. Gil Masters, Renewable and Efficient Electric Power System, WileyIEEE Press,
2004.
3. A.G. Phadke and J.S. Thorp, Synchronized Phasor Measurements and their
Applications, Springer Edition, 2010.
4. T. Ackermann, Wind Power in Power Systems, Hoboken, NJ, USA, John Wiley,
2005.

EE 5291

Seminar - II

PCC

0 0 0

1 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

The students will be exposed to various advance topics in power systems.

CO2
CO3

To be able to analyze and develop a thought process for presentation.


To be able to improve his language and communication skills

CO4

To be able to understand others point of view, thereby encouraging team


work.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

CO4

Detailed Process:
Students will be allotted to the faculty members. On the advice of the faculty students will
select a topic of interest which is not covered in the regular class work and which enhances the
students knowledge in modern power systems. Student will explore the recent publications and
prepare a presentation and share it all the students. Faculty i/c will monitor the presentations
along with the other faculty members.

EE 6242

Comprhensive VivaVoce Examination

PCC

0 0 0

4 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Students are expected to understand the various courses and


comprehensively correlate them in design and operation of modern power
systems

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

CO1

PO2
3

PO3
3

PO4
3

PO5
2

PO6
-

PO7
2

PO8
3

PO9
1

Dissertation Part A

EE 6249

0 0 0

PRC

8 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1
CO2
CO3

Identify a problem suitable to carryout dissertation work through literature


survey.
Formulate the problem and identify suitable modeling paradigm Analyze the
problem and identify the solution methodology
Analyze the problem and identify the solution methodology

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3

Dissertation Part B

EE 6299

PRC

0 0 0

18 Credits

Pre-requisites: - None
Course Outcomes: At the end of the course the student will be able to:
CO1

Simulate using modern tool sets and validate through experimental methods
wherever feasible.

CO2

Validate and analyze the results using multiple case studies.

CO3

Deduce conclusions and draw inferences worthy of publication

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Course
Outcomes

PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

CO1

CO2

CO3