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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE


COURSE SYLLABUS, Summer, 2005

COURSE NUMBER: CS 1337

COURSE TITLE: Computer Science I

CREDIT HOURS: 3

INSTRUCTOR: Cort Steinhorst


ECSS 3.609
Office Phone: 972-883-6353
E-Mail: cort.steinhorst@utdallas.edu
Web Site: www.utdallas.edu/~csteinh

OFFICE HOURS: Monday, 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.


Tuesday, 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Wednesday, 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Thursday, 8:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Other hours by appointment.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to object-oriented software analysis, design, and development. Classes and


objects. Object composition and polymorphism. Sorting, searching, recursion. Strings
using core classes. Inheritance and interfaces. Graphic User Interfaces. Includes a
comprehensive programming project.

Prerequisite: CS 1336 or equivalent programming experience. (3-0) S

TEXTBOOK:

Introduction to JAVA Programming, Fifth Edition, by Y. Daniel Liang, Prentice Hall


ABET COURSE EXPECTATIONS:

After successful completion of this course, the student should have an:

1. Ability to develop object oriented software solutions for use on computers


2. Ability to express algorithmic solutions in a high level comp uter language
3. Ability to utilize the String classes
4. Ability to utilize express multi-class relationships among objects
5. Ability to implement graphical user interfaces
6. Ability to develop graphical programs utilizing standard layout managers
7. Ability to deve lop event driven programs
8. Ability to process data with abstract data types
9. Ability to perform searches and sorts
10. Ability to develop programs utilizing recursive methodology
11. Ability to utilize reference variables

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

There will be regularly assigned reading and homework problems. The homework
problems will require the student to spend time programming a computer.

Programming assignments should be turned in by means of WebCT. Homework files


contain:

A text copy of all source code (.java).


A text copy of your algorithm(s) (.txt or .doc).

Programming assignments will be graded on a 100 point basis, utilizing the following
criteria:

Program Design 25%


Program Execution 20%
Satisfaction of Specification 20%
Coding Style 15%
Comments 10%
Creativity 10%.

Keep in mind that you always want to write code that is easy to understand and is also
easy to maintain.

Late assignments will be accepted up to three days after the program due date.
Assignments turned in on the first day after the program due date lose 5 points for
lateness. Assignments turned in on the second or third day after the program due date
lose 10 points for lateness.
GRADING:

Projects and exams will determine grades. All exams are open book and open notes. The
final grade will be composed as follows:

Projects and Quizzes 25%


Exam 1 25%
Exam 2 25%
Exam 3 25%.

Letter grades will be assigned as follows:

98-100 A+
92-97 A
90-91 A-
88-89 B+
82-87 B
80-81 B-
78-79 C+
72-77 C
70-71 C-
68-69 D+
62-67 D
60-61 D-
Below 60 F.

ACADEMIC HONESTY:

The University of Texas System Policy on Academic Honesty appears in the Regents
Rules and Regulations, Part One, Chapter VI, Section 3, Paragraph 3.22. Any student
who commits an act of scholastic dishonesty is subject to discipline. Scholastic
dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission
for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another
person, taking an examination for another, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a
student or the attempt to commit such acts. The minimum penalty for academic
dishonesty is a failing grade (zero) for the project or examination. Do your own work on
all projects and exams.