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Module Guide

Lord Ashcroft International Business School

Research Methods for


Business and Management
Department: Economics and International Business
Module Code: MOD004452
Level: 7

Academic Year: 2014/15


Semester/Trimester: One

Module Guide

Contents
1. Key Information ....................................................................................................................................2
Module Title..2
2. Introduction to the Module ....................................................................................................................2
2.1 Employability skills delivered in this Module ........................................................................................2
3. Attendance ...........................................................................................................................................3
4. Learning Outcomes and Outline Delivery......4
5. Assessment ..........................................................................................................................................5
5.1. Type of Assessment..5
5.2. Qualifying conditions.5
5.3(a). Submitting your work via Turnitin/Grademark [Cambridge and Chelmsford students]6
5.3(b). Submitting your work [Students in all other locations at Associate Colleges].7
5.4. Feedback...........................................................................................................................................8
6. How is My work Marked?........................................................................................................................9
7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards..12
7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria and Marking Rubric.............................................................................12
7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria ............................................................................................13
7.3 Specific Marking Criteria.....14
7.3.1
Element 010 (Research Poster)..14
7.3.1
Element 011 (Full Research Proposal).....15
8. Assessment Offences.........................................................................................................................16
9. Learning Resources ...........................................................................................................................19
9.1. Library .............................................................................................................................................19
10. Module Evaluation ............................................................................................................................20
11. Report on Last Delivery of Module ....................................................................................................20
Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information ................................................................................................22

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Module Guide

1. Key Information
Module title: Research Methods for Business and Management
Module Leader: Dr Noah Karley
Cambridge: LAB322
Extension: 5739
Email: noah.karley@anglia.ac.uk
Module Tutors:
Tourism: Dr Artikis Panos
Marketing: Dr Jonathan Wilson
International Finance etc.: Dr Artikis Panos
Management: Dr Zilia Iskoujina
International Business: Dr Zilia Iskoujina
MBA: Dr Craig Duckworth
MBA Block, Crawford: Dr Greg OShea
Accounting, Accounting & Finance, Finance, MBA, Supply Management: Dr Andrew Armitage
Every module has a Module Definition Form (MDF) which is the officially validated record of the module.
You can access the MDF for this module in three ways via:

the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)


the My.Anglia Module Catalogue at www.anglia.ac.uk/modulecatalogue
Anglia Ruskins module search engine facility at www.anglia.ac.uk/modules

All modules delivered by Anglia Ruskin University at its main campuses in the UK and at Associate
Colleges throughout the UK and overseas are governed by the Academic Regulations. You can view
these at www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs. An extract of the Academic Regulations, known as the
Assessment Regulations, is available at this website too (all new students will have received a printed
copy as part of their welcome pack).
In the unlikely event of any discrepancy between the Academic Regulations and any other publication,
including this module guide, the Academic Regulations, as the definitive document, take precedence
over all other publications and will be applied in all cases.

2. Introduction to the Module


This module provides course participants with the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities they will
need to effectively carry out a piece of small scale business/management research. A particular
emphasis will be placed upon developing individuals towards their Masters dissertation/project. A focus
is given to the specific issues faced by managers and researchers when carrying out research in an
organisational setting. These will include the philosophical aspects of enquiry in social settings, operating
in political contexts, negotiating access to key individuals and data, and meeting the research outcomes
expected by multiple organisational stakeholders. Consequently, this module will focus on providing
individuals with the necessary skills to meet these challenges and therefore effectively plan, carry out
and report upon their Masters level dissertation/project.
2.1 Employability skills delivered in this Module
It is important that we help you develop employability skills throughout your course which will assist you
in securing employment and supporting you in your future career. During your course you will acquire a
wide range of key skills. In this module, you will develop those identified below:

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Module Guide

SKILL

Skills acquired in this


module

Communication (oral)
Communication (written)
Commercial Awareness
Cultural sensitivity
Customer focus
Data Handling
Decision making
Enterprising
Flexibility
Initiative
Interpersonal Skills
Leadership/Management of others
Networking
Organisational adaptability
Project Management
Problem Solving and analytical skills
Responsibility
Team working
Time Management
Other

X
X
X
X
X
X

X
Review or synthesize
existing knowledge
Investigate existing
situations or problems
Provide solutions to
problems
Explore and analyse more
general issues
Construct or create new
procedures or systems
Explain phenomenon
Generate new knowledge

3. Attendance
Attending all your classes is very important and one of the best ways to help you succeed in this module.
In accordance with the Student Charter, you are expected to arrive on time and take an active part in all
your timetabled classes. If you are unable to attend a class for a valid reason (e.g.: illness), please
contact your Module Tutor and the faculty office by phone or email as follows: Phone: 0845 196 2112,
email: laibsabsences-cam@anglia.ac.uk.
Anglia Ruskin will closely monitor the attendance of all students and will contact you by e-mail if you
have been absent without notice for two weeks. Continued absence can result in various consequences
including the termination of your registration as you will be considered to have withdrawn from your
studies.
International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry clearance/leave to remain
as a student (Tier 4 student visa) are required to be in regular attendance at Anglia Ruskin. Failure to do
so is considered to be a breach of national immigration regulations. Failure to do so will have serious
implications for your immigration status in the UK. Anglia Ruskin, like all British Universities, is statutorily
obliged to inform UK Visa & Immigration (Home Office) of significant unauthorised absences by any
student visa holders.
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Module Guide

4. Learning Outcomes and Outline Delivery


No

Type

Knowledge and
understanding

Knowledge and
understanding

Intellectual, practical,
affective and
transferable skills
Intellectual, practical,
affective and
transferable skills

On successful completion of this module the student will be


expected to be able to:
Demonstrate a critical awareness of different research designs and
respective methodologies relevant to academic and practitioner
researchers working within an international context.
Explain their chosen research question/hypothesis and research
objectives, and all the relevant elements contributing to a research
proposal suitable to researching a contemporary international
business topic.
Critically evaluate the literature relevant to their research aims in
order to develop a conceptual framework or critical stance.
Act as an independent self-learner demonstrate the skills necessary
to plan, organise, undertake and present an international business
project.

Lectures
1

Topics
Module overview, nature of management research

Formulating and clarifying the research topic

Critically reviewing academic literature and academic writing

Research philosophies and approaches

Negotiating access and research ethics

Selecting samples

Collecting data through questionnaires

Analyzing quantitative data

Collecting data through observation and interviews

10

Using secondary data

11

Writing and presenting your project report

12

Issues in research and assignment advice and formative feedback

NB: Listed lectures and topics to be tailored to suit block teaching as required

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Module Guide

5. Assessment
5.1 Type of assessment
The assessment for this module consists of two elements. Final submission dates for elements
of assessment vary.
Element Type of assessment

010

Research proposal
Poster

Word or Submission
time
method
limit
500
TurnitinUK
GradeMark

011

Full research proposal

2500

TurnitinUK
GradeMark

Final Submission Date

No later than 5th January 2015


by 2pm Early date strongly
advised

By 10th November 2014*

*This poster submission date applies to students taking module on weekly basis only. Students on block
teaching will be advised by module tutor of the suitable submission date.
5.2

Qualifying conditions

Qualifying
Mark
see
guidance
notes

Learning
Outcomes

% Weighting
& Fine
Grade (FG)
or pass/fail
(PF)

Coursework A
(Element 010)

1-4

20%

30

Students produce a 500 word (max)


research proposal poster

Coursework B
(Element 011)

1-4

80%

30

Final research proposal, maximum word


limit of 2500

Method
see guidance
notes

Length/duration and other comments

In order to pass this module, students are required to achieve an overall mark of 40%.
In addition, students are required to:
(a) achieve the qualifying mark for each element of fine graded assessment as specified above
(b) pass any pass/fail elements

All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published
deadline which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be submitted
ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or non-submission.
All student work which contributes to the eventual outcome of the module (i.e.: if it determines whether
you will pass or fail the module and counts towards the mark you achieve for the module) is submitted

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Module Guide

via Turnitin/GradeMark. You CANNOT submit work for this element via the iCentres and Academic
staff CANNOT accept work directly from you.
Any late work (posted to Turnitin/Grademark) will NOT be considered and a mark of zero will be
awarded for the assessment task in question.
You are requested to keep a copy of your work.
5.3 (a). Submitting your work via Turnitin/Grademark [Cambridge and Chelmsford students]
You are required to submit your written assignment(s) online via Turnitin/Grademark. Unless stated on
the assignment brief, all your assignments should be submitted online. Hard copy assignments handed
into the iCentre will NOT be marked. You must put YOUR Student ID number (SID) as the
submission title (details below).
You will be enrolled automatically to two types of Turnitin class: 1) Grademark Classes entitled by
module name, to which you will submit a ONE TIME ONLY final submission; 2) The Originality Report
Class to which you can submit multiple drafts for originality checking.
The Grademark class page shows the start date (when you can begin submitting work), the due date for
your assignment and the post date. All assignments must be submitted by 5pm on the due date. Any
late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in question.
The post date is the date when both feedback and provisional results will be posted online. You should
follow the detailed instructions provided on the VLE:
https://vle.anglia.ac.uk/sites/LTA/Grademark/Content/Home.aspx
When you submit your paper, remember to include the information:

When you click Upload, you then see a preview of your file. If you are happy it is the right file, click
Confirm to submit your work.
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POINTS TO NOTE
1. The due date as seen in eVision is the official submission deadline. Any late work will NOT be
accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in question. Do not leave it
until the last minute to submit your work the system becomes extremely busy and can be slower
during the period of the deadline.
2. Grademark final submission classes will become available at least 10 working days before the final
submission date. Be aware that work can only be submitted ONCE to these classes and cannot be
removed or changed. All work for one assessment element must be submitted as one file (not
in parts).
3. All work submitted MUST be entitled by your Student ID number.
4. There is guidance about the file types and file sizes supported on Turntin/Grademark see the
section on Preparing my Assignment on : https://vle.anglia.ac.uk/sites/LTA/Grademark/
5. Any work handed in via the iCentre will NOT be marked.
6. The Originality Report is automatically generated by Turnitin on submitting work. A paper copy of the
originality report is not required.
7. The Originality Report will not be used to make assessment decisions unless concerns arise as to
poor academic practice, plagiarism, or collusion. The report may then be considered as part of the
normal investigatory procedures undertaken by the academic team and the Director of Studies
(again, please see Section 10 of the Assessment Regulations).
8. Re-sits and extensions are also to be submitted via Turnitin. New Turnitin classes will be created for
re-sits.
9.

Full details on submitting to Turnitin, the Originality Report, and a FAQs list, can be located on the
module VLE. If you have experience submission difficulties, please email: LAIBS-GrademarkSupport@anglia.ac.uk Furthermore, there is a support VLE site
(https://vle.anglia.ac.uk/sites/LTA/Grademark/Content/Home.aspx) there are links to videos to show
you how to submit your work and to view your feedback.

All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published
deadline which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be submitted
ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or non-submission.
5.3(b) Submitting your work [Students in all other locations at Associate Colleges]
All student work which contributes to the eventual outcome of the module (i.e. if it determines whether
you will pass or fail the module and counts towards the mark you achieve for the module) is submitted
according to your institutions guidelines. Academic staff CANNOT accept work directly from you.
Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in
question.
You are requested to keep a copy of your work.

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Module Guide

5.4. Feedback
You are entitled to feedback on your performance for all your assessed work. For all assessment tasks
which are not examinations, this is accomplished by a member of academic staff providing your mark
and associated comments which will relate to the achievement of the modules intended learning
outcomes and the assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was first issued. This
feedback will be available on-line via Turnitin/Grademark or may be sent directly to your Anglia Ruskin
e-mail account.
The marker of your assignment will include feedback on written assignments that includes answers to
these three key questions:
1.
What is your overall feedback?
2.
How does your assignment compare to the marking criteria?
3.
How can you improve in the future?
Examination scripts are retained by Anglia Ruskin and are not returned to students. However, you are
entitled to feedback on your performance in an examination and may request a meeting with the Module
Leader or Tutor to see your examination script and to discuss your performance.
Anglia Ruskin is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work within 20 working days
of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. This is extended to 30 days for feedback for a
Major Project module (please note that working days excludes those days when Anglia Ruskin University
is officially closed; e.g.: between Christmas and New Year). Personal tutors will offer to read feedback
from several modules and help you to address any common themes that may be emerging.
On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for pieces of work that you completed in the earlier
stages of the module. We provide you with this feedback as part of the learning experience and to help
you prepare for other assessment tasks that you have still to complete. It is important to note that, in
these cases, the marks for these pieces of work are unconfirmed. This means that, potentially,
marks can change, in either direction!
Marks for modules and individual pieces of work become confirmed on the Dates for the Official
Publication of Results which can be checked at www.anglia.ac.uk/results.
HOW TO VIEW YOUR FEEDBACK IN TURNITIN GRADEMARK
Click on the class that you wish to view and then you will see the assignments for the module listed.
Click the blue view button to open up the document viewer.

The Document Viewer will open and the main feedback on your work is shown in the General
Comments:

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Module Guide

There may also be Quick Marks on your assignment or a Grading Form/Rubric to show how you
performed against the marking criteria, click on the tabs to open them.
Comments List
Expands
/collapses
comments
on all
pages
Expands
/collapses
comments
on a page

Rubric/Grading Form
Number of
comments
on a page

Jumps to the
comment
within your
assignment

Expanded
comments

Scroll to
see how
your work
compared
with the
marking
criteria

6. How is My Work Marked?


After you have handed your work in or you have completed an examination, Anglia Ruskin undertakes a
series of activities to assure that our marking processes are comparable with those employed at other
universities in the UK and that your work has been marked fairly, honestly and consistently. These
include:

Anonymous marking your name is not attached to your work so, at the point of marking, the
lecturer does not know whose work he/she is considering. When you undertake an assessment task
where your identity is known (e.g.: a presentation or Major Project), it is marked by more than one
lecturer (known as double marking)

Internal moderation a sample of all work for each assessment task in each module is moderated
by other Anglia Ruskin staff to check the standards and consistency of the marking

External moderation a sample of student work for all modules is moderated by external
examiners experienced academic staff from other universities (and sometimes practitioners who
represent relevant professions) - who scrutinise your work and provide Anglia Ruskin academic staff
with feedback, advice and assurance that the marking of your work is comparable to that in other UK
universities. Many of Anglia Ruskins staff act as external examiners at other universities.

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Module Guide

Departmental Assessment Panel (DAP) performance by all students on all modules is discussed
and approved at the appropriate DAPs which are attended by all relevant Module Leaders and
external examiners. Anglia Ruskin has over 25 DAPs to cover all the different subjects we teach.
This module falls within the remit of the Economics and International Business Departmental
Assessment Panel.
The following external examiners are appointed to this DAP and will oversee the assessment of this
and other modules within the DAPs remit:

External Examiners Name

Academic Institution

Position or Employer

Prof Dr Jens Cordes

Hochschule Harz University of


Applied Sciences

Professor of Service Management


and Service

Dr Kenny Crossan

Edinburgh Napier University

Economics Lecturer

Dr Margaret Fletcher

University of Glasgow

Lecturer

Dr Chris Miller

University of Glamorgan

Principal Lecturer

Prof Klaus Nielsen

University of London

Professor of Institutional Economics

Dr Jalal Uddin Siddiki

Kingston University

Senior Lecturer

Dr Frans Somers

None (practitioner)

Owner/Consultant SBC International

The above list is correct at the time of publication. However, external examiners are appointed at
various points throughout the year. An up-to-date list of external examiners is available to students and
staff at www.anglia.ac.uk/eeinfo.

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Module Guide

Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart below:

Student submits
work / sits
examination

Work collated and passed to


Module Leader
Work is marked by Module
Leader and Module Tutor(s)1. All
marks collated by Module Leader
for ALL locations2

Internal moderation samples


selected. Moderation undertaken
by a second academic3

Any issues?

YES

NO
Students receive
initial (unconfirmed)
feedback

External Moderation Stage

Internal Moderation Stage

Marking Stage

Flowchart of Anglia Ruskins Marking Processes

Unconfirmed marks and feedback


to students within 20 working
days (30 working days for Major
Projects)

External moderation samples


selected and moderated by
External Examiners4

Any issues?

YES

NO

DAP4 Stage

Marks submitted to DAP5 for


consideration and approval

1
2

Confirmed marks
issued to students
via e-Vision

Marks Approved by DAP5 and


forwarded to Awards Board

All work is marked anonymously or double marked where identity of the student is known (e.g.: in a presentation)
The internal (and external) moderation process compares work from all locations where the module is delivered
(e.g.: Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough, Malaysia, India, Trinidad etc.)
The sample for the internal moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever
is the greater) for each marker and covers the full range of marks
Only modules at levels 5, 6 and 7 are subject to external moderation (unless required for separate reasons). The
sample for the external moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever is
the greater) for the entire module and covers the full range of marks
DAP: Departmental Assessment Panel Anglia Ruskin has over 25 different DAPs to reflect our subject coverage

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Module Guide

7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards


7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria and Marking Rubric or Grading Form

Executive Summary

A++ = 90-100

The executive
summary is wellfocused on the main
points for top
management. It is
exceptionally wellwritten to highlight
your proposed ebusiness strategy.

A+ = 80-89%

A = 70-79%

B = 60-69%

C = 50-59%

D = 40-49%

F = 30-39%

F- = 20-29%

F = 10 -19%

F---- = 0-9%

An outstanding
executive summary
that is well-focused
and considered. It
explains the purpose
and conclusions of
the report well.

An excellent
summary that is clear
and succinct. It
outlines the main
points for the senior
management team.

A very good
executive summary
that highlights the
main points which
top management
would be interested
in.

The executive summary


highlighted the major
points in the report,
however, some aspects
were missing.

There is the
beginnings of an
executive summary.
You really needed to
summarise what the
report recommended.
The idea of an
executive summary is
that if top
management read
just the summarise
they would know
what the report
proposes.

Your executive
summary is unclear
make sure to focus
on summarising the
most important
aspects in your
report.

You have
misunderstood the
purpose of the
executive summary.
You needed to
overview the whole
report, including the
main facts about your
recommendation.

There is some
attempt to explain the
report but this is not
really an executive
summary. The
executive summary
should have
overviewed the main
recommendation of
the report.

NO EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
The executive
summary should
have overviewed the
main
recommendation of
the report. The idea
is that top
management do not
have to read the
whole report to know
what it is about.

CREATE ROW for


each marking criteria.

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Module Guide

7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria


ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS
LEVEL 7
Level 7 is characterised by an expectation of students expertise in their specialism. Students are semi-autonomous, demonstrating
independence in the negotiation of assessment tasks (including the major project) and the ability to evaluate, challenge, modify and
develop theory and practice. Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to isolate and focus on the significant features of problems
and to offer synthetic and coherent solutions, with some students producing original or innovative work in their specialism that is worthy
of publication or public performance or display.

Generic Learning Outcomes (GLOs) (Academic Regulations, Section 2)

Characteristics of Student Achievement by Marking Band

Mark Bands

Outcome
Knowledge & Understanding

Intellectual (thinking), Practical,


Affective and Transferable Skills

90-100%

Exceptional analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics with


very clear originality and autonomy. Exceptional
development of conceptual structures and argument
making an exceptional use of scholarly conventions.
Demonstrates independence of thought and a very high
level of intellectual rigour and consistency. Work pushes
the boundaries of the discipline and may be considered for
external publication

Exceptional analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics.


Exceptional development of conceptual structures and
argument, making consistent use of scholarly conventions.
Exceptional research skills, independence of thought, an
extremely high level of intellectual rigour and consistency,
exceptional expressive/professional skills, and substantial
creativity and originality. Exceptional academic/intellectual
skills. Work pushes the boundaries of the discipline and
may be considered for external publication

80-89%

Outstanding analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics with


clear originality and autonomy. Outstanding development
of conceptual structures and argument making an
exemplary use of scholarly conventions. Demonstrates
independence of thought and a very high level of
intellectual rigour and consistency

Outstanding analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics. Very


high level development of conceptual structures and
argument, making consistent use of scholarly conventions.
Outstanding research skills, independence of thought, a
high level of intellectual rigour and consistency,
outstanding expressive/professional skills, and
considerable creativity and originality. Exemplary
academic/intellectual skills

70-79%

Excellent analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics. Excellent


development of conceptual structures and argument
making excellent use of scholarly conventions.
Demonstrates independence of thought and a high level of
intellectual rigour and consistency

Excellent analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics. High


level development of conceptual structures and argument,
making consistent use of scholarly conventions. Excellent
research skills, independence of thought, a high level of
intellectual rigour and consistency, excellent expressive/
professional skills, and considerable creativity and
originality. Excellent academic/intellectual skills, and
considerable creativity and originality

60-69%

Good analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics.


Development of conceptual structures and argument
making consistent use of scholarly conventions

Good analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics.


Development of conceptual structures and argument,
making consistent use of scholarly conventions

50-59%

Satisfactory knowledge of key issues/ concepts/ethics in


discipline. Descriptive in parts but some ability to
synthesise scholarship and argument. Minor lapses in use
of scholarly conventions

Satisfactory knowledge of key issues/ concepts/ethics in


discipline. Descriptive in parts but some ability to
synthesise scholarship and argument. Minor lapses in use
of scholarly conventions

Achieves module
outcome(s) related to
GLO at this level

40-49%

A marginal pass in
module outcome(s)
related to GLO at this
level

Basic knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Generally descriptive, with restricted synthesis
of existing scholarship and little argument. Use of
scholarly conventions inconsistent

Basic knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Generally descriptive, with restricted synthesis
of existing scholarship and little argument. Use of
scholarly conventions inconsistent.

30-39%

A marginal fail in
module outcome(s)
related to GLO at this
level. Possible
compensation.
Satisfies qualifying
mark

Limited knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Largely descriptive, with restricted synthesis of
existing scholarship and limited argument. Limited use of
scholarly conventions.

Limited research skills impede use of learning resources


and problem solving. Significant problems with
structure/accuracy in expression. Team/Practical/
Professional skills not yet secure. Weak academic/
intellectual skills. Limited use of scholarly conventions

Little evidence of knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics


in discipline. Largely descriptive, with little synthesis of
existing scholarship and little evidence of argument. Little
evidence of use of scholarly conventions.

Little evidence of research skills, use of learning resources


and problem solving. Major problems with structure/
accuracy in expression. Team/Practical/Professional skills
virtually absent. Very weak academic/intellectual skills.
Little evidence of use of scholarly conventions

Inadequate knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Wholly descriptive, with inadequate synthesis
of existing scholarship and inadequate argument.
Inadequate use of scholarly conventions.

Inadequate use of research skills, learning resources and


problem solving. Major problems with structure/accuracy in
expression. Team/Practical/Professional skills absent.
Extremely weak academic/intellectual skills. Inadequate
use of scholarly conventions

20-29%

10-19%

Fails to achieve
module outcome(s)
related to this GLO.
Qualifying mark not
satisfied. No
compensation
available

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Module Guide

1-9%
0%

No evidence of knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Incoherent and completely but poorly
descriptive, with no evidence of synthesis of existing
scholarship and no argument whatsoever. No evidence of
use of scholarly conventions.

No evidence of use of research skills, learning resources


and problem solving. Incoherent structure/accuracy in
expression. Team/Practical/Professional skills nonexistent. No evidence of academic/intellectual skills. No
evidence of use of scholarly conventions

Awarded for: (i) non-submission; (ii) dangerous practice and; (iii) in situations where the student fails to address the
assignment brief (e.g.: answers the wrong question) and/or related learning outcomes

7.3 Specific Marking Criteria


7.3.1

Element 010 (Research Poster)

Marking Criteria

Comments

Marks

1. Does the working title mirror closely the


content of the poster?

Maximum 20%

2. Does the introductory part of the poster


inform the reader of the problem or situation
and the context the student is interested in?

Maximum 20%

3. Does the poster inform the reader of the


rationale of this study?
a. What is the research issue?
b. Why is it an issue?
c. Why is it an issue now?
d. What could this research shed light on?

Maximum (a, b, c, d)
a. max 15%
b. max 15%
c. max 15%
d. max 15%

TOTAL: 100%
Organize your research poster materials using headings, such as Title, Introductory Part, Rationale.
These headings will help establish a logical flow to your poster.

1) Title: initially this might be regarded as a working title, and ideally should mirror closely the content of
the poster. The title is particularly important for a poster. In general, a good title will get people to stop
and listen.
2) Introductory part: This informs the reader of the problem or situation and the context you are
interested in. The goal is to give the reviewers some basic academic information they can use to
evaluate the significance of the research proposal.
3) Rationale for this study.
- What is the research issue?
- Why is it an issue?
- Why is it an issue now?
- What could this research shed light on?
You have to introduce the topic and clarify the significance of what you are trying to present. That is, you
have to present research questions with a logical sequencing of facts. You have to give examples to
illustrate your rational. Be sure to have a conclusion that summarizes your take-home message (why
is it an issue now? what could this research shed light on?).
Your poster should be constructed so that it presents the desired information in a self-explanatory
manner. You have to think of a poster as a series of highly efficient, organized panels upon which
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Module Guide

appear synopses of the relevant information you want to convey (what is the research issue?) just
enough to get your point across.
Include references. Make it clear that you know what has been done in your area in the past and where
your research will fit in.
You have to make your poster visually appealing. Have fun. Be creative. Incorporate colour. Use
photographs, graphs, charts, maps, and the like. Simplify charts and figures to include only relevant
information. Be attentive to the layout and placement of your materials.
Write clearly. Make sure your poster includes complete sentences and accurate spelling and
punctuation.
7.3.2

Element 011 (Full Research Proposal)

Marking Criteria

Comments

Marks
Maximum 15%

1. Introduction
- Does the introduction inform the reader regarding the research
aims, objectives and research questions?
Maximum 30%
2. Literature review
- Does the student critically review at least 6 sources to
underpin the study?
- Does the literature review demonstrate students knowledge of
the literature and make a critical link with the research question
to be investigated?
Maximum 40%
3. Research design and methodology
- Does the student provide a detailed rational of how she/he
intend to achieve the research objectives and framework;
- Type of investigation.
- Data collection method.
- Sampling method.
- Accessibility issues.
- Ethical issues.
- Data analysis plan.
- Research limitations.
Maximum 15%
4. Timetable and references
- Does the student provide a rational timetable?
- Do references correctly applied?
TOTAL: 100%
1. Introduction
You have to introduce the topic and clarify the significance of what you are trying to present. In addition,
in this section you have to present the:
- Research aims
- Research objectives
- Research questions
Please, provide references. Give academic information.
2. Literature review
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This section will demonstrate your knowledge of the literature and make a critical link with the
research question to be investigated. Students are expected to critically review at least 6 sources to
underpin the study. The literature should mostly rely on published academic journal articles in the
research area. This critical activity should produce a conceptual framework.
3. Research Design and Methodology
This section should provide a detailed rationale of how you intend to achieve your research objectives.
You are expected to address the following areas:
- Type of investigation: Explain clearly whether your research can be classified as an exploratory,
descriptive or hypothesis testing study. Refer to the lecture notes and textbook for details on
each type.
- Data collection method: Explain how you are going to collect the data (e.g. postal questionnaire,
telephone interview, focus group, etc) and why this fits the purpose of your research.
- Sampling method: Explain whether you plan to use a probability or non-probability sampling design
and the specific sampling technique. The study participants should be able to offer the right type
of information to enable you address the research problem.
- Accessibility issues: what accessibility issues are you likely to encounter when you collect the
data? How are you going to manage the accessibility issues?
- Ethical issues: You must discuss any ethical issues that are relevant to your research topic,
participants, and method. Discuss how you are going to deal with the ethical issues.
- Data analysis plan: how you intend to analyse the data you will collect? This section must be
consistent with the previous section on data collection method and must be mindful of the nature
of the data collected, whether this is quantitative or qualitative.
- Research limitations: Define the limitations of the study that you believe you may encounter and
could be affect the quality, scope, or value of the research.
4. Timetable and References
Provide a Gantt chart on how you will use your available time to complete your proposed research. This
will provide an indication of the viability of the proposal. You will need to justify your plan.
The reference list at this stage need not be lengthy, only sufficient to inform your proposal. The list must
include all the sources that were cited and consulted in writing the research proposal. You must use the
Harvard Style of referencing.

8. Assessment Offences
As an academic community, we recognise that the principles of truth, honesty and mutual respect are
central to the pursuit of knowledge. Behaviour that undermines those principles weakens the community,
both individually and collectively, and diminishes our values. We are committed to ensuring that every
student and member of staff is made aware of the responsibilities s/he bears in maintaining the highest
standards of academic integrity and how those standards are protected.
You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. When you are preparing your work
for submission, it is important that you understand the various academic conventions that you are
expected to follow in order to make sure that you do not leave yourself open to accusations of plagiarism

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Module Guide

(e.g.: the correct use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and that your work maintains its academic
integrity.

Definitions of Assessment Offences


Plagiarism
Plagiarism is theft and occurs when you present someone elses work, words, images, ideas, opinions or
discoveries, whether published or not, as your own. It is also when you take the artwork, images or
computer-generated work of others, without properly acknowledging where this is from or you do this
without their permission.
You can commit plagiarism in examinations, but it is most likely to happen in coursework, assignments,
portfolios, essays, dissertations and so on.
Examples of plagiarism include:

directly copying from written work, physical work, performances, recorded work or images, without
saying where this is from;
using information from the internet or electronic media (such as DVDs and CDs) which belongs to
someone else, and presenting it as your own;
rewording someone elses work, without referencing them; and
handing in something for assessment which has been produced by another student or person.

It is important that you do not plagiarise intentionally or unintentionally because the work of others
and their ideas are their own. There are benefits to producing original ideas in terms of awards, prizes,
qualifications, reputation and so on. To use someone elses work, words, images, ideas or discoveries is
a form of theft.
Collusion
Collusion is similar to plagiarism as it is an attempt to present anothers work as your own. In plagiarism
the original owner of the work is not aware you are using it, in collusion two or more people may be
involved in trying to produce one piece of work to benefit one individual, or plagiarising another persons
work.
Examples of collusion include:

agreeing with others to cheat;


getting someone else to produce part or all of your work;
copying the work of another person (with their permission);
submitting work from essay banks;
paying someone to produce work for you; and
allowing another student to copy your own work.

Many parts of university life need students to work together. Working as a team, as directed by your
tutor, and producing group work is not collusion. Collusion only happens if you produce joint work to
benefit of one or more person and try to deceive another (for example the assessor).
Cheating
Cheating is when someone aims to get unfair advantage over others.
Examples of cheating include:

taking unauthorised material into the examination room;


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Module Guide

inventing results (including experiments, research, interviews and observations);


handing your own previously graded work back in;
getting an examination paper before it is released;
behaving in a way that means other students perform poorly;
pretending to be another student; and
trying to bribe members of staff or examiners.

Help to Avoid Assessment Offences


Most of our students are honest and want to avoid committing assessment offences. We have a variety
of resources, advice and guidance available to help make sure you can develop good academic skills.
We will make sure that we make available consistent statements about what we expect. In accordance
with our Academic Honesty Policy, you will be able to do tutorials on being honest in your work from
the library (http://anglia.libguides.com/GAP) and other central support services and faculties, and will be
able to review your work for plagiarism using TurnitinUK (where appropriate), an online service for
matched-text. You can get advice on how to use honestly the work of others in your own work from the
library website (www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm) and your lecturer and personal
tutor.
TurnitinUK will produce a report which clearly shows if passages in your work have been matched with
another source. Originality of assessment is an academic judgement and there is no generally
acceptable upper or lower similarity score. You may talk about the matched-text in the TurnitinUK
report with a member of academic staff to see where you may need to improve your academic practice.
If you are not sure whether the way you are working meets our requirements, you should talk to your
personal tutor, module tutor or other member of academic staff. They will be able to help you and tell you
about other resources that will help you develop your academic skills.

Procedures for Assessment Offences


An assessment offence is the general term used to define cases where a student has tried to get unfair
academic advantage in an assessment for himself or herself or another student.
We will fully investigate all cases of suspected assessment offences. If we prove that you have
committed an assessment offence, an appropriate penalty will be imposed which, for the most serious
offences, includes expulsion from Anglia Ruskin. For full details of our assessment offences policy and
procedures, see Section 10 of the Academic Regulations at: www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs.

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Module Guide

9. Learning Resources
9.1. Library
Library Contacts
Lord Ashcroft International Business School
libteam.aibs@anglia.ac.uk
Reading List
Resources

Notes

Key text
Wilson, J. (2010). Essentials of Business Research: A
Guide to Doing Your Research Project. London:
Sage.
.
Books

We will draw heavily on this book. Copies in


the library plus an e-book copy

Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2012).


Research Methods for Business Students. (6th edn).
Harlow: Prentice Hall.
Bryman, A. and Bell, E. (2011). Business Research
Methods. (3rd edn). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Easterby- Smith, M., Thorpe, R. Jackson, P. and
Lowe, A. (2008). Management Research. (3rd edn).
London: Sage.

Useful background textbooks

Keleman, M. and Rumens, N. (2008). An introduction


to critical management research. London: Sage.
Sekaran, U. and Bougie, R. (2010). Research
Methods for Business: A Skill Building Approach. (5th
edn). New York: John Wiley & Sons.
Wilson, J. (2010). Essentials of Business Research: A
Guide to Doing Your Research Project. London:
Sage.
Journals
It is important that you draw from material contained
in academic journals. These are some relevant titles.

Available in the Digital Library.

Websites
Research in Education (RESINED), 2008. Research
in Education Home page. [online] Available at
<http://www.edu.plymouth.ac.uk/RESINED/resedhme.
htm> [Accessed 5 July 2011].

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This is a really useful website which explains


the process of research carefully and clearly
with lots of examples and it covers both
qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Module Guide

Websites
Book Companion website at
www.pearsoned.co.uk/saunders

For access to all resources associated with the


key text including revision questions, exercises,
and additional case studies.

Research in Education (RESINED), 2008. Research


in Education Home page. [online] Available at
<http://www.edu.plymouth.ac.uk/RESINED/resedhme.
htm> [Accessed 14 September 2012].

This is a really useful website which explains


the process of research carefully and clearly
with lots of examples and it covers both
qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Additional notes on this reading list


Additional reading will be recommended weekly in class.
Link to the University Library catalogue and Digital Library http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/
Link to Harvard Referencing guide http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

10. Module Evaluation


During the second half of the delivery of this module, you will be asked to complete a module evaluation
questionnaire to help us obtain your views on all aspects of the module.
This is an extremely important process which helps us to continue to improve the delivery of the module
in the future and to respond to issues that you bring to our attention. The module report in section 11 of
this module guide includes a section which comments on the feedback we received from other students
who have studied this module previously.
Your questionnaire response is anonymous.
Please help us to help you and other students at Anglia Ruskin by completing the Module Evaluation
survey. We very much value our students views and it is very important to us that you provide feedback
to help us make improvements.
In addition to the Module Evaluation process, you can send any comment on anything related to your
experience at Anglia Ruskin to tellus@anglia.ac.uk at any time.

11. Report on Last Delivery of Module

MODULE REPORT FORM

This form should be completed by module tutors (where there is more than one delivery) and forwarded to Module Leaders who
compiles the results on to one form for use at the Programme Committee and other methods of disseminating feedback to
students.

Module Code and Title:


Anglia Ruskin Department:
Location(s) of Delivery:
Academic Year:

Semester/Trimester:

Enrolment Numbers (at each location):


Module Leader:
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Module Guide

Other Module Tutors:


Student Achievement Provide a brief overview of student achievement on the module as evidenced by the range of marks awarded. A
detailed breakdown of marks will be available at the Departmental Assessment Panel.

Feedback from Students Briefly summarise student responses, including any written comments

Module Leader/Tutors Reflection on Delivery of the Module, including Response to Feedback from Students
(including resources if appropriate)

Developments during the current year or planned for next year (if appropriate)

External Examiners Comments State whether the external examiner agreed the marks and/or commented on the
module

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Module Guide

Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information

THIS INFORMATION ONLY APPLIES TO STUDENTS WHO ARE


UNSUCCESSFUL IN THEIR FIRST SUBMISSION
The re-assessment for this module consists of one or two elements, depending on individuals
circumstance. Check your results in e-vision.
Element Type of assessment

010
011

Word or Deadline for assessment


time
limit
500
20 July 2015
2500
20 July 2015

Research Poster
Full research proposal

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