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ATEC 3325: Introduction to Computer Mediated Communication

Fall 2006, Section 001 (TR, 2-3:15 p.m.)

Dr. Gooch
Office Number: JO 4.128
Office Hours: MW, 1-4:00 p.m. and by appointment
Office Phone: (972) 883-2038
E-mail: john.gooch@utdallas.edu

Course Description
This introductory course on computer-mediated communication (CMC) will explore ways in which
human-to-human communication interactions have been influenced or altered through the use of
computer technology. How has the mediation of computers affected the substance and processes
of our interactions with each other? How are virtual communities related to geopolitical
communities? How do our understanding of language and communication change with CMC
activities? We shall survey and study established and emerging modalities of computer mediated
communication and mediums such as email, egroups, bulletin boards, real-time chat rooms, web
cams, MOOs (multi-user domains object-oriented) and MUDs (multi-user domains). While this
course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of CMC, we will also analyze CMC
from other theoretical perspectives such as that of communication and cultural studies, to name
a few.

ATEC 3325 is a reading intensive course, as are most introductions to theories, and furthermore,
it is a writing intensive course. Your progress in this class will depend significantly on 1) your
demonstrated ability to respond to the readings in an informed and timely manner and 2) to
apply any of the theoretical frameworks to CMC activities for analysis in an informed manner, and
3) submitting assignments and other requirements in a timely manner. I will give detailed written
feedback on all assignments except the homework and class work. You must rigorously proofread
all work for spelling, grammar, and mechanical errors. The student must meet and exceed
expectations to earn an “A” on any given assignment.

Course Goals and Objectives


Upon successful completion of ATEC 3325, students should be able to:

· Practice and apply different approaches to and modes of written exposition as


appropriate to a variety of theses and subjects associated with CMC
· Write using effective technical requirements, including organization, mechanics, and
thesis development
· Develop sensitivity to written language by being able to employ and apply effective and
appropriate rhetorical devices directed at a defined audience
· Demonstrate an ability to conduct research, apply source material, discuss general
information, and apply logical process when writing about CMC issues
· Analyze CMC from different disciplinary perspectives (communication, cultural studies,
history) and communicate that analysis in class discussions and in writing
· Analyze and evaluate in writing the arguments of CMC theorists

Required Textbooks
Lum, Casey Man Kong. (Ed.). Perspectives on Culture, Technology and Communication: The
Media Ecology Tradition. Hampton Press, 2006.
Vitanza, Victor J. (Ed.). CyberReader. Second Edition. Allyn and Bacon, 1999.
Wood, Andrew F. and Matthew J. Smith. Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity,
and Culture. Second Edition. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 2005.

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Skills and Other Requirements for the Course
The course is taught using WebCT. All students must have UTD User IDs and passwords to access
course materials—including the submission of assignments. Students have the responsibility to
ensure that the course remains accessible to them for the duration of the semester.

Note: I reserve the right to modify this syllabus at any time during the course to suit the needs
of the students and the course objectives. Any modifications shall be given to you in writing.

College level writing is expected in this course. Assignments that do not reflect college level
writing will not earn high grades.

Assignments
Assignment Points % Due Date
Literature Review (7 to 8 pages) 100 10% September 8
Midterm Exam (3 to 4 pages, prox) 100 10% October 12
Critical Paper (draft, at least 7 pages) 100 10% November 9
Critical Paper (10 to 15 pages) 200 20% November 17
Final Exam (3 to 4 pages, prox) 200 20% TBA
Online Posts/Responses 200 20% At least one per week
(length varies) beginning August 21
Participation and Attendance 100 10% NA
NOTE: You will double-space all papers and exam responses. Use only 11 or 12 point font.
Grading Scale
930 – 1000 = A 730 – 769 = C
900 – 929 = A - 700 – 729 = C-
870 – 899 = B+ 670 – 699 = D+
830 – 869 = B 630 – 669 = D
800 – 829 = B- 600 – 629 = D-
770 – 799 = C+ 599 and below = F
(Grading scale is consistent with the UTD Undergraduate Catalogue, 2004-06.)

ATEC 3325 Schedule, FALL 2006


Aug 17 Introduction to Course
Aug 22 Communicating with Technology
Wood and Smith, Chapters 1 and 2
Aug 24 Identity
Wood and Smith, Chapter 3
Aug 29 Communities in Cyberspace
Wood and Smith, Chapter 6
Aug 31 Communities in Cyberspace
Part 2 (Vitanza)
Sept 5 (Cyber)Politics and (Cyber)Power
Wood and Smith, Chapter 8

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Sept 7 (Cyber)Politics and (Cyber)Power
Wood and Smith, Chapter 9
Sept 12 Relationships and Conflict in Cyberspace
Wood and Smith, Chapter 4
Sept 14 Gender Issues
Kantrowitz, page 176 (Vitanza)
Herring, page 190 (Vitanza)
Sept 19 MUDs, MOOs, and Chatrooms
Part 7 (Vitanza)
Sept 21 MUDs, MOOs, and Chatrooms
Part 7 (Vitanza)
Sept 26 Internet Addiction
Wood and Smith, Chapter 5
Sept 28 The Virtual Marketplace
Wood and Smith, Chapter 7
Oct 3 Freedom, Censorship, and Legal Aspects of CMC
Part 3 (Vitanza)
Oct 5 Freedom, Censorship, and Legal Aspects of CMC
Barlow, page 318 (Vitanza)
Critical Art Ensemble, page 339 (Vitanza)
Oct 10 VR and Cyberspace
Part 1 (Vitanza)
Oct 12 Midterm Exam
Oct 17 Cyberspace and Popular Culture, the Cyberpunk
Wood and Smith, Chapter 10
Part 6 (Vitanza)
Oct 19 Cyberspace and Popular Culture, the Cyberpunk
The Cyberpunk
Part 6 (Vitanza)
Oct 24 Introduction to Media Ecology
Lum, Chapter 1 (CTC)
Morrison, Chapter 7 (CTC)
Oct 26 Introduction to Media Ecology
Morrison, Chapter 7 (CTC)
Gencarelli, Chapter 8 (CTC)
Oct 31 Ethics, Human Relations, and Media Ecology
Postman, Chapter 2 (CTC)
Strate and Lum, Chapter 3 (CTC)
Nov 2 Ethics, Human Relations, and Media Ecology
Strate and Lum, Chapter 3 (CTC)
Nov 7 Media and Propaganda
Kluver, Chapter 4 (CTC)
Nov 9 Media and Theology
Christians, Chapter 5 (CTC)
Nov 14 Technology, Culture, and Society
Wasser, Chapter 9 (CTC)
Nystrom, Chapter 10 (CTC)
Nov 16 Technology, Culture, and Society
Ashcroft, Chapter 13 (CTC)
Nov 21 Political Economy, Communication, and Technology
Heyer, Chapter 6 (CTC)
CTC = Perspectives on Culture, Technology and Communication

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Vitanza = Cyberreader
Wood and Smith = Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity, & Culture

Policies
General Policies and Course Expectations
· Students must submit all major assignments (not including homework/class work) to
pass the course. Students who fail to submit all major assignments will not pass the
course, regardless of the number of points the student has earned.
· Cell phones and digital pagers must be powered off during formal class hours.
· I will not accept late homework/class work regardless of the excuse.
· Please do not bring meals to class. Students should eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner at a
time other than class time.
Room and Equipment Use
· Tampering with or destroying any of the computers, printers, Smart Board, white boards,
modems or wiring in the classroom is strictly prohibited. Violations will result in
disciplinary action by the Dean of Students’ office.
· The room may be used only for ATEC 3325 related activities. You may not work on other
class projects, check your e-mail, print, work for other classes, burn CDs that are not
part of ATEC 3325 assignments, install software (games, music, executables,
programming languages, or any other software that has not been approved). Any
violation of the above restriction would refer a student to disciplinary action with the
Dean of Students office. A second violation will result in the student receiving an “F” in
the course regardless of the quality of class work.
Absence Policy
Because successfully completing ATEC 3325 depends upon your attendance and participation,
even absences resulting from seemingly legitimate circumstances can hinder your overall
performance. I will allow you three (3) days as personal/free/sick leave for this semester. For
every absence over three (3), the student’s “attendance and participation” grade will be reduced
by 25 points. Students who accumulate five or more absences should seriously consider
withdrawing from the course.

I will consider excusing absences for extended illness and/or hospital stay on an individual and
case-by-case basis. Students should consult with me privately regarding such circumstances.

Punctuality
It is important to attend class on time. Persistent and reoccurring tardiness is disrespectful to me
and to your fellow peers. If you continually arrive to class late, it will affect your final grade in the
course. Student may leave early with instructor permission; however, such occurrences should be
very infrequent.

Field Trip Policies


Off-campus Instruction and Course Activities

Off-campus, out-of-state, and foreign instruction and activities are subject to state law
and University policies and procedures regarding travel and risk-related activities.
Information regarding these rules and regulations may be found at the website address
http://www.utdallas.edu/BusinessAffairs/Travel_Risk_Activities.htm. Additional
information is available from the office of the school dean. Below is a description of any
travel and/or risk-related activity associated with this course.

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Student Conduct & Discipline

The University of Texas System and The University of Texas at Dallas have rules and
regulations for the orderly and efficient conduct of their business. It is the responsibility
of each student and each student organization to be knowledgeable about the rules and
regulations which govern student conduct and activities. General information on student
conduct and discipline is contained in the UTD publication, A to Z Guide, which is
provided to all registered students each academic year.

The University of Texas at Dallas administers student discipline within the procedures of
recognized and established due process. Procedures are defined and described in the
Rules and Regulations, Board of Regents, The University of Texas System, Part 1,
Chapter VI, Section 3, and in Title V, Rules on Student Services and Activities of the
university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures. Copies of these rules and regulations
are available to students in the Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are
available to assist students in interpreting the rules and regulations (SU 1.602, 972/883-
6391).

A student at the university neither loses the rights nor escapes the responsibilities of
citizenship. He or she is expected to obey federal, state, and local laws as well as the
Regents’ Rules, university regulations, and administrative rules. Students are subject to
discipline for violating the standards of conduct whether such conduct takes place on or
off campus, or whether civil or criminal penalties are also imposed for such conduct.

Academic Integrity

The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty.
Because the value of an academic degree depends upon the absolute integrity of the
work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that a student demonstrate a
high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work.

Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related
to applications for enrollment or the award of a degree, and/or the submission as one’s
own work or material that is not one’s own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty
involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying
academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary
proceedings.

Plagiarism, especially from the web, from portions of papers for other classes, and from
any other source is unacceptable and will be dealt with under the university’s policy on
plagiarism (see general catalog for details). This course will use the resources of
turnitin.com, which searches the web for possible plagiarism and is over 90% effective.

Email Use

The University of Texas at Dallas recognizes the value and efficiency of communication
between faculty/staff and students through electronic mail. At the same time, email
raises some issues concerning security and the identity of each individual in an email
exchange. The university encourages all official student email correspondence be sent
only to a student’s U.T. Dallas email address and that faculty and staff consider email
from students official only if it originates from a UTD student account. This allows the
university to maintain a high degree of confidence in the identity of all individual

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corresponding and the security of the transmitted information. UTD furnishes each
student with a free email account that is to be used in all communication with university
personnel. The Department of Information Resources at U.T. Dallas provides a method
for students to have their U.T. Dallas mail forwarded to other accounts.

Withdrawal from Class

The administration of this institution has set deadlines for withdrawal of any college-level
courses. These dates and times are published in that semester's course catalog.
Administration procedures must be followed. It is the student's responsibility to handle
withdrawal requirements from any class. In other words, I cannot drop or withdraw any
student. You must do the proper paperwork to ensure that you will not receive a final
grade of "F" in a course if you choose not to attend the class once you are enrolled.

Student Grievance Procedures

Procedures for student grievances are found in Title V, Rules on Student Services and
Activities, of the university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures.

In attempting to resolve any student grievance regarding grades, evaluations, or other


fulfillments of academic responsibility, it is the obligation of the student first to make a
serious effort to resolve the matter with the instructor, supervisor, administrator, or
committee with whom the grievance originates (hereafter called “the respondent”).
Individual faculty members retain primary responsibility for assigning grades and
evaluations. If the matter cannot be resolved at that level, the grievance must be
submitted in writing to the respondent with a copy of the respondent’s School Dean. If
the matter is not resolved by the written response provided by the respondent, the
student may submit a written appeal to the School Dean. If the grievance is not resolved
by the School Dean’s decision, the student may make a written appeal to the Dean of
Graduate or Undergraduate Education, and the deal will appoint and convene an
Academic Appeals Panel. The decision of the Academic Appeals Panel is final. The
results of the academic appeals process will be distributed to all involved parties.

Copies of these rules and regulations are available to students in the Office of the Dean
of Students, where staff members are available to assist students in interpreting the rules
and regulations.

Incomplete Grade Policy

As per university policy, incomplete grades will be granted only for work unavoidably
missed at the semester’s end and only if 70% of the course work has been completed.
An incomplete grade must be resolved within eight (8) weeks from the first day of the
subsequent long semester. If the required work to complete the course and to remove
the incomplete grade is not submitted by the specified deadline, the incomplete grade is
changed automatically to a grade of F.

Disability Services

The goal of Disability Services is to provide students with disabilities educational


opportunities equal to those of their non-disabled peers. Disability Services is located in
room 1.610 in the Student Union. Office hours are Monday and Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to
6:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to
5:30 p.m.

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The contact information for the Office of Disability Services is:
The University of Texas at Dallas, SU 22
PO Box 830688
Richardson, Texas 75083-0688
(972) 883-2098 (voice or TTY)

Essentially, the law requires that colleges and universities make those reasonable
adjustments necessary to eliminate discrimination on the basis of disability. For example,
it may be necessary to remove classroom prohibitions against tape recorders or animals
(in the case of dog guides) for students who are blind. Occasionally an assignment
requirement may be substituted (for example, a research paper versus an oral
presentation for a student who is hearing impaired). Classes enrolled students with
mobility impairments may have to be rescheduled in accessible facilities. The college or
university may need to provide special services such as registration, note-taking, or
mobility assistance.

It is the student’s responsibility to notify his or her professors of the need for such an
accommodation. Disability Services provides students with letters to present to faculty
members to verify that the student has a disability and needs accommodations.
Individuals requiring special accommodation should contact the professor after class or
during office hours.

Religious Holy Days

The University of Texas at Dallas will excuse a student from class or other required
activities for the travel to and observance of a religious holy day for a religion whose
places of worship are exempt from property tax under Section 11.20, Tax Code, Texas
Code Annotated.

The student is encouraged to notify the instructor or activity sponsor as soon as possible
regarding the absence, preferably in advance of the assignment. The student, so
excused, will be allowed to take the exam or complete the assignment within a
reasonable time after the absence: a period equal to the length of the absence, up to a
maximum of one week. A student who notifies the instructor and completes any missed
exam or assignment may not be penalized for the absence. A student who fails to
complete the exam or assignment within the prescribed period may receive a failing
grade for that exam or assignment.

If a student or an instructor disagrees about the nature of the absence [i.e., for the
purpose of observing a religious holy day] or if there is similar disagreement about
whether the student has been given a reasonable time to complete any missed
assignments or examinations, either the student or the instructor may request a ruling
from the chief executive officer of the institution, or his or her designee. The chief
executive officer or designee must take into account the legislative intent of TEC
51.911(b), and the student and instructor will abide by the decision of the chief executive
officer or designee.

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General Grading Criteria
Analysis of Audience and Purpose
Any written assignment you prepare for this class should present a clear purpose (i.e., what you
are attempting to accomplish). An introduction, generally speaking, should establish your purpose
for the paper. You should also write to address an audience. For example, the audience might be
those whom you can likely persuade on a given side of the issue.

Organization and Development (Overall Content)


It is important to structure effectively the information and also provide adequate support for
ideas and arguments through evidence and analysis. Effective writing also necessitates that you
effectively structure each paragraph and each section.

Thesis or Main Point


Any piece of writing should support a main point, central claim, or thesis. Your written essays
and essay answers on exams should support a main point that you are communicating to an
intended audience.

Style
Word choices, use of language, and sentence structure become very important for a piece of
writing’s overall effectiveness. Writers should maintain an appropriate level of style for the
audience and also for their intended purpose.

Format (Delivery and Design Features)


Formatting concerns relate to certain and specific visual features such as font size and type, font style,
white space, and use of color. Writers make a multitude of basic formatting decisions when preparing
content.

Professionalism
I expect you to proofread and edit carefully all work you submit in this class. I also expect you to adhere to
conventional English grammar and mechanics on all assignments. Professionalism also means that you use
appropriate source citation wherever and whenever necessary so that you avoid violations of copyright –
even if those violations are inadvertent.

Major Assignment Descriptions

Literature Review
Value: 100 points or 10%
Due: Uploaded to WebCT no later than day’s end Friday, September 8 by 11:55 p.m.
NOTE: Please submit as rich text document or Word document to “Assignments” section.
Length: 7 to 8 pages, typed and double spaced, 11 or 12 point font

Assignment Expectations and Description


For the first, major assignment, you will write a literature review addressing a particular theme
from the course. The literature review is not a book report. In other words, you will not just
present summaries of various sources. Rather, you will identify specific themes and issues that
relate to one major topic (e.g., gender, community) and explain how different authors have
treated those themes. You should foreground the authors’ works; you are not writing a position
paper (per se). You are, however, critically analyzing what others have said about the topic. The
literature review should identify “gaps” in the research or issues and themes these articles do not
address explicitly or in enough detail.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

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· Community in cyberspace
· Gender relations in online communities
· Race relations in online communities
· Identify construction in cyberspace
· Legalities of online communication (e.g., copyright, obscenity, freedom of expression)
· Cyberculture in popular media

At the very minimum, the essay must include the following:

1. At least eight (8) secondary sources. At least five (5) of these eight must come from
sources other than your textbooks. You may use articles from magazines and academic
journals as well as chapters from books. Do not use Wikipedia or Spark Notes.
2. Proper and correct MLA for parenthetical citation and Works Cited page.
3. Focused theme or issue. Be careful about defining the topic too broadly. Granted, some
possible topics from above represent very broad topics, but those suggestions do
represent suggestions per se that will help guide you in your writing process.

Some academic journals and magazines for finding articles include: Technical Communication,
Technical Communication Quarterly, Journal of Technical Writing and Communication, and
Business Communication Quarterly, Intercomm – to name only a few.

NOTE: You may use articles and publications from the World Wide Web, but you should very
carefully scrutinize such sources. Not all sources from the Web are credible and authentic. Make
certain you can clearly identify the author and/or the affiliation for Web resources.

Criteria
I will assess your paper according to the following criteria:

· Thesis: Does the paper contain an explicit or implicit central claim or main point?
· Organization and Development: Does the paper possess structure? Are points and ideas
clearly presented and supported?
· Style: Has the writer chosen effective words to express his or her ideas? Is the writer’s
sentence structure effective? Does the essay reflect college-level writing?
· Focus: Does the paper address the same topic throughout or does the paper shift from
one major theme or topic to another?
· Grammar and Mechanics: Does the written document adhere to conventional grammar?
· Analysis, Critical Thinking: Does the paper show that the writer has analyzed issues??
· Audience and Purpose: Is the audience for this essay clear? Can the user or reader
clearly identify your purpose or what you are attempting to accomplish in the essay?

MLA Citation and Plagiarism


Please correctly use Modern Language Association (MLA) for parenthetical (in-text) citation and
format concerns. You must include a “Work” or “Works Cited” page – in this case, a
“listing” – with your essay. An essay that does not provide adequate source documentation is
not acceptable for this assignment and therefore potentially subject to a failing grade.

The “Work” or “Works Cited” page should meet MLA requirements as stipulated in the MLA
Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Sixth Edition. Please review policies regarding
plagiarism from the ATEC 3325 policy statement and syllabus for Fall 2006.

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Other Important Notes
Your essay or paper must meet and exceed expectations to earn the “A” grade. The paper should
not merely present a summary of readings or summary of an authority’s position on the subject.
You may need to summarize a particular perspective or aspect of an issue; however, I should be
able to read your arguments and thoughts as substantiated by evidence and reasoning. In other
words, your voice should come through clearly.

Other Helpful Links/Information

MLA Citation
http://mit.imoat.net/handbook/mla-gpc.htm

http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/research/mlaparen.html

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html

http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite5.html

Toulmin Model for Argumentation

http://commfaculty.fullerton.edu/rgass/toulmin2.htm

http://www.concentric.net/~Creyn266/COMM335/Toulmin.htm

http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~digger/305/toulmin_model.htm

Critical Essay
Value: 200 points or 20% (November 7 draft = 100 points or 10%)
Draft Due: In class, November 9 (uploaded to WebCT by 11:55 p.m. that evening)
Draft Length: at least 7 pages, typed and double spaced, 11 or 12 point font
Final Draft Due: Uploaded to WebCT by Friday, November 17, 2006 by 11:55 p.m.
Final Length: 10-15 pages, typed and double spaced, 11 or 12 point font

Assignment Expectations and Description


For the critical essay assignment, you will choose one issue from the course and write a well-
reasoned, substantively developed essay supporting a thesis. You will also use readings from the
class as evidence to support your thesis as well as any outside research, but it is not a research
paper per se (additional sources will help, though). This assignment differs from the literature
review assignment because whereas the literature review asks you to survey a body of literature
to determine why questions we have yet to ask, the critical essay asks you to take a position
regarding one of those issues and defend it. For example, you could choose to write about
gender relations in cyberspace or freedom of expression. In another sense, you might choose
one of the works from Perspectives on Culture, Technology and Communication and write an
explication that helps the audience understand the work’s basic premise and assertions. The topic
choice is yours, as longs it relates to the focus of ATEC 3325.

Your paper should first clearly define the issues for the essay in the introduction. Then, the body
of the paper should present supporting arguments and evidence for the position. Finally, the
conclusion will summarize the thesis and state the importance of the overall topic.

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Criteria
I will assess your paper according to the following criteria:

· Thesis: Does the paper contain an explicit or implicit central claim or main point?
· Organization and Development: Does the paper possess structure? Are points and ideas
clearly presented and supported?
· Style: Has the writer chosen effective words to express his or her ideas? Is the writer’s
sentence structure effective? Does the essay reflect college-level writing?
· Focus: Does the paper address the same topic throughout or does the paper shift from
one major theme or topic to another?
· Grammar and Mechanics: Does the written document adhere to conventional grammar?
· Analysis, Critical Thinking: Does the paper show that the writer has analyzed issues??
· Audience and Purpose: Is the audience for this essay clear? Can the user or reader
clearly identify your purpose or what you are attempting to accomplish in the essay?

MLA Citation and Plagiarism


Please correctly use Modern Language Association (MLA) for parenthetical (in-text) citation and
format concerns. You must include a “Work” or “Works Cited” page – in this case, a
“listing” – with your essay. An essay that does not provide adequate source documentation is
not acceptable for this assignment and therefore potentially subject to a failing grade.

The “Work” or “Works Cited” page should meet MLA requirements as stipulated in the MLA
Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Sixth Edition. Please review policies regarding
plagiarism from the ATEC 3325 policy statement and syllabus for Fall 2006.

Other Important Notes


Your essay or paper must meet and exceed expectations to earn the “A” grade. The paper should
not merely present a summary of readings or summary of an authority’s position on the subject.
It is understood that you may need to summarize a particular perspective or aspect of an issue;
however, I should be able to read your arguments and thoughts as substantiated by evidence
and reasoning. In other words, your voice should come through clearly.

Other Helpful Links/Information

MLA Citation
http://mit.imoat.net/handbook/mla-gpc.htm

http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/research/mlaparen.html

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html

http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite5.html
Toulmin Model for Argumentation

http://commfaculty.fullerton.edu/rgass/toulmin2.htm

http://www.concentric.net/~Creyn266/COMM335/Toulmin.htm

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http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~digger/305/toulmin_model.htm

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