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2012 TECHNICAL REPORT

Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide,


RCIC Application.
Replaces TR-105874 and TR-016909-R1

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NOTICE: This report contains proprietary information that is the intellectual property of
EPRI. Accordingly, it is available only under license from EPRI and may not be reproduced
or disclosed, wholly or in part, by any licensee to any other person or organization.

Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide,


RCIC Application
Replaces TR-105874 and TR-016909-R1
1007460
Final Report, September 2012

EPRI Project Manager


D. Dobbins
This document does NOT meet the requirements of
10CFR50 Appendix B, 10CFR Part 21,
ANSI N45.2-1977 and/or the intent of ISO-9001 (1994)
ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE
3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304-1338 PO Box 10412, Palo Alto, California 94303-0813 USA
800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com

DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES


THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN
ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH
INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI). NEITHER EPRI, ANY MEMBER OF EPRI, ANY COSPONSOR, THE
ORGANIZATION(S) BELOW, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM:
(A) MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION WHATSOEVER, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, (I)
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PROCESS, OR SIMILAR ITEM DISCLOSED IN THIS DOCUMENT.
REFERENCE HEREIN TO ANY SPECIFIC COMMERCIAL PRODUCT, PROCESS, OR SERVICE BY
ITS TRADE NAME, TRADEMARK, MANUFACTURER, OR OTHERWISE, DOES NOT NECESSARILY
CONSTITUTE OR IMPLY ITS ENDORSEMENT, RECOMMENDATION, OR FAVORING BY EPRI.
THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATION PREPARED THIS REPORT:
Electric Power Research Insitute (EPRI)

THE TECHNICAL CONTENTS OF THIS DOCUMENT WERE NOT PREPARED IN ACCORDANCE


WITH THE EPRI NUCLEAR QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM MANUAL THAT FULFILLS THE
REQUIREMENTS OF 10 CFR 50, APPENDIX B AND 10 CFR PART 21, ANSI N45.2-1977 AND/OR
THE INTENT OF ISO-9001 (1994). USE OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS DOCUMENT IN NUCLEAR
SAFETY OR NUCLEAR QUALITY APPLICATIONS REQUIRES ADDITIONAL ACTIONS BY USER
PURSUANT TO THEIR INTERNAL PROCEDURES.

NOTE
For further information about EPRI, call the EPRI Customer Assistance Center at 800.313.3774 or
e-mail askepri@epri.com.
Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, and TOGETHERSHAPING THE FUTURE OF ELECTRICITY
are registered service marks of the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc.
Copyright 2012 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The following organization prepared this report:
Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center (NMAC)
1300 W. T. Harris Blvd.
Charlotte, NC 28262
Principal Investigator
J. Kelso
This report describes research sponsored by EPRI.
The Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, RCIC Application was produced by the Nuclear
Maintenance Applications Center (NMAC) and the following original Technical Advisory Group
(TAG) members. These individuals provided valuable assistance during the development of this
guide:
Mark Bergman
Randy Bunt
Mike Chambers
Mark Dooley
Bill Gover
Mark Miller
Chan Patel
Dave Pennington
Brad Short
Bill Stuart
Chuck Vonier
Ken Wheeler

Public Service Electric and Gas


Southern Nuclear Operating Company
Florida Power and Light
Entergy
Southern Nuclear Operating Company
Duke Energy
Amergen
Nuclear Management Co., Monticello
Entergy
Entergy
Southern Nuclear Operating Company
Wheeler Turbo Machinery Consulting

NMAC and TTUG would like to express their appreciation to Jim Kelso, System and Turbo
Machinery Services, for his dedicated efforts put forth on the development of this maintenance
guide.

This publication is a corporate document that should be cited in the literature in the following
manner:
Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, RCIC Application: Replaces TR-105874 and TR-016909-R1.
EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 2012. 1007460.
iii

REPORT SUMMARY
Terry turbines represent a critical component in many nuclear power plants. The trouble-free and
reliable operation of these turbines is important for both plant safety and for maximizing the
availability of safety-related systems.
Background
Since their publication, two Nuclear Maintenance and Applications Center (NMAC) reports,
Terry Turbine Controls Maintenance Guide, Revision 1 (TR-016909-R1) and Terry Turbine
Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide (TR-105874), have provided plant engineers and
maintenance personnel with important reference information on Terry turbine systems. These
reference guides have significantly contributed to improved plant maintenance activities. In
recent years, however, many new developments and techniques have emerged, which have
continued to improve Terry turbine reliability and maintenance practices. These improved
practices have been communicated to the nuclear industry through annual meetings, workshops,
and information exchanges facilitated by NMACs Terry Turbine Users Group (TTUG). To
provide plant personnel with a single turbine maintenance resource, EPRI has combined all of
this information and created a maintenance guide specific to each turbine application. Each guide
includes information that is common to all Terry turbines, as well as information specific to the
featured turbine. The three guides are:

Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, HPCI Application: Replaces TR-105874 and


TR-016909-R1, report number 1007459

Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, RCIC Application: Replaces TR-105874 and


TR-016909-R1, report number 1007460

Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, AFW Application: Replaces TR-105874 and


TR-016909-R1, report number 1007461

Objectives
To provide maintenance, inspection, and troubleshooting assistance to plant engineering and
maintenance personnel for the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system

To publish a report that combines maintenance recommendations for RCIC turbines and
turbine controls with recent industry knowledge and advancements

Approach
A Technical Advisory Group (TAG) consisting of key TTUG utility and industry personnel was
formed. This group met several times to gather and identify critical improvements and new
information related to turbines and turbine controls. This information was combined with
information from the existing maintenance guides and comprises the material contained in this
guide. Experience-proven practices and maintenance techniques were identified and discussed
v

during the TAGs effort and are also summarized. To ensure the accurate understanding and
communication of the recommendations in this report (and because unique circumstances and
installation details vary by turbine type), the TAG recommended that a guide be developed for
each specific turbine application, HPCI, RCIC, and AFW. This guide features the RCIC
application.
Results
This report provides the end user with a complete maintenance guide for the RCIC application of
the Terry turbine. The information that is provided addresses every aspect of each maintenance
task that is likely to be encountered by plant personnel. The report will help to improve turbine
reliability and availability and will aid in monitoring, diagnosing, and troubleshooting equipment
performance and problems.
This report addresses specific recommendations and practices for specific plant applications, thus
making it easy for plant personnel to use.
EPRI Perspective
The information contained in this guide represents a significant collection of technical
information, including techniques and good practices related to turbine maintenance, monitoring,
and troubleshooting. Compiling this information provides a valuable single point of reference for
power plant personnel. Through the use of this guide, EPRI members should be able to
significantly improve and optimize their plants existing predictive, preventive, and corrective
maintenance programs related to turbine equipment. This will help members to achieve increased
reliability and availability at a decreased cost.
Keywords
Turbine systems
Plant Support Engineering
Plant maintenance
Plant operations

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EPRI Proprietary Licensed Material

PREFACE
EPRIs Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center (NMAC), in conjunction with the NMAC
Terry Turbine Users Group (TTUG), has previously published two maintenance guides to
provide technical guidance to plant engineers and maintenance personnel on the Terry turbines
installed in BWR and PWR power plants. These reports are:

Terry Turbine Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide, TR-105874, 1995

Terry Turbine Controls Maintenance Guide, Revision 1, TR-016909-R1, 1998

The purpose of this guide is to combine and update the contents of these previous publications
into a report that will provide plant engineers and maintenance personnel with a single point of
reference for all maintenance activity, troubleshooting, and performance monitoring on their
plants Terry turbine.
In an effort to better organize the information, a separate maintenance guide has been developed
for each turbine application:

The HPCI turbine, report number 1007459

The RCIC turbine, report number 1007460

The AFW turbine, report number 1007461

Each guide includes information that is common to all Terry turbines, as well as information
specific to the featured turbine.
Each one of these guides also includes a specific reference section.
This guide features the RCIC turbine. Written based on feedback from years of operating
experience, it will define specific, unique instructions that are not necessarily obvious from
standard equipment drawings and documentation. The information does not always detail all
required steps because it is intended that the guide be used by knowledgeable and trained
personnel.
Physical descriptions contained herein might vary in some plant installations. The end user is
cautioned to verify their specific configuration prior to use.

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EPRI Proprietary Licensed Material

CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................1-1
1.1

Turbine Application ....................................................................................................1-1

1.2

The RCIC System ......................................................................................................1-1

1.2.1

System Function ................................................................................................1-1

1.2.2

System Components .........................................................................................1-1

1.3

Turbine Design Basis .................................................................................................1-2

1.3.1

Thermodynamic Design .....................................................................................1-2

1.3.2

Operating Conditions .........................................................................................1-3

1.4

List of Figures ............................................................................................................1-6

2 STEAM SUPPLY, EXHAUST, AND DRAIN SYSTEMS ........................................................2-1


2.1

The Systems Steam Requirements ...........................................................................2-1

2.1.1

Pressure ............................................................................................................2-1

2.1.2

Cleanliness ........................................................................................................2-1

2.1.3

Steam Quality ....................................................................................................2-1

2.2

Steam Supply .............................................................................................................2-2

2.2.1

Description ........................................................................................................2-2

2.2.2

Condensation Detection and Voiding .................................................................2-2

2.2.3

Condensation Minimizing Techniques ...............................................................2-3

2.3

Turbine Exhaust Systems ..........................................................................................2-3

2.3.1

Description of the BWR RCIC Turbine Exhaust Systems...................................2-3

2.3.2

Gland Seal Containment Systems .....................................................................2-5

2.4

Auxiliary Steam Connection .......................................................................................2-6

3 PERFORMANCE MONITORING ..........................................................................................3-1


3.1

Data Sources .............................................................................................................3-1

3.1.1

Surveillance Testing ..........................................................................................3-1

3.1.2

Transient Monitoring and Recording System .....................................................3-2

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3.1.3

Plant Computer Input .........................................................................................3-2

3.1.4

Walkdown Inspections .......................................................................................3-2

3.1.5

Operator Logs ...................................................................................................3-2

3.1.6

Maintenance History ..........................................................................................3-2

3.1.7

Industry Experience ...........................................................................................3-3

3.2

Data Points ................................................................................................................3-3

3.2.1

Standby and Steady-State Data Points ..............................................................3-3

3.2.2

Transient Data Points ........................................................................................3-4

3.3

Evaluating and Trending System Performance and Equipment Condition ..................3-5

3.3.1

Pump Performance............................................................................................3-5

3.3.2

Oil Analysis........................................................................................................3-5

3.3.3

EG-Type Governor Performance .......................................................................3-6

3.3.4

Turbine Gland Leakage .....................................................................................3-7

3.3.5

Vibration ............................................................................................................3-7

3.3.6

Overspeed Trip Testing .....................................................................................3-7

3.4

Examples of Transient Data Recording ......................................................................3-7

3.5

List of Figures ............................................................................................................3-9

4 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE ............................................................................................4-1


4.1

Discussion..................................................................................................................4-1

4.2

Routine Inspections and Surveillance Testing ............................................................4-1

4.2.1

Daily Walkdown .................................................................................................4-1

4.2.2

Monthly/Quarterly Inspection and Surveillance Testing......................................4-2

4.3

Routine Inspections and Planned Maintenance ..........................................................4-4

4.4

Major Inspections and Planned Maintenance .............................................................4-6

5 TURBINE COMPONENT DESCRIPTION, INSPECTION, AND REPAIR .............................5-1


6 TURBINE TRIP AND THROTTLE VALVE ............................................................................6-1
6.1

Description .................................................................................................................6-1

6.2

Minor Disassembly for Access to Valve Internals Only ...............................................6-2

6.3

Major Disassembly .....................................................................................................6-3

6.3.1

Gimpel Valve Disassembly ................................................................................6-3

6.3.2

S & K Valve Disassembly ..................................................................................6-5

6.4

Inspection...................................................................................................................6-7

EPRI Proprietary Licensed Material

6.5

Reassembly .............................................................................................................6-10

6.5.1

Gimpel Valve Reassembly ...............................................................................6-10

6.5.2

S & K Valve Reassembly .................................................................................6-14

6.6

T & T Valve Balance Chamber Pressure Measurement and Adjustment ..................6-19

6.7

List of Figures ..........................................................................................................6-21

7 TURBINE GOVERNOR VALVE............................................................................................7-1


7.1

Description .................................................................................................................7-1

7.1.1

Single-Seated V-Port Governor Valve ...............................................................7-1

7.1.2

Three-Inch Venturi Seat Governor Valve ...........................................................7-2

7.1.3

Valve Stem Packing ..........................................................................................7-3

7.2

Disassembly...............................................................................................................7-3

7.3

Inspection...................................................................................................................7-4

7.4

Valve Stem Replacement, 3 Inch Venturi Valve .........................................................7-6

7.5

Reassembly ...............................................................................................................7-7

7.5.1

Valve Stem Packing ..........................................................................................7-7

7.5.2

Valve Reassembly .............................................................................................7-9

7.6

List of Figures ............................................................................................................7-9

8 TURBINE GOVERNOR VALVE LINKAGE ...........................................................................8-1


8.1

Description .................................................................................................................8-1

8.2

Linkage Disassembly .................................................................................................8-1

8.3

Inspection...................................................................................................................8-2

8.4

Linkage Reassembly and Adjustment ........................................................................8-3

8.5

List of Figures ............................................................................................................8-5

9 TURBINE JOURNAL BEARINGS ........................................................................................9-1


9.1

Description .................................................................................................................9-1

9.2

Disassembly...............................................................................................................9-2

9.2.1

Coupling End .....................................................................................................9-2

9.2.2

Governor End ....................................................................................................9-2

9.3

Inspection...................................................................................................................9-3

9.4

Reassembly ...............................................................................................................9-4

9.4.1

Coupling End and Governor End .......................................................................9-4

9.4.2

Coupling End Only.............................................................................................9-5

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9.4.3
9.5

Governor End Only ............................................................................................9-5

List of Figures ............................................................................................................9-6

10 TURBINE THRUST BEARING .........................................................................................10-1


10.1

Description ..........................................................................................................10-1

10.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................10-1

10.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................10-3

10.4

Reassembly.........................................................................................................10-4

10.5

List of Figures ......................................................................................................10-6

11 TURBINE SHAFT OIL SEALS..........................................................................................11-1


11.1

Description ..........................................................................................................11-1

11.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................11-1

11.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................11-2

11.4

Reassembly.........................................................................................................11-2

12 TURBINE SHAFT STEAM SEALS ...................................................................................12-1


12.1

Description ..........................................................................................................12-1

12.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................12-2

12.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................12-3

12.4

Reassembly.........................................................................................................12-4

12.5

List of Figures ......................................................................................................12-6

13 TURBINE OIL PUMP ........................................................................................................13-1


13.1

Description ..........................................................................................................13-1

13.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................13-1

13.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................13-2

13.4

Maintenance Guidelines ......................................................................................13-2

13.5

Reassembly.........................................................................................................13-2

13.6

List of Figures ......................................................................................................13-3

14 TURBINE GOVERNOR AND OIL PUMP DRIVE GEAR ASSEMBLY ..............................14-1

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14.1

Description ..........................................................................................................14-1

14.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................14-2

14.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................14-4

14.4

Reassembly.........................................................................................................14-5

EPRI Proprietary Licensed Material

14.5

Backlash Adjustment ...........................................................................................14-6

14.6

Spiral Gear Thrust Washer Replacement ............................................................14-7

14.7

List of Figures ......................................................................................................14-9

15 TURBINE CASING ...........................................................................................................15-1


15.1

Description ..........................................................................................................15-1

15.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................15-2

15.3

Cleaning and Inspection ......................................................................................15-2

15.4

Reassembly.........................................................................................................15-3

15.5

List of Figures ......................................................................................................15-5

16 TURBINE ROTOR, SHAFT/WHEEL ASSEMBLY ............................................................16-1


16.1

Description ..........................................................................................................16-1

16.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................16-1

16.3

Cleaning and Inspection ......................................................................................16-3

16.4

Shaft/Wheel Replacement ...................................................................................16-4

16.4.1

Disassembly .................................................................................................16-4

16.4.2

Cleaning and Inspection ...............................................................................16-5

16.4.3

Reassembly .................................................................................................16-5

16.5

Reassembly.........................................................................................................16-6

16.6

List of Figures ......................................................................................................16-8

17 TURBINE STEAM JET ASSEMBLIES .............................................................................17-1


17.1

Description ..........................................................................................................17-1

17.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................17-1

17.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................17-2

17.4

Replacement .......................................................................................................17-2

18 TURBINE REVERSING CHAMBERS ...............................................................................18-1


18.1

Description ..........................................................................................................18-1

18.2

Disassembly ........................................................................................................18-1

18.3

Inspection ............................................................................................................18-1

18.4

Reassembly.........................................................................................................18-2

19 TURBINE BEARING PEDESTALS ..................................................................................19-1


19.1

Description ..........................................................................................................19-1

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19.2

Inspection ............................................................................................................19-2

20 TURBINE OIL SYSTEM....................................................................................................20-1


20.1

General Description .............................................................................................20-1

20.2

Ring Lubrication and Pressure Circulation System ..............................................20-2

20.2.1

Oil Retention ................................................................................................20-2

20.2.2

Oil Pump and Pressure Control System .......................................................20-4

20.2.3

Oil Header Components ...............................................................................20-4

20.2.4

Oil Drain System ..........................................................................................20-4

20.2.5

Oil Drain System Flooding ............................................................................20-5

20.2.6

Inspection and Maintenance .........................................................................20-7

20.3

List of Figures ......................................................................................................20-8

21 TURBINE CONTROL SYSTEM OVERVIEW ....................................................................21-1


22 WOODWARD EG-TYPE GOVERNOR .............................................................................22-1
22.1

Description ..........................................................................................................22-1

22.1.1

Power Supply ...............................................................................................22-1

22.1.2

RGSC Module ..............................................................................................22-2

22.1.3

EG-M Control Box ........................................................................................22-3

22.1.4

Bias Speed-Setting Potentiometer ................................................................22-5

22.1.5

Magnetic Speed Pickup ................................................................................22-5

22.1.6

EG-R Hydraulic Actuator ..............................................................................22-6

22.1.7

Remote Servo ..............................................................................................22-7

22.1.8

Summary of Operation .................................................................................22-7

22.2

Calibration ...........................................................................................................22-8

22.2.1

Calibration Test Equipment ..........................................................................22-9

22.2.2

Calibration Procedures .................................................................................22-9

22.3

System Operation Deviating from Design Basis ................................................22-23

22.4

Troubleshooting .................................................................................................22-24

22.5

List of Figures ....................................................................................................22-25

23 WOODWARD PG-TYPE GOVERNOR .............................................................................23-1


24 TRANSIENT CONTROL IMPROVEMENT ........................................................................24-1
24.1

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Steam Bypass Systems .......................................................................................24-1

EPRI Proprietary Licensed Material

24.2

Characterized Steam Admission Valves ..............................................................24-2

24.3

Linkage Adjustment for Minimum Required Governor Valve Stroke .....................24-2

24.4

Valve Travel Gags ...............................................................................................24-2

25 TURBINE OVERSPEED TRIP SYSTEM ..........................................................................25-1


25.1

General Description .............................................................................................25-1

25.2

Mechanical Overspeed Trip System Components ...............................................25-2

25.2.1

Overspeed Governor ....................................................................................25-2

25.2.1.1 Disc-Type Overspeed Governor...............................................................25-2


25.2.1.2 Pin-Type Overspeed Governor ................................................................25-3
25.2.2

Overspeed Trip Tappet.................................................................................25-3

25.2.3

Tappet Nut and Head Lever Assembly .........................................................25-4

25.2.4

Connecting Linkage to the Trip and Throttle Valve .......................................25-5

25.3

Mechanical Overspeed Trip Adjustments ............................................................25-6

25.3.1

Tappet Installation and Engagement Adjustment..........................................25-6

25.3.1.1 Polyurethane Head Tappet With the Disc Overspeed Governor...............25-6


25.3.1.2 Polyurethane Head Tappet With the Pin Overspeed Governor ................25-9
25.3.2

Connecting Linkage Adjustment .................................................................25-11

25.3.3

Trip Speed Adjustment ...............................................................................25-12

25.3.3.1 Disc-Type Overspeed Governor.............................................................25-13


25.3.3.2 Pin-Type Overspeed Governor ..............................................................25-14
25.4

Mechanical Overspeed Trip Testing ..................................................................25-16

25.5

Motor Drive for Overspeed Trip Testing .............................................................25-18

25.6

Electronic Overspeed Trip System ....................................................................25-18

25.7

List of Figures ....................................................................................................25-19

26 CRITICAL FITS AND DIMENSIONS.................................................................................26-1


26.1

English (British) Units ..........................................................................................26-1

26.2

International System of Units (SI) ........................................................................26-8

27 RECOMMENDED BOLT TORQUE ..................................................................................27-1


28 ALIGNMENT.....................................................................................................................28-1
29 TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDES .......................................................................................29-1

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30 REFERENCES .................................................................................................................30-1
30.1

EPRI Documents .................................................................................................30-1

30.2

Tuthill Pump Company ........................................................................................30-1

30.3

Woodward Governor Company Manuals .............................................................30-1

30.4

Terry Corporation Design Improvement (DI) Packages........................................30-2

30.5

General Electric Service Information Letters (SILs) .............................................30-2

30.6

NRC Documents..................................................................................................30-3

30.6.1

Information Circulars and Notices .................................................................30-3

30.6.2

AEOD/C602, Case Study Report ..................................................................30-4

30.6.3

NUREG-1154 ...............................................................................................30-4

30.6.4

NUREG-1177 ...............................................................................................30-4

30.6.5

NUREG-1275, Volume 10 ............................................................................30-4

30.7

INPO Documents.................................................................................................30-4

30.7.1

Significant Operating Experience Reports ....................................................30-4

30.7.2

Significant Event Report/Notice ....................................................................30-4

30.7.3

Operations and Maintenance Reminders .....................................................30-5

31 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ..............................................................................31-1

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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1 Typical Section Drawing, RCIC Turbine, Type GS-2 (Sheet 1 of 2) .........................1-7
Figure 3-1 RCIC System, Surveillance Test ...........................................................................3-11
Figure 3-2 RCIC System, Vessel Injection .............................................................................3-13
Figure 3-3 RCIC System Automatic Vessel Injection Startup .................................................3-15
Figure 3-4 RCIC System Vessel Injection Restart, With Flooded Steam Supply Line .............3-17
Figure 6-1 Gimpel Trip and Throttle Valve, Drawing P-4979 ..................................................6-23
Figure 6-2 Gimpel Trip and Throttle Valve, Drawing P-6540 ..................................................6-25
Figure 6-3 S & K Trip and Throttle Valve, With Operator ........................................................6-27
Figure 7-1 Two and One Half-Inch Governor Valve Internals .................................................7-11
Figure 7-2 Three Inch Governor Valve Internals.....................................................................7-13
Figure 7-3 Governor Valve Stem Packing ..............................................................................7-15
Figure 8-1 Linkage Adjustment Points, Single-Lever EG Governor, V- Port Valve ...................8-7
Figure 8-2 Linkage Adjustment Points, Single-Lever EG Governor, Venturi Valve ...................8-9
Figure 9-1 Journal Bearing Fit Measurement ...........................................................................9-7
Figure 9-2 Speed Pickup Gap Setting ......................................................................................9-9
Figure 10-1 Double-Ball Thrust Bearing, Disc Trip .................................................................10-7
Figure 10-2 Double-Ball Thrust Bearing, Pin Trip ...................................................................10-9
Figure 10-3 Double-Ball Thrust Bearing ...............................................................................10-11
Figure 10-4 Wheel Lap.........................................................................................................10-13
Figure 12-1 Carbon Seal Assembly........................................................................................12-7
Figure 12-2 Carbon Ring Match-Marks ..................................................................................12-9
Figure 12-3 Turbine Lower-Half Gland Case Seal Preparation.............................................12-11
Figure 12-4 Carbon Ring Clearance.....................................................................................12-13
Figure 12-5 Turbine Gland Case Horizontal Joint Seal Preparation .....................................12-15
Figure 13-1 Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly With Oil Pump ........................................13-5
Figure 14-1 Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly .............................................................14-11
Figure 14-2 Gear Assembly Backlash ..................................................................................14-15
Figure 14-3 Spiral Gear, Lower Thrust Washer Installation ..................................................14-17
Figure 15-1 Turbine Casing Horizontal Joint Seal Preparation ...............................................15-7
Figure 16-1 Wheel Lap...........................................................................................................16-9
Figure 16-2 Turbine Rotor Runout Inspection ......................................................................16-11
Figure 20-1 Oil Piping Schematic ...........................................................................................20-9

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Figure 20-2 Turbine Bearing Housing Oil Level ....................................................................20-11


Figure 22-1 Woodward EG Governor Control System Schematic ........................................22-27
Figure 22-2 Woodward EG-R Actuator and Remote Servo Schematic .................................22-29
Figure 25-1 Disc-Type Overspeed Governor........................................................................25-21
Figure 25-2 Disc-Type Overspeed Governor Trip Weight Clearance....................................25-23
Figure 25-3 Pin-Type Overspeed Governor .........................................................................25-25
Figure 25-4 Disc-Type Trip with Molded Tappet ...................................................................25-27
Figure 25-5 Pin-Type Trip with Molded Tappet.....................................................................25-29
Figure 25-6 Trip Linkage ......................................................................................................25-31

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LIST OF TABLES
Table 1-1 Parts List for Type GS-2 Turbine Section Drawing (Reference Figure 1-1) ..............1-4
Table 6-1 Parts List for Schutte and Koerting Trip and Throttle Valve (Reference
Figure 6-3)......................................................................................................................6-20
Table 29-1 General Troubleshooting Information, RCIC Turbines ..........................................29-1

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INTRODUCTION

1.1

Turbine Application

Steam turbines are used as the main pump drive mechanism for all Boiling Water Reactor
(BWR) Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) Systems.

1.2

The RCIC System

1.2.1 System Function


The primary function of the RCIC system is to provide water injection to the reactor vessel in
the event that the vessel has been isolated from its normal source of coolant inventory. Due to its
significantly lower injection flow rate, the RCIC system is not a backup for the HPCI system.
However, the RCIC system does support the primary function of the HPCI system.
Typical injection flow rates vary from an upper design limit of 400 to 800 gpm (1515 to
3030 lpm), across a reactor vessel pressure range from above 1100 psig (7585 kPa) to a nominal
low pressure of 150 psig (1035 kPa).
1.2.2 System Components
The RCIC System is a steam turbine-driven pumping system, with a multi-stage centrifugal
pump directly coupled to a Terry steam turbine assembly.
Additional system components include valves and instrumentation associated with:

Steam supply to the turbine, including its drain system

Exhaust from the turbine, including its drain system

Pump suction, from both the condensate storage system and the suppression pool

Pump discharge, including injection to the vessel and test return to the condensate
storage system

Pump minimum flow sub-system

Self-contained cooling water sub-system

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EPRI Licensed Material


Introduction

This guide focuses specifically on the turbine drives but provides a brief description of their
associated steam supply line(s) and exhaust lines.

1.3

Turbine Design Basis

The RCIC systems are all standby systems, which are idle during normal plant operation and
only run when required to perform their design function or during routine testing. The turbines
are quick-started from a cold condition with no pre-warming or other operator action.
Reference Figure 1-1
Reference Table 1-1
All Terry RCIC applications use their solid-wheel design in a G turbine frame size. The frame
size identifies a nominal 24 in. (610 mm) diameter turbine wheel where a GS-1 frame indicates
lower-half steam admission only, and a GS-2 frame indicates both lower-half and upper-half
steam admission. The specific frame designation (GS-1 or GS-2) used on a particular application
is based on the output power required, the operating speed(s) and the specific operating steam
conditions.
The Terry solid-wheel turbine was purposely selected for the RCIC systems. Its main advantages
include:

Rugged one-piece wheel construction

Insensitivity to degraded steam conditions, including water slugs

Minimal axial thrust steam loads under all operating conditions

Suitability for required cold, quick-start transients

1.3.1 Thermodynamic Design


The requirement that operation use inlet steam pressures from a nominal 1100 psig (7585 kPa)
down to as low as 85 psig (585 kPa) defines the thermodynamic design requirements. Typically,
the power required at the low (decayed) inlet steam condition determines the necessary steam
flow capability and, in turn, the governor valve size, and the number and size of the steam
nozzles. Once these are determined, the required frame size is defined based on the limits of each
frame.
The low-pressure design criterion yields a design with considerable excess steam flow capacity
and corresponding power capability at the high-pressure steam inlet conditions. This excess
power capability provides extremely rapid acceleration during startup and results in the RCIC
turbine governor valve operating near its full closed position (that is, typically 20% open or less).
These conditions signify the requirements for a responsive, well-maintained turbine control
system.

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Introduction

Steam enters the RCIC turbines through a single governor valve. Steam is then directed into an
individual high-pressure steam ring, which is an integral part of the turbine casing. Expanding
nozzles then direct the steam tangential into the turbines solid-wheel buckets where its direction
is reversed l80. Reversing chambers, located at each nozzle, cause the steam to re-enter the
turbine wheel several times, thereby utilizing most of the steams available energy.
By using the steam ring/expanding nozzle design, the turbine casing joints and the turbine shaft
gland seals are subjected only to exhaust pressure.
1.3.2 Operating Conditions
As previously identified, the turbines used for RCIC systems must operate over a wide range of
steam inlet conditions. These turbines also operate over a wide range of required speed. The
design basis for low-speed operation is typically 20002500 rpm, with high-speed operation
typically 40004700 rpm. An additional requirement of operation is an unattended, cold, quickstart with rated flow from the driven pump within 30 to 90 seconds.
The normal operating environment for these systems is different than most normal turbine-driven
pump systems in that the systems normal condition is cold shutdown. Actual operation typically
consists of cold quick-start surveillance tests on a quarterly schedule and perhaps one plantrequired start per year, resulting in total operating time of less than 10 hours per year. This
characteristic dictates a unique approach to routine maintenance where the emphasis is placed on
operational readiness rather than on the repair and replacement of worn components.
A Woodward EG-type control system configuration is used on all RCIC turbines. This
configuration, when properly installed, calibrated, adjusted, and maintained, is capable of
controlling the required cold, quick-start transients on the turbines, as well as their steady-state
operational requirements. It is important that the control system be set up to sense turbine speed
at or below l000 rpm and to limit turbine speed to its maximum operating design condition,
thereby avoiding overspeed transients during the cold, quick-start requirement for the system.
In the event of control system problems, all turbines have been provided with a mechanical
overspeed trip protection system. Some turbines also maintain a redundant electrical/electronic
overspeed trip protection system. The trip setpoint for these protection systems is typically l0 to
25% above the normal maximum operating speed of the turbine.

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Introduction
Table 1-1
Parts List for Type GS-2 Turbine Section Drawing (Reference Figure 1-1)

1-4

Item
No.

Description

Item
No.

Description

001
002
003
004
005
006
007
008
009
010
011
012
013
014
015
016
017
018
019

Turbine Shaft
Coupling Key
Wheel Key
Wheel Nut
Locking Setscrew
Thrust Bearing Locknut
Thrust Bearing Lockwasher
Thrust Bearing Spacer
Pump Bracket Joint Screws
Thrust Collar Pin
Thrust Collar Setscrew
Oil Deflector Setscrew
Overspeed Trip Disc Key
Turbine Wheel
Coupling End Pedestal Stud
Turbine Case Assembly
Gland Case Assembly
Lifting Eye Bolt
Governor End Pedestal Stud

041
042
043
044
045
046
047
048
049
050
051
052
053
054
055
056
057
058
059

020
021
022
023
024
025
026
027
028
029
030
031
032
033
034
035
036
037
038
039
040

Governor End Pedestal Stud


Pedestal Stud Nut
Steam Jet Plug
Steam Jet Plug Gasket
Gland Case Socket Head Screw
Gland Case Fitted Stud
Gland Case Fitted Stud Nut
Chamber Support Ring Screw
Reversing Chamber
Reversing Chamber Screw
Jet Body Holder
Jet Body Flexitallic Gasket, R4-9F
Jet Body Assembly
Reversing Chamber Support Ring
Carbon Ring Spring
Carbon Ring
Carbon Ring Stop
Governor End Pedestal
Inspection Plug
Oil Seal

060
061
062
063
064
065
066
067
068
069
070
071
072
073
074
075
076
077
078
079
080

Thrust Collar
Oil Ring
Journal Bearing Alignment Pin
Oil Seal
Oil Seal
Speed-Sensing Spur Gear
Magnetic Speed Pickup
Coupling End Pedestal
Coupling End Pedestal Flange
Pedestal Flange Hex Head Screw
Oil Deflector
Ball Thrust Bearing
Governor End Journal Bearing
Coupling End Journal Bearing
Shaft-Driven Oil Pump
Pump Case Cover
Pump Bracket and Cap
Truarc Retaining Ring
Electric Governor Remote (EG-R)
Hydraulic Actuator
EG-R Hydraulic Actuator Adapter
1 in. NPT Pipe Plug
Drive Shaft Lower Bushing
Drive Shaft Upper Bushing
Drive Shaft
Spiral Drive Gear Locknut
Spiral Drive Gear Key
Spiral Gear Assembly
Overspeed Trip Disc Assembly
Spiral Gear Spacer
EG-R Hydraulic Actuator Coupling
Pump Case Cover Screw
Actuator Adapter Plate Screw
Lower-Half Turbine Casing
Upper-Half Turbine Casing
Steam Ring Blank Flange
Steam Ring Blank Flange Gasket
Steam Ring Blank Flange Stud
Steam Ring Blank Flange Nut
Steam Ring Blank Flange Washer
Steam Ring Blank Flange

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Introduction
Table 1-1 (continued)
Parts List for Type GS-2 Turbine Section Drawing (Reference Figure 1-1)
Item
No.

Description

081
082
083
084
085
086
087
088
089
090
091
092
093
094
095
096
097
098
099
100
101
102

Steam Ring Blank Flange Gasket


Steam Ring Plug
Turbine Casing Joint Allen Nut
Turbine Casing Joint Washer
Turbine Casing Joint Stud
Turbine Casing Joint Dowel Pin
Turbine Casing Joint Stud
Actuator Coupling Roll Pin
Upper Thrust Washer Screw
Upper Thrust Washer
Lower Thrust Washer
Lower Thrust Washer Screw
Spiral-Driven Gear Key
Spiral Drive Gear Locknut Setscrew
Pipe Plug
Steam Ring Blank Flange
EG-R Hydraulic Actuator Stud
EG-R Hydraulic Actuator Stud Nut
Pump Bracket Hex Head Cap Screw
Oil Pump Socket-Head Cap Screw
Oil Pump Dowel Pin

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Introduction

1.4

List of Figures

Figure

Description

1-1(1)

Typical Section Drawing, RCIC Turbine, Type GS-2 (Sheet 1 of 2)

1-1(2)

Typical Section Drawing, RCIC Turbine, Type GS-2 (Sheet 2 of 2)

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Figure 1-1
Typical Section Drawing, RCIC Turbine, Type GS-2 (Sheet 1 of 2)

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Introduction

Figure 1-1 (contimued)


Typical Section Drawing, RCIC Turbine, Type GS-2 (Sheet 2 of 2)

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STEAM SUPPLY, EXHAUST, AND DRAIN SYSTEMS

2.1

The Systems Steam Requirements

2.1.1 Pressure
There are three inlet steam pressures associated with RCIC systems:

The maximum pressure is the required design pressure of the inlet components of the
turbines and only exists under severe upset conditions of the reactor. Maximum pressure is
1250 psig (8620 kPa).

The normal pressure is the steam pressure available at the turbine under normal plant
operating conditions. Normal pressures range from 900 to 1180 psig (6205 to 8135 kPa).

The low or minimum pressure is the lowest inlet pressure at which the turbine is required to
operate. The low-pressure condition also defines the thermodynamic design of the turbine.
Typical low-steam inlet pressures range from 85 to 150 psig (585 to 1035 kPa).

2.1.2 Cleanliness
The chemistry restrictions imposed in the operation of the boiling water reactors are more severe
than the restrictions required for the turbines.
Each plant should follow their specific Foreign Material Exclusion Controls regarding foreign
material in the turbine steam supply lines.
2.1.3 Steam Quality
The steam supply to the RCIC turbines should ideally be dry saturated steam, with moisture
content maintained below 1%. Typically, the Terry turbine is capable of receiving water
carryover from its steam supply line without sustaining damage. However, experience has
demonstrated that water carryover transients and steam condensing transients have resulted in
loss of system operability due to control system problems and turbine overspeed trips. These
areas of concern have been documented in the following:

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Steam Supply, Exhaust, and Drain Systems

NRC Information Notices:


IN 85-50

Complete Loss of Main and Auxiliary Feedwater at a PWR

IN 85-76

Recent Water Hammer Events

IN 86-14

PWR Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Turbine Control Problems, with Supplements 1


& 2, Overspeed Trips of AFW, HPCI, and RCIC Turbines

IN 93-51

Repetitive Overspeed Tripping of Turbine Driven Auxiliary Feedwater Pumps

INPO Significant Event Reports (SERs):


SER 18-80

Repetitive Trip of Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Overspeed Trip Throttle Valve

SER 23-80

Emergency Feedwater Pump Turbine Trip on Overspeed

SER 72-81

Emergency Feedwater Pump Overspeed

SER 36-83

Loss of All Feedwater

SER 29-85

Loss of Main and Auxiliary Feedwater

SER 7-90

Turbine Driven Pump Overspeed

2.2

Steam Supply

2.2.1 Description
The design specifications for all RCIC systems define requirements for the turbine steam supply
line. These specifically dictate that the steam line be continuously sloped from the reactor steam
header to the turbine, and that it be pre-warmed, pressurized, and drained down to a normally
closed steam supply valve located directly upstream of the turbine. Because the BWR uses direct
reactor steam for the supply to the RCIC turbines, the steam supply lines are provided with
isolation valves (one inboard and one outboard of the primary containment) with appropriate
automatic closing signals.
2.2.2 Condensation Detection and Voiding
The most common operating problems associated with the steam supply system are a result of
water carryover. Typically, the Terry turbine is capable of receiving water carryover from its
steam supply line without sustaining damage. However, experience has demonstrated that water
carryover transients have resulted in loss of system operability due to control system problems
and turbine overspeed trips.
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Steam Supply, Exhaust, and Drain Systems

A turbine startup transient with water carryover into the steam supply line could have one of the
following scenarios:
The initial acceleration transient would be normal, with the turbine driven by dry, highenergy steam. As the water carryover enters the turbine, the acceleration transient
decreases, or stops, due to a lack of driving energy. The turbine control system, calling
for an increase in turbine speed, will open the turbine governor valve. When the water
carryover clears the turbine, and dry high-energy steam enters the full open turbine
governor valve, a high turbine acceleration transient will occur, potentially driving the
turbine to an overspeed trip speed.
An alternate scenario is that the water carryover (downstream of the governor valve)
could flash into high-energy steam due to pressure drop, resulting in a high turbine
acceleration transient and potentially driving the turbine to an overspeed trip speed.
The steam supply lines to all RCIC turbines include a drain pot system located upstream of the
normally closed steam supply valve at the turbine. During the systems standby condition, the
drain pot will collect steam condensation and automatically void through a steam trap to the
plants main condenser. Due to historic maintenance problems, some steam traps have been
replaced with fixed orifices. The drain pot system includes level switches for detecting abnormal
collection of condensate, indicating a malfunction or plugging of the steam trap (or orifice). The
level switches provide an alarm of the abnormal condition and automatically open a bypass
around the steam trap (or orifice).

IMPORTANT: To ensure system operational readiness, it is critical that preventive maintenance and
instrument calibration programs be established and implemented for the steam supply drain pot system
components.

2.2.3 Condensation Minimizing Techniques


The steam lines to the turbines are insulated to minimize the heat loads into their immediate area,
and to provide for personnel safety. This insulation also reduces the condensation rate of the
pressurized steam line during the systems standby condition.

2.3

Turbine Exhaust Systems

2.3.1 Description of the BWR RCIC Turbine Exhaust Systems


Realizing that the BWR RCIC turbines use direct reactor steam, it is necessary that the turbine
exhaust steam be directed to the containment suppression pool, where it is discharged under
water and condensed. Due to containment penetration, isolation valves are required in the turbine
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Steam Supply, Exhaust, and Drain Systems

exhaust lines. Originally, these valves were a simple swing check valve and a stop check valve,
located in series. Due to changes in containment isolation valve design criteria, later designs use
a simple swing check valve, a lift check valve, or an equalized balanced check valve, in series
with a motor-operated gate valve.
As noted, the turbine exhaust lines discharge under water. During turbine operation, the
temperature of the exhaust line rises above ambient conditions. Following turbine shutdown and
the subsequent cooldown, a vacuum forms, drawing water into the exhaust line. This condition
has the potential for a water hammer cycle against the valves in the exhaust line. The potential
for the water hammer cycle increases as the height between the exhaust line penetration to the
suppression pool and the pool water level decreases (that is, less vacuum is required to lift water
to the horizontal run of the turbine exhaust line). To avoid the potential water hammer cycles,
vacuum breakers have been added to the turbine exhaust lines. These are located downstream of
their respective isolation valves and interface with the air space of the suppression pool. In
addition to the vacuum breakers, most BWR RCIC turbine exhaust lines have been provided
with underwater condensing spargers, to further stabilize the turbine exhaust pressure during
system operation.
Malfunction of the valves in the turbine exhaust lines could result in over-pressurizing the
turbine exhaust casing. To avoid this possible condition, rupture discs are provided in the turbine
exhaust lines. Two rupture discs have been provided in series, with an orifice vent between them.
With this arrangement, the outboard disc will not be subjected to pressure or vacuum cycles, or
to steam temperature cycles (that is, the outboard disc will not be subjected to potential cycle
fatigue with time). Damage to, and resultant minor leakage through, the inboard disc can be
detected by observing the rupture disc vent during system surveillance testing.
A rupture disc is a non-shutoff device. Unlike a relief valve with open/close capability, once
ruptured, the discs will not re-close. The turbine exhaust systems therefore have the following
specific instrumentation provisions:

The exhaust line includes two pressure switches, either of which will provide automatic trip
of the turbine upon sensing an abnormally high exhaust pressure condition. This abnormal
transient condition could be the result of the slow opening of an exhaust line check valve, or
it could be due to the required acceleration of a minor water slug in the exhaust system. The
intent of these pressure switches is to trip the turbine and avoid potentially breaching the
rupture discs pressure boundary.

If the exhaust line has a severe blockage (that is, the malfunctioning of a valve or the
collection of a major water slug), an excessive exhaust pressure transient on system startup
could result in steam release through the rupture discs. The RCIC turbine exhaust systems
have four pressure switches located between the two rupture discs. These switches will sense
the high-pressure condition due to rupture disc release, providing an automatic steam line
isolation signal and a turbine trip signal, thus terminating the release of steam.

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Steam Supply, Exhaust, and Drain Systems

IMPORTANT: To ensure system protection, it is critical that preventive maintenance and instrument
calibration programs be established and implemented for the exhaust line and the rupture disc pressure
switches.

In an effort to avoid trapped water in the exhaust system, the turbine exhaust casing low point is
drained to the low-point drain pot of the exhaust line. The exhaust line drain pot is drained to a
containment system.

CAUTION!! For those systems with monitoring instrumentation, it is critical that preventive
maintenance and instrument calibration programs be established for the exhaust drain system level
switch and alarm components. For those systems without instrumentation, a guarded sight level gauge
could be added to the vertical section of the turbine exhaust line and drain pot piping. Potential water
accumulation in the exhaust system could then be visually monitored prior to, during, and following
surveillance test activity, thereby verifying the operability of the drain system. Water accumulation could
result in equipment damage or personal injury.

2.3.2 Gland Seal Containment Systems


The turbine shaft and valve stem seals are clearance-type seals and some leakage is normal.
Leakoff connections are provided. All RCIC turbines have provisions for containing this leakage
to prevent contamination and reduce equipment room heat load.
Because a BWR uses direct reactor steam for the supply to the RCIC turbines, steam leakage
from the turbine glands would ultimately contaminate the equipment rooms. Therefore, these
turbines have been provided with gland seal containment systems.
All RCIC turbines up to the BWR-6 product line are provided with CSM, Series 40 gland
exhausters with barometric condensers, manufactured by the Nash Engineering Company.
Square D level switches are provided for monitoring and controlling water level and vacuum in
the gland exhausters condensate receiver tank.
The RCIC turbines for the BWR-6 product line are provided with 3CDL Series Cyclo Blowers,
manufactured by Gardner Denver Company. These are capable of pressurizing the turbine
glands to prevent steam leakage, an alternative to evacuating and condensing steam as was
necessary on previous turbine assemblies.
The turbine instruction manuals provide complete and adequate information for operating,
maintaining, and troubleshooting the gland seal containment systems.

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Steam Supply, Exhaust, and Drain Systems

NOTE: Operating experience has demonstrated that the throttling valves in the turbine shaft leakoff lines
should be throttled to a minimum vacuum condition, typically 1 to 2 inches mercury, ( or a minimum
pressure condition, typically 10 to 12 psig) while maintaining the turbine shaft glands free from external
steam leakage. If throttling valves are used in the leakoff line from the T & T valve and the governor
valve, they should be in the wide open position.

2.4

Auxiliary Steam Connection

A significant number of RCIC turbines have site provisions for connecting auxiliary steam to the
main steam supply line to the turbine. Typical auxiliary steam capacities are 20,000 to 50,000 lbs
per hour at inlet pressures of 100 to 200 psi (690 to 1380 kPa). These are sufficient to run the
turbines uncoupled at no load to demonstrate the operability of the turbines overspeed trip
protective device or the availability of the overall turbine assembly following maintenance
activity. The use of auxiliary steam avoids potential critical path delays during plant startup (for
example, when waiting for the availability of reactor steam, or when delays with available
reactor steam occur while troubleshooting operational problems with the turbine assembly or its
components).
In lieu of auxiliary steam, compressed air can be considered an alternative source for driving the
turbines. For example, a 1200 scfm air compressor is adequate for driving a RCIC turbine.

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PERFORMANCE MONITORING

3.1

Data Sources

There are a significant number of data sources available for monitoring the performance of RCIC
turbines and systems.
3.1.1 Surveillance Testing
Surveillance testing is the most meaningful method of monitoring overall system and equipment
performance. Individual plant technical specifications define the requirements for surveillance
testing, typically requiring the demonstration of time to rated pump flow and discharge pressure,
for various reactor pressures. The objective of this testing should be to simulate as closely as
possible the actual startup sequence of the systems following an auto-initiation signal. An
operability demonstration of the systems should include not only steady-state pump flow and
pressure data, but also quick-start control capability and proper valve sequencing.
Both the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
(NRC) have expressed concern regarding the pre-conditioning of systems prior to conducting
surveillance tests. These concerns include:

Pre-draining of steam supply lines and turbine exhaust lines

Pre-warming of turbine casings

Venting and priming pump discharge lines

Priming turbine hydraulic and control oil systems

Bypassing system control logic

There is typically a criterion for cold, quick-start demonstration (that is, simulating a system
startup that would be expected from an automatic startup signal). Originally, the arbitrary
definition for a cold, quick-start demonstration was no system operation for a prior 72-hour
period. A significant number of sites have now justified a shorter period of time.
If abnormal conditions are discovered during the preceding pre-conditioning steps, action must
be taken to justify the operability and availability of the system.

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Performance Monitoring

3.1.2 Transient Monitoring and Recording System


The meaningful efforts of surveillance testing are significantly improved by recording pertinent
transient data. The review of recorded transient data provides for:

Detailed evaluation of a specific surveillance test

Trending evaluation of the performance of specific components from a series of surveillance


tests

Troubleshooting required to evaluate the malfunction or degradation of specific components,


or perceived system problems due to abnormal transients

The recording of transient data should not be limited to planned testing but should be performed
upon any system initiation. This data becomes particularly valuable in the event of a system
demand startup or operating problem.
3.1.3 Plant Computer Input
The plant computer is a typical source for recording system data. In addition to recording
pertinent transient data, the computer is an excellent source for recording changes in the position
of system valves and the actuation of system alarms by using its switching function. This
information is valuable in troubleshooting system malfunctions or abnormal transients.
3.1.4 Walkdown Inspections
A daily walkdown is recommended for an inspection of equipment. This inspection should
include a visual check for external leakage of steam, water, and oil, and a general overview of
the standby status of the equipment.
Recordkeeping is recommended for scheduling maintenance (for example, to monitor dripping
water or oil, leaking steam, or abnormal hot spots, and to schedule maintenance prior to a minor
issue progressing into a major problem requiring immediate attention).
3.1.5 Operator Logs
Operator logs are useful for monitoring the type and frequency of tests conducted on the systems,
including any test anomalies. Realizing that these logs are dependent on their depth of input, they
are often beneficial in troubleshooting problems that require a review of testing history.
3.1.6 Maintenance History
A review of maintenance history provides an excellent tool for monitoring repeat problems and
potential weak links in system design.

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Performance Monitoring

3.1.7 Industry Experience


Last, but certainly not least, are the benefits available from reviewing industry experience. Both
the NRC and INPO provide frequent reviews and summaries of industry experience regarding
operability and operational problems associated with the RCIC systems and turbines (see
reference reports at the end of this guide). The Terry Turbine Users Group (TTUG) is an
organization that was formed for the purpose of improving the reliability and maintainability of
Terry turbine systems. This organization serves the nuclear industry by providing information,
education, and a communication forum for Terry turbine users. This effort has been
accomplished by collectively sharing industry experiences (both successes and concerns) and
jointly resolving technical issues. With continued attendance and participation, this group has
proven to be an excellent sounding board.

3.2

Data Points

The identification of data points has been divided into two categories:

Standby and steady-state data

Transient data

In the following lists, note that some data points have been identified in both categories.
3.2.1 Standby and Steady-State Data Points
A log of the following standby and steady-state data should be maintained for evaluating and
trending system operational readiness and overall performance:

Oil analysis, including moisture content, acidity, viscosity, and particle count

EG-type governor in standby and steady-state conditions

Ramp generator and signal converter (RGSC) output

Electric governor magnetic pickup (EG-M) control box output

Pump flow

Pump discharge pressure

Pump suction pressure

Turbine speed

Turbine steam inlet pressure

Turbine exhaust pressure

Turbine casing temperature (that is, steam supply valve leakage monitor)

Turbine oil temperatures

Turbine oil pressures, after oil temperature has reached a steady-state, stabilized condition
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Turbine gland leakage visual evaluation

Vibration, both horizontal and vertical, at each journal bearing

Overspeed trip setpoint (test each refuel cycle)

3.2.2 Transient Data Points


The following transient data, listed in relative order of priority, should be recorded during system
startup and operation for use in evaluating specific performance, logging data trends, and
troubleshooting malfunctioning components. For transient data to be meaningful, a minimum
recording rate of ten samples per second is recommended.

NOTE: The first six items are the minimum required for any effort in evaluating or troubleshooting
system or turbine performance.

Turbine speed

Pump discharge flow

Pump discharge pressure

Ramp generator and signal converter (RGSC) output

EG-M control box output

Transient position of the turbine governor valve, using a low-tension linear


potentiometer

EG-R hydraulic actuator Port A pressure

EG-R hydraulic actuator Port E pressure

Turbine exhaust pressure

Pump suction pressure

Flow controller output

System initiation signal

Steam admission valve, open/closed position

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3.3 Evaluating and Trending System Performance and Equipment


Condition
Detailed evaluation and trending of system performance and equipment condition is possible by
recording the type of pertinent data that was listed previously. Examples of data evaluation and
trending techniques are outlined in the sections that follow.

IMPORTANT: Transient data recorded on a consistent time base is much easier to evaluate.

3.3.1 Pump Performance


Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code defines the requirements for inservice
testing of system pumps, with specific acceptance standards identified (including alert and
required action ranges). An ongoing log of pump performance parameters (reference speed, flow,
suction and discharge pressure, and vibration) should be maintained and examined for trending
patterns (for example: At a fixed, referenced speed and constant pump flow, is pump-developed
head indicating a decreasing trend?). If pump performance parameters are approaching the alert
range, corrective actions should be planned, with recalibration of test instrumentation being a
possible first step. If the required action range is reached, immediate corrective maintenance
will be required.
The following steps are recommended for obtaining repeatable inservice testing data:

Place the flow controller in manual.

Adjust the flow controller output (a fixed speed demand signal) to obtain the reference
turbine speed condition. Properly calibrated speed recording is critical. To obtain meaningful
test data, the reference turbine speed should be within 10% of the maximum rated turbine
speed.

Adjust the test-return throttling valve to obtain the pumps rated flow condition.

Measure the pumps suction and discharge pressures, with their difference being the pumps
developed head.

3.3.2 Oil Analysis


The logging and trending of oil analysis results is extremely important, especially with regard to
moisture content and particle count, both of which have a direct impact on turbine operability
and reliability. Moisture content should be verified frequently if equipment room humidity is
high or steam leakage is evident. If analysis data is trending toward allowable limits, increased
monitoring should be implemented and appropriate corrective maintenance action should be
scheduled.
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3.3.3 EG-Type Governor Performance


Monitoring and trending the following various output signals enables evaluation of EG-type
governor performance:

During standby conditions, monitor and log the output voltage from the RGSC module
(TP1+ and TP2-) and the EG-M control box (Terminal 4- and 5+). A trending shift
of 0.2 volts DC, either plus or minus, would be cause for inspection and recalibration.

During steady-state operation, monitor and log the output voltage from the EG-M control box
(Terminal 4- and 5+). On-speed null voltage should be -0.75 to -1.00 volts DC for RCIC
turbines. A trending shift of 0.2 volts DC, either plus or minus, could indicate a shift in the
setting of the EG-R hydraulic actuator null voltage screw, dirt accumulation, or binding in
the EG-R hydraulic actuator pilot valve plunger/pilot valve bushing/drive shaft assembly.
This would be cause for inspection and recalibration.

During transient startup conditions, monitor and trend turbine speed peaks and valleys. The
first speed peak is controlled by the initial response of the turbine governor:

For the RCIC turbines without the steam bypass start configuration, the speed peak is in
response to the first closure of the turbine governor valve from its full open position.

For the RCIC turbines with the steam bypass start configuration or a modified throttling
steam supply valve, the first turbine acceleration transient is controlled by means of a
restricted steam supply. This is followed by the turbine control system throttling the
governor valve to return turbine speed to the idle setpoint of the RGSC module.

The following speed peaks and valleys are the results of the turbine governor responding to
its comparison of turbine speed demand and actual turbine speed. A significant change in a
speed peak or valley, or a trending increase in their magnitude, is indicative of a potential
problem (such as slow governor response, binding of control linkages due to misalignment,
wear, and dirt, or bending or binding of the turbine governor valve stem). Early inspection
and corrective action of these potential problems can prevent system and equipment
inoperability incidents, typically the overspeed trip transient.

During transient startup conditions, evaluate the relation between the EG-M control box
output voltage and turbine governor valve movement. A voltage increase above the EG-M
control box on-speed null voltage is a valve-open signal, whereas a voltage decrease below
null voltage is a valve-close signal. A change in the voltage magnitude required to obtain
valve movement could indicate restricted EG-R hydraulic actuator response or restricted
valve movement. A trending change in required voltage magnitude would be cause for
inspection and transient response testing.

During transient startup conditions, evaluate the time delay that occurs between the EG-M
control box output voltage crossing the on-speed null voltage level (from either the positive
or negative direction) and the governor valve movement response. A change in the time
delay required to obtain valve movement could indicate restricted EG-R hydraulic actuator
response or restricted valve movement. A trending change in the time delay would be cause
for inspection and transient response testing.

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3.3.4 Turbine Gland Leakage


Because the BWR uses direct reactor steam for the supply to the RCIC turbines, gland seal
containment is important in preventing contamination of the equipment rooms. Visual
observation of turbine gland performance during surveillance testing can attest to the condition
of the gland seals. Some gland leakage is typical during initial turbine startup, until sufficient
pressure differential is established to seat the carbon rings in the gland cases. Monitoring and
trending the vacuum (or pressure) required to prevent external steam leakage is important.
Increasing vacuum or pressure requirements would indicate deteriorating gland performance.
Early detection and corrective maintenance action can prevent expensive replacement of a
damaged chrome-plated turbine shaft or damaged gland cases.
3.3.5 Vibration
Monitoring vibration has already been addressed under pump performance. A trending increase
in vibration could indicate a shift in equipment alignment, an unbalanced or damaged rotor,
improper lubrication, or damaged bearings. Corrective maintenance should be scheduled prior to
the vibration level reaching the required action range.
3.3.6 Overspeed Trip Testing
It is recommended that the operability of the turbine mechanical overspeed trip assembly be
checked each refueling cycle. The actual trip setpoint should be verified a minimum of three
times, with the consecutive trip speeds being within the speed acceptance criteria. The trip
speeds should be non-trending (that is, neither continuously increasing nor continuously
decreasing).
The trending trip speeds could actually be a shifting setpoint due to looseness of components,
trip spring damage, binding, dirt, or possible improper assembly. Inspection and corrective action
is required.

NOTE: Trending is not an issue or a concern if the three trip speeds are within 50 rpm of each other.

3.4

Examples of Transient Data Recording

Reference Figures 3-1 through 3-4


Figures 3-1 and 3-2 are examples of transient data for Plant Hatch turbines with EG-type
governors. This data sample was limited to defining ramp generator signal converter (RGSC)
output, EG-M control box output, turbine speed, and governor valve position.

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Figure 3-1 illustrates a typical RCIC system surveillance test cold, quick-start transient, with an
open, preset test return line pump discharge resistance.
Figure 3-2 illustrates a typical RCIC system automatic vessel injection start transient.
In reviewing these figures, note:

The interaction between the RGSC output signal and the EG-M control box output signal

The interaction between the EG-M control box output signal and the position of the governor
valve

The transient similarities between the surveillance test and the vessel injection test

Figure 3-3 illustrates a normal RCIC system automatic vessel injection startup. Figure 3-4
illustrates a vessel injection restart of the RCIC system, approximately 22 minutes later, with a
flooded steam line. This startup resulted in an electronic overspeed trip. These RCIC system
operations were in conjunction with recovery from a BWR reactor scram, as documented in
NRC Information Notice 2000-01. The following data review is offered:
As illustrated in Figure 3-3:
Time
From
Startup
13 seconds
15 seconds
18 seconds

Description

Ramp generator initiates, with a ramp time of 10.7 seconds


Governor valve leaves its full closed position
Governor valve position plateaus at 40% open, followed by smooth
modulation to 60% open
24 seconds Speed acceleration is a smooth transient with a final maximum speed
of 4100 rpm
As illustrated in Figure 3-4:
Time
From
Startup
16 seconds
19 seconds
23 seconds
24 seconds

Description

Ramp generator initiates, with a ramp time of 10.9 seconds


Governor valve leaves its full closed position
Governor valve position plateaus at 45% open
EG-M output calls for an increase in turbine speed, with minimal
speed response
26 seconds
EG-M output is maximum, governor valve is full open, but speed
plateaus at 3300 rpm
28 seconds
Water in steam inlet line clears, and high-quality steam results in
rapid turbine acceleration
28.3 seconds Turbine trips at ~ 5000 rpm, the electronic trip setpoint

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3.5

List of Figures

Figure

Description

3-1

RCIC System, Surveillance Test

3-2

RCIC System, Vessel Injection

3-3

RCIC System Automatic Vessel Injection Startup

3-4

RCIC System Vessel Injection Restart, With Flooded Steam Supply Line

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Figure 3-1
RCIC System, Surveillance Test

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Figure 3-2
RCIC System, Vessel Injection

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Figure 3-3
RCIC System Automatic Vessel Injection Startup

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Figure 3-4
RCIC System Vessel Injection Restart, With Flooded Steam Supply Line

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PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

4.1

Discussion

A good preventive maintenance program is a combination of planned inspections and testing,


and planned maintenance activities with the objective of preventing forced outages and nonscheduled repair maintenance. Planned maintenance activities can be defined from a review of
past maintenance activity and trended performance data.

NOTE: Historically, a significant number of licensee event reports have implied that an established
maintenance program could have prevented the abnormal incident.

Following is a conservative definition for inspection, testing, and planned maintenance based on
a review of operating experience. This definition might vary from that contained in existing
turbine instruction manuals.

4.2

Routine Inspections and Surveillance Testing

4.2.1 Daily Walkdown


A daily walkdown is recommended for a visual inspection of equipment. This inspection should
include a check for:

External leakage of steam, water, and oil

Internal steam leakage by means of temperature verification of valve bodies, turbine casings,
and leakoff lines

Proper operation of the steam supply and turbine exhaust drain systems

Proper level in the appropriate oil reservoirs

Proper system and turbine valve lineup, paying particular attention to the turbines Trip and
Throttle (T & T) valve trip latch engagement and overspeed trip tappet nut/head lever
interface

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4.2.2 Monthly/Quarterly Inspection and Surveillance Testing

NOTE: Most operating sites have stopped conducting monthly surveillance testing, deferring to
quarterly testing only. If operational problems are encountered, it is recommended that monthly testing
be reinstated.

The following standby data points should be monitored and logged for data trending and
verification of operational readiness:

Ramp generator and signal converter (RGSC) output (TP-1, +/- and TP-2, common)

EG-M control box output (Terminal 4, common, and Terminal 5, +/-)

Pump discharge pressure

Pump suction pressure

Turbine casing temperature (that is, steam supply valve leakage monitor)

Turbine oil temperatures

The recommended quarterly surveillance test should include satisfaction of the Inservice
Testing Criteria, Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, evaluating pump
performance and vibration levels.
During the surveillance test startup transient, verify proper control of turbine acceleration.
The surveillance test should be of sufficient duration (30 minutes or more), adequate to bring
steam-wetted metal to an elevated temperature and to drive moisture out of critical turbine and
valve gland areas. Likewise, turbine oil temperature must stabilize.
During the surveillance test, visually inspect for external leakage of steam, water, and oil. Verify
satisfactory operation of the turbine glands and gland containment system.
With stabilized oil temperature, and with the turbine operating near its maximum rated speed,
verify that the oil pump discharge header pressure is within its defined acceptable range.
For the inservice testing portion of the surveillance test, the following steps are recommended for
obtaining repeatable data:

Place the flow controller in manual.

Adjust the flow-controller output (a fixed speed demand signal) to obtain the reference
turbine speed condition. Properly calibrated speed recording is critical. To obtain meaningful
test data, the reference turbine speed should be within 10% of the maximum rated turbine
speed.

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Adjust the test-return throttling valve to obtain the pumps rated flow condition.

Measure the pumps suction and discharge pressures, with their difference being the pumps
developed head.

Terminate the surveillance test by locally tripping the turbine via the mechanical overspeed trip
assembly (that is, depress the local trip lever, thereby lifting the tappet assembly). Verify
separation of the tappet nut/head lever interface and closure of the T & T valve. Verify free
movement of the trip linkage.

NOTE: It is not necessary or desirable to reduce turbine speed prior to tripping the turbine. The trip
function should be demonstrated from a full-load condition.

Locally close the T & T valve operator, and reset the trip linkage. Verify free reset action of the
tappet assembly, free movement of the trip linkage, and proper engagement of the overspeed trip
tappet nut-head lever interface, and the T & T valve trip hook-latchup lever interface.
Using the local hand-wheel, slowly reopen the T & T valve and verify that there is no binding or
interference in the operating mechanism. Verify that the turbine returns to rated speed under
governor control.
Remotely trip the turbine from the control room and verify the operability of the solenoid trip
system.

NOTE: It is not necessary or desirable to reduce turbine speed prior to tripping the turbine. The trip
function should be demonstrated from a full-load condition.

Close the steam supply valve and return the T & T valve to its normal full open position, using
the motor operator. Verify that the operators limit switch terminates the opening cycle with
1/32 in. (1 mm) minimum clearance between the sliding nut and the coupling.
Immediately after turbine shutdown, draw an oil sample from the coupling end bearing pedestal
and perform a spectrum analysis, including moisture evaluation, particle count, viscosity, total
acidity count, and lubricity. Verify that the oil condition satisfies the defined acceptance criteria.
Review and trend all recorded performance and sampling data for both transient and steady-state
conditions.

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4.3

Routine Inspections and Planned Maintenance

Routine inspections and planned maintenance are recommended during each refueling outage, a
typical time cycle of 18 to 24 months. The following list of activities is conservative. With the
benefit of past maintenance history and performance data trending, many items can justifiably be
deferred until alternate outages or until the major inspection outage.
Verify that all external structural bolting is properly torqued.
Check for excessive steam inlet and exhaust piping stresses on the turbine, by visual observation
of potential interferences that could prevent freedom of movement. Check potential interferences
such as:

Turbine governor end pedestal sliding foot clearance

Pipe hanger misalignment

Pipe sleeve clearance

For the turbine T & T valve assembly, clean, visually inspect, and lubricate the sliding nut, the
screw spindle, the split coupling, and the trip linkages and pins. Verify that the assembly
setscrews are tight and pay particular attention to the cone-point setscrews and jam nuts that are
used on the Schutte & Koerting valves trip hook. Verify freedom of movement of the valve
linkages. Verify full valve travel.

CAUTION!! Avoid excessive lubrication, which could at times be worse than no lubrication. Do not
lubricate steam side valve components.

For the turbine governor valve assembly, clean and visually inspect the linkage.

NOTE: Lubrication of the Garlock bushings and washers is neither required nor desired.

Verify freedom of movement and full travel of the governor valve.


Manually close the governor valve and verify that the linkage springs are not coil-bound.
Release the governor valve and verify that the spring force is sufficient to return the valve to its
partially open position.
Verify proper alignment between the turbine and its driven equipment.
Drain the turbine oil from the bearing pedestals and the equalizer pipe.
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Clean the equalizer pipe.


Where applicable, remove and discard the oil filter elements. Clean the filter housings and install
new filter elements.
Measure the thrust bearing axial clearance (turbine shaft endplay) for both the as-found
clearance, and for the as-left clearance following final reassembly of the bearing pedestal caps.
Verify that the final as-left clearance satisfies defined acceptance criteria.
Visually inspect the turbine journal bearings and thrust bearing.
Clean the bearing pedestals.
For the EG-type governor:
Remove and clean the control tubing between the EG-R hydraulic actuator and the
remote servo. Examine drained oil for evidence of moisture and particulate. Reinstall the
control tubing.
Drain and clean external oil reservoir (respectfully referred to as the beer can) in the oil
supply line to the EG-R hydraulic actuator.
Remove the top cover from the EG-R hydraulic actuator and inspect the coil area for
evidence of moisture and particulate. Conditions in the coil area relate to the conditions
within the hydraulic actuator; abnormal findings indicate the potential necessity for
replacing the hydraulic actuator. Reinstall the top cover on the EG-R hydraulic actuator.
For the turbine overspeed trip assembly: clean and visually inspect the tappet nut, the head lever,
the head bracket, and the trip lever. Verify proper engagement between the tappet nut and the
head lever. Examine the overspeed tappet head for discoloration, hairline cracks, flat spots,
uneven surfaces, or other surface defects. Verify that the tappet assembly moves freely and turns
with no binding. Replace if damaged. Do not lubricate these components.
Verify acceptable conditions for the governor drive assembly. This inspection includes thrust
washer clearance, gear assembly backlash, drive shaft runout, and drive shaft bushing clearance.
Calibrate the turbine oil system pressure gauges and pressure switches.
Review the historic and present analysis data for the oil removed from the turbine assembly. If
the oil particle count exceeds the acceptance criteria, it is recommended that the turbine oil
system be mechanically cleaned or flushed. If the oil analysis exceeds the acceptance criteria, the
oil should be discarded and the oil reservoir should be filled with new turbine oil. If the oil
analysis satisfies the defined acceptance criteria, the used turbine oil can be returned to the oil
reservoir and passed through a filter press or nominal 5 micron filter.

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IMPORTANT: Prior to filling or replenishing the turbine oil system, the moisture content, acidity, and
viscosity of the new oil should be verified against the acceptance criteria. Particle count should satisfy
the acceptance criteria of SAE 3 or ISO 15/12, and the new oil should be passed through a filter press or
nominal 5 micron filter.

CAUTION!! After the initial fill of the turbine oil system, or after refilling following maintenance
activity and/or oil flushing, the turbine should be started under local manual control of the T & T valve.
Run at low speed (that is, 1500 to 2000 rpm) to prime the oil system piping and components. Manual
rotation of the turbine shaft will not prime the turbine oil system. Add oil as required, after turbine
shutdown.

Recalibrate the turbine electronic control system. With the turbine in operation, verify that the
steady-state operating null voltage is within -0.75 to -1.00 DC (that is, verify that the EG-R
hydraulic actuator null-screw adjustment is compatible with the calibration of the electronic
control system). This operational verification should be accomplished with the turbine operating
within 10 percent of its maximum rated speed, and with the pump delivering maximum rated
flow at a discharge pressure within 20 percent of its maximum rated condition.
Verify operability and acceptable speed setpoint(s) for the turbine overspeed trip assembly.
For the turbine T & T valve, following final reassembly of the inspected components, verify
complete engagement and proper surface contact between the trip hook and the latch-up lever.
Verify that the required pull force for separating the trip hook/latch-up lever is less than
25 lbs (110 N) from the full open position, and with maximum steam forces on the valve. Verify
that the trip connecting rod spring preload is between 28 and 32 lbs (125 and 140 N).

4.4

Major Inspections and Planned Maintenance

A complete turbine internal inspection, in addition to all previously defined inspections and
planned maintenance, is recommended at an interval of four to five refueling cycles (a typical
time period of 6 to 10 years) unless operating history dictates the need for more frequent
inspections.

CAUTION!! Plant liability insurance might dictate the required frequency for turbine inspection.

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It is strongly recommended that, prior to the scheduled internal inspection, a surveillance test be
conducted with the insulation removed from the turbine assembly. This effort will expose
normally hidden areas for inspection during turbine operation, such as checking for turbine
casing joint leakage, gland case leakage, and cracks in high-pressure leakoff piping and drain
piping.
Refer to the appropriate sections of this guide for detailed information regarding disassembly,
inspection, and reassembly of the turbine assembly components. Areas that have historically
been of particular concern in the industry include:
Turbine T & T valve

Replacement of the valves screw spindle, brass split ring (split washer), and thrust washer
(friction washer) is recommended.

Do not lubricate the steam side of the valve assembly.

Turbine governor valve assembly

Replacement of the carbon spacers, steel washers, and retaining rings is recommended.

Turbine governor valve linkage system

Visually inspect and verify freedom of movement and full travel of the linkage system.

Do not lubricate the Garlock bushings.

Thrust bearing

It is not necessary to remove the thrust bearing from the turbine rotor unless inspection
identifies the necessity for replacing bearing parts.

Verify acceptable turbine shaft endplay (thrust bearing clearance) after final assembly of the
governor end bearing pedestal cap.

Turbine shaft gland seals and gland housings

The gland housings must be match-marked to ensure that their original orientation is
maintained during reassembly.

Replacement of the carbon rings and springs is recommended.

Turbine governor drive assembly

The backlash on a used set of gears cannot be adjusted because a wear pattern of the
assembly has been established.

If gear replacement is required, both the drive gear and the driven gear must be replaced as
an assembly.

If either gear is removed due to other maintenance activity, it must be match-marked to


ensure that its original orientation is maintained during reassembly.
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Turbine casing

During disassembly, identify any clearance problems associated with the horizontal joint
stud-nut removal (pay particular attention to the gland case areas and the bypass body flange
areas). Any clearance problems will have to be addressed during reassembly.

Joint stud removal is recommended to properly clean the lower-half casing horizontal flange.

Steam jet assemblies

Do not remove the steam jets or the jet bodies unless visual inspection identifies serious
damage.

Reversing chambers and reversing chamber bolting

Do not remove the reversing chambers unless replacement is required.

Turbine oil system

Inspect the oil system orifices for accumulation of foreign material and potential blockage of
flow.

Turbine governor components

Replacement of the turbine governor components is typically dictated by the site-specific


established qualified life of each component, or by identified operational problems associated
with a particular component.

Turbine overspeed trip assembly

Consideration should be given to replacing the overspeed trip tappet as a consumable item.

Replacement of the overspeed trip tappet is required if inspection indicates any discoloration
or evidence of deterioration.

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TURBINE COMPONENT DESCRIPTION, INSPECTION,


AND REPAIR
The following sections deal with component-level disassembly, inspection, repair, and
reassembly of major components or subassemblies of the RCIC turbines.
The information is intended to supplement and be used in conjunction with the turbine
instruction manual. It is written to define specific, unique instructions that are not necessarily
obvious from the standard equipment drawings and documentation. The information does not
always detail all required steps because it is to be used by knowledgeable, trained personnel.
When performing a major ins pection of an RCIC turbine assembly, it is time-efficient to
conduct the component disassembly, inspection, repair, and reassembly in a specific sequence. In
an effort to support this activity, the following general outline is identified:
NOTE: The numbers in parenthesis refer to the Maintenance Guide, with the first digit
defining the appropriate Chapter/Section, and the complete number identifying the
applicable paragraph
Turbine Disassembly
Separate main pump/turbine coupling and remove coupling spacer (16.2)
Remove the Trip and Throttle (T & T) valve stem high-pressure leakoff to the turbine exhaust
casing (15.2)
Remove bypass body (GS-2 model only) (15.2)
Remove upper-half turbine casing (15.2)
Measure the as-found turbine shaft axial thrust clearance and wheel lap with bearing
pedestal caps installed (10.2 and 10.6)
Remove tubing from EG-R hydraulic actuator (14.2)
Remove EG-R hydraulic actuator and its adapter plate (14.2)
Measure the as-found driven gear/thrust washer clearance (14.2)
Remove pump bracket cap (14.2)
Measure the as-found spiral gear assembly backlash (14.2)
Remove actuator/oil pump drive shaft, with driven gear and actuator coupling (14.2)
Measure the as-found overspeed trip connecting rod spring tension (25.3.2)
Remove overspeed trip connecting rod spring (25.2.4)
Remove overspeed trip connecting rod/head lever assembly (9.2.2 and 25.2.4)
Remove magnetic speed pickup probe(s) (9.2.1)
Remove bearing pedestal caps (9.2)

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Turbine Component Description, Inspection, and Repair

Remove upper-half journal bearings (9.2)


Remove upper-half gland cases (12.2)
Remove carbon rings, springs, and stops (12.2)
Remove turbine rotor assembly (16.2)
Measure the turbine shaft runout (in V-blocks located on temporary plates on the bearing
pedestals) (16.3)
Remove lower-half journal bearings (9.2)
Remove lower-half gland cases and their associated leakoff piping (12.2)
Map the location and height of the studs and then remove them from the lower-half turbine
casing (15.3)
Cleaning and Inspection
Further disassembly will be determined from inspection results. If necessary, proceed with
the following disassembly.
Turbine Rotor Disassembly
Coupling End (11.2)
Remove main coupling hub and sleeve
Remove oil deflector
Remove oil ring
Remove speed-sensing spur gear
Remove thrust collar/oil deflector assembly
Remove wheel nut
Governor End (10.2 and Figure 10-1 or 10-2)
Loosen its setscrew and remove the spiral gear locknut
Remove spiral drive gear with its key (match-mark for reassembly)
Remove spiral gear spacer
Measure the turbine shaft runout in the area of the gear spacer
Remove overspeed trip assembly with its key (match-mark for reassembly)
Remove oil ring
Remove thrust bearing locknut and lockwasher
Remove thrust bearing
Remove thrust bearing spacer
Remove thrust collar/oil deflector assembly
Remove wheel nut
Remove turbine wheel (16.4.1)

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Turbine Component Description, Inspection, and Repair

Miscellaneous Disassembly
Overspeed Trip (25)
Remove trip assembly from governor end bearing pedestal cap
Remove assembly cotter pin
Remove tappet nut from tappet stem
Remove tappet and reset spring from head bracket, space collar, and tappet guide
Actuator Drive Shaft (14.2)
Remove actuator drive coupling
Remove driven gear with its key (match-mark for reassembly)
Shaft-Driven Oil Pump (13.5)
Remove suction and discharge piping
Remove oil pump
Remove oil pump cover plate with its dowel pins
Remove pump bracket housing with its dowel pins (14.5)
Remove reversing chambers (18.2)
Remove steam jet assemblies (17.4)
Miscellaneous Reassembly
Install steam jet assemblies (17.4)
Install reversing chambers (18.4)
Install pump bracket housing with its dowel pins (14.5)
Shaft-Driven Oil Pump (13.5)
Install oil pump cover plate with its dowel pins
Install oil pump
Install suction and discharge piping (defer until after drive gear assembly backlash
measurement)
Actuator Drive Shaft (14.4)
Install driven gear with its key (follow match-mark if used gear)
Install actuator drive coupling
Overspeed Trip (25)
Install tappet guide, space collar, and head bracket onto governor end bearing pedestal cap
Insert tappet and reset spring into tappet guide, space collar, and head bracket

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Install tappet nut onto tappet stem


Defer installation of the assembly cotter pin until final adjustment of the tappet engagement
(beyond the scope of this inspection sequence definition)
Turbine Rotor Reassembly
Install turbine wheel (16.4.3)
Coupling End (11.4)
Install wheel nut
Install thrust collar/oil deflector assembly
Install speed-sensing spur gear
Install oil ring
Install oil deflector
Install main coupling sleeve and hub
Governor End (10.4 and Figure 10-1 or 10-2)
Install wheel nut
Install thrust collar/oil deflector assembly
Install thrust bearing spacer
Install thrust bearing
Install thrust bearing locknut and lockwasher
Install oil ring
Install overspeed trip disc assembly with its key (follow match-mark)
Install spiral gear spacer
Install spiral drive gear with its key (follow match-mark if used gear)
Install spiral gear locknut and tighten its setscrew
Turbine Reassembly
Install studs in lower-half turbine casing (15.4)

NOTE: The following turbine reassembly steps (through installation of the upper-half turbine
casing) must be accomplished in a continuous sequence (preferably within a ten-hour period) to
ensure proper joint sealing.
Install lower-half gland cases with their respective leakoff lines (12.4)
Install lower-half journal bearings (9.4)
Install turbine rotor assembly (16.4)
Install carbon rings, springs, and stops (12.4)
Measure the final carbon ring clearance (lift method) (12.4)
Install upper-half gland cases (12.4)

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Install upper-half journal bearings (9.4)


Measure the bearing shell/bearing pedestal cap crush (9.4)
Install bearing pedestal caps (9.4)
Measure the final turbine shaft axial thrust clearance and wheel lap (9.4.3, 10.4, 16.4.3,
and 16.5)
Install upper-half turbine casing (15.4)
Install actuator/oil pump drive shaft with driven gear and actuator coupling (14.4)
Measure the final spiral gear assembly backlash. If a new drive gear assembly is
installed, it might be necessary to realign the pump bracket housing to obtain an
acceptable backlash measurement. (14.4)
Install pump bracket cap (14.4)
Measure the final driven-gear/thrust-washer clearance (14.4)
Install EG-R hydraulic actuator and its adapter plate (14.4)
Install tubing on EG-R hydraulic actuator (14.4)
Install bypass body (GS-2 model only) (15.4)
Install T & T valve stem high-pressure leakoff to the turbine exhaust casing (15.4)
Install magnetic speed pickup probe(s) (9.4.2)
Install overspeed trip connecting rod/head lever assembly (25.2.4)
Install overspeed trip connecting rod spring (25.2.4)
Measure the final overspeed trip connecting rod spring tension (25.3.2)
Reassemble main pump/turbine coupling and coupling spacer (defer until after completion of
the overspeed trip verification tests) (16.4.3 and 16.5)
NOTE: This major inspection sequence does not include activity on the turbine T & T valve (6),
the turbine governor valve (7 and 8), or the overspeed trip assembly (25).

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TURBINE TRIP AND THROTTLE VALVE


Reference Figures 6-1, 6-2, and 6-3
Reference Table 6-1
All RCIC turbines include a trip and throttle (T & T) valve, which is a semi-balanced globe-type
valve with steam inlet flow above the valve disc and seat. In addition to its primary protective
function of rapid closure, the T & T valve is capable of throttling steam flow into the turbine,
thereby controlling turbine speed independent from the normal turbine control/governor system.
All T & T valves have a hand-wheel for local operation. Most valves also have a motor operator
for remote operation.
The T & T valve is fully open during system standby conditions and normal turbine operation
(that is, it is usually used as a protective valve only).

6.1

Description

The T & T valves have been supplied by two manufacturers, Gimpel Corporation and Schutte &
Koerting (S & K), a division of Ketema Inc. The original Gimpel valves were provided with the
valve yoke common to the valve cover. Later Gimpel valves, and all S & K valves, were
provided with the valve yoke separate from the valve cover.
Following is a brief description of valve operation:
Starting with the valve in the tripped position, turn the hand-wheel (or motor operator) in
the valve-closed direction (clockwise). The rotation of the screw spindle will raise the
sliding nut and the latch-up lever, compressing the trip spring until the latch-up lever
engages the trip hook. Turning the hand-wheel in the counterclockwise direction will
now lift the valve disc and open the valve.
Initial movement of the valve stem in the opening direction unseats the pilot valve,
permitting steam to flow from the balance chamber to the outlet of the valve. Because the
flow area into the balance chamber is restricted, the pressure in the balance chamber
drops as the pilot valve is opened. The force required to unseat the main disc is thereby
reduced. When the pilot valve is fully open it contacts the main disc. Further movement
of the valve stem unseats the main disc.

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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

The valve is tripped by rotating the trip hook, disengaging it from the latch-up lever, and
allowing the sliding nut (with the screw spindle, valve stem, and disc assembly) to move
downward under spring force to the closed position. The valve operator remains in the
open position.
Note that the valve disc and the valve operator can both be closed, open, or in a mid-position, or
the valve disc can be closed with the valve operator open. Therefore, indicating switches have
been provided to independently identify the position of the valve stem and the valve operator.

6.2

Minor Disassembly for Access to Valve Internals Only

CAUTION!! Prior to any disassembly activity, isolate the T & T valve from any source of steam, oil, or
electrical power.

Disconnect the mechanical trip linkage to the trip lever.


Electrically disconnect the trip solenoid.
With the latch-up lever engaged with the trip hook, place a soft stop-block between the spring
side of the trip hook and the barrel of the valve yoke. This will prevent accidental separation of
the tripping mechanism.
Using the valve operator hand-wheel, place the valve disc in light contact with the valve seat.
Remove the coupling hex nuts and bolts, and carefully remove one coupling half, ensuring that
the split ring and thrust washer do not fall out.
Remove the split ring (split washer), the thrust washer (friction washer), and the remaining
coupling half.
Match-mark the valve yoke, cover, and body.
Remove the valve cover hex nuts.
Remove the valve yoke, the valve cover, and the strainer, where applicable. Discard the
flexitallic gasket.
Remove the valve disc and pilot valve with its stem as an assembly.

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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

CAUTION!! For the Gimpel valve only, the disc assembly pin is a sliding fit. Be careful to avoid
inadvertent separation of the disc.

For the Gimpel valve only: remove the assembly pin and separate the valve disc from the pilot
valve.
For the S & K valve only: after grinding out the staked assembly points, unscrew the disc flange
and separate the valve disc from the pilot valve.

6.3

Major Disassembly

Although their valve designs are similar, separate disassembly instructions for the two valve
manufacturers are identified in the following sections.

CAUTION!! Prior to any disassembly activity, isolate the T & T valve from any source of steam, oil, or
electrical power, and trip the valve to its closed position.

6.3.1 Gimpel Valve Disassembly


Reference Figures 6-1 and 6-2 for the location of the numbers denoted in parentheses.
Disconnect the mechanical trip linkage to the trip lever (92).
Where applicable, disconnect the solenoid trip link (86, 87, and 88) to the trip crank (89) and
remove the trip solenoid (83).
Remove the valve stem position indicating switches (105).
With the trip hook (36) disengaged from the latch-up lever (34), turn the valve operator handwheel counterclockwise to its stop, thus moving the latch-up lever (34) to its tripped position
with the sliding nut (33) just touching the surface of the valve stem coupling (29). Do not jam.
Remove the valve operator (4448, or 81 and 9598).
Carefully unscrew and remove the yoke cap (1).

CAUTION!! There might be some residual load from the internal compression spring.

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Remove the internal spring (2).


Turn the screw spindle (32) clockwise approximately two turns, moving the sliding nut (33)
away from the valve stem coupling (29).
Lift the latch-up lever (34) and engage it with the trip hook (36).
Loosen the setscrew (30) in the valve stem coupling (29).
Carefully loosen and remove the coupling hex nuts (12), the guide plate (76), and the position
switch actuator assembly (103, 104, 109, 110, and 111). Do not let the two halves of the coupling
separate.
Carefully remove one coupling half (29), the thrust washer (10), and both halves of the split
ring (9).
Remove the remaining coupling half (29), allowing the valve disc (26) and the pilot valve and
stem (28) to drop onto their seats.
Supporting the weight of the latch-up lever (34), disengage the trip hook (36) and carefully lower
the latch-up lever (34) to its tripped position.
Remove both of the trunnion screws (6) from the latch-up lever (34) and the sliding nut (33).
Loosen its setscrew (7), remove the link pin (8), and remove the latch-up lever (34) from the
valve yoke (13).
Loosen its setscrew (3), remove the link pin (4), and remove the latch-up lever link (5) from the
valve yoke (13).
Loosen its cap screw (90) and remove the trip crank (89) and its key (91) from the trip hook shaft
(38).
Loosen its setscrew (93) and remove the mechanical trip lever (92) and its key (94) from the trip
hook shaft (38).
Loosen its setscrew (39) and remove the trip hook (36), its key (37), and the trip hook shaft (38).

CAUTION!! The trip hook shaft can only be removed in one direction. The keyway extends from the trip
hook to one end of the shaft. The shaft must be removed from the opposite end. Do not force the shaft. Tap
lightly if necessary. When the trip hook shaft is removed, the trip hook, key, washer, and spring are free
to be removed.

Remove the trip hook washer (42) and spring (41).


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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

Carefully slide the screw spindle (32) and the sliding nut (33) assembly out of the yoke (13). Tap
lightly with a mallet if necessary. Do not use excessive force.
Note the orientation of the sliding nut (33) as it is assembled on the screw spindle (32). The
sliding nut is not symmetrical. Now remove the sliding nut (33) by turning it off the screw
spindle (32).
Match-mark the valve yoke (13), cover (74), and body (18).
Remove the yoke nuts (73) and valve yoke.
Remove the valve cover hex nuts (16).
Remove the valve cover (74) with its bushing (14) as an assembly, and remove the strainer (19),
which is typically tack-welded to the cover.
Discard the flexitallic gasket (17).
Remove the valve disc (26) and the pilot valve with its stem (28) as an assembly.

CAUTION!! The disc assembly pin (27) is a sliding fit. Be careful to avoid inadvertent separation of the
disc.

Remove the assembly pin (27) and separate the valve disc (26) from the pilot valve (28).
6.3.2 S & K Valve Disassembly
Reference Figure 6-3 for the location of the numbers denoted in parentheses.
Reference Table 6-1
Disconnect the mechanical trip linkage to the radius lever (7).
Disconnect the trip solenoid slotted link (57) and pin assembly (10) from the trip hook (21).
Remove the trip solenoid (23).
Remove the valve stem position indicating switches (2).
With the trip hook (21) disengaged from the latch-up lever (13), turn the valve operator handwheel counterclockwise to its stop. This moves the latch-up lever (13) to its tripped position with
the sliding nut (44) just touching the surface of the valve stem coupling (6). Do not jam.
Remove the valve operator (39, 40, and 56).
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Loosen the locking setscrew (54) and carefully unscrew and remove the yoke nut (41).

CAUTION!! There might be some residual load from the internal compression spring.

Remove the internal spring (43).


Turn the screw spindle (42) clockwise approximately two turns, moving the sliding nut (44)
away from the valve stem coupling (6).
Loosen the setscrew (58) in the valve stem coupling (6).
Carefully loosen and remove the coupling hex nuts (4A) and the position-switch actuator (5). Do
not let the two halves of the coupling (6) separate.
Carefully remove one coupling half (6), the friction washer (48), and both halves of the split
washer (47).
Remove the remaining coupling half (6).
Loosen the setscrew (8) and remove the radius lever (7) and its Woodruff key (62) from the trip
hook pin (12).
Loosen the jam nuts (20) and the cone-point setscrews (19) that secure the trip hook (21) to the
trip hook pin (12).
Remove the nuts (17 and 18) and outboard washer (16) that secure the trip hook (21) to its return
spring pin (14).
Tap the trip hook pin (12) out of the arms of the valve yoke (1) and the trip hook (21).

CAUTION!! Upset metal on the trip hook pin (from the cone-point setscrews) might offer resistance in
pin removal. Use care in supporting the valve yoke arms if it is necessary to press the pin out of the
assembly.

Remove the trip hook (21), inboard washer (16), and return spring (15).
Loosen the latch-up lever setscrew (46) and tap its assembly pin (45) out of the arms of the yoke
(1). The latch-up lever (13) can now be separated from the sliding nut (44) and removed.

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CAUTION!! Upset metal on the assembly pin (from the setscrews) might offer resistance in pin removal.
Use care in supporting the valve yoke arms if it is necessary to press the pin out of the assembly.

Remove the screw spindle (42) and the sliding nut (44) from the valve yoke (1).
Note the orientation of the sliding nut (44) as it is assembled on the screw spindle (42). Remove
the sliding nut (44) by turning it off the screw spindle (42).
Match-mark the valve yoke (1), cover (49), and body (32).
Remove the valve cover hex nuts (50A).
Remove the valve yoke (1) and the valve cover (49) with its upper leakoff bushing (26) as an
assembly.
Remove the strainer (30).
Discard the flexitallic gasket (27).
Remove the valve disc (29) and the pilot valve with its stem (33) as an assembly.
After grinding out the staked assembly points, unscrew the disc flange (28) and separate the
valve disc (29) from the pilot valve (33).

6.4

Inspection

Visually inspect the main disc and the pilot valve and stem for galling, excessive or uneven wear,
pitting, corrosion, and damage.
Using liquid penetrant, inspect the seating surfaces of the pilot valve, the main disc, and their
mating seats. Any linear cracking is cause for rejection.
Using bluing compound, visually inspect the main disc-to-seat interface to confirm a 100%
circumferential, 1/16 in. (2 mm) maximum width seating contact. If necessary, lightly lap the
disc to its seat using 500 grit lapping compound.
Using bluing compound, visually inspect the pilot valve-to-main disc seat interface to confirm a
100% circumferential, 1/16 in. (2 mm) maximum width seating contact. If necessary, lightly lap
the pilot valve to the disc seat using 500 grit lapping compound.
After verifying seating contact, assemble the pilot valve into the main disc and verify that its lift
is within tolerance.
Using a dial indicator, verify that the pilot valve stem runout is acceptable.
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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

Visually inspect the threaded end of the pilot valve stem for galling and thread damage.
Visually inspect the latch-up lever/sliding nut assembly for excessive or abnormal wear.
Visually inspect the contact surfaces of the latch-up lever and the trip hook. The surfaces must be
clean, with no wear, pitting, corrosion, or other damage. The trip hook has a critical 90 surface
contour with the centerline of its assembly pin, which must be maintained. The surfaces are
hardened and can be cleaned with a fine stone. Do not remove metal during the cleaning
process.
Visually inspect the thrust washer (friction washer), the split ring (split washer), and the screw
spindle head for galling, wear, or damage. Replace worn parts as necessary.
Using liquid penetrant, inspect the screw spindle head for indication of cracks. Replace the screw
spindle if crack indications are found.
Special Inspection Note:
A 10 CFR Part 21 report, issued by Dresser-Rand on November 21, 2001, defined a
material substitution defect for the screw spindles used on an identified number of
Gimpel trip and throttle valve assemblies. The Part 21 report indicates that the
identification list is a best estimate because some interchanging of valve assemblies has
occurred over the years.
The material substitution involved the use of Grade 1213 and 1215 carbon steel in place
of the design-required Grade 1018 carbon steel.
The Part 21 report has identified all turbine sites using the Gimpel trip and throttle valve
assembly. It is recommended that the identified sites verify the actual serial number
(valve number) of their installed trip and throttle valve. If the valve number is in the
affected series, the valves screw spindle should be replaced at the next available
maintenance opportunity.
It is further recommended that any screw spindles in storage stock be tested to confirm
that the correct material has been used. If a screw spindle is suspect, it should be
replaced.
Finally, it is recommended that the screw spindles be replaced on a 6 to 10 year life
cycle, scheduled with the major inspection cycle for the T & T valve. The brass split ring
(split washer) and the thrust washer (friction washer) should also be replaced at this time.
Assemble the coupling, screw spindle, thrust washer (friction washer), and split ring (split
washer). Verify that the total endplay (axial clearance) is within acceptance criteria. Replace
worn parts as necessary.

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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

Visually inspect the assembly pins for upset metal. If necessary, dress off with a fine file. Verify
that the runout of the assembly pins is acceptable.
Visually inspect the leakoff bushing for galling, excessive or uneven wear, and damage.
Measure the diameter of the valve stem and the inside diameter of the valve cover bushing.
Verify that the clearance is within acceptance criteria.
Verify that the valve stem moves freely in the valve cover bushing.
Visually inspect the valve yoke compression spring coils for evidence of damage and permanent
distortion.
Measure the free length and the spring constant of the valve yoke compression spring. The
vendor design values are:
Vendor

Free Length

Schutte & Koerting

Gimpel, Original

Gimpel, Heavy Duty *

P/N K0326-2

P/N K7342-2

11 13/16 in. (300 mm) 11 3/4 in. (298 mm)

Spring Constant Not available

12 1/4 in. (311 mm)

250 lb/in. (440 N/cm) 350 lb/in. (615 N/cm)

* D-R Gimpel provided a retrofit heavy-duty spring to ensure full closure of the valve during
abnormal low-flow, high back-pressure operating conditions. A few sites have installed this
retrofit spring.
A 10% reduction in design value, or a 5% change in a previously logged measurement would
indicate the necessity for spring replacement.
Visually inspect the trip hook reset spring coils for evidence of damage and permanent
distortion.
Measure the free length and the spring constant of the trip hook reset spring. The nominal free
length should be 2 3/4 in. (70 mm), with a spring constant of 25 lb/in. (45 N/cm). Note that this
is a stiffer retrofit spring, (Dresser- Rand P/N 105594A10) which is required for seismic
qualification and to eliminate inadvertent trips due to vibration. A 10% reduction in design value
or a 5% change in a previously logged measurement would indicate the necessity for spring
replacement.
Verify that the balance chamber throttle screw is free to turn in the valve yoke.

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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

6.5

Reassembly

As with the major disassembly, even though the valve designs are quite similar, separate
reassembly instructions are identified for the two valve manufacturers.
6.5.1 Gimpel Valve Reassembly
Reference Figures 6-1 and 6-2
Place the disc (26) on the pilot valve and stem (28) and insert the disc pin (27). Do not stake the
disc pin.
Install the disc and stem assembly into the valve body (18).

CAUTION!! To avoid potential galling or other damage to the components, do not turn the disc while its
weight is resting on the valve seat.

If not tack-welded to the valve cover, install the strainer (19) into the valve body (18).
Install a new flexitallic gasket (17) on the valve body (18).
Following the match-marks identified during disassembly, install the valve cover (74) with its
bushing (14) and strainer (19) (where applicable) as an assembly. Use care in lowering the valve
cover over the valve stem.
Align the valve cover (74) to the valve body (18) and verify freedom of movement of the pilot
valve and stem (28).
Install the valve cover nuts (16). Tighten these nuts in a star pattern, compressing the gasket no
more than 0.015 in. (0.4 mm) per cycle. When the gasket is totally compressed, the joint between
the cover and the body should be metal-to-metal. The final assembly torque should satisfy the
high-strength torque table defined in Section 27.
Verify that the pilot valve and stem (28), and the disc (26) assembly, move freely and do not
bind.
Following the match-marks identified during disassembly, install the valve yoke (13) and nuts
(73) (there is no gasket). Tighten these nuts in a star pattern.
Lightly lubricate the sliding nut (33) and the screw spindle (32) with a high-temperature lithiumbased grease.

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Thread the sliding nut (33) onto the screw spindle (32). Verify that the sliding nut (33)
orientation is the same as that noted during disassembly. The sliding nut is not symmetrical.
Carefully slide the screw spindle (32) and the sliding nut (33) assembly into the yoke (13),
aligning the holes in the sliding nut with the slots in the yoke. The assembly should slide freely.

NOTE: Apply a light coat of sulfur-free anti-seize lubricant to the linkage pins prior to assembly.

Install the latch-up lever link (5) and pin (4) onto the valve yoke (13). Align the flat on the pin
with the setscrew hole in the link. Install and tighten the setscrew (3). Check the link for free
movement.
Install the latch-up lever (34) and pin (8) into the latch-up lever link (5). Align the flat on the pin
with the setscrew hole in the link. Install and tighten the setscrew (7). Check the latch-up lever
and link for free movement.
Install the trunnion screws (6) into the latch-up lever (34) and sliding nut (33). Turn the sliding
nut as required for alignment. Torque the trunnion screws to 90- 100 ft-lb (120-135 N/M).
Check the parts for free movement.
Install the trip hook spring (41) and washer (42) onto the yoke-mounted stud (40).
With its key (37) located in the trip hook (36), position the trip hook (36) in the valve yoke (13)
and insert the trip hook shaft (38) into the valve yoke (13) and trip hook (36). Install and tighten
the setscrew (39). Check the parts for free movement.

CAUTION!! The trip hook shaft can only be installed in one direction. The keyway extends from the trip
hook to one end of the shaft. The shaft must be installed from the opposite end. Do not force the shaft. Tap
lightly if necessary.

Install the trip crank (89) with its key (91) onto the trip hook shaft (38). Install and tighten its cap
screw (90).
Install the mechanical trip lever (92) with its key (94) onto the trip hook shaft (38). Install and
tighten its setscrew (93).
Raise the latch-up lever (34) until it reaches the stop on the valve yoke (13). The trip hook (36)
should freely engage with the latch-up lever (34).

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With the latch-up lever (34) in contact with the trip hook (36), measure the clearance between
the latch-up lever (34) and the valve yoke (13). If necessary, remove metal from the latch-up
lever to obtain a minimum clearance of 1/32 in. (1 mm).
Check the surface contact of the latching faces of the trip hook (36) and the latch-up lever (34).
The faces should be smooth and contact should be at least 75% of the surface area. If necessary,
fit by stoning or fine-filing the surface of the latch-up lever only.

CAUTION!! The trip hook has a critical 90 surface contour with the centerline of its assembly pin,
which must be maintained.

With the latch-up lever (34) engaged with the trip hook (36), turn the screw spindle (32) until the
gap between the screw spindle head and the pilot valve and stem (28) is the approximate
thickness of the thrust washer (10).
Install both halves of the split ring (9) on the end of the screw spindle head. Orient the washer
split 90 with the coupling split.
Assemble one half of the coupling (29) to the stem (28) and the screw spindle (32). Turn the
screw spindle (32) if necessary, to align the parts. Do not force the parts.
Install the thrust washer (10) with its beveled edge facing away from the screw spindle (32).
Turn the screw spindle, if necessary, to obtain the required clearance for assembly. Do not force
the parts.
Install the other half of the coupling (29) with its bolts (11), guide plate (76), the position switch
actuator assembly (103, 104, 109, 110, and 111), and nuts (12). Tighten the nuts. Turn the screw
spindle (32) counterclockwise and partially open the valve for better access to the coupling nuts.
Verify that the coupling (29) is free to rotate a small amount and that the screw spindle (32) turns
freely.
Turn the screw spindle (32) counterclockwise until the valve is approximately half-open.
Turn the pilot valve and stem (28) into the coupling (29) until it contacts the thrust washer (10).
Back the stem out a minimum of 1/4 turn. Continue turning until the machined flat on the stem
aligns with the coupling setscrew hole. Install and tighten the setscrew (30) and stake it in place.

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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

NOTE: If a new pilot valve and stem assembly is required, verify that a flat exists on the threaded end of
the stem. If necessary, machine a flat on the threaded end of the valve stem, in the area of the locking
setscrew. An alternate to the machined valve stem flat would be to spot face the valve stem (1/8 in. (3.2
mm) drill, 1/8 in. (3 mm) deep) via the setscrew hole at assembly.

Lubricate the valve assembly [via its grease fittings (31)] with high-temperature lithium-based
grease.

CAUTION!! Under no circumstances should the sliding parts of the steam section of the valve be
lubricated.

Turn the screw spindle (32) clockwise and close the valve. Do not bind.
Disengage the trip hook (36) from the latch-up lever (34) and turn the screw spindle (32)
counterclockwise. This moves the latch-up lever (34) toward the valve body (18) until the sliding
nut (33) contacts the coupling (29). Do not bind.
Manually lift the latch-up lever (34) and verify the freedom of movement of all parts. No friction
or binding should be encountered. The only force required should be that to overcome the weight
of the parts.
Install the internal spring (2).
Install the yoke cap (1) into the yoke (13) and tighten until the head of the yoke cap is in metalto-metal contact with the yoke.
Turn the screw spindle (32) clockwise to reset the valve.
Verify complete engagement between the latch-up lever (34) and the trip hook (36).

CAUTION!! The valve will now be spring-loaded and must be handled with care.

Turn the screw spindle (32) counterclockwise a couple of turns to partially open the valve and
then turn it clockwise to lightly seat the valve. Verify smooth movement.
Turn the screw spindle (32) counterclockwise to fully open the valve. Do not bind. Verify that
the coupling (29) has stopped on the sliding nut (33) and that nothing else has limited the stroke.
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Turn the screw spindle (32) clockwise until the valve is seated. Do not bind. Verify that the valve
is seated and that there is no interference from other parts.
Disengage the latch-up lever (34) from the trip hook (36) and turn the screw spindle (32)
counterclockwise. This moves the latch-up lever (34) toward the valve body (18) until the sliding
nut (33) contacts the coupling (29). Do not bind.
Verify that the sliding nut (33) has contacted the coupling (29) and that nothing else has limited
the stroke.
Install the valve operator (4448, or 81 and 9598).
Reset the valve by turning the hand-wheel clockwise to re-engage the latch-up lever (34) with
the trip hook (36). Verify complete engagement.
Turn the hand-wheel counterclockwise and open the valve approximately two turns.
Using a force gauge, pull on the mechanical trip lever (92), thus disengaging the trip hook (36)
from the latch-up lever (34). The valve should close rapidly. The force required to disengage the
trip hook should be less than 25 lbs (110 N).
Reconnect the mechanical trip linkage to the trip lever (92).
Where applicable, reinstall the trip solenoid (83) and reconnect its trip link (86, 87, and 88) to the
trip crank (89). Verify the operability of the solenoid trip system.
Where applicable, verify the electrical operation of the valves motor operator. Set the motor
operators switches so that the valve torque seats in the closing direction and the opening limit
switch stops the motor with 1/32 in. (1 mm) minimum clearance between the sliding nut (33) and
the coupling (29), in the full open position.
CAUTION: The valve operators torque switches should be set at a nominal 1, and no more than 1 1/2.
Excessive torque can distort the valve stem coupling and potentially damage the valve screw spindle or
other valve components

6.5.2 S & K Valve Reassembly


Reference Figure 6-3
Reference Table 6-1
Place the disc (29) on the pilot valve and stem (33). Screw the disc flange (28) into the disc (29)
and tighten. Stake the assembly in four equally spaced locations.
Install the disc (29) and stem (33) assembly into the valve body (32).
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Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve

CAUTION!! To avoid potential galling or other damage to the components, do not turn the disc while its
weight is resting on the valve seat.

Install the strainer (30) into the valve body (32).


Install a new flexitallic gasket (27) on the valve body (32).
Following the match-marks identified during disassembly, install the valve yoke (1) and the
valve cover (49) with its upper-leakoff bushing (26) as an assembly. Use care in lowering the
valve cover and bushing over the valve stem.
Align the valve cover (49) with the valve body (32) and verify freedom of movement of the pilot
valve and stem (33).
Install the valve cover nuts (50A). Tighten these nuts in a star pattern, compressing the gasket no
more than 0.015 in. (0.4 mm) per cycle. When the gasket is totally compressed, the joint between
the cover and the body should be metal to metal. The final assembly torque should satisfy the
high-strength torque table defined in Section 27.
Verify that the pilot valve and stem (33) and the disc (29) assembly move freely and do not bind.
Lightly lubricate the sliding nut (44) and the screw spindle (42) with a high-temperature lithiumbased grease.
Thread the sliding nut (44) onto the screw spindle (42). Verify that the sliding nut (44)
orientation is the same as that noted during disassembly.
Carefully slide the screw spindle (42) and the sliding nut (44) assembly into the yoke (1). The
assembly should slide freely.

NOTE: Apply a light coat of sulfur-free anti-seize lubricant to the linkage pins prior to assembly.

Locate the latch-up lever (13) on the sliding nut (44) and align it between the arms of the yoke
(1). Install its assembly pin (45) and secure the latch-up lever (13) to the pin (45) with its
setscrew (46). Check the assembly for free movement.
Install the return spring (15) and the inboard washer (16) onto the spring pin (14).
Locate the trip hook (21) on its return pin (14) and install the outboard washer (16) and nuts
(17, 18).
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Align the trip hook (21) between the arms of the yoke (1) and install the trip hook pin (12). Align
the pin indents with the setscrew holes in the trip hook. Install and tighten the two cone-point
setscrews (19). Tighten the jam nuts (20). Check the trip hook (21) for free movement.
Install the radius lever (7) with its Woodruff key (62) onto the trip hook pin (12). Install and
tighten its setscrew (8).
Raise the latch-up lever (13) until it reaches the stop on the valve yoke (1). The trip hook (21)
should freely engage with the latch-up lever (13).
Check the surface contact of the latching faces of the trip hook (21) and the latch-up lever (13).
The faces should be smooth and contact should be at least 75% of the surface area. If necessary,
fit by stoning or fine-filing the surface of the latch-up lever only.

CAUTION!! The trip hook has a critical 90 surface contour with the centerline of its assembly pin,
which must be maintained.

With the latch-up lever (13) engaged with the trip hook (21), turn the screw spindle (42) until the
gap between the screw spindle head and the pilot valve and stem (33) is the approximate
thickness of the friction washer (48).
Install both halves of the split washer (47) on the end of the screw spindle head. Orient the
washer split 90 with the coupling split.
Assemble one half of the coupling (6) to the stem (33) and the screw spindle (42). Turn the
screw spindle (42) if necessary to align the parts. Do not force the parts.
Install the friction washer (48). Turn the screw spindle (42) if necessary to obtain the required
clearance for assembly. Do not force the parts.
Install the other half of the coupling (6) with its cap screws (4); position the switch actuator (5)
and nuts (4A), and tighten the nuts. If necessary, turn the screw spindle (42) counterclockwise
and partially open the valve for better access to the coupling nuts (4A).
Verify that the coupling (6) is free to rotate a small amount and that the screw spindle (42) turns
freely.
Turn the screw spindle (42) counterclockwise until the valve is approximately half open.
Turn the pilot valve and stem (33) into the coupling (6) until it contacts the friction washer (48)
and then back the stem out a minimum of 1/4 turn. Continue turning until the machined flat on
the stem aligns with the coupling setscrew hole. Install and tighten the setscrew (58) and stake it
in place.
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NOTE: If a new pilot valve and stem assembly is required, verify that a flat exists on the threaded end of
the stem. If necessary, machine a flat on the threaded end of the valve stem, in the area of the locking
setscrew. An alternate to the machined valve stem flat would be to spot face the valve stem (1/4 in. drill,
1/8 in. deep) via the setscrew hole at assembly.

Lubricate the valve assembly via its grease fittings (61) with high-temperature lithium-based
grease.

CAUTION!! Under no circumstances should the sliding parts of the steam section of the valve be
lubricated.

Turn the screw spindle (42) clockwise and close the valve. Do not bind.
Disengage the trip hook (21) from the latch-up lever (13) and turn the screw spindle (42)
counterclockwise, thus moving the latch-up lever (13) toward the valve body (32) until the
sliding nut (44) contacts the coupling (6). Do not bind.
Manually lift the latch-up lever (13) and verify freedom of movement of all parts. No friction or
binding should be encountered. The only force required should be that to overcome the weight of
the parts.
Install the internal spring (43).
Install the yoke nut (41) into the yoke (1) and tighten until the head of the yoke nut is in metalto-metal contact with the yoke.
Install and tighten setscrew (54).
Turn the screw spindle (42) clockwise to reset the valve.
Verify complete engagement between the latch-up lever (13) and the trip hook (21).

CAUTION!! Excessive tightening of the return spring nuts (17, 18) can prevent proper trip hook
engagement.

CAUTION!! The valve will now be spring-loaded and must be handled with care.

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Turn the screw spindle (42) counterclockwise a couple of turns to partially open the valve and
then turn it clockwise to lightly seat the valve. Verify smooth movement.
Turn the screw spindle (42) counterclockwise to fully open the valve. Do not bind. Verify that
the coupling (6) has stopped on the sliding nut (44) and that nothing else has limited the stroke.
Turn the screw spindle (42) clockwise until the valve is seated. Do not bind. Verify that the valve
is seated and that there is no interference from other parts.
Disengage the latch-up lever (13) from the trip hook (21) and turn the screw spindle (42)
counterclockwise, thus moving the latch-up lever (13) toward the valve body (32) until the
sliding nut (44) contacts the coupling (6). Do not bind.
Verify that the sliding nut (44) has contacted the coupling (6) and that nothing else has limited
the stroke.
Install the valve operator (39, 40, and 56).
Reset the valve by turning the hand-wheel clockwise to re-engage the latch-up lever (13) with
the trip hook (21). Verify complete engagement.
Turn the hand-wheel counterclockwise and open the valve approximately two turns.
Using a force gauge, pull on the radius lever (7), thus disengaging the trip hook (21) from the
latch-up lever (13). The valve should close rapidly. The force required to disengage the trip hook
should be less than 25 lbs (110 N).
Reconnect the mechanical trip linkage to the radius lever (7).
Reinstall the trip solenoid (23) and reconnect its slotted link (57) and pin assembly (10) to the
trip hook (21). Verify the operability of the solenoid trip system.
Verify the electrical operation of the valves motor operator. Set the motor operators switches,
so that the closing limit switch stops the motor when the valve disc contacts its seat in the closing
direction, and the opening limit switch stops the motor with 1/32 in. (1 mm) minimum clearance
between the sliding nut (44) and the coupling (6) in the full open position.
CAUTION: The valve operators backup torque switches should be set at a nominal 1, and no more than
1 1/2. Excessive torque can distort the valve stem coupling and potentially damage the valve screw
spindle or other valve components

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6.6 T & T Valve Balance Chamber Pressure Measurement and


Adjustment
Chattering of the main disc indicates insufficient balance chamber pressure. Excessive force on
the hand-wheel or stalling of the operator indicates excessive balance chamber pressure. The
following steps define the requirements for balance chamber adjustment:
Remove the pipe plug (75) from the pressure tap in the valve cover (74) and install a temporary
steam pressure gauge (having a range at least equal to the maximum steam inlet pressure).
With the T & T valve closed, admit inlet steam pressure to the valve. The pressure gauge should
read steam inlet pressure.
Slowly open the valve using the hand-wheel until an increase in resistance is felt, which will be
approximately 1/8 in. (3 mm) of valve stem travel (that is, pilot valve full open, main disc on its
seat).

CAUTION!! The turbine might rotate at this time, due to the steam flow through the pilot valve.

The balance chamber pressure can now be read on the pressure gauge. To increase the pressure,
turn the throttle screw (23) counterclockwise; to decrease the pressure, turn the throttle screw
clockwise. The correct pressure is 15 to 20% of the inlet line pressure.

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Table 6-1
Parts List for Schutte and Koerting Trip and Throttle Valve (Reference Figure 6-3)
Part Number

6-20

Description

Part Number

Description

001

Yoke

033

Pilot Valve/Stem

002

Switch

034

Stuffing Box Gasket

002A

Switch Lever

035

Stud

003

Switch Mounting Plate

035A

Hex Nut

004

Hex Cap Screw

036

Lower Leakoff Bushing

004A

Hex Nut

037

Stuffing Box

005

Switch Actuator

038

Pipe Plug

006

Coupling

039

Motor Operator

007

Radius Lever

040

Cap Screw

008

Setscrew

041

Yoke Nut

009

Solenoid Bracket

042

Screw Spindle

010

Solenoid Pin Assembly

043

Spring

011

Cap Screw

044

Sliding Nut

012

Trip Hook Pin

045

Pin

013

Latch-Up Lever

046

Setscrew

014

Spring Pin

047

Split Washer

015

Spring

048

Friction Washer

016

Washer

049

Cover

017

Hex Nut

049A

Pipe Plug

018

Hex Jam Nut

050

Stud

019

Cone Point Setscrew

050A

Hex Nut

020

Hex Jam Nut

051

Throttle Screw

021

Trip Hook

052

Lock Screw

022

Hex Nut

053

Pipe Plug

023

Solenoid

054

Setscrew

024

Cap Screw

055

Pipe Plug

025

Yoke Flange

056

Gib Key

026

Upper Leakoff Bushing

057

Slotted Link

027

Cover Gasket

058

Setscrew

028

Disc Flange

059

Setscrew

029

Disc

060

Round Head Screw

030

Strainer Basket

061

Grease Fitting

031

Seat

062

Key

032

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6.7

List of Figures

Figure

Description

6-1

Gimpel Trip and Throttle Valve, Drawing P-4979

6-2

Gimpel Trip and Throttle Valve, Drawing P-6540

6-3

S & K Trip and Throttle Valve, With Operator

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Figure 6-1
Gimpel Trip and Throttle Valve, Drawing P-4979

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Figure 6-2
Gimpel Trip and Throttle Valve, Drawing P-6540

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Figure 6-3
S & K Trip and Throttle Valve, With Operator

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TURBINE GOVERNOR VALVE


To maintain the desired turbine speed, the RCIC turbines incorporate a single governor valve,
which controls steam flow to the turbine in response to the governor control systems output. The
governor valve outlet supplies steam to the turbine casing steam ring(s), and subsequently to
each installed steam jet.

7.1

Description

Two basic governor valve designs are used on RCIC turbines.


The first design is a single-seated, pressure-balanced, characterized V-port plug valve. This
V-port valve design was originally supplied in 2 1/2 in. and 4 in. diameter sizes. Problems with
operating forces and stability resulted in the elimination of the 4 in. V-port valve and the
development of a second governor valve design.
The second design is a single-seated, pressure-balanced 3 in. diameter solid plug/venturi seat
assembly.
7.1.1 Single-Seated V-Port Governor Valve
Reference Figure 7-1
All GS-1 model turbines use the 2 1/2 in. diameter V-port valve, with a nominal 3 in. inlet.
This governor valve assembly consists of a valve body (containing a valve seat and a valve
guide) and a characterized V-port valve plug. The valve plug is positioned by the governor
control system through a governor linkage assembly.
The valve seat and the valve guide are screwed into the valve body and retained by one of three
methods:

Original assemblies have a slot in the valve seat and the valve guide, into which valve body
material is upset (staked).

Intermediate assemblies have the valve seat and valve guide tack-welded to the valve body.
Several of these configurations demonstrated cracking of the tack weld. One site reported
that the valve seat unscrewed, resulting in an inability to achieve rated horsepower due to
limited steam flow capability.
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The latest assemblies use keys that are fitted into slots in the valve seat and valve guide,
which are then welded to the valve body. If maintenance requires removal or replacement of
the valve seat or valve guide, it is recommended that the method of retaining them be
changed to this configuration.

To ensure proper concentricity, the valve seat and valve guide are finish-machined after their
assembly into the valve body.
The valve plug is axially positioned within the valve body by means of its valve stem. The valve
stem is connected and self-aligned to the valve plug by a T-head on the stem and a mating slot in
the valve plug. A stiff cushion spring minimizes free play and maintains the relative position
between the valve plug and its stem.
The valve plug has balance ports in its upper end, which vent the steam pressure buildup above
the valve plug to the turbine steam ring, thereby equalizing the pressure across the plug and
reducing the forces required to stroke the valve. With the governor valve in its full closed
position, these balance ports will vent steam inlet leakage past the valve guide and into the
turbine steam ring. This valve guide leakage flow is typically insufficient to rotate the turbine.
The valve plug is characterized by the use of V-port openings. These openings result in a small
change in flow area for a given change in valve position at the initial opening of the valve (that
is, representing the high-pressure steam conditions). The relative change in flow area increases
as the valve is opened further.
7.1.2 Three-Inch Venturi Seat Governor Valve
Reference Figure 7-2
All RCIC GS-2 model turbines use the 3 in. diameter, pressure-balanced valve plug/venturi seat
assembly, with a nominal 4 in. inlet. This larger governor valve is required to satisfy the higher
steam flow rates associated with the higher horsepower rating of the GS-2 model turbine. As
with the V-port valve, the valve plug is positioned by the governor control system through a
governor linkage assembly.
This 3 in. governor valve does not have the precise low-flow trim capability that is available with
the 2 1/2 in. V-port governor valve. The EG-type governor systems, used on all RCIC turbines,
have sufficient gain adjustment and power to compensate for this loss in low-flow trim.
The valves venturi seat is shrunk-fit into the valve body and is seal-welded in place. The valves
guide sleeve is located in an extension of the valve bonnet and is seal-welded in place.
The valve plug is positioned within the valve body by means of its valve stem. The valve stem
forms a solid interface connection with the valve plug by means of a close-tolerance tapered fit.
The assembly is locked together with a jam nut. Because there is no capability for self-alignment
between the valve plug and its stem, it is critical that the concentricity and runout of the two
assembled parts be maintained within defined acceptance tolerance.
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This valve plug also has balance ports in its upper end, which vent the steam pressure buildup
above the valve plug to the turbine steam ring, thereby equalizing the pressure across the plug
and reducing the forces required to stroke the valve. With the governor valve in its full closed
position, these balance ports will vent steam inlet leakage past the valve guide into the turbine
steam ring. This valve guide leakage flow is typically insufficient to rotate the turbine.
7.1.3 Valve Stem Packing
Reference Figure 7-3
The valve stem packing is designed to control steam leakage along the valve stem to atmosphere,
without creating binding or excessive friction. The packing design is the same for both turbine
governor valve designs.
The valve stem packing consists of alternating carbon spacers and stainless steel flat washers,
assembled in the governor valve bonnet bore and retained in place with a guide bushing and
truarc snap ring. There are no adjustments in this assembly.
In lieu of the snap ring assembly, an alternate design is also available from the turbine vendor.
This design consists of a retainer plate located in a counter-bore in the governor valve bonnet,
held in place by three counter-sunk allen-head cap screws.
Steam conditions in the governor valve body pressure-load the carbon spacer/steel washer
assembly in the governor valve bonnet. The carbon spacers form a close fit to the valve stem,
with significant clearance at the valve bonnet bore. Conversely, the stainless steel flat washers
form a close fit to the valve bonnet bore, with significant clearance at the valve stem. This
labyrinth design provides a throttling assembly, thus limiting steam flow across the valve stem
while also allowing for a limited amount of self-aligning capability with the valve stem. A steam
leakoff connection is provided between the inner and outer valve stem packing.

7.2

Disassembly

Reference Figures 7-1, 7-2, and 7-3


Remove the governor valve operating linkage and fulcrum bracket assembly, in accordance with
Section 8.2.
Remove the gland piping from the governor valve bonnet.
Remove the remaining stud nuts securing the valve bonnet to the valve body.
Support the weight of the valve bonnet and remove the bonnet with the valve plug and stem as an
assembly. Discard the gasket.

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NOTE: Where applicable, use jacking bolts to separate the valve bonnet from the valve body.

CAUTION!! To avoid damage to the governor valve plug and stem, the valve guide, and the valve seat,
it is critical that axial alignment be maintained during bonnet removal.

With the valve bonnet removed, slide the valve plug and the valve stem as an assembly from the
bonnet.
For the 2 1/2 in. V-port valve only, remove the valve stem from the valve plug by sliding it off
the slot in the valve plug.

CAUTION!! Do not lose the assembly cushion spring that is located between the valve stem and the
valve plug.

Remove the truarc snap ring(s), the guide bushing(s), the carbon spacers, and the stainless steel
flat washers from the valve bonnet. It is recommended that the carbon spacers, stainless steel flat
washers, and snap rings be discarded, and new parts be used during valve reassembly.

NOTE: If the assembly has been in service for a long period of time, it will probably be necessary to
break up the carbon spacers and remove the components in pieces.

7.3

Inspection

Clean and remove all deposits on the governor valve seat and guide and visually inspect for
pitting, erosion, corrosion, scoring, cracks, and wear.
Clean and remove all deposits on the governor valve plug and visually inspect for pitting,
erosion, corrosion, scoring, cracks, and wear.
For the 3 in. venturi valve, inspect the bonnet extension fit diameter for scoring or galling. Clean
as necessary.
For the 3 in. venturi valve, inspect the valve body bore fit diameter for scoring or galling. Clean
as necessary.

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Visually inspect the gasket seating surfaces for pitting, corrosion, erosion, or other damage.
Refer to Section 26 (Critical Fits and Dimensions) and verify the dimensional adequacy of the
governor valve components.
Clean and visually inspect the bonnet bore(s) that had contained the carbon spacers and stainless
steel washers for pitting, corrosion, erosion, and wear. Pay particular attention to the bottom
sealing surface of the bonnet, at the diameter of the bore. Due to the clearance with the carbon
spacer (spacer outside diameter versus bonnet bore diameter), this area is a natural crud trap. If
necessary, this surface should be re-machined and lapped, finishing with a fine lapping
compound.

CAUTION!! Ensure that the bottom of the bonnet bore remains perpendicular to its centerline.

Clean and visually inspect the valve stem for pitting, erosion, corrosion, scoring, and wear.
Replace if necessary.
Special Inspection Notes
A significant number of corrosion-related binding problems have been reported with the
governor valve stems, most critically the 410 stainless steel stems with a liquid nitridehardened surface. These binding conditions have resulted in turbine control problems,
including numerous overspeed trip incidents during startup.
In addressing this corrosion problem, several alternate stem materials, and surfacehardening and plating processes, have been designed and tested by both individual sites
and Dresser-Rand. Stem designs that are presently in service include a:

410 stainless steel stem with a gas-nitrided surface hardening

410 stainless steel stem with a liquid-nitrided surface hardening

410 stainless steel stem with a chrome-plated surface

410 stainless steel stem with an aluminized coating

Ferillium stem with no coating

Inconel 718 stem with no coating

Inconel 718 stem with a special chromium-carbide coating

These stems must be closely monitored and inspected for evidence of binding conditions.
A recent problem with thermal expansion has been identified, involving the use of
Inconel 718 valve stems. The thermal expansion coefficient for Inconel 718 is 30 to 40%
greater than the coefficient for 410 stainless steel, a condition that was not evaluated with
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the change in stem material. As identified in a Part 21 design defect disclosure (issued in
April 1998), the corrective action for the thermal expansion concern is to increase the
inside diameter of the carbon spacers used in the governor valve bonnet packing
assembly. During inspection (and reassembly), it is critical to verify the required
minimum cold clearance between the outside diameter of the valve stem and the inside
diameter of the carbon spacers.
For the 2 1/2 in. V-port valve, place the stem in V-blocks that are 2 in. (50 mm) from the T-head
and 2 in. (50 mm) in from the threaded end. Verify that mid-point runout is acceptable.
Excessive runout is cause for replacement.
For the 3 in. venturi valve, do not separate the valve stem from the valve plug unless valve stem
replacement is required. With the valve plug supported in V-blocks, verify acceptable runout
conditions for the valve stem. Excessive runout is cause for valve stem replacement.

7.4

Valve Stem Replacement, 3 Inch Venturi Valve

Replacement of the valve stem is required if pitting, corrosion, excessive runout or other
unacceptable conditions are found.
Remove the valve stem locknut from inside the valve plug and discard. Due to the staking, this
nut is not normally reusable.

NOTE: Due to the potential for heavy staking of the assembly nut, the reduced area of the threaded end
of the valve stem might shear off during removal of the nut.

Using a press, drive the valve stem out of the valve plug. In some cases, it will be necessary to
machine the stem.
Cut off the valve stem, approximately flush with the end of the valve plug.
With the valve plug centered in a lathe, drill a 5/16 in. (8 mm) diameter hole all the way
through the valve stem. Press the remaining valve stem material out of the valve plug.
If the valve stem still cannot be pressed from the valve plug, using tapered reamers,
continue to reduce the stems wall thickness until separation is accomplished.
With the new valve stem supported in V-blocks adjacent to the threaded end and the tapered end,
verify that its runout is acceptable.
Apply a thin coat of Prussian blue to the taper on the new valve stem and check the contact
between the stem and the tapered hole in the valve plug. A minimum of 75% contact is required.
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Clean the components and install the valve stem into the valve plug.
With the valve plug supported in V-blocks, verify acceptable valve stem runout conditions.
If the runout is excessive, remove the stem and rotate it to a new position. Recheck the runout.
An inability to meet the runout requirements necessitates replacement of the valve stem, the
valve plug, or both.
When the runout is acceptable, install and torque the valve stem locknut to 8 to 10 ft-lb
(11 to 14 N-m) and recheck the runout.

CAUTION!! Due to dimension tolerances, it is possible that the tapered end of the valve stem might
protrude through the thickness of the valve plugs head. This condition results in the locknut bottoming on
the valve stem rather than on the valve plug. To correct this, install a 410 stainless steel washer with a
thickness equal to the length of the protrusion, plus approximately 0.020 in. (0.5mm).

If runout is still acceptable, stake the end of the valve stem to secure the locknut.

7.5

Reassembly

7.5.1 Valve Stem Packing


Reference Figure 7-3
Verify that both the valve bonnet bore and its bottom surface are clean and smooth, thus
providing acceptable sealing surfaces.
Orient the governor valve bonnet with the axis of the carbon spacer/steel washer bore vertical. It
should be oriented with the steam side facing up, and with a clearance elevation high enough to
insert (and remove) a 12 in. (300 mm) long round-stock (or spare valve stem) into the bonnet
bore from the outside (or atmospheric) end of the bonnet.
Insert a 12 in. (300 mm) long, 0.498 to 0.499 in. (12.65 to 12.67 mm) diameter round-stock (or
spare valve stem) into the bonnet bore from the outside (or atmospheric) end of the bonnet.
Install new carbon spacers and stainless steel flat washers into the steam side of the valve bonnet.
It is critical that a carbon spacer be installed first and then be followed by alternating flat washers
and carbon spacers until the valve bonnet cavity is full. If necessary, the stack can be finished
with two carbons or two flat washers to fill the cavity.

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The final packing assembly should completely fill the cavity, to within the thickness of one flat
washer, without being tight. Note the following guidelines:

The carbon spacers and the steel washers must be freely installed, without the use of force.

The carbon spacers will fit with a close clearance to the valve stem, and the steel washers
will fit with a close clearance to the valve bonnet bore.

Lightly tap each steel washer after its installation to verify its proper seating in the valve
bonnet bore.

Typically 18 to 22 carbon spacers and steel washers are required to fill the valve bonnet
cavity.

Complete this assembly by installing the valve stem guide bushing and new truarc snap ring.
When installing the snap ring, the bevel on its outside diameter must face toward the carbon
spacer/flat washer assembly, with the sharp edge away from the assembly.
Insert the valve stem (2 1/2 in. V-port valve) or the valve stem/plug assembly (3 in. venturi
valve) into the steam side of the governor valve bonnet, and carefully push the round-stock (or
spare stem) from the valve bonnet.
Temporarily secure the valve stem against inadvertent movement while re-positioning the valve
bonnet.
Orient the governor valve bonnet with the axis of the carbon spacer/steel washer bore horizontal.
Install new carbon spacers and stainless steel flat washers into the atmospheric side of the valve
bonnet. Again, it is critical that a carbon spacer be installed first. Typically, one steel washer and
an additional carbon spacer will then fill this cavity.
Complete this assembly by installing the valve stem guide bushing and new truarc snap ring.
When installing the snap ring, the bevel on its outside diameter must face toward the carbon
spacer/flat washer assembly, with the sharp edge away from the assembly.
For the 2 1/2 in. V-port valve, install the V-port valve plug onto the valve stem with its cushion
spring.

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7.5.2 Valve Reassembly


Reference Figures 7-1 and 7-2
For the 3 in. valve only, apply anti-seize compound to the fit diameter on the valve bonnet
extension.
Install the valve bonnet, with the valve plug and stem assembly, onto the valve body using a new
flexitallic gasket. For optimum drainage, verify that the bonnet is oriented with the valve stem
leakoff connection below the valve stems centerline, preferably vertically downward.

CAUTION!! It is critical that axial alignment be maintained during the valve bonnet installation. The
valve bonnet has a rabbit fit with the valve body but there is no doweled interface. There is some
allowable radial movement and significant circumferential movement between the two parts. To assist in
proper alignment, it is recommended that two, temporary, cylindrical dowels be installed in accessible
bolt holes approximately 180 apart.

Install the stud nuts and gradually tighten them to a snug condition in an alternating sequence.
Ensure that the valve bonnet is pulled up square to the valve body joint face at all times during
the tightening sequence. The valve body and the valve bonnet flanges will mate up metal-tometal when the bonnet bolting is tight, thus ensuring proper alignment.

CAUTION!! Verify free rotation and axial movement of the valve plug/valve stem assembly during the
tightening sequence.

7.6

List of Figures

Figure

Description

7-1

Two and One Half Inch Governor Valve Internals

7-2

Three Inch Governor Valve Internals

7-3

Governor Valve Stem Packing

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Figure 7-1
Two and One Half-Inch Governor Valve Internals

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Figure 7-2
Three Inch Governor Valve Internals

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Turbine Governor Valve

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Turbine Governor Valve

Figure 7-3
Governor Valve Stem Packing

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TURBINE GOVERNOR VALVE LINKAGE


The governor valve linkage consists of those components that position the governor valve in
response to changes in the output of the turbine governor control system.

8.1

Description

Reference Figures 8-1 and 8-2


All RCIC turbines, using the EG-type governor with remote servo, use a single, fulcrumsupported actuating lever between the remote servo and the governor valve stem.
The single lever-type linkage translates the governor servo position to a governor valve position
at a constant, linear ratio.

8.2

Linkage Disassembly

NOTE: Before beginning disassembly, manually stroke the governor valve to examine and note any
excessive play or binding in the linkage and valve parts due to wear or damage.

Remove the flexloc nut and assembly pin between the governor lever and the remote servo slip
link. Remove the Garlock thrust washers, where applicable.
Remove the valve stem jam nut.
Loosen its setscrew and remove the valve stem outer spring seat.
Lift the governor lever upwards, as required to clear the valve stem assembly.

NOTE: If the assembly uses a large actuating lever for the valve position indicator switches, it might be
necessary to remove its locating dowel pin and rotate or remove the switch actuating lever, in order for
the governor lever to clear the valve stem assembly.

8-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

Loosen its setscrew and remove the anti-rotation governor lever block.
Loosen its setscrew and remove the inner spring seat.
Remove the valve stem spring.
Loosen its setscrew and remove the spring seat from the fulcrum support bracket.
Remove the stud nuts securing the bracket to the valve bonnet and remove the fulcrum support
bracket, complete with the governor lever.

CAUTION!! Use care in supporting the weight of the fulcrum support bracket. Avoid contact with the
valve stem.

8.3

Inspection

Visually inspect all lever and linkage pivot points, rod ends, pins, and Garlock bushings for
excessive play or looseness. Repair or replace as necessary.

NOTE: Excessive play or looseness is a common cause for improper or unstable governor performance.

Examine the radius faces of the governor lever at its interface with the valve stem spring seats.
If flats have been worn on the contact faces, the area should be dressed with a fine file to restore
the radius profile.
Visually inspect the valve stem spring and the remote servo slip link spring for cracks and
distortion, and replace as necessary. The valve stem spring has a free length of 3.0 in. (76 mm),
and the remote servo slip link spring has a free length of 2.5 in. (64 mm). Both springs have a
nominal spring constant of 130 lbs/in. (230 N/cm). A 10% reduction in design value or a 5%
change in a previously logged measurement would indicate the necessity for spring replacement.
Visually inspect the valve stem spring seats and guides for abnormal rubbing and excessive
wear.

8-2

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

Special Inspection Note


Reference Figures 8-1 and 8-2
The fulcrum support spring seat, as used on some governor valves, was originally a twopiece assembly that consisted of a bronze bushing inserted into a steel housing. As
identified in a Part 21 design defect disclosure issued in April 1984, 17 spring seat
assemblies were manufactured with a dimensional tolerance error. These defective spring
seats were provided as spare parts.
The two-piece assembly is now obsolete, having been replaced with a single-piece steel
spring seat. If inspection identifies that the bronze/steel spring seat assembly is installed,
it is recommended that it be replaced with the single-piece steel spring seat. At a
minimum, the integrity of the bronze/steel assembly must be verified, re-staking as
necessary.

8.4

Linkage Reassembly and Adjustment

Install the fulcrum support bracket, complete with the governor lever. Align the fulcrum on its
dowel pins and retain the position with its stud nuts.

CAUTION!! Use care in maintaining alignment between the fulcrum support bracket and the valve
stem. Avoid contact with the valve stem.

Torque the valve bonnet stud nuts.


Install the gland piping onto the valve bonnet.
Lift the governor lever clear of the valve stem.
Install the valve stem spring seat in the fulcrum support bracket and turn it fully clockwise into
the bracket. Do not tighten its setscrew at this time.
Verify free valve stem movement with no binding.
Install the valve stem spring and the inner spring seat onto the valve stem. Do not tighten the
spring seat setscrew at this time.

CAUTION!! The governor valve stem spring has a free length of 3 in. (76 mm). The servo spring has a
free length of 2 1/2 in. (64mm). In all other ways, the springs are identical. Do not interchange them.

8-3

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

Lower the governor lever into position on the valve stem.


Verify proper alignment between the governor lever and the remote servo slip link. With the
governor lever in an approximate horizontal position, verify that the assembly pin hole in the
remote servo slip link is located in the center of the slot in the governor lever. If necessary,
realign the remote servos mounting (adapter) plate.
With the remote servo fully inserted and the governor valve held in its fully closed position,
adjust the threaded position of the inner spring seat on the valve stem so that the assembly pin
hole in the governor lever is approximately 1/8 in. (3 mm) above the corresponding pin hole in
the remote servo slip link. Clockwise rotation of the inner spring seat will decrease the governor
lever offset, and counterclockwise rotation will increase the offset. This relationship will ensure
positive, full closure of the governor valve before the remote servo is fully inserted.
NOTE: The nominal governor valve stem stroke is 5/8 to 7/8 inch (16 to 22 mm). Counterclockwise
rotation of inner spring seat will decrease the governor valve stem stroke.

Lock the inner spring seat into position on the valve stem with its setscrew.
Lift the governor lever clear of the valve stem and install the anti-rotation governor lever block.
Thread the block onto the valve stem (until it contacts the inner spring seat) and lock it into
position with its setscrew.
Rotate the valve stem assembly as necessary to orient the anti-rotation governor lever block so
that its radius edges are on the top and its square edges are on the bottom.
Lower the governor lever into position on its anti-rotation block.
Thread the outer spring seat onto the valve stem and adjust for the required total clearance
between the radius surfaces of the governor lever and the inner and outer spring seat faces.
Verify the minimum clearance throughout the full valve stroke. Lock the outer spring seat into
position with its setscrew.
Install and tighten the valve stem jam nut.
Verify free valve stem movement with no binding.
Turn the fulcrum support spring seat counterclockwise, compressing the valve stem spring to
obtain approximately 1/32 in. (1 mm) of space between the spring coils with the governor valve
in its full closed position. Do not coil bind! Lock the spring seat into position with its setscrew.
If the remote servo is replaced, a 1/4 in. (6 mm) diameter hole must be drilled through the new
servo rod, 1/2 in. (13 mm) from its end, to facilitate installation of the slip link.

8-4

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

If the remote servo slip link spring was removed during disassembly, or replaced during
assembly, it must be compressed to an installed length of 2 in. (50 mm).
Install the assembly pin and flexloc nuts between the governor lever and the remote servo slip
link. Verify full pin thread engagement with the locknuts (to achieve their locking feature).

CAUTION!! Do not over-tighten the locknuts, thereby restricting free movement.

Verify acceptable total side clearance between the thickness of the remote servo slip link and the
space in the governor lever fork. On the GS-1 governor valve assemblies, this clearance is
typically within the dimensional tolerances of the components. On the GS-2 governor valve
assemblies, this clearance is obtained with the use of one or two Garlock thrust washers.
If removed, install and properly orient the actuating lever for the valve position indicator
switches. Lock into position with its dowel pin.
Manually stroke the governor valve through its full travel and verify smooth movement with no
binding or sticking. Specifically, verify that there is side clearance and free movement at the
governor lever/fulcrum pivot point and at the interface between the governor lever and the
remote servo slip link.
Release the governor valve from its full closed position and verify that the valve stem spring has
sufficient force to fully open the valve.

NOTE: Do not lubricate the Garlock bushings and thrust washers associated with the governor lever
assembly.

8.5

List of Figures

Figure

Description

8-1

Linkage Adjustment Points, Single-Lever EG Governor, V- Port Valve

8-2

Linkage Adjustment Points, Single-Lever EG Governor, Venturi Valve

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Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

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Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

Figure 8-1
Linkage Adjustment Points, Single-Lever EG Governor, V- Port Valve

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Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

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Turbine Governor Valve Linkage

Figure 8-2
Linkage Adjustment Points, Single-Lever EG Governor, Venturi Valve

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TURBINE JOURNAL BEARINGS


RCIC turbines are fitted with two journal bearings, which support the turbine rotor in its casing
and maintain the correct radial position of the rotor relative to the steam nozzles, seals, and other
stationary components. Journal bearings carry the weight of the rotor, radial steam loads, and
coupling-induced loads. They control rotor vibration and provide damping. Journal bearings are
hydrodynamic bearings, which rely on an oil film or wedge between the bearing and the shaft to
prevent wear and remove friction heat. Anti-friction bearings, ball or roller, are not used for
journal bearing applications in these turbines.

9.1

Description

The poured babbitt journal bearing is used on all RCIC turbines. The original bearing design was
a cast iron shell that was lined with a poured lead base babbitt and horizontally split for easy
installation and removal. A new bearing design offers a steel tube with a centrifugally cast tin
base babbitt. The tube assembly is then horizontally split, doweled, bolted, and bored. The
improved, new-design bearing is interchangeable with the original bearing.
The governor end journal bearing also contains and locates the turbine thrust bearing. With this
configuration, the governor end and coupling end journal bearings are not interchangeable.
The journal bearings have provisions for both oil-ring lubrication and pressure-feed lubrication.
Because RCIC turbines do not have an external auxiliary oil pump, ring lubrication is required
for turbine startup and coastdown. All RCIC turbines also use the pressure-feed lubrication
configuration, where a turbine shaft-driven oil pump provides pressurized oil to the center of the
journal bearing by way of a feed hole in the lower-half bearing shell.
The upper-half bearing shell has an inspection hole through which the functioning of the oil ring
can be verified. The upper-half bearing shell also has a locating hole, which mates to a dowel in
the bearing pedestal cap, thus ensuring proper bearing orientation during assembly.

NOTE: Some governor end upper-half bearing shells are constructed with extensions at the horizontal
split, thus preventing inadvertent rotation of the bearing during assembly. This configuration does not
require a locating dowel.

9-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Journal Bearings

9.2

Disassembly

9.2.1 Coupling End

NOTE: Anytime the coupling end bearing pedestal cap is disturbed or removed, it will be necessary to
reinstall the magnetic speed pickup(s) and to verify that the gap between the pickup and the speed-sensing
gear is 0.008 to 0.010 in. (0.21 to 0.25 mm).

Remove the magnetic speed pickup(s).


Remove the bearing pedestal cap locating dowel pins and the bearing cap joint bolting. Lift the
bearing pedestal cap vertically to clear the journal bearing and remove it.
Remove the assembly screws and the upper-half journal bearing.
Move the oil ring clear of the lower-half journal bearing and locate it in a safe area.
Support the turbine shaft with a lifting sling or wooden blocks and wedges, and roll out the
lower-half journal bearing. It might be necessary to tap on the bearing shell to break it loose from
an oil film or a tight fit. Care must be taken to avoid distorting or upsetting metal at the shell
joint.
Thoroughly clean the journal bearing assembly with an approved solvent.
9.2.2 Governor End
Disconnect the mechanical overspeed trip connecting rod from the trip linkage on the turbine
T & T valve.
Remove the overspeed trip interlock limit switch and bracket and locate them in a safe area.
Remove the bolts securing the vertical flange of the pump bracket cap to the governor end
bearing pedestal cap.
Remove the bearing pedestal cap locating dowel pins and the bearing cap joint bolting. Lift the
bearing pedestal cap vertically to clear the journal bearing and remove it.
Remove the assembly screws and remove the upper-half journal bearing.
Move the oil ring clear of the lower-half journal bearing and locate it in a safe area.

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Turbine Journal Bearings

Support the turbine shaft with a lifting sling or wooden blocks and wedges, and roll out the
lower-half journal bearing. It might be necessary to tap on the bearing shell to break it loose from
an oil film or a tight fit. Care must be taken to avoid distorting or upsetting metal at the shell
joint.
Thoroughly clean the journal bearing assembly with an approved solvent.

9.3

Inspection

Examine the bearing babbitt for wear, wiping, cracking, discoloration due to overheating, or
separation from its steel backing. The original cast iron-backed bearings did not have a tight
bond between the backing and the babbitt, and a slight separation line between them was normal.
Excessive separation, however, is cause for replacement. Slight scoring on the babbitt faces and
hard deposits embedded in the babbitt can be removed with a scraper or Scotch-Brite.
Examine the oil feed hole in the lower-half bearing shell for plugging or foreign object damage.
Examine the oil rings for distortion or other damage.
Clean the turbine shaft journal bearing contact area and examine it for pitting, scoring, and
discoloration due to overheating. Minor imperfections can be polished and blended with fine
crocus cloth or Scotch-Brite. Serious imperfections, which can result in improper bearing
performance, might require rework or replacement of the turbine shaft.
Measure and record the turbine shaft diameter. Measure and record the inside diameter of the
journal bearings. Verify that the diametrical clearance between the turbine shaft and the journal
bearings is acceptable.
Examine the fit of the journal bearing assembly within the bearing pedestal for evidence of
looseness. There is a slight interference fit between the two, which must be verified during
reassembly.
If unacceptable conditions are discovered during the bearing inspection, replace the complete
journal bearing assembly.
Examine residuals in the oil for evidence of turbine condition. The type of metallic deposits and
other foreign material present can indicate its origin and the condition of a part or parts.
With the governor end bearing pedestal cap removed, visually inspect the overspeed trip tappet
assembly for damage.

9-3

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Journal Bearings

9.4

Reassembly

9.4.1 Coupling End and Governor End


New journal bearings are preserved with a rust inhibitor for storage purposes. If a new bearing is
required, it must be thoroughly cleaned with an approved solvent prior to installation.
Using lint-free rags and an approved solvent, thoroughly clean the turbine bearing pedestals
(with their self-contained oil sumps) and the bearing pedestal caps. Verify that all joint faces are
clean and free of any upset metal.
Verify that the oil flow paths into the turbine bearing pedestals are free from obstruction and
foreign material.
Apply a thin film of oil on the turbine shaft journal area and then roll the lower-half journal
bearing into position.
Remove its support mechanism and lower the turbine shaft onto the journal bearings.
Install the upper-half journal bearings and verify their proper orientation at the horizontal joint.
Reinstall the assembly screws.
Reference Figure 9-1
Verify the interference fit between the journal bearing and the bearing pedestal cap in the
following manner:

Position shimstock strips (typically 0.005 inch (0.12 mm) shim) on the bearing pedestal
mating surfaces.

Place plastigage material (typically red tape, 0.002 to 0.006 inch (0.05 to 0.15 mm) range) on
top of the bearing shell.

Install and then remove the bearing pedestal cap.

Read the plastigage.

The interference fit will be the difference between the shimstock thickness and the plastigage
reading.

Remove the plastigage material.

Prepare the bearing pedestal cap joint faces with a thin coating of Permatex-2 or other approved
compound.
Install the bearing pedestal cap. Install and seat the locating dowel pins and then install and
tighten the bearing cap joint bolting.

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EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Journal Bearings

9.4.2 Coupling End Only


Reference Figure 9-2
Reinstall the magnetic speed pickup(s) using the following guidelines:

Verify that the speed-sensing spur gear is properly aligned with the center of the speed
pickup mounting hole, and that it is secured with its two setscrews. Realign if necessary.

With a dial indicator located on the speed-sensing gear via the speed pickup mounting hole,
rotate the turbine shaft and verify that the total indicated runout is acceptable. Locate the
high-point gear tooth in the center of the pickup mounting hole.

Verify that the speed pickup mounting hole threads (5/8-18) are free of burrs and foreign
material.

Install the magnetic speed pickup and screw it in until contact is made with the sensing gear
tooth.

Mount a dial indicator on the end of the magnetic speed pickup and, turning
counterclockwise, back the pickup out to its acceptable gap setting.

With the dial indicator in place, tighten the pickup locknut and verify that the gap setting
remains within its acceptable range.

If the final speed pickup gap exceeds its acceptance criteria, repeat the adjustment process.

Reinstall the speed pickup electrical connector.

9.4.3 Governor End Only


Reinstall the bolts securing the vertical flange of the pump bracket cap to the bearing pedestal
cap.
Reinstall the overspeed trip interlock limit switch and bracket.
Reconnect the mechanical overspeed trip connecting rod to the trip linkage on the turbine T & T
valve.
Measure the turbine shaft endplay:

Hand-jack the turbine shaft to one end.

Release the load and zero a dial indicator on the turbine shaft.

Hand-jack the turbine shaft to the opposite end.

Release the load and read the dial indicator.

Repeat this effort to verify consistent readings.

Verify that the turbine shaft endplay is acceptable.


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Turbine Journal Bearings

9.5

List of Figures

Figure

Description

9-1

Journal Bearing Fit Measurement

9-2

Speed Pickup Gap Setting

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Turbine Journal Bearings

Figure 9-1
Journal Bearing Fit Measurement

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Turbine Journal Bearings

Figure 9-2
Speed Pickup Gap Setting

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10

TURBINE THRUST BEARING


A thrust bearing is fitted to all turbines. The thrust bearing serves to position the turbine rotor
axially in its correct location relative to the steam nozzles, seals, drive gears, driven equipment,
and other stationary components. The thrust bearing also absorbs any steam-induced thrust loads
developed in the turbine and any thrust loads that are transmitted through the coupling from the
pump. The Terry solid-wheel design has very little internally developed steam thrust, so the
primary thrust loads are those from the coupling.
Reference Figures 10-1, 10-2, and 10-3

10.1 Description
The double-ball thrust bearing configuration is used on all RCIC turbine applications. It consists
of two angular contact ball bearings installed back to back so that the pair is capable of absorbing
thrust in either direction.
The outer races of the two ball bearings are positioned axially in the shell of the governor end
journal bearing, with an allowable axial clearance between the journal bearing shell and the ball
bearing outer races of 0.000 to 0.002 in. (0.00 to 0.05 mm). Because the thrust bearing is not
intended to carry any radial load, the outer races are free to move radially.
The inner races of the two ball bearings, with a spacer for positioning the turbine wheel, are
shrunk-fit against a shoulder on the turbine shaft and are held in position with a
lockwasher/locknut assembly.
Lubrication to the ball thrust bearing is provided by the oil that is pressure-fed to the governor
end journal bearing, and by subsequent oil flow from the end of the journal bearing to the thrust
bearing.

10.2 Disassembly
Prior to disassembly, the as-found turbine shaft endplay (or turbine shaft axial movement) should
be measured. This measurement must be taken with the bearing pedestal caps doweled and
bolted in place, and with the turbine uncoupled from its driven equipment.

Hand-jack the turbine shaft to one end.

Release the load and zero a dial indicator on the turbine shaft.
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Turbine Thrust Bearing

Hand-jack the turbine shaft to the opposite end.

Release the load and read the dial indicator.

Repeat the effort to verify consistent readings.

Verify acceptable endplay. Excessive endplay, or an excessive change in previously measured


endplay, could indicate a worn or damaged ball thrust bearing, or possibly a damaged journal
bearing shell.
Disconnect the mechanical overspeed trip connecting rod from the trip linkage on the turbine
T & T trip valve.
Remove the overspeed trip interlock limit switch and bracket and locate them in a safe area.
Remove the bolts securing the vertical flange of the pump bracket cap to the governor end
bearing pedestal cap.
Remove the bearing pedestal cap locating dowel pins and the bearing cap joint bolting. Lift the
bearing pedestal cap vertically to clear the journal bearing and remove it.
Remove the assembly screws and the upper-half journal bearing.
Move the oil ring clear of the lower-half journal bearing and locate it in a safe area.
Support the turbine shaft with a lifting sling or wooden blocks and wedges and roll out the
lower-half governor end journal bearing assembly. It might be necessary to tap on the bearing
shell to break it loose from an oil film or a tight fit. Care must be taken to avoid distorting or
upsetting metal at the shell joint.
At this point in disassembly, the ball thrust bearing is available for inspection (while it is
installed on the turbine shaft). If inspection results indicate the necessity for replacement, the
following steps define the disassembly required for removal of the ball thrust bearing. Turbines
with the disc-type overspeed trip assembly require turbine rotor removal for thrust bearing
replacement. With the pin-type overspeed trip assembly, the thrust bearing can be removed with
the rotor in place. However, if thrust bearing replacement is required, a simultaneous turbine
internal inspection is recommended. The following disassembly instructions are written
accordingly.
Refer to sections 15.2 and 16.2 and remove the upper-half turbine casing and the turbine rotor.
Place the rotor on firm supports (for example, on V-blocks temporarily located across the turbine
bearing pedestals).
Loosen its locking setscrew and remove the spiral gear locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the
turbine shaft.
Match-mark its orientation and remove the spiral drive gear with its key.
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Turbine Thrust Bearing

Remove the spiral gear spacer.


Measure and record the as-found turbine shaft runout in the gear spacer area.
If the disc-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, loosen its locking setscrew and remove the
disc assembly as a unit with its key.
If the pin-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, loosen the weight-adjusting screws locking
setscrew. Remove the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw), the trip weight, and the trip
weight spring. Match-mark its orientation and remove the overspeed trip disc with its key.
Remove the thrust bearing locknut and lockwasher. Use care to avoid distorting the turbine shaft.
Remove the ball thrust bearing. The inner races of the bearings are a slight interference fit on the
shaft. If the bearings are to be re-used, take care to pull only on the inner race while removing
the bearings, so as to not damage the balls or races. Removal of the bearings is not recommended
unless replacement is planned.
Removal of the thrust bearing spacer is not required unless it has been damaged or if it is
necessary to adjust the turbine wheel lap.
In preparation for inspection and reassembly, thoroughly clean all component parts with an
approved solvent.

10.3 Inspection
Examine each ball bearing for smooth rotation and any feel of roughness or noise. Examine the
balls and races for scoring, cracks, abnormal wear, and discoloration due to overheating. If
unacceptable conditions are discovered, or if the as-found endplay exceeds the maximum
allowed, the ball bearing must be replaced as a complete assembly.
Examine the gear spacer and the thrust bearing spacer for upset metal, distortion, and abnormal
wear. Replace parts if unacceptable, non-repairable conditions are found.
Examine the turbine shaft for upset metal. Pay special attention to threads that were in contact
with locking setscrews. Upset metal and minor bruises can be cleaned and blended using a fine
oil stone, emery paper, and Scotch-Brite. Turbine shaft threads can be repaired with an
appropriate thread gauge file.
Examine residuals in the oil for evidence of turbine condition. The type of metallic deposits and
other foreign material present can indicate its origin and the condition of a part or parts.

10-3

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Turbine Thrust Bearing

10.4 Reassembly
If removed, install the thrust bearing spacer.
Orient the ball bearings back to back, with the wider faces of their outer races facing each other.
Heat the bearings to 175200F (7993C) and slide them onto the turbine shaft. Hold the
bearings against the thrust bearing spacer and the shaft shoulder until they shrink onto the turbine
shaft.
Install the lockwasher and locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the turbine shaft when tightening
the locknut. Torque the locknut to 200 ft-lb (270 N-m) and bend a lockwasher tab into the
locknut slot.
If the pin-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, install the mechanical overspeed trip disc
(noting its proper orientation) with its key. Reinstall the trip weight spring, the trip weight, and
the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw). Fully extend the trip weight and then turn the
weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw) exactly two turns counterclockwise.
If the disc-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, install the disc assembly as a unit with its key,
and tighten its locking setscrew.

CAUTION!! The mechanical overspeed trip assembly will require trip setpoint verification.

Measure and record the turbine shaft runout in the gear spacer area. Compare with the as-found
measurement recorded during disassembly and verify that the runout is acceptable.
Install the gear spacer and the spiral drive gear with its key, noting its proper orientation.
Install the spiral gear locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the turbine shaft when tightening the
locknut. Torque the locknut to 150 ft-lb (200 N-m). Tighten the locking setscrew and stake it in
place.
Using lint-free rags and an approved solvent, thoroughly clean the turbine bearing pedestal (with
its self-contained oil sump) and the bearing pedestal cap. Verify that all joint faces are clean and
free of any upset metal.
Verify that the oil flow paths into the turbine bearing pedestal are free from obstruction and
foreign material.
Reinstall the lower-half governor end journal bearing.
Refer to Section 16.5 and reinstall the turbine rotor.
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Turbine Thrust Bearing

Properly locate the oil rings on the turbine shaft.


Install the upper-half journal bearing and verify proper orientation at the horizontal joint.
Reinstall the assembly screws.
Prepare the bearing pedestal cap joint faces with a thin coating of Permatex-2 or other approved
compound.
Install the bearing pedestal cap. Install and seat the locating dowel pins. Install and tighten the
bearing cap joint bolting.
Reinstall the bolts securing the vertical flange of the pump bracket cap to the bearing pedestal
cap.
Reinstall the overspeed trip interlock limit switch and bracket.
Reconnect the mechanical overspeed trip connecting rod to the trip linkage on the turbine
T & T valve.
Measure the turbine shaft endplay:

Hand-jack the turbine shaft to one end.

Release the load and zero a dial indicator on the turbine shaft.

Hand-jack the turbine shaft to the opposite end.

Release the load and read the dial indicator.

Repeat the effort to verify consistent readings.

Verify that the turbine shaft endplay is acceptable.


Reference Figure 10-4 and verify correct wheel lap.
Refer to Section 15.4 and reinstall the upper-half turbine casing.

10-5

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Thrust Bearing

10.5 List of Figures


Figure

Description

10-1

Double-Ball Thrust Bearing, Disc Trip

10-2

Double-Ball Thrust Bearing, Pin Trip

10-3

Double-Ball Thrust Bearing

10-4

Wheel Lap

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Turbine Thrust Bearing

Figure 10-1
Double-Ball Thrust Bearing, Disc Trip

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Figure 10-2
Double-Ball Thrust Bearing, Pin Trip

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Turbine Thrust Bearing

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Turbine Thrust Bearing

Figure 10-3
Double-Ball Thrust Bearing

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Figure 10-4
Wheel Lap

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11

TURBINE SHAFT OIL SEALS


Oil seals are used on RCIC turbine assemblies to retain atmospheric oil within their respective
bearing pedestals and to deflect steam and water away from entering into the bearing pedestal.

11.1 Description
For the turbines coupling end bearing pedestal, oil seals are used on both the inboard and the
outboard ends of the pedestal. Each oil seal consists of an oil deflector (sometimes identified as a
thrust collar) located on the turbine shaft with setscrews, and a split dust collar (one half located
in the bearing pedestal and the other half located in the bearing pedestal cap). The lower-half
dust collars have drain holes, which are oriented to return trapped oil to the bearing pedestal. The
inboard oil deflector includes a steam shield, used to prevent steam and water (potentially
leaking from the turbine shaft steam seals) from entering the oil system. For the turbines
governor end bearing pedestal, a single oil seal is used on the inboard end of the pedestal. This
oil seal consists of an oil deflector, a steam shield, and a split dust collar, which is similar to that
used on the inboard end of the coupling end bearing pedestal. The outboard end of the governor
end bearing pedestal is enclosed within the pump bracket housing (with the turbine shaft
contained therein) so a shaft oil seal is unnecessary.
Many original thrust collars were an assembly consisting of the thrust collar and a sheet metal
deflector that was riveted to the assembly. Replacement thrust collars are a one-piece design that
has the deflector integral with the thrust collar. Due to the thicker deflector and slight differences
in the deflector position on the collar, additional machining might be required to maintain
adequate axial and radial clearances at assembly.

11.2 Disassembly
Removal of the dust collars from the bearing pedestals for cleaning or replacement is
accomplished by rolling the lower half out of the bearing pedestal bore if the turbine rotor is in
place, or by prying the dust collar out if the rotor has been removed. The upper half is removed
by prying it out of the bearing pedestal cap.

CAUTION!! Dust collar halves must be match-marked prior to removal to ensure that parts are not
inadvertently interchanged during reassembly.

11-1

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Turbine Shaft Oil Seals

Removal of the oil deflectors requires removal of the turbine rotor (refer to Section 16.2). With
the turbine rotor removed, loosen the setscrews and pull the oil deflectors from the turbine shaft.
Prior to removing the oil deflectors from the coupling end of the turbine shaft, the coupling hub
and sleeve, and the speed-sensing gear, must be removed from the turbine shaft. Prior to
removing the oil deflector from the governor end of the turbine shaft, the drive gear, the
overspeed trip components, and the thrust bearing assembly must be removed from the turbine
shaft.

11.3 Inspection
Examine each dust collar for distortion or bends in their labyrinth edges and straighten them as
necessary.
Verify that the drain holes in the lower-half dust collars are free from foreign material, with an
open drain path into their respective bearing pedestals.
Examine the steam shields on the appropriate oil deflectors for distortion or bends and straighten
them as necessary. Some steam shields are an integral part of the oil deflectors; others are a twopiece design with the shield attached to the oil deflector by rivets or screws. For the two-piece
design, verify that the shield is properly attached with no looseness.
Verify that the clearance between stationary and rotating components is acceptable.

11.4 Reassembly
Refer to Section 16.5 for turbine rotor reassembly and installation of the corresponding oil
deflectors.
Apply a light coating of sealant on the mating surfaces and roll the dust collars into their
respective bearing pedestals and bearing pedestal caps. The oil drain holes in the lower-half dust
collars must be properly oriented to ensure oil drainage into the bearing pedestal. If new dust
collars are installed, some rework might be necessary for proper clearance. If necessary, the
inside diameter of the dust collars can be scraped to obtain the minimum radial clearance.

11-2

EPRI Licensed Material

12

TURBINE SHAFT STEAM SEALS

Clearance seals are used on RCIC turbine assemblies to control the leakage of steam from the
interface between the turbine shaft and the turbine casing. The seals are subjected to exhaust
steam pressure only.
Reference Figure 12-1

12.1 Description
The steam seal assembly consists of a gland case, split at the horizontal joint, which contains
four sets of carbon ring assemblies. The three inboard carbon ring assemblies are active steam
seals, with the outboard ring considered to be an air seal.
The original gland seal cases are cast iron. Replacement stainless steel gland cases are now
available.
The gland case halves are bolted and doweled, and machined as an assembly containing four
compartments for the carbon ring seals. The side faces of the carbon ring compartments are
machined to a smooth finish, concentric and square to the shaft, to provide a sealing face with
the carbon rings. The gland cases are match-machined and are not interchangeable. The
lower half of each gland case has a drain or leakoff connection, which is drilled and tapped into
the annular space just inside the outboard carbon rings sealing compartment. The early RCIC
turbines drew a vacuum at this connection for steam leakage control. Later RCIC turbines
pressurize the connection for steam leakage control.
The gland case assemblies are located between the upper-half and lower-half turbine casings.
They are assembled with two fitted studs, and appropriate nuts, on their outboard end (with
respect to the turbine wheel). This provides a precision fit at the horizontal joint, assuring that
there is no offset on the sealing faces for the carbon ring assemblies. The inboard end of the
gland cases are assembled with allen-head cap screws.Removal of the upper-half gland case
requires removal of the upper-half turbine casing. Removal of the lower-half gland case requires
removal of the turbine rotor.

NOTE: The dowel pin, shown on most RCIC section drawings between the lower gland housing and the
turbine case, was not supplied and is not required.

12-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Shaft Steam Seals

Reference Figure 12-2


Each carbon ring consists of three segments held together by a garter spring, which permits the
assembled ring to float with the turbine shaft. Each segment is match-marked on one side, at its
outer edge and near its butt end, so that the three segments in each ring can be assembled in the
correct relationship to each other. The segments are not interchangeable and each carbon ring
must be replaced as an assembly. The garter spring freely passes through a clearance hole drilled
into a carbon ring rotation stop piece. This stop piece fits into a machined recess in the lowerhalf gland case and into a slot in one of the carbon ring segments. Differential pressure across the
gland forces each carbon ring assembly against the sealing face of its respective gland case
compartment.
The carbon ring assembly is designed with a cold clearance to the turbine shaft so that the
clearance at operating temperature is minimized. This cold clearance is based on the nominal
diameter of the ring, the difference in thermal expansions of the carbon ring and shaft, and the
normal operating exhaust temperature of the turbine. Excessive clearance will result in excessive
leakage, and inadequate clearance can result in both excessive leakage and high shaft vibration.

12.2 Disassembly
Refer to Section 15.2 and remove the upper-half turbine casing.
Remove the assembly bolts, studs, and nuts, and separate the gland case joint with a light tap
using a soft-face hammer.
Lift the upper-half gland case vertically to clear the carbon rings and remove it. If the carbon
rings are frozen in the case, it will be necessary to pry the upper-half gland case off its horizontal
joint and cut the four carbon ring garter springs prior to gland case removal.

CAUTION!! Match-mark the gland case halves to ensure that coupling end parts are not inadvertently
interchanged with governor end parts.

Roll each assembled garter spring out of its mating groove in the carbon ring and remove the
carbon ring segments. It is inadvisable to disconnect the spring while in place over the ring
assembly. That would require significant stretching, which could result in a permanent
lengthening of the spring, rendering it useless.

NOTE: It is recommended that carbon rings and springs be replaced rather than reused.

12-2

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Turbine Shaft Steam Seals

CAUTION!! If the carbon ring segments are to be examined and reused, it is essential that they be
identified as to their exact location and orientation. Carbon ring segments are matched and are not
interchangeable.

Disconnect the garter springs and remove them with the carbon ring rotation stops. The rotation
stops are sometimes secured to the lower-half gland case with a locking screw.
Refer to Section 16.2 and remove the turbine rotor.
Separate the joint and remove the lower-half gland case, carefully feeding the leakoff piping and
flex hose through the rib openings of the bearing pedestal. It is usually necessary to disconnect
the gland piping prior to removing the gland case.

12.3 Inspection
Examine each carbon ring segment for nicks, pits, chips, or cracks, and for any scoring on its
sealing face. The unacceptable condition of any segment will be cause for replacement of the
carbon ring assembly because segments are not interchangeable.
With the carbon ring assembled, check the seating of the segment butts by holding them in front
of a strong light. Butts should be flat and square, with no light seen between them. Replace the
carbon ring assembly if unacceptable conditions are found.
If the as-found clearance determined during disassembly is excessive, replace the carbon ring
assembly(s).
Visually inspect the garter spring(s) for discoloration (overheating), permanent stretch, and coil
deformation. Replace if any concerns are noted.
Visually inspect the rotation stop piece for deformation or any upset metal. Verify that the garter
spring freely passes through its respective hole in the rotation stop piece. Replace the stop piece
if any concerns are noted.
Thoroughly clean the gland cases. Do not neglect to clean the gland case outside diameter fit
with the turbine casing. Visually inspect the carbon ring compartments for pitting and foreign
materials. Dress the compartment sealing faces to return them to their original smooth finish. If
necessary, the gland cases can be assembled and the compartment sealing faces machine-cut to
return them to their original finish. Verify that the joint faces are clean and free of any upset
metal. Upset metal can be removed with a fine, flat file or oil stone, using care to maintain sharp
edges and corners for proper sealing upon reassembly.

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EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Shaft Steam Seals

Clean the turbine shafts chrome-plated carbon ring contact area, and examine for pitting,
peeling, scoring, and discoloration due to overheating. Minor imperfections can be polished and
blended with fine crocus cloth or Scotch-Brite. Serious imperfections, which can result in
improper gland performance, might require rework or replacement of the turbine shaft. Measure
the turbine shaft diameter and verify that it is within acceptable limits.

12.4 Reassembly
Reference Figure 12-3

NOTE: As identified previously in the section on disassembly, it is recommended that new carbon rings
and springs be used in reassembly.

If new gland cases are required, verify that their as-cast condition does not interfere with the
wheel nuts on the turbine shaft.
The leakoff piping and flex hose must typically be reinstalled, using approved thread sealant,
prior to locating the gland case in the turbine casing.
Verify that the turbine casing locating rib is clean and free of any upset metal.
Final cleaning of the turbine casing locating rib and the gland case housings should be with
alcohol or acetone, in order to remove cleaning solvent residues.

NOTE: The recommended jointing compound is Industrial Gasket and Shim Companys Turbo Repair
Kit, Part Number ZZ3373X062KIT. The kit consists of Turbo 50, a liquid resin, and Temp-Tite II, a highsolid, 1/16 in. (2 mm) diameter sealant string. The complete part number is critical in ensuring that the
repair kit is obtained, rather than just a container of resin or a container of Temp-Tite II string.
The kit is identified with a limited shelf life of six months. However, sealing results are significantly
improved if the kit is less than one-month old. Industrial Gasket and Shim Company is noted for
immediate delivery of this product upon request.
Curing agents (X1 Catalyst and 718 Catalyst) are available. However, industry experience has proven
that the use of a catalyst is not required or recommended. Under no circumstances should the 718
Catalyst be used, as the curing process starts immediately at room temperature.
Once the jointing compound has been applied to the sealing surface, the assembly process should be
completed within a 10-hour period.

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EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Shaft Steam Seals

CAUTION!! The Material Safety Data Sheet for Turbo 50 identifies the potential for skin irritation with
the use of this product. Personnel who react to poison ivy should avoid contact with Turbo 50.

Apply a thin film of the liquid resin to the locating rib of the lower-half turbine casing. Lay a
single pass of Temp-Tite II string in position and locate the lower-half gland case. Place a block
of wood across the gland case and firmly tap the case down into position.
Refer to Section 16.5 and reinstall the turbine rotor.
Reassemble the carbon rings on the shaft, starting with the inboard ring and working outward. If
carbon segments are reused, it is essential that each ring be installed in its exact location
identified during disassembly.

CAUTION!! All segments (new and old) are match-marked with notches and are not interchangeable.

Reference Figure 12-2


Insert the garter spring so that the two ends are protruding up on each side of the turbine shaft at
equal length.
Insert the carbon segment that has a slot for the rotation stop piece into the lower-half housing
and locate it on the garter spring. Repeat this with the second carbon segment, matching the
corresponding notches. Equalize both segments around the turbine shaft.
Place the rotation stop piece on a garter spring and locate it in its segment.

CAUTION!! If new rotation stops are required, verify that their length is not excessive, thereby
preloading the carbon segment against the turbine shaft.

Using minimum tension, stretch the garter spring sufficiently to join the ends together, and
position the garter spring so that its joint is at the approximate center of a carbon segment.
Place the third carbon segment on the turbine shaft, against the other segments and the garter
spring, matching with the corresponding notches. Lightly push the third carbon segment between
the other two, and carefully roll the garter spring up and over to lock it in place.
Verify that the completed carbon ring assembly is free to rotate and has axial movement.
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Turbine Shaft Steam Seals

Orient the carbon ring assembly with its rotation stop piece located in the machined recess in the
lower-half gland case.
Reference Figure 12-4
Perform the following to measure the diametrical clearance between each carbon ring assembly
and the turbine shaft:

Locate a dial indicator on top of the carbon ring.

Carefully lift the carbon ring so that it contacts the bottom of the turbine shaft.

Monitor and record the dial indicator movement while moving the carbon ring assembly up
and down.

Verify acceptable clearance.

Reference Figure 12-5


Apply a thin film of the liquid resin to the flange face of the lower-half gland case.

CAUTION!! Avoid excessive resin that can be squeezed into the carbon ring compartments, possibly
restricting the required free movement of the carbon ring assemblies.

Lay a single pass of Temp-Tite II string in position, and replace the upper-half gland case.
Install the bolts, studs, and nuts, and tighten evenly.
Refer to Section 15.4 and reinstall the upper-half turbine casing.

12.5 List of Figures


Figure

Description

12-1

Carbon Seal Assembly

12-2

Carbon Ring Match-Marks

12-3

Turbine Lower-Half Gland Case Seal Preparation

12-4

Carbon Ring Clearance

12-5

Turbine Gland Case Horizontal Joint Seal Preparation

12-6

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Figure 12-1
Carbon Seal Assembly

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Figure 12-2
Carbon Ring Match-Marks

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Figure 12-3
Turbine Lower-Half Gland Case Seal Preparation

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Figure 12-4
Carbon Ring Clearance

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Figure 12-5
Turbine Gland Case Horizontal Joint Seal Preparation

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13

TURBINE OIL PUMP


All RCIC turbines are equipped with a circulating oil lubrication system, which uses a shaftdriven oil pump.
Reference Figure 13-1

13.1 Description
The oil pump used on all RCIC turbines is an RFD-1-A series pump, manufactured by the Tuthill
Pump Company. This is a displacement-type, internal gear pump with bi-directional capability.
Two sizes of this pump have been used, with selection based on the required oil flow rate. These
pumps have the same external interface dimensions:

ORFD-1-A, rated at 105 gallons per hour at 1800 rpm, used on original RCIC applications

1RFD-1-A, rated at 180 gallons per hour at 1800 rpm, used on later RCIC applications

Referring to the model number: the -1 defines the use of standard external ports with a 1/2-14
NPT interface. The -A defines the modified pump shaft with two flats, leaving a 0.2460.248 in.
(6.256.30 mm) wide tang for the shaft end configuration.
The oil pump is driven off the turbine shaft through a right angle gear assembly. The end of the
drive shaft that drives the main oil pump is slotted to mate with the tang end of the oil pump
shaft. The pump assembly is bolted to an oil pump cover that, in turn, is bolted to the bottom of
the pump bracket housing.

13.2 Disassembly
This section defines the effort required to remove the oil pump assembly for its maintenance or
inspection:
Drain the lubricating oil system.
Remove the oil pump suction and discharge piping.
Remove the four cap screws securing the pump to its oil pump cover, and then remove the oil
pump assembly.
13-1

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Turbine Oil Pump

13.3 Inspection
During operation, verify that there is no air in-leakage into the suction side of the oil pump.
Aerated oil can reduce control system response and stability.
During operation, verify that the oil pump discharge pressure is within the acceptable range of 12
to 15 psi (80 to 105 kPa), at the turbines maximum operating speed.

CAUTION!! Oil temperature and viscosity will affect pump discharge pressure.

During operation, verify that there is no leakage from the pump cover gasket or the pump
mounting gasket.
If operating history indicates a continued requirement for readjusting the pump discharge
pressure via its discharge relief valve, there might be cause for replacement of the oil pump
assembly (or the relief valve assembly).
With the oil pump removed, verify that the depth from the mounting face of the pump cover to
the root of the interface slot on the drive shaft is 1.30 in. (33.0 mm), at a minimum. This
minimum depth will ensure that a pump shaft extension of 1.25 in. (31.8 mm) (nominal) will not
preload or lift the mating drive shaft when the oil pump assembly is installed.
Visually inspect the drive tang end of the pump drive shaft for wear, burrs, or steps on the drive
flats.
Turning the pump by hand, verify free, smooth rotation.

13.4 Maintenance Guidelines


The oil pump assembly is basically maintenance-free, with the exception of replacing the pump
cover gasket or mounting gasket should external leakage occur. If concerns develop regarding
pump performance, it is recommended that the oil pump assembly be replaced.

13.5 Reassembly
This section defines the installation of the oil pump assembly.
Using a new vellumoid-paper mounting gasket, locate the oil pump assembly on its oil pump
cover. If inspection dimensions indicate a concern for preloading or lifting of the drive shaft, a
thicker gasket or shim stock can be used to obtain the required clearance between the end of the
pump shaft and the drive shaft.
13-2

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Turbine Oil Pump

Install and tighten the four cap screws, securing the pump assembly to its oil pump cover.
Reconnect the oil pump suction and discharge piping, using care to ensure a positive vacuum
seal on the suction side of the pump assembly.

13.6 List of Figures


Figure

Description

13-1

Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly With Oil Pump

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Turbine Oil Pump

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13-4

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Turbine Oil Pump

Figure 13-1
Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly With Oil Pump

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14

TURBINE GOVERNOR AND OIL PUMP DRIVE GEAR


ASSEMBLY
The turbine speed control governor and the turbine lubricating oil pump are driven off the
governor end of the turbine shaft.
All RCIC turbines have a right angle spiral gear drive assembly, where the turbine shaft drives a
drive shaft, which, in turn, drives both the turbine governors EG-R hydraulic actuator and the
turbines oil pump.
Reference Figures 14-1 and 14-1A

14.1 Description
The spiral gear drive assembly consists of steel helical gears, with a reduction gear ratio of
1.782:1. The driving gear is keyed and located on the governor end of the turbine shaft, with a
slight interference fit. The driven gear, at a right angle to the driving gear, is keyed to a drive
shaft, which is located in the pump bracket housing. The driven gear is positioned against a
shoulder on its drive shaft and is held in place with a snap ring.
The drive shaft is radially positioned with upper and lower shaft bushings. Both bushings are
located in the pump bracket housing and below the driven gear.
The drive shaft is axially positioned with upper and lower thrust washers, located in the pump
bracket cap and the pump bracket housing, respectively. Originally, the thrust washers were held
in position with soft dowel pins, peened into chamfered holes in the washers and polished
smooth. For later turbines, and for replacement parts, the thrust washers are held in position with
recessed, flat-head machine screws, which are staked in place.
The top of the drive shaft is directly coupled to the turbine governors EG-R hydraulic actuator.
The EG-R hydraulic actuator is attached to its adapter plate by means of two 1/4-20 studs and
nuts. The EG-R actuator adapter plate has a spigot fit into the pump bracket cap, thus ensuring
actuator alignment with its drive coupling.

14-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

NOTE: On a few later RCIC turbines, the EG-R hydraulic actuator adapter plate includes a guide
bushing for the actuator drive shaft. This bushing is lubricated by the drain oil from the hydraulic
actuator.

The EG-R actuator drive coupling is press-fit onto the drive shaft, positioned against a shoulder,
and doweled into place. The opposite end of the coupling is spline-fit to the drive shaft of the
hydraulic actuator. The side of the coupling includes vent holes to release any trapped oil
pressure between the drive shaft and the hydraulic actuator.
The bottom of the drive shaft drives the turbines oil pump. The end of the shaft is slotted to
mate with the tang on the end of the oil pump shaft.
Proper lubrication is critical for reliable operation of the spiral gear drive assembly. Due to
restrictive oil passages throughout the assembly, meticulous oil cleanliness is a requirement.
An externally orificed feed line supplies pressurized oil to both the lower and the upper shaft
bushings, both of which are located in the pump bracket housing and below the driven gear. Oil
travels the length of the upper shaft bushing via an axial groove in its inside bore. Oil then enters
the face of the lower thrust washer, where it is distributed via four tapered, scalloped grooves.
Oil that is under pressure then passes through a hole in the driven gear and enters the face of the
upper thrust washer, where it is contained in a circumferential groove. The upper thrust washer
also contains a radial groove through which excess oil is discharged. An additional external oil
line, from the vent on the oil reservoir for the EG-R hydraulic actuator, connects to an orifice in
the pump bracket cap. This orifice directs an oil spray into the mesh of the gear assembly.

14.2 Disassembly
Remove the electrical connection to the EG-R hydraulic actuator.

CAUTION!! Verify that power has been removed from the electronic controls prior to disconnecting the
actuator.

Label and remove the hydraulic control tubing from the EG-R hydraulic actuator. Note that the
oil supply line at the hydraulic actuator includes a small reservoir, which provides priming oil to
the hydraulic actuator during the turbine startup transient. Protect openings from entry of foreign
material.
Remove the two hex nuts and lift the EG-R hydraulic actuator free from its adapter plate.
Remove the four cap screws that secure the actuator adapter plate to the pump bracket cap.
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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

With a direct vertical lift, remove the actuator adapter plate.

NOTE: If the actuator is to be replaced, it should be replaced at this point in the disassembly. Field
maintenance on the actuator assembly is not recommended.

Measure and record the as-found axial thrust clearance of the drive shaft. This is accomplished
by placing a dial indicator on the end of the shaft and moving the shaft up and down.
Remove the bolts securing the vertical flange of the pump bracket cap to the governor end
bearing pedestal cap.
Remove the locating dowel pins and joint bolting of the pump bracket cap.
With a direct vertical lift, remove the pump bracket cap.

NOTE: It is not necessary to remove the pump bracket housing unless damage is observed, or if the
installation of a new gear assembly is required with the turbine rotor in place.

Reference Figure 14-2


While holding the driven gear firmly in contact with the lower thrust washer, measure and record
the as-found backlash of the spiral gear assembly.
Remove the drive shaft with the EG-R hydraulic actuator coupling and the driven gear as an
assembly. It is not necessary to remove the coupling or the driven gear from the shaft unless
inspection results dictate that the coupling, the drive shaft, or the spiral gear assembly requires
replacement.
If coupling replacement is required, remove the locking dowel pin and pull the EG-R hydraulic
actuator coupling from the drive shaft, using care to avoid bending or galling the shaft.
If spiral gear assembly replacement is required, both drive and driven gears must be replaced as
a set:
For the drive gear replacement: remove the lower-half pump bracket housing. Loosen its
locking setscrew and remove the spiral gear locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the
turbine shaft. Remove the spiral drive gear with its key.
For the driven gear replacement: remove its retaining snap ring and pull the gear from the
drive shaft. Use care not to gall the shaft or the locating key.
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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

If drive shaft replacement is required, match-mark the driven gear to ensure proper orientation
when assembled onto the new shaft.
If inspection results dictate replacement of the shaft bushings, the bushings must be pulled from
their respective locations in the pump bracket housing. They have been installed with a slight
press fit.

14.3 Inspection
Examine the spiral gear assembly teeth for pitting, scoring, cracks, an abnormal or excessive
wear pattern, and discoloration due to overheating.
Replace the spiral gear assembly if backlash is excessive or if other unacceptable conditions are
identified.
Examine the drive shaft for abnormal wear patterns. With the shaft in V-blocks, verify that the
total indicated runout is acceptable. Check the driven spiral gear for looseness on the drive shaft.
Examine the actuator coupling for cracks and abnormal wear. Verify that the assembly dowel pin
fits securely in place. Replace if unacceptable conditions are found.
Examine the upper and lower thrust washers for wear, damage to their lubrication grooves, and
discoloration due to overheating. Verify that the locating dowel pins are polished flush with the
running surface of the thrust washers, or that the locating setscrews are properly recessed below
the running surface of the thrust washers. Replace the lower thrust washer if unacceptable
conditions are identified. Replace the upper thrust washer if axial clearance exceeds acceptance
criteria, or if other unacceptable conditions are identified.
Examine the upper and lower shaft bushings for wear, damage to the lubrication groove (upper
bushing only), and discoloration due to overheating. Verify that the diametrical clearance
between the bushings and the drive shaft is within tolerance. If unacceptable conditions are
found, replace the shaft bushings.
Measure and record the as-found turbine shaft runout in the gear spacer area.
Verify that the gear spray orifice is free of damage and foreign material, and that the oil spray is
properly directed into the mesh of the gear assembly.
Verify that the oil feed to the shaft bushings is free of damage and foreign material.

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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

14.4 Reassembly
If replacement shaft bushings are required, press the new bushings into their respective locations
in the pump bracket housing. Use care to avoid rolling material into the inside diameter of the
bushing(s). Verify that the axial lubrication groove on the inside bore of the upper shaft bushing
has not been obstructed with upset metal.
If replacement thrust washers are required, refer to the detailed instructions in Section 14.6.
If a replacement drive shaft is required, it will be necessary to match-drill and ream its end from
the EG-R hydraulic actuator coupling to install the coupling dowel pin at final assembly. If the
driven spiral gear is to be reused, it must be match-marked prior to removal from the old drive
shaft so that it is installed with the same orientation onto the new drive shaft.
Likewise, if a replacement EG-R hydraulic actuator coupling is required, it will be necessary to
match-drill and ream the new coupling from the drive shaft to install the coupling dowel pin at
final assembly. A preferred alternative is to replace both the drive shaft and the EG-R hydraulic
actuator coupling, and drill and ream them as an assembly for the locking dowel pin.
If a replacement spiral gear assembly is required:

Install the spiral drive gear onto the turbine shaft with its key.

Install the spiral gear locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the turbine shaft when tightening
the locknut. Torque the locknut to 150 ft-lb (200 N-m). Tighten the locking setscrew and
stake it in place.

Install the pump bracket housing.

Install the spiral-driven gear onto the drive shaft with its key, and secure it in place with its
retaining snap ring.

Install the EG-R hydraulic actuator coupling, locating it on the shoulder of the drive shaft.
Secure it with its locking dowel pin.

Using lint-free rags and an approved solvent, thoroughly clean the pump bracket cap and the
pump bracket housing. Verify that all joint faces are clean and free of any upset metal.
Verify that the oil supply passages are free of damage and foreign material.
Install the drive shaft and spiral-driven gear into the pump bracket housing.
Reference Figure 14-2
While holding the driven gear firmly in contact with the lower thrust washer, verify that the
backlash of the spiral gear assembly is within acceptance criteria. Note that these criteria are
different for new gears versus used gears. Record final reading.
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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

Prepare the flanges of the pump bracket cap with a thin coating of Permatex-2 or other approved
compound.
Reinstall the pump bracket cap.
Install and seat the locating dowel pins, and then install and tighten the joint bolting.
Install the bolts that secure the vertical flange of the pump bracket cap to the governor end
bearing pedestal cap.
Verify that the axial thrust clearance of the drive shaft is within acceptance criteria. Note that
these criteria are different for new versus used thrust washers. Record the final reading.
Reinstall the EG-R hydraulic actuator adapter plate. Install and tighten the four cap screws.
Reinstall the EG-R hydraulic actuator and secure it with the two hex nuts.
Reinstall the hydraulic control tubing on the EG-R hydraulic actuator, including the supply line
oil reservoir.
Reinstall the electrical connections to the EG-R hydraulic actuator.
Re-establish power to the electronic controls.

14.5 Backlash Adjustment


The backlash or running clearance of the spiral gear assemblies is determined by the center
distance between the drive and the driven gears. This center distance is set by the position of the
pump bracket housing, which is bolted and doweled to the governor end bearing pedestal.
Backlash adjustment is only performed with new gear assemblies. If the as-found backlash of
used gears exceeds the acceptance criteria, the gear assembly must be replaced.
If the backlash of a new gear assembly is not within its acceptance criteria, the backlash must be
adjusted by moving the pump bracket housing horizontally until proper backlash is achieved.
Pull the two dowel pins used to locate the housing on the pedestal and remove the pump bracket
housing from the governor end bearing pedestal. Clean the mating flanges.
Install the pump bracket housing on the governor end bearing pedestal snug-tight, making sure
that the horizontal flange of the housing is flush with the horizontal flange of the bearing
pedestal.
Install the driven gear and shaft, and measure the backlash at the pitch diameter of the gear.
Reference Figure 14-2
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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

If the backlash is less than the required minimum, move the pump bracket housing away from
the turbine shaft. If the backlash exceeds the required maximum, move the pump bracket housing
closer to the turbine shaft. Take care to maintain the horizontal flanges flush. Repeat as
necessary until the backlash is within the acceptance criteria for new gears.

NOTE: The backlash adjustments should be made with no piping or tubing attached to the pump bracket
housing.

Tighten the pump bracket housing and re-ream, or drill and ream, the dowel pin holes to
maintain this position.
Remove the pump bracket housing and apply a thin film of Permatex-2 or other approved
sealant to the flange. Assemble the pump bracket housing to the bearing pedestal. Install the
dowel pins. Install and tighten the pump bracket flange bolting.
Verify that the backlash is within the acceptance criteria.

14.6 Spiral Gear Thrust Washer Replacement


The driven gear of the spiral gear assembly is located vertically with two thrust washers. A thrust
or running clearance between the thrust washers and the driven gear is required to allow for
lubrication and thermal expansion. Thrust washer replacement is required if the clearance
exceeds acceptance criteria, or if other unacceptable conditions exist.
The thrust washers are held in place with two rivets or flat-head screws in each washer. Most
turbines were built using rivets. The screws were only used in later production. Screws are the
preferred replacement for all units when thrust washer replacement is necessary.
Replacement thrust washers are supplied oversized in thickness. They must be machined at the
time of installation to provide the proper positioning of the driven gear, and to provide the
required thrust clearance.
An estimate of the correct thrust washer thickness can be determined by measuring the existing
washers, if they are not damaged beyond measurement. If measurement of the existing washers
is not possible, the required thickness can be determined in the following manner:
Reference Figure 14-3

Remove the existing thrust washers by prying them loose (in the case of the riveted version)
or by removing the screws (in the later version).

Temporarily locate the new lower thrust washer. Do not install rivets or screws at this time.

Install the driven gear and drive shaft assembly in the pump bracket housing.
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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

Measure the vertical distance from the top face of the driven gear to the top of the outside
diameter of the drive gear.

Subtract 0.30 in. (7.6 mm) from this dimension. The resulting dimension is the amount that
must be removed from the bottom surface of the lower thrust washer to properly position the
driven gear relative to the drive gear.

Machine the determined amount from the bottom surface of the lower thrust washer, while
maintaining the surface flat and parallel to the thrust face.
Install the lower thrust washer using two #10-32 threads per in. flat-head screws, 3/8 in. (10 mm)
long. If the original washers were riveted in place, it will be necessary to drill and tap the pump
bracket housing for the screws with a #10-32 tap, 1/2 in. (13 mm) deep.

NOTE: The orientation of the four tapered, scalloped lubrication grooves is not critical.

Check that the screw heads do not protrude above the thrust face of the washer and stake the
screws in place. Dress off any raised metal from the staking with a fine file or flat stone.
Install the driven gear and drive shaft assembly into the pump bracket housing. Install the pump
bracket cap without the upper thrust washer.
Using a dial indicator, measure the total vertical movement of the driven gear and shaft assembly
within the pump bracket assembly. The required thickness of the upper thrust washer is the
measured travel minus 0.010 in. (0.25 mm), for the nominal thrust clearance.
Machine the upper thrust washer to the thickness determined above, removing material from the
back surface of the washer only. Maintain this surface flat and parallel to the thrust face of the
washer.
Install the upper thrust washer using two #10-32 threads per in. flat-head screws, 3/8 in. (10 mm)
long. If the original washers were riveted in place, it will be necessary to drill and tap the pump
bracket cap for the screws with a #10-32 tap, 1/2 in. (13 mm) deep.

NOTE: Although not critical, the preferred orientation of the radial lubrication discharge groove is
toward the drive gear assembly.

Check that the screw heads do not protrude above the thrust face of the washer and stake the
screws in place. Dress off any raised metal from the staking with a fine file or flat stone.

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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

Assemble the driven gear, shaft, and pump bracket cap. Verify that the final thrust clearance is
within the acceptance criteria.

14.7 List of Figures


Figure

Description

14-1

Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly

14-1A

Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly, Thrust Washer Detail

14-2

Gear Assembly Backlash

14-3

Spiral Gear, Lower Thrust Washer Installation

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Figure 14-1
Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly

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Figure 14-1A
Spiral Gear, Governor Drive Assembly, Thrust Washer Detail

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Figure 14-2
Gear Assembly Backlash

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Turbine Governor and Oil Pump Drive Gear Assembly

Figure 14-3
Spiral Gear, Lower Thrust Washer Installation

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15

TURBINE CASING
The turbine casing is the main pressure-containing component of the turbine. It contains two
separate pressure areas, the steam ring, and the exhaust case. The steam ring area is subject to
inlet steam pressure and serves to distribute the steam to the steam jets. The exhaust case area is
subjected to exhaust pressure only.

15.1 Description
The pressure-retaining casings for all RCIC turbines are split across the horizontal joint, defining
an upper-half turbine casing and a lower-half turbine casing. The flanged faces are accurately
ground for jointing. The turbine casing halves are located with tapered dowel pins, and are
secured with studs and nuts.
RCIC turbines have the steam ring as an integral part of the case castings.
All RCIC turbines are GS models, either GS-1, with lower-half steam admission only, or GS-2,
with both lower-half and upper-half steam admission.
The lower-half turbine casing is identical for both the GS-1 and GS-2 model turbines. Steam
admission is through a single governor valve, which is flange-mounted to the lower-half turbine
casing. Steam enters a self-contained steam ring, which simultaneously feeds a maximum of five
steam jet bodies. The turbine exhaust connection is also located in the lower-half turbine casing.
With this arrangement, turbine disassembly can be accomplished without disturbing either the
turbine steam inlet or the turbine exhaust piping.
The upper-half turbine casing for the GS-1 model turbine is a simple turbine exhaust casing. The
upper-half turbine casing for the GS-2 model turbine (a higher horsepower capacity turbine)
includes a self-contained steam ring, which simultaneously feeds a maximum of five additional
steam jet bodies. The upper-half steam ring is connected to the lower-half steam ring by a single
externally flange-mounted bypass body.
The upper-half/lower-half turbine casing assembly contains the turbine exhaust steam. The steam
rings do not interface with the turbine casing horizontal joint. The turbine casing horizontal joint
is, therefore, subjected to exhaust pressure and temperature conditions only.
The turbine shaft seal gland cases, also split across the horizontal joint, are located between the
upper- and lower-half turbine casings.

15-1

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Turbine Casing

15.2 Disassembly
NOTE: Any time that the upper-half turbine casing is removed, it is likely that the gland case seal of the
lower-half turbine casing will be disturbed. It is necessary to proceed with turbine rotor and gland case
removal to clean and reseal the gland case. Refer to Section 12 for this required activity.

Remove the turbine trip and throttle (T & T) valve high-pressure valve stem leakoff piping to the
upper-half turbine exhaust casing.
Remove the flange stud nuts and the turbine bypass body (GS-2 models only).
Remove the dowel pins and nuts at the turbine casing horizontal joint.

NOTE: Prior to nut removal, inspect the casing stud/nut assembly for full nut thread engagement.
Identify any problem areas for correction during reassembly.

NOTE: It might be necessary to partially lift the upper-half turbine casing to obtain the required
clearance for nut removal.

Rig the upper-half turbine casing for a square and level vertical lift by way of the eye bolt
located on the top centerline of the casing.
With a light lifting load on the rigging, and using a lead hammer, sharply tap around the turbine
casing flange to separate the horizontal joint. The lifting load can be increased after each pass
around the turbine casing flange.
With the horizontal joint separated, partially lift the upper-half turbine casing to remove any
captured stud nuts. Lift the upper-half turbine casing clear of the turbine rotor and locate it on
wood blocks, taking care to prevent damage to the horizontal joint flange face.

15.3 Cleaning and Inspection


Visually inspect the horizontal joint for indications of leakage or leak paths.
Thoroughly clean the upper-half and lower-half turbine casing flange faces and the stud holes in
the upper-half case with an approved solvent.

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Turbine Casing

NOTE: To facilitate proper cleaning, it is recommended that the studs be removed from the lower-half
turbine casing. Map the location and height of the studs prior to their removal.

Thoroughly clean the threads on all studs and visually inspect them for worn threads,
deformation, cracks, or other damage. Dress the threads as required. Verify that the nuts turn
freely on the studs.
Bottom-tap all threaded holes.
Examine flange faces for steam leak erosion, scratches, dings, and upset metal. If necessary,
surfaces can be smoothed with a hand-held flat stone. Extreme care must be taken to avoid
rounding off the required sharp edges, especially in the areas of the gland case interface.
Examine the casing internals for loose parts, corrosion, erosion, and other abnormal wear
patterns.
Demonstrate the operability of the turbine casing drain system by putting water in the lower-half
turbine casing and verifying that it exits via the casing low-point drain.

15.4 Reassembly
Reinstall the studs in the lower-half turbine casing flange. Use care to properly set their depth so
that there will be approximately one full thread showing above the nut when it is reassembled.
Verify the proper internal cleanliness of the turbine casings.
Final cleaning of the turbine casing flanges and the gland case housings should be with alcohol
or acetone, in order to remove cleaning solvent residues.

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Turbine Casing

NOTE: The recommended jointing compound is Industrial Gasket and Shim Companys Turbo Repair
Kit, Part Number ZZ3373X125KIT (or ZZ3373X062KIT). The kit consists of Turbo 50, a liquid resin, and
Temp-Tite II, a high-solid, 1/8 in. (3 mm) diameter (or 1/16 in. (2 mm) diameter) sealant string. The
complete part number is critical to ensure that the repair kit is obtained, rather than a container of resin
or a container of Temp-Tite II string.
The kit is identified with a limited shelf life of six months. However, sealing results are significantly
improved if the kit is less than one-month old. Industrial Gasket and Shim Company is noted for
immediate delivery of this product upon request.
Curing agents (X1 Catalyst and 718 Catalyst) are available; however, industry experience has proven
that the use of a catalyst is not required or recommended. Under no circumstances should the 718
Catalyst be used because the curing process starts immediately at room temperature.
Once the jointing compound has been applied to the sealing surface, the assembly process should be
completed within a 10-hour period.

CAUTION!! The Material Safety Data Sheet for Turbo 50 identifies the potential for skin irritation with
the use of this product. Personnel who react to poison ivy should avoid contact with Turbo 50.

Reference Figure 15-1


Spread a thin film of the liquid resin evenly over the lower-half turbine casing flange sealing
surface, and over the upper half gland case sealing rib. Place a 1/16 in. (2 mm) diameter TempTite string at the joint between the gland case and the turbine casing, typical two locations for
each gland case. Lay a 1/16 in. (2 mm) diameter Temp-Tite II string across the upper half gland
case, and lay a single pass of Temp-Tite II string, either 1/16 or 1/8 in. (2 or 3 mm) diameter
around the inside of the bolt circle of the turbine casing flange.
Rig the upper-half turbine casing in a square and level position by way of the eye bolt located on
the top centerline of the casing.
Lower the upper-half turbine casing into position on the lower-half turbine casing, using care not
to foul the studs. With the flange joints separated by approximately 1 in. (25 mm), install the
joint dowel pins to ensure proper casing alignment prior to casing flange contact. With proper
alignment verified, complete the lowering of the upper-half turbine casing and seat the dowel
pins.

CAUTION!! If clearance difficulty was encountered with nut removal during disassembly, these nuts
must be reinstalled during lowering of the upper-half turbine casing.

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Turbine Casing

Coat the studs with an approved anti-seize lubricant and install all nuts hand-tight. Verify full nut
thread engagement.
Tighten the casing joint nuts. The following tightening sequence is critical for obtaining a steamtight joint:
Initially tighten the two nuts on each side of the gland case at each end of the turbine
casing. Continue to tighten the rest of the nuts alternately, working outward and finishing
at the sides of the turbine casing. Tighten the nuts in three passes, achieving the required
full torque value at the third pass. Repeat the sequence at the final torque until no further
nut movement is noted. It is recommended that the final torque sequence be repeated
after approximately 24 hours, to verify that no further nut movement is noted.
Reinstall the turbine bypass body (GS-2 models only) using new flexitallic gaskets. Coat the
studs with an approved anti-seize lubricant and install all nuts hand-tight. Torque the flange nuts
evenly in a diagonal pattern.
Reinstall the turbine T & T valve high-pressure valve stem leakoff piping to the upper-half
turbine exhaust casing, where applicable.
NOTE: When insulating the turbine casing, verify that the insulation material stops at the turbine gland
cases. If insulation material encloses the gland cases with the bearing pedestal caps, there is a high
probability that steam and water will enter the turbine oil system.

15.5 List of Figures


Figure

Description

15-1

Turbine Casing Horizontal Joint Seal Preparation

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Turbine Casing

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Figure 15-1
Turbine Casing Horizontal Joint Seal Preparation

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16

TURBINE ROTOR, SHAFT/WHEEL ASSEMBLY


The turbine rotor consists of the rotating components of the turbine assembly, including the
shaft, wheel, oil deflectors, thrust bearing components, overspeed trip components, and governor
drive gear.

16.1 Description
The turbine shaft for the RCIC turbine is a one-piece steel forging, accurately machined, with
ground journal bearing areas and chrome-plated steam seal areas.
Both the GS-1 and GS-2 model turbines use a single 24 in. (610 mm) diameter solid forged steel
Terry wheel, which is single-keyed and shrunk-fit onto the turbine shaft. The wheel is positioned
on the turbine shaft with two wheel nuts (one on each side of the wheel), which are securely
locked in place with a setscrew.
In addition to the turbine wheel, the coupling end of the turbine shaft has two oil deflectors
(located inboard and outboard of the journal bearing area) and a speed-sensing gear (located
between the journal bearing area and the inboard oil deflector). The governor end of the turbine
shaft has an oil deflector located inboard of the journal bearing area. Outboard of the governor
end journal bearing area, the turbine shaft has the thrust bearing assembly, the overspeed trip
shaft-mounted components, and the governor drive gear. Original turbines used a disc-mounted
overspeed trip assembly, whereas later turbines use a pin-type overspeed trip assembly.
The axial position of the turbine rotor assembly within the turbine casing (that is, the wheel lap)
is controlled by the relative location of the thrust bearing, which is axially positioned on the
turbine shaft by the thickness of the thrust bearing spacer or the thrust collar thickness.
The turbine rotor assembly is statically and dynamically balanced.

16.2 Disassembly
Match-mark the hubs and spacer of the main coupling between the turbine and the driven pump.
Remove the coupling spacer.

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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

CAUTION!! The coupling spacer bolts are part of a balanced coupling assembly. Mark accordingly for
proper orientation during reassembly.

Refer to the appropriate sections and perform the following:

Remove the upper-half turbine casing (Section 15.2).

Remove the carbon seals (Section 12.2).

Measure and record thrust clearance (Section 10.2).

Measure and record wheel lap (Reference Figure 16-1).

Remove the bearing pedestal caps (Section 9.2).

Remove the pump bracket cap with the EG-R hydraulic actuator (Section 14.2).

Remove the upper-half journal bearings (Section 9.2).

Arrange lifting slings on the turbine rotor so that the lift will be straight, with the rotor balanced
and the turbine shaft horizontal.

CAUTION!! The rotor lift must be horizontal. Any angle can result in cracking the shell of the governor
end journal bearing due to the tight fit of the thrust bearing assembly.

While manually steadying the turbine rotor, slowly lift it clear of the lower-half turbine casing
and place it on firm supports.

NOTE: The following steps are required only if inspection results dictate the necessity for component
removal.

Loosen its locking setscrew and remove the spiral gear locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the
turbine shaft.
Match-mark its orientation and remove the spiral drive gear with its key, and the gear spacer.
Measure and record the as-found turbine shaft runout in the gear spacer area.
If the disc-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, loosen its locking setscrew and remove the
disc assembly as a unit with its key.

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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

If the pin-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, loosen the adjusting screws locking setscrew.
Remove the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw), the trip weight, and the trip weight spring.
Match-mark its orientation and remove the overspeed trip disc with its key.
Refer to Section 10.2 and remove the thrust bearing.

16.3 Cleaning and Inspection


Using an approved solvent, clean the turbine shaft and wheel. Pay particular attention to the
turbine shaft journal areas and the chrome-plated carbon ring contact areas.
Examine the turbine shaft for pitting, scoring, peeling, and discoloration due to overheating.
Minor imperfections can be polished and blended with fine crocus cloth or Scotch-Brite.
Examine the chrome-plated shaft seal areas for any scoring, pitting, lifting, or peeling of the
chrome plating. Minor imperfections can be blended and polished with crocus cloth. Major
imperfections, particularly any lifting or peeling of the chrome, are cause for reworking or
replacing the shaft.
Examine the turbine wheel for corrosion, erosion, cracked partitions, and foreign object damage.
If the partition lips are eroded more than 1/4 in. (6 mm), the turbine wheel should be replaced.
Verify that the wheel nuts are firmly locked and that the wheel is tight on the turbine shaft.
If the as-found turbine shaft endplay is unacceptable, refer to the thrust bearing section
(Section 10) for thrust bearing removal, inspection, and replacement.
Reference Figure 16-1
If the as-found wheel lap is unacceptable, it will be necessary to adjust the thrust bearing spacer.
Refer to the thrust bearing section (Section 10) for the method used to adjust rotor position.
Verify acceptable shaft diameters at the bearing journals and the gland journals.
Place the turbine rotor assembly on V-blocks located at the turbine shaft journals. It is
recommended that the V-blocks be put on steel plates, which are placed on the turbine bearing
pedestals.
Reference Figure 16-2
Verify acceptable turbine shaft runout at the following locations:

Adjacent to the main coupling

Coupling end bearing journal

Coupling end gland journal

Wheel rim, axial


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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

Governor end gland journal

Governor end bearing journal

Adjacent to the governor drive gear

NOTE: Rotor runout can only be checked in V-blocks. Shaft centers or journal bearings do not yield
acceptable accuracy.

16.4 Shaft/Wheel Replacement


The turbine shaft is an interference fit in the turbine wheel and is secured in position with a key
and wheel nut(s). Removal of the existing shaft and installation of a new shaft will require
heating the wheel to expand the wheel bore sufficiently to remove this interference. Separation
of the shaft from the wheel is not required or recommended unless replacement of the shaft or
wheel is necessary.
16.4.1 Disassembly
Remove the governor drive gear, overspeed trip disc, ball thrust bearing, and thrust bearing
spacer from the turbine shaft.
Measure and record the locations of all remaining shaft-mounted components, using the shaft
coupling end as a baseline. A rotor sketch is useful for recording these dimensions. Particular
care must be used in measuring wheel position.
Remove the remaining shaft-mounted components including the wheel nuts.
Compare the existing shaft to the replacement shaft to ensure that the replacement shaft is
correct. Pay particular attention to the axial position of the locating shoulders for the thrust
bearing.
Hang the rotor vertically from the coupling end so that it can be rotated while the wheel is
heated. Arrange wooden blocks below the wheel to catch it when it comes loose from the shaft.
While slowly rotating the rotor, apply heat from two or three rose bud-type torches to the wheel.
Concentrate on the hub and rim areas, and heat quickly but uniformly. The objective is to heat
the wheel sufficiently hotter than the shaft to overcome the wheel shrink. Do not exceed a metal
temperature of 600F (315C). If the wheel does not come free and fall off the shaft from its own
weight, hitting it with soft-face hammers might help.
If the wheel starts to move and then hangs up, check that it is not cocked on the shaft. If not, the
shaft might have heated up and it will be necessary to allow the assembly to cool and try again.
Allow the wheel to cool to room temperature.
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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

16.4.2 Cleaning and Inspection


Clean the wheel bore, removing any burrs or raised metal. Measure the bore diameter in several
locations. Record these dimensions.
Measure the wheel fit area of the new shaft and compare to the wheel bore measurements. The
shaft should be larger than the wheel bore by an amount equal to the required shaft/wheel
interference.
16.4.3 Reassembly
Fit the wheel key to the shaft and to the wheel. The key should be snug in the shaft, and a slip fit
through the wheel keyway. Measure over the key and across the keyway in the wheel bore. Fit
the key to give 0.005 to 0.010 in. (0.13 to 0.25 mm) clearance over the key when installed in the
wheel.
Using the dimensions recorded prior to wheel removal, position the coupling end wheel nut on
the shaft so that the wheel position will match the original dimension from the shaft end.
Install the wheel key in the shaft and hang the shaft from the coupling end, directly above the
wheel bore.
Set two snap gauges to a dimension 0.003 to 0.004 in. (0.08 to 0.10 mm) larger than the
measured shaft diameter.
Heat the wheel uniformly until the preset snap gauges will fit the expanded wheel bore. Alternate
use of the two snap gauges to keep the gauges at room temperature. Do not exceed a metal
temperature of 600F (315C).
Lower the shaft into the expanded wheel until it seats against the pre-positioned wheel nut.
Allow the assembly to cool to room temperature. If the shaft hangs up on the way into the wheel,
it might help to use a soft-faced hammer on the shaft end. If it hangs up solidly, the shaft will
have to be removed, inspected, and the assembly process repeated.
Inspect the cooled assembly for proper wheel location. Install the second wheel nut; tighten both
wheel nuts snug-tight and lock in place with the setscrews.
Reference Figure 16-2
Place the turbine rotor assembly on V-blocks located at the bearing journals and verify
acceptable turbine shaft runout at the following locations:

Adjacent to the main coupling

Coupling end bearing journal

Coupling end gland journal


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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

Wheel rim, axial

Governor end gland journal

Governor end bearing journal

Adjacent to the governor drive gear

NOTE: Rotor runout can only be checked in V-blocks. Shaft centers or journal bearings do not yield
acceptable accuracy.

Fill all unused shaft keyways with fitted half-keys and tape in place.
Balance the shaft/wheel assembly. Balance corrections are made by grinding on the underside of
the wheel rim to a maximum depth of 0.060 in. (1.5 mm).
Assemble the remaining shaft-mounted components (except the main coupling half) on the shaft,
using the recorded dimensions to locate them.
Recheck the rotor balance. If further corrections are needed, they should only be made on the
newly installed components. (This is normally the overspeed trip disc.)
Install the pump half-coupling.
Install the turbine rotor in the turbine case and check the wheel lap. Adjust the wheel lap and
thrust clearance as necessary, in accordance with Figure 16-1 and Section 10.4.
Inspect the rotor assembly for proper clearance (both axial and radial) of oil seals and dust
collars. Adjust as necessary by moving any components that have improper clearance. Tighten
and stake all setscrews.

16.5 Reassembly
Refer to Section 10.4 and assemble the thrust bearing.
If the pin-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, install the mechanical overspeed trip disc
(noting its proper orientation) with its key. Reinstall the trip weight spring, the trip weight, and
the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw). Fully extend the trip weight and then turn the
weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw) exactly two turns counterclockwise.
If the disc-type mechanical overspeed trip is used, install the disc assembly as a unit with its key,
and tighten its locking setscrew.

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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

CAUTION!! The mechanical overspeed trip assembly will require trip setpoint verification.

Measure and record the turbine shaft runout in the gear spacer area. Compare with the as-found
measurement recorded during disassembly and verify that runout is within acceptance criteria.
Install the gear spacer and the spiral drive gear with its key, noting its proper orientation.
Install the spiral gear locknut. Use care to avoid distorting the turbine shaft when tightening the
locknut. Torque the locknut to 150 ft-lb (200 N-m). Tighten its locking setscrew and stake it in
place.
Using lint-free rags and an approved solvent, thoroughly clean the turbine bearing pedestal (with
its self-contained oil sump) and the bearing pedestal cap. Verify that all joint faces are clean and
free of any upset metal.
Verify that the oil flow paths into the turbine bearing pedestal are free from obstruction and
foreign material.
Install the lower-half journal bearings in the bearing pedestals and apply a thin film of oil.
Arrange lifting slings on the turbine rotor so that the lift will be straight, with the rotor balanced
and the turbine shaft horizontal.
While manually steadying the turbine rotor, slowly lower it into the lower-half turbine casing.
While lowering, verify that the journal bearing oil rings are properly oriented.
Refer to the appropriate sections and perform the following:

Install the upper-half journal bearings (Section 9.4).

Install the pump bracket cap, with the EG-R hydraulic actuator (Section 14.4).

Install the bearing pedestal caps (Section 9.4).

Verify acceptable wheel lap and record (Reference Figure 16-1).

Verify acceptable thrust clearance and record (Section 10.4).

Install the carbon seals (Section 12.4).

Install the upper-half turbine casing (Section 15.4).

Following the match-marks identified during disassembly, reinstall the main coupling spacer
between the turbine and the driven pump.

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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

16.6 List of Figures


Figure

Description

16-1

Wheel Lap

16-2

Turbine Rotor Runout Inspection

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Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly

Figure 16-1
Wheel Lap

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Figure 16-2
Turbine Rotor Runout Inspection

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17

TURBINE STEAM JET ASSEMBLIES


Each turbine is fitted with several steam jet assemblies. The number of assemblies installed is
determined by the individual requirements of each application. RCIC turbines have one steam jet
in each jet body.
The steam jet assemblies serve to expand the steam and direct the resulting high-velocity steam
jet to the wheel, thus converting the heat energy of the steam into rotation of the turbine shaft.

17.1 Description
The steam jet assembly consists of two basic components, the jet body and the jet. The jet body
serves as a mounting location for the jet and as a conduit for the high-pressure steam to the jet.
The jet (or nozzle) provides the expanding profile to decrease the steam from the initial highpressure to exhaust pressure, and it directs the high-velocity steam into the turbine wheel.
Individual steam jet assemblies are identified by location in the turbine case. The locations are
numbered in a clockwise direction when viewed from the governor end of the turbine. Number
one is the first jet below the horizontal joint on the right-hand side.
The jet is threaded into the jet body and sealed at the time of manufacture. The outlet of the jet is
then formed into a square or rectangular shape to match the slot in the reversing chamber. This
manufacturing sequence results in an assembly that cannot be serviced as individual components.
The square outlet will not line up properly if the jet is removed from the jet body after squaring.
All RCIC turbines use a jet body holder to secure the jet body assembly to the steam ring. The jet
body holder is a hollow, threaded nipple inserted through the steam ring wall and screwed into
the jet body assembly. A spiral-wound or corrugated steel gasket is used to seal the joint.

17.2 Disassembly
Removal of the steam jet assemblies from the turbine case is NOT recommended unless
significant, non-repairable damage to the steam jet has occurred and replacement is required. All
necessary inspections can be performed with the steam jet assemblies installed in the turbine
case.

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Turbine Steam Jet Assemblies

17.3 Inspection
Visually inspect the steam jet outlets for mechanical damage, corrosion, and erosion. Minor
dings or dents on the outlet can be carefully straightened and smoothed. Corrosion and erosion
are not normally a major concern in this application.
Visually verify that all jets are open and not plugged with any foreign material.
Visually inspect accessible areas for indications of steam leakage between the steam ring wall
and the jet body. Any significant leakage will require replacement.

17.4 Replacement
Refer to the appropriate sections and perform the following:

Remove the upper-half turbine case (Section 15.2).

Remove the turbine rotor if replacing the lower-half steam jets (Section 16.2).

Remove the reversing chambers associated with the steam jet assemblies that are to be
replaced (Section 18.2).

The steam jet assemblies are held in the case by jet body holders inserted through the steam ring
wall and screwed into the steam jet body. Access to the jet body holders through the outer wall
of the steam ring is obtained by removing the steam ring plugs, the governor valve body, the
bypass elbow, or the blank flanges (as defined in the following chart).
GS-1
Location
1
2
3
4
5

Access
Bypass elbow blank flange
Steam ring plug
Steam ring plug
Steam ring plug
Governor valve

Location
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Access
Bypass elbow
Steam ring plug
Steam ring plug
Steam ring plug
Governor valve
Steam ring plug
Blank flange
Steam ring plug
Steam ring plug
Bypass elbow

GS-2

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Remove the steam ring plug, the governor valve, the bypass elbow, or the blank flange as
required. The steam ring plugs are screwed into the steam ring with a straight thread and sealed
with a corrugated steel gasket. They are frequently difficult to remove after the turbine has been
in service and often must be machined out to avoid damage to the steam ring threads.
Insert a length of 1 in. hex stock through the steam ring and into the inside of the jet body holder.
Using the hex stock, unscrew the jet body holder from the jet body. The jet body can be held
with a pipe wrench to prevent it from turning.
Remove the jet body holder, jet body, and gasket from the turbine case.
Install the new jet body, gasket, and jet body holder and tighten them finger-tight. Install the
reversing chamber.
Rotate the steam jet body assembly until the steam jet outlet fits into the slot in the reversing
chamber. Holding the steam jet body in this position, tighten the jet body holder.
Using a new gasket, replace the steam ring plug, the valve body, the bypass elbow, or the blank
flange.
Refer to the appropriate sections and perform the following:

Install the turbine rotor if removed (Section 16.5).

Install the upper-half turbine case (Section 15.4).

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18

TURBINE REVERSING CHAMBERS


As the name implies, the reversing chambers (located at each steam jet) reverse the steam flow
exiting the turbine wheel and return it to the wheel in an attempt to extract as much energy as
possible from the steam flow. The effectiveness of the reversing chambers is minimal at high
turbine rotor speeds, but there is a significant impact on increasing turbine horsepower at speeds
below 2500 rpm.

18.1 Description
The number of reversing chambers matches the number of steam jets used up to a maximum of
ten, five each in the upper-half and lower-half turbine casings, respectively. The number of
steam jets/reversing chambers is determined by the horsepower requirement for the turbine. For
example, the GS-1 model turbine has a maximum capacity of five steam jets/reversing chambers
located in the lower-half turbine casing. The GS-2 model turbine has a maximum capacity of
tenfive each in the upper-half and lower-half turbine casing, respectively. The reversing
chambers are rigidly bolted to machined rings, internal to the upper-half and lower-half turbine
casings. On later turbine designs, the governor end reversing chamber support is a separate split
ring, bolted to the upper-half and lower-half casings, respectively. The reversing chamber screws
are secured in the reversing chambers by staking.

18.2 Disassembly
Reversing chamber disassembly/removal is only required if visual inspection reveals damage, or
if the improbable necessity of replacing the steam jets exists.
To access the reversing chambers, refer to sections 15.2 and 16.2 and remove the upper-half
turbine casing and the turbine rotor.
Remove the reversing chamber cap screws and remove the reversing chamber(s).

18.3 Inspection
Visually inspect the reversing chamber assemblies for missing or broken cap screws.
Visually inspect the reversing chambers for cracked or missing partitions and for evidence of
turbine wheel rubs, erosion, pitting, scale deposits, and foreign object damage.
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18.4 Reassembly
Replace damaged or missing parts.

CAUTION!! If new reversing chambers are installed, verify that their mounting flange thickness is equal
to or less than that of the original reversing chambers. Thicker mounting flanges will result in
interference with the turbine wheel.

If reversing chamber replacement is required, use new cap screws during reassembly.
Clean the female threads and coat the cap screw threads with an approved anti-seize lubricant.
Place the reversing chamber into position. Install and hand-tighten the lubricated cap screws.
Torque the cap screws to between 50 to 60 in-lbs (560 to 680 N-cm) and stake the cap screw
heads in place.
Refer to sections 16.5 and 15.4 and reinstall the turbine rotor and the upper-half turbine casing.

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19

TURBINE BEARING PEDESTALS


The bearing pedestal assemblies serve to:

Support the turbine casing

Locate and support the journal bearings

Locate and support the thrust bearing

Contain the lubricating oil,

Collect foreign material and water at their low point

Additionally, the overspeed trip mechanism is located on the governor end pedestal cap, and the
pump bracket housing containing the governor drive mechanism is mounted on the front of the
governor end pedestal.

19.1 Description
The RCIC turbines use separate, bolted-on pedestals. The pedestals are located by means of a
spigot fit and are then bolted and doweled to the turbine casing. The spigot absorbs lateral and
vertical downward loads on the turbine case. The bolts and dowels absorb rotational and vertical
upward loads on the turbine case.
Each bearing pedestal assembly consists of a bearing pedestal and pedestal cap. The pedestal cap
is secured to the pedestal with bolts and is located with dowel pins or roll pins. The pedestal and
cap are machined as an assembly and cannot be replaced individually.
The coupling end bearing pedestal is doweled and rigidly bolted to the turbine baseplate.
The governor end bearing pedestal is a sliding foot interface with the turbine baseplate, thus
allowing for thermal expansion. Following are specifics related to the governor end bearing
pedestal:

The pedestal foot, the baseplate, and any alignment shims are coated with Molycote 360X
lubricant. This is permanent lubrication. No maintenance activity is required unless extreme
environmental conditions were encountered or the pedestal was flooded.

Two guide blocks (welded to the turbine baseplate) control movement in the horizontal
direction, perpendicular to the turbine shaft. The turbine assembly is initially centered on its
baseplate, with equal clearance of 0.008 to 0.012 in. (0.20 to 0.30 mm) between the pedestal

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foot and each guide block. Later turbine assemblies use an adjustable rocker guide block
design where the clearance definition is reduced to 0.008 to 0.010 in. (0.20 to 0.25 mm).

Movement in the vertical direction is controlled by shoulder bolt and washer assemblies,
providing a vertical clearance of 0.008 to 0.015 in. (0.20 to 0.38 mm).

Excessive steam inlet and exhaust line piping loads can distort the governor end pedestal-tobaseplate interface, resulting in potential turbine misalignment and vibration.

In addition to the support and locating functions, the pedestals serve as part of the lubricating oil
sump.
The bearing pedestal cap inspection plugs are vented to minimize the potential for pressure
build-up in the bearing pedestal area.
The internal surfaces of the pedestals are painted with Rust-Ban paint to seal the casting surfaces.
This paint is compatible with all normal turbine oils.

19.2 Inspection
Visually inspect the pedestal surfaces for evidence of distortion and stress cracks.
The bearing pedestals should be drained and the internal surfaces should be cleaned and
inspected during each refueling cycle (that is, approximately every 18 months to 2 years).
Remove any damaged, preservative paint coating. Do not attempt to repaint the surfaces of
the pedestals.
Verify that the governor end sliding foot pedestal-to-baseplate interface is clean and free of paint
and foreign material.
Verify that clearance is available at the guide blocks (horizontal movement) and at the shoulder
bolt/washer assemblies (vertical movement). It is acceptable for the turbine to shift horizontally,
as long as it is not forced up against a guide block, and as long as proper alignment is
maintained.

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20

TURBINE OIL SYSTEM

20.1 General Description


The turbine oil system provides for the lubrication and cooling of the equipment bearings and
other accessories, and it provides control oil and hydraulic oil to the turbine governor system.
The turbines are designed to operate with any brand of high-quality turbine oil. The
recommended oil viscosity is 150 SSU at 100F (38C) for forced-feed lubrication systems.
Minimum oil temperature for operation is 60F (16C). During normal surveillance testing,
maximum operating oil temperature should not exceed 140F (60C), supply to the bearings, or
160F (72C), drain from the bearings. A bearing drain temperature of 180F (82C) is
anticipated for maximum design basis conditions.

CAUTION!! Motor oils are not acceptable for use with steam turbines. Likewise, unless originally
specified, synthetic oils are not recommended for the turbine lubrication system.

Due to the adverse operating conditions and the infrequent use of RCIC turbines, it was
originally recommended that oils containing vapor-phase rust and corrosion inhibitors be used.
Typically recommended were Mobils Vaportec Light and Shells VSI 32, both of which also
contain oxidation and foam inhibitors.
Operating experience at several sites has implicated vapor-phase oil in operational problems
related to sludge and varnish buildup during standby conditions. As a result of this experience,
most sites have changed to standard turbine oil, with acceptable results.
To ensure reliable operation of the turbine and its control accessories, the following conservative
oil acceptance criteria have been established. These values are based on review efforts performed
by the TTUG, as documented on the TTUG Web page.

Moisture content shall be less than 0.5%.

Acidity, as measured by the Neutralization Number Test (ASTM D974), shall be equal to or
less than 0.5 mgKOH/g.

The viscosity change from the baseline shall be less than 10%.

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Particle count shall be within the following tolerance (SAE 5 or ISO 17/14):
Particle Size (Microns)

Allowable Parts/100 ml

5 to 10

87,000

10 to 25

21,400

25 to 50

3,130

50 to 100

430

Over 100

41

It is recommended that oil moisture content be verified on a monthly basis and that acidity,
viscosity, and particle count be verified each quarter, until a data trending program can justify
extending the inspection frequency.
Oil should be refurbished or changed if the acceptance criteria cannot be satisfied. Oil should
also be changed if its appearance is different than when it was new, or if it picks up an unusual
odor.

IMPORTANT: Prior to filling or replenishing the turbine oil system, the moisture content, acidity, and
viscosity of the new oil should be verified to ensure that it satisfies the noted acceptance criteria.
Particle count should satisfy the acceptance criteria of SAE 3 or ISO 15/12, and the new oil should be
passed through a filter press or nominal 5 micron filter.

20.2 Ring Lubrication and Pressure Circulation System


Reference Figure 20-1
All RCIC turbines use ring lubrication and pressure circulation. The ring lubrication system is a
backup to the pressure circulation system. It provides lubrication to the journal bearings during
turbine coastdown in the unlikely event of a circulation system malfunction.
20.2.1 Oil Retention
Turbine oil is retained in the turbine bearing pedestals and the equalizer pipe header.
The bearing pedestals drain to, and are interconnected with, the equalizer pipe header (which is
located at the low point of the turbine oil system). The coupling end of the equalizer header is
provided with a plug to facilitate draining and cleaning.

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Reference Figure 20-2


Oil level within the bearing pedestals is extremely critical. The inside diameter of the oil ring
should be submerged in oil a minimum of 1/4 in. (6 mm) and a maximum of 5/8 in. (16 mm).
Deviation from these oil level limits will directly affect the lubrication capability of the oil ring
system. During turbine operation, there is a tendency for oil to transfer from the coupling end
bearing pedestal to the governor end bearing pedestal. Excessive oil level has the potential for
coming in contact with the rotating overspeed trip assembly disc, aerating the oil, and ultimately
choking the oil drain line. This can result in discharging oil from the bearing pedestal seals.
Proper oil level can be verified or established by following these sequential steps:
1. Remove the coupling end bearing cap.
2. Raise the oil ring 1/4 in. (6 mm) by placing a 1/4 in. (6 mm) round-stock between the oil ring
and the top of the turbine shaft.
3. Adjust the bearing pedestal oil level so that it is just touching the bottom inside diameter of
the oil ring. It will take a few minutes to equalize the oil level between the coupling end and
the governor end bearing pedestals. This is the low oil level.
4. Mark or verify the mark on the oil level indicating gauge.
5. Temporarily raise the oil level an additional 3/8 in. (10 mm). Again, it will take a few
minutes to equalize the oil level between the coupling end and governor end bearing
pedestals. This is the high oil level.
6. Mark or verify the mark on the oil level indicating gauge.
7. With access through the inspection plug on the governor end bearing pedestal cap, verify a
minimum clearance of 1/8 in. (3 mm) between the high oil level and the bottom of the
overspeed trip assembly disc. If necessary, lower the high oil level definition.
8. Remove the 1/4 in. (6 mm) round-stock. Return the oil level to its minimum, and replace the
coupling end bearing cap.

NOTE: In an effort to minimize the potential for oil aeration problems, it is recommended that oil be
maintained at or slightly above the minimum level.

CAUTION!! Do not add oil to maintain gauge glass level with the turbine running. This can result in
overfilling the lubrication system and subsequent flooding.

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20.2.2 Oil Pump and Pressure Control System


A turbine shaft-driven oil pump, drawing its suction from the equalizer pipe header, provides
pressure oil to the lubrication system. A relief valve, discharging to the equalizer header,
maintains oil header pressure at 12 to 15 psig (80 to 105 kPa) with turbine speed at its maximum
rated condition.
20.2.3 Oil Header Components
The pump discharge flows through an oil filter and an oil cooler. It pressure-feeds the:

Coupling end journal bearing through a 3/32 in. (2.4 mm) line orifice

Governor end journal bearing and thrust bearing through a 1/16 in. (1.6 mm) line orifice

Woodward EG-R hydraulic actuator through a local startup oil sump

Hydraulic actuator drive shaft bushings through a 3/32 in. (2.4 mm) line orifice

Hydraulic actuator drive shaft gear assembly through an internal 1/16 in. (1.6 mm) orifice
located in the pump bracket cap. The oil supply is actually from the vent connection on the
hydraulic actuators startup oil sump.

NOTE: Depending upon the particular oil piping arrangement, line orifices might be orifice plates
located between a pair of pipe flanges, or they might be located within tube fittings.

The Woodward EG-R hydraulic actuator is connected to the Woodward remote servo via
stainless steel tubing (3/8 in. diameter, 0.049 in. maximum wall thickness). Interface connectors
are flareless bite-type fittings (for example, either Parker or Swagelok).
The oil pump discharge header also includes a pressure indicator and a pressure switch set to
alarm if the header pressure drops below a nominal 2 to 4 psig (15 to 30 kPa). On later turbine
assemblies, the oil pump discharge header includes a local temperature indicator and a
temperature switch located in the oil pump discharge downstream of the oil cooler. The
temperature switch is set to alarm at 160F (71C).
Most oil filter installations include local pressure gauges and a differential pressure switch for
monitoring pressure drop across the oil filter assembly. The switch is set to alarm at a nominal
5 to 7 psid (35 to 50 kPa), increasing differential pressure.
20.2.4 Oil Drain System
The bearing pedestals are interconnected with the equalizer pipe header via individual 1 1/2 in.
drain line pipes. Each drain line has a local temperature indicator and a temperature switch, set
to alarm at 180F (82C). On some earlier turbine arrangements, the drain lines were 1 in. pipe.
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20.2.5 Oil Drain System Flooding


There has been a historic problem with oil flooding in the turbines governor end bearing
pedestal during extended run periods of the RCIC system. These problems have been addressed
in NRC Information Notice 94-84 and were discussed during the TTUG meetings in 1995 and
1996.
The oil flooding problem is attributed to the accumulation of air bubbles in the governor end
drain line. It occurs with turbines using the disc-type overspeed trip design and 1 in. drain piping.
Potential factors contributing to the oil flooding problems and associated corrective actions
include:
Turbine Oil Level
It is essential that the correct oil level be maintained in the turbine bearing pedestals. As
identified in Section 20.2.1, after establishing the correct oil level, it is critical that the standby,
static oil level be maintained near the low-level definition.
Oil Aeration and Air In-Leakage
Oil aeration and air in-leakage are sources for air bubbles in the oil system. Oil aeration can be
caused by the oil spray to the EG-R hydraulic actuators drive gears, the oil header relief valve
discharge, the EG-R hydraulic actuators relief valve discharge, and possibly from deteriorated
performance of the shaft-driven oil pump. Major oil aeration (or foaming) will occur if the oil
level contacts the overspeed trip disc. Sources for air in-leakage include the suction tubing to the
shaft-driven oil pump, which runs under a slight vacuum, and the discharge of the oil header
relief valve when it is connected to the pump suction tubing. Air leaks must be repaired. On later
turbine assemblies, the oil header relief valve discharge is connected to the middle of the
equalizer pipe, eliminating it as a potential source of air in-leakage.
Disc-Type Overspeed Trip System
The oil flooding problem occurs with turbines using the disc-type overspeed trip design and
1 in. drain piping.
Journal bearing lubrication is the only oil source to the coupling end bearing pedestal. Oil
supplies to the governor end bearing pedestal include journal and thrust bearing lubrication, drive
shaft bushing lubrication, drive gear assembly spray lubrication, and discharge from the EG-R
hydraulic actuators relief valve. With this flow input imbalance, there is a normal and expected
tendency for the oil level to drop in the coupling end bearing pedestal and to rise in the governor
end bearing pedestal.
There is only a nominal 1/2 in. (13 mm) clearance between the correct low oil level definition
and the bottom of the overspeed trip disc. If the governor end bearing pedestal oil level increases

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and contacts the overspeed trip disc, oil aeration (or foaming) and ultimate choking of the drain
line occurs.
Later turbine designs use a pin-type overspeed trip system, which provides a significant increase
in oil level clearance. Retrofit conversion to the pin-type overspeed trip system is not considered
to be cost-effective.
Oil Drain Line Configuration and Size
The drain line from the coupling end bearing pedestal typically has a continuous slope to the
equalizer pipe, with no problems with proper oil draining.
The drain line from the governor end bearing pedestal typically has a short horizontal run (a
potential air trap) from the pedestal to clear the turbines governor valve, followed by a
continuous slope to the equalizer pipe.
Turbine assemblies were originally provided with 1 in. drain piping. With the onset of the oil
flooding problems, drain lines on later turbine assemblies were provided with 1 1/2 in. drain
pipes and oil flooding problems were eliminated.
A number of turbine assemblies have been successfully retrofitted in the field by increasing the
governor end bearing pedestal drain line to 1 1/2 in. pipe, thereby eliminating the oil flooding
problems. It is critical that this retrofit activity include boring the pedestal for 1 in. pipe.
A few turbine assemblies were unsuccessfully retrofitted to the 1 1/2 in. drain pipe, using a 1 by
1 1/2 in. concentric bushing. This bushing creates a built-in air trap.
Oil System Vents
Several installations have added vent lines to the bearing pedestal caps, the horizontal section of
the governor end bearing pedestal 1 in. drain line, and/or the 3 in. equalizer pipe, with declared
success.
Oil Header Pressure
A few installations have lowered the oil header pressure from 1215 psig (80105 kPa) to 810
psig (5570 kPa) in an effort to reduce total flow to the bearing pedestals, thereby reducing the
potential for oil foaming and flooding. Each of these installations also installed vent systems.
Equalizer Pipe Slope
The equalizer pipe is typically sloped down from the governor end bearing pedestal to the
coupling end bearing pedestal. This causes any trapped air to vent into the governor end bearing
pedestal, with the potential for choking the drain flow. Reversing the equalizer pipe slope vents
any trapped air into the lightly loaded coupling end bearing pedestal. If this retrofit activity is
pursued, it is recommended that the coupling end bearing pedestal drain line be increased to
1 1/2 in. pipe. A minor drawback to this modification is that the equalizer pipe will not fully
drain during maintenance cleaning activity.
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20.2.6 Inspection and Maintenance


The entire turbine oil system should be checked for leakage during normal system surveillance
testing and appropriate corrective actions should be taken as necessary.
The oil header pressure should be checked during normal system surveillance testing and
adjusted if necessary. This check must be made with the turbine operating near maximum rated
speed. If the header pressure is adjusted at low turbine speed, it will be excessive at rated speed.
The bearing pedestals and the equalizer pipe are designed as low-point collection areas for water
and foreign material. As such, they should be drained, cleaned, and inspected during each
refueling cycle (that is, approximately every 18 months to 2 years). If the removed oil is
acceptable for reuse, it can be returned to the oil system through a filter press or nominal
5 micron filter. If new oil is required, it must also be passed through a filter press or nominal
5 micron filter.
The oil filter elements should be replaced and their housings should be cleaned during each
refueling cycle (that is, approximately every 18 months to 2 years). The filter elements should be a

recommended nominal 25 micron, consistent with Woodward Product Specification 37733C for the EG-R
Actuator. Finer filtration could result in unwarranted delta-pressure alarms.
NOTE: Do not confuse the in-service 25 micron filter elements with the recommended 5 micron filter
elements (or filter press) recommended when adding new oil to the turbine reservoir.

The setpoints for the pressure switches in the lubrication system should be verified and adjusted
if necessary during each refueling cycle (that is, approximately every 18 months to 2 years).
The pressure gauges throughout the lubrication system should be calibrated during each refueling
cycle (that is, approximately every 18 months to 2 years).
The oil system orifices should be inspected for accumulation of foreign material and potential
blockage of flow during each major turbine inspection cycle (that is, approximately every 6 to 10
years). This should be done more frequently if there have been problems with high particulate or
foreign material in the oil.

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NOTE: For component and piping reassembly following inspection and maintenance, use a siteapproved sealant on the male threads only. Do not use Teflon tape! Allow time for the thread sealant to
cure prior to oil exposure.

CAUTION!! After the initial fill of the turbine oil system, or after refilling following maintenance
activity and/or oil flushing, the turbine should be started under manual control of the T & T valve. Run at
low speed (that is, 1500 to 2000 rpm) to prime the oil system piping and components. Manual rotation of
the turbine shaft will not prime the turbine oil system. Add oil as required, after turbine shutdown.

20.3 List of Figures


Figure

Description

20-1

Oil Piping Schematic

20-2

Turbine Bearing Housing Oil Level

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Figure 20-1
Oil Piping Schematic

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Figure 20-2
Turbine Bearing Housing Oil Level

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21

TURBINE CONTROL SYSTEM OVERVIEW


The turbine control system, receiving its speed demand signal from the RCIC systems flow
controller output, provides for the speed control of the turbine. The purpose of the turbine
governor control system is two-fold:

To provide rapid response on initial startup to limit turbine speed overshoot during the
system start transient

To maintain the turbine at the operating speed(s) necessary to provide the required system
design criteria (that is, a constant injection flow rate over a wide range of reactor pressures)

The thermodynamic design of the turbine is dictated by the power requirements of the pump
when operating at the minimum inlet steam pressure conditions, typically 100 to 150 psig (690 to
1035 kPa). Normal surveillance testing and most system challenges occur at normal operating
pressure, typically 1000 to 1200 psig (6900 to 8275 kPa). When operating at normal inlet
pressure, the turbine is capable of several times the rated horsepower. Because the pump absorbs
very little power until flow is established, the turbine/pump accelerates very rapidly and the
speed control system must be capable of controlling this transient.
The next three sections define the following aspects of the turbine control system:

Woodward EG-type governor

Woodward PG-type governor

Transient control improvement

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WOODWARD EG-TYPE GOVERNOR


All RCIC turbines use Woodward Governor Companys EG-type control system.

22.1 Description
Reference Figure 22-1
The EG-type control system consists of the following primary components:

Power supply

Ramp generator and signal converter (RGSC) module

Electric governor-magnetic pickup (EG-M) control box

Bias speed-setting potentiometer

Magnetic speed pickup

Electric governor-remote (EG-R) hydraulic actuator

Remote servo

22.1.1 Power Supply


The original power supply for the governor control system was provided by Woodward
Governor Company. The power supply is a simple voltage-dropping resistor assembly, mounted
on a heat sink. This resistor conditions the station DC battery voltage (typically a 125 volt
system, with a few 250 volt systems) to a 48 DC voltage supply to the EG-M control box.
Marginal 70 watt resistors were used, which incurred frequent failures due to station battery
voltage surges during power transients.
Over the years, a significant number of applications have changed to higher wattage resistors,
while others have converted to isolated AC/DC or DC/DC power supply systems. These options
have resulted in significant improvements in power supply reliability.

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22.1.2 RGSC Module


The RGSC module provides the turbine speed reference signal to the EG-M control box. As its
name implies, this module has two basic functions:

Ramp generator function for controlling turbine acceleration during the startup transient

Signal converter function for conditioning the output signal from the HPCI systems flow
controller during system operation

The RGSC module is powered by a 36 volt DC source from the EG-M control box.
It has three major circuits (listed below) that are integrated onto a single printed circuit board,
and four potentiometers for calibrating the functions of the circuits.

Ramp Generator: In the standby condition, with the ramp circuit open, the ramp generator
defines a low-speed (low-voltage) signal, which is adjustable by its idle potentiometer. With
system startup, the ramp circuit automatically closes (via an external switch), initiating a
linear ramp of increasing speed (increasing voltage) signal, which is adjustable by its ramp
slope potentiometer. The ramp rate adjustment controls both the turbines acceleration rate
and its time to rated speed. The maximum obtainable voltage output from the ramp generator
circuit is greater than the maximum voltage output from the signal converter circuit. If the
ramp circuit is opened, the ramp generator output immediately returns to the low-speed idle
signal.

Signal Converter: The output from the RCIC systems flow controller is the turbines speed
demand input signal to the signal converter. The signal converter has the capability to receive
a 4 to 20 milliamp, a 10 to 50 milliamp, or a 1 to 5 volt input signal and convert it to a
voltage signal that is linearly proportional to turbine speed demand. In the standby condition,
with the systems flow controller recognizing zero flow, the signal converter is at its
maximum voltage level and is adjustable by the converter gain potentiometer. During
startup, as system flow approaches its rated condition, the flow controller output will
decrease with a corresponding decrease in the signal converters output voltage. With
system-rated flow achieved, the flow controller output signal and the signal converters
output voltage will remain constant. The converter zero potentiometer is adjusted to obtain
zero voltage output when the signal converters input signal is at its minimum value.

Low-Signal Selector: This circuit continuously senses and selects the lowest (least positive)
voltage output from either the ramp generator or the signal converter. The selected output
signal is transmitted to the speed reference section of the EG-M control box. In the standby
condition, the output from the low-signal selector will be the idle voltage of the ramp
generator. With system startup, the low-signal selector will output the increasing voltage
signal from the ramp generator until its voltage level exceeds that of the signal converter. The
low-signal selector will then provide a bumpless transfer between the ramp generator circuit
and the signal converter circuit.

Woodward Governor Companys manual # 82359 provides more generic information regarding
the RGSC module.
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22.1.3 EG-M Control Box


The EG-M control box contains the primary electronic portion of Woodward Governor
Companys EG-type control system. This module is a proportional plus derivative controller,
with adjustable gain and stability settings, respectively, and is powered from an external 48 volt
DC source.
The EG-M control box uses three printed circuit boards with appropriate external components.

Converter Printed Circuit Board: This board receives the AC-voltage signal from the
magnetic pickup speed sensor through an external isolation transformer. In conjunction with
an external speed range capacitor, the board converts the AC-voltage signal into a usable
DC-voltage signal (proportional to turbine speed) at the speed section of the amplifier printed
circuit board. The isolation transformer ensures separation of the common speed-sensor
signal between the converter printed circuit board and the tachometer printed circuit board.
Special Note:
The converter printed circuit board also includes a rectified circuit for the 48 volt DC power
supply. Included in this circuit is a 110 micro-fared electrolytic filtering capacitor. In a recent
period of six years there have been three reported failures (June 1994, December 1995, and
August 2000) of similar electrolytic capacitors used on the Woodward 2301A Control
Module. The vendor concluded that these were end of life failures (life expectancy is 5 to 15
years, depending on storage and operating environments). There have been no reported
failures of the electrolytic capacitors used in the EG-M control box.
The potential failure modes for the electrolytic capacitor are two-fold:
Shorted Circuit: If the magnitude of the shorted condition is sufficient to drop input
power below 42 volts DC, then the control system will become inoperative.
Open Circuit: The filtering function of the capacitor would be lost, possibly affecting
the control systems stability.
Engine Systems, Incorporated (representing Woodward Governor Company) has defined the
following conservative corrective actions:

Replace the electrolytic capacitor and refurbish the EG-M control box every 5 to 7 years.

For control units in storage, reform the electrolytic capacitor every 18 to 24 months by
applying rated voltage to the input power terminals of the control unit for a minimum
period of 24 hours. (Note that installed units are continuously powered and reforming is
not required.)

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There has been some consideration given to eliminating the electrolytic capacitor from the
power supply circuit. This is especially a viable option for those installations using a stable,
isolated power supply. However, this is a design change that is not supported by Woodward
Governor Company.

Amplifier Printed Circuit Board: This board contains a speed section, a speed reference
section, an amplifier section, and a stability section. The output from the converter printed
circuit board provides the input voltage to the speed section. The output from the RGSC
module plus the external bias speed-setting potentiometer provides the input voltage to the
speed reference section. The speed reference section also has a high-trim potentiometer and a
low-trim potentiometer, both external to the printed circuit board, which define the operating
speed range for the turbine. During steady-state operation, the voltages at the speed section
and the speed reference section are equal and of opposite polarity, and there is no voltage
input to the amplifier section. If there is a transient condition, the voltages will differ at the
speed section and the speed reference section. This voltage difference is fed into the
amplifier section, which will provide an output voltage to the EG-R hydraulic actuator
proportional to the input voltage difference. Adjustment of the amplifier gain potentiometer,
external to the printed circuit board, will control the magnitude of this proportional voltage
signal. The maximum available voltage signal is +9 volts DC to -9 volts DC. The stability
section, with its external stability potentiometer, provides an adjustable feedback time delay
derivative. Note that the output of the amplifier section is also the input to the stability
section.

Tachometer Printed Circuit Board: As with the converter printed circuit board, this board
also receives the AC-voltage signal from the magnetic pickup speed sensor through an
external isolation transformer. In conjunction with an external speed range capacitor, the
board converts the AC-voltage signal into a milliamp signal (proportional to turbine speed),
which is used to drive a remote located speed indicator. The isolation transformer ensures
separation of the common speed-sensor signal between the converter printed circuit board
and the tachometer printed circuit board. Two external potentiometers are provided for the
calibration of the speed indicator.

The EG governing system must never be operated with an actuator voltage that is at zero volts.
If the electrical signal is lost, the actuator would not know the difference between a zero-voltage
control signal and a loss of control signal. The EG-M control box is therefore calibrated with an
offset, or null, voltage when the system is operating at a steady-state condition. For the RCIC
system, the null voltage is set at -0.75 to -1.00 volts DC. With the negative EG-M control box
null voltage (and a corresponding offset adjustment of the centering springs in the EG-R
hydraulic actuator), the turbine governor valve will go full open and the turbine will go to
overspeed trip upon loss of power within the EG governing system. This somewhat surprising
failure mode is selected in order to use the throttling capability of the turbines trip and throttle
(T & T) valve after resetting the overspeed trip linkage, thereby continuing turbine operation
without a functioning governor system.
Woodward Governor Companys manual # 37705 provides more generic information regarding
the EG-M control box.

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22.1.4 Bias Speed-Setting Potentiometer


The bias speed-setting potentiometer provides an input voltage to the speed reference section of
the EG-M control boxs amplifier printed circuit board. This input voltage adds to the voltage
input from the RGSC module, and provides a method for manually increasing turbine speed.
The generic instructions in the Woodward Governor Companys manuals define using the bias
speed-setting potentiometer for setting turbine speed. However, for normal RCIC system
operation, the bias speed-setting potentiometer is maintained in its fully counterclockwise
position and has only a passive function. Its only active function is to manually increase turbine
speed above the maximum governor speed setting when conducting turbine overspeed trip tests.
The original bias speed-setting potentiometer was a simple 200 ohm wire-wound potentiometer.
It is critical that this potentiometer is maintained in its fully counterclockwise position during
normal system operation, and that it be returned to its fully counterclockwise position following
each overspeed trip test.
An overspeed test controller is available, thus replacing the original bias speed-setting
potentiometer. This controller consists of a potentiometer, a fixed resistor, and a momentary
action switch. During normal system operation, the fixed resistor is in the circuit and bypasses
the position of the potentiometer. When conducting turbine overspeed trip tests, the action switch
is held in its test position, which activates the potentiometer. This potentiometer is used to
increase turbine speed to its trip speed condition. It is critical that this potentiometer is
maintained in its fully counterclockwise position (CCW) during normal system operation, and
that it be returned to its fully counterclockwise position following each overspeed trip test.

CAUTION!! Regarding the overspeed test controller: due to manufacturing tolerances, there is a finite
difference in the values of the fixed 200 ohm resistor and the potentiometers 200 ohm resistor. This
difference will result in a small step change in turbine speed when the controllers action switch is put in
the test position.

NOTE: For those sites that exclusively use the Motor Drive for overspeed trip testing (Refer Section 25,
Paragraph 25-5), the overspeed test controller could be replaced with a fixed 200 ohm, 6.5 watt resistor
installed across EG-M terminals 7 and 8, and a shunt installed across EG-M terminals 6 and 7.

22.1.5 Magnetic Speed Pickup


The magnetic speed pickup is the device used for detecting the actual speed of the turbine. The
pickup consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet behind a soft iron pole piece, around which a
coil of fine wire has been wound.

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In conjunction with a rotating spur gear (the teeth of which pass the pickups pole piece), the
magnetic speed pickup produces a pulsating voltage output. This internally generated AC output
frequency is linearly proportional to the surface speed of spur gear teeth. The generated output
frequency is always equal to:
(rpm of the gear) x (number of the gear teeth)
60
The pickup spur gear is a 48-tooth gear, located directly on the turbine shaft. The generated
output frequency of the pickup, relative to the turbine shaft speed, is the number of spur gear
teeth passing the pickup pole piece for one revolution of the turbine shaft. That is:
(turbine shaft rpm) x (48)
60
The generated AC output from the magnetic speed pickup is fed into the converter printed circuit
board and the tachometer printed circuit board of the EG-M control box. Here it is converted into
a DC voltage that is proportional to turbine speed.
22.1.6 EG-R Hydraulic Actuator
The EG-R hydraulic actuator converts the variable electrical signal from the EG-M control box
into a hydraulic force for positioning the remote servo. The EG-R hydraulic actuator is an
integrating controller, providing reset action for the speed control system. The integrating
function of the actuator is matched with the proportional and derivative functions of the EG-M
control box. The actuator is driven by the turbine shaft through a right angle gear assembly. This
provides rotation for the actuators internal oil pump and relative rotation between the nonrotating pilot valve plunger and its rotating bushing.
The EG-R hydraulic actuator includes the following major components:

Displacement Oil Pump With Relief Valve: Filtered oil from the turbine oil system, at a
nominal pressure of 5 to 15 psig (35 to 105 kPa), is provided to the suction of the gear-type
oil pump contained within the EG-R hydraulic actuator. This internal oil pump, together with
an internal relief valve, will deliver operating oil pressure of 325 to 375 psig (2240 to 2585
kPa) above the pump suction pressure to the actuators hydraulic system. With the pump in
good condition, this operating oil pressure will be developed with an actuator rotational
speed of approximately 400 rpm, or an equivalent turbine speed of 700 rpm. The relief valve
discharges internally, returning oil back to the suction of the actuators oil pump.

Pilot Valve Plunger With Rotating Bushing: The pilot valve plunger controls the flow of
oil to and from the major area of the power piston in the remote servo. The pilot valve
bushing, an integral part of the actuators drive shaft, rotates during operation and thereby
minimizes friction with the pilot valve motion. The pilot valve plunger is connected to an
armature magnet that is spring-suspended in the field of a two-coil transducer (or solenoid).
The output signal from the EG-M control box is applied to the transducer coils. This signal
(+9 volts DC to -9 volts DC maximum available) produces a force proportional to the

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strength of the signal. This force moves the armature magnet and the pilot valve plunger up
and down, porting oil from and to the remote servo, respectively. The centering springs,
suspending the armature magnet, will return it and the pilot valve plunger to their steadystate, centered position when the electric control signal fades to its on-speed voltage value
(that is, its null-voltage value). For the RCIC system, the null voltage is set at -0.75 to -1.00
volt DC. The actuators null voltage screw, accessed via the vent screw in the actuator cover,
is adjusted to match the actuators centering springs with the electrical null voltage. With the
negative EG-M control box null voltage, and the corresponding offset adjustment of the
centering springs in the EG-R hydraulic actuator, the turbine will go to overspeed trip upon
loss of power within the EG governing system. This somewhat surprising failure mode is
selected in order to use the throttling capability of the turbines T & T valve after resetting
the overspeed trip linkage, thereby continuing turbine operation without a functioning
governor system.

Spring-Loaded Buffer Piston and Needle Valve System: The integrating-reset action of
the EG-R hydraulic actuator is obtained by means of the buffer system and the temporary
pressure differential it provides across the compensation land of the pilot valve plunger. The
stability of this integrating-reset hydraulic circuit is adjustable via the systems needle valve,
which controls the rate of pressure equalization.

External Oil Reservoir: An external oil reservoir is installed at the oil supply port to the
EG-R hydraulic actuator. This reservoir provides oil priming to the actuator during the
turbine startup transient.

Woodward Governor Companys manual # 37710 provides more generic information regarding
the EG-R hydraulic actuator.
22.1.7 Remote Servo
The remote servo is a differential area power piston device, used to transmit the hydraulic signals
from the EG-R hydraulic actuator into physical movement of the turbines governor valve
linkage. The linkage positions the turbine governor valve, thus controlling steam flow to the
turbine. Extension of the remote servos piston will open the turbine governor valve.
Stainless steel tubing (3/8 in. diameter and 0.049 in. maximum wall thickness) provides the
interface between the EG-R hydraulic actuator and the remote servo. Interface connectors are
flareless bite-type fittings (for example, either Parker or Swagelok).
Linkage provides the interface between the remote servo and the turbine governor valve.
22.1.8 Summary of Operation
In the standby condition, with no pump discharge flow, the systems flow controller output is
saturated, calling for maximum turbine speed. There is no frequency input from the magnetic
speed pickup. The negative RGSC idle voltage is calling for a low-speed demand. The resulting

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EG-M positive voltage output is calling for an open position of the turbine governor valve. The
turbine governor valve is spring-loaded in the open position.
With the turbine steam supply valve leaving its closed position, the RGSCs ramp circuit is
initiated, increasing its voltage output in a positive direction, thus calling for an increase in
turbine speed.
Upon receiving a demand for an increase in turbine speed, the EG-M control box will generate
an increasing voltage output in a positive direction. With the turbine governor valve springloaded in the open position, the turbine will immediately accelerate in speed.
Reference Figure 22-2
The positive voltage signal from the EG-M control box will lower the pilot valve plunger in the
EG-R hydraulic actuator, thereby applying full oil pressure at Port E on the remote servo. Due to
the differential area of the remote servo piston between Port E and Port A, the remote servo
piston will remain in its extended position and the turbine governor valve will remain in its full
open position.
With turbine speed below the demand requirement, the EG-M voltage output will remain above
its null-voltage condition in the positive direction; the turbine governor valve will remain in its
full open position and turbine speed will continue to increase.
Conversely, with turbine speed above the demand requirement, the EG-M voltage output will go
below its null-voltage condition in the negative direction.
Reference Figure 22-2
The negative voltage signal from the EG-M control box will raise the pilot valve plunger in the
EG-R hydraulic actuator, relieving the oil pressure at Port E. With the oil pressure relieved at
Port E, oil pressure at Port A will retract (or insert) the remote servo piston (that is, the remote
servo piston will move downward). Downward movement of the remote servo piston will lower
the governor valve lever and close the turbine governor valve.
With turbine speed demand satisfied, the EG-M voltage output will go to its null-voltage
condition; the EG-R will be in its neutral position (holding the remote servo and the turbine
governor valve in a fixed position) and turbine speed will remain constant.

22.2 Calibration
The key element to successful operation of the EG governor control system is the proper
calibration of the RGSC module and the EG-M control box, followed by matching this
calibration to the EG-R hydraulic actuator.

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22.2.1 Calibration Test Equipment


The following test equipment is required for checkout and calibration of the turbine EG governor
control system:

0 to 50 volt DC, 1 amp power supply.

0 to 50 milliamp current source with an indication meter and a 0 to 10 DC voltage source


with indicating meter, both floating with respect to the power supply identified previously.

Sine-wave audio-frequency generator with frequency counter, floating with respect to the
power supply identified previously.

0 to 200 ohm overspeed test potentiometer, or a jumper and a fixed 200 ohm resistor.

30 to 50 ohm, 10 watt resistor for hydraulic actuator load simulation.

Single-pole single-throw (SPST) switch.

Two volt-ohm meters, 20,000 ohms per volt DC minimum. Two additional volt-ohm meters
would be useful.

A jewelers screwdriver or a similar tool to adjust small potentiometers.

A stopwatch.

22.2.2 Calibration Procedures

NOTE: The calibration procedures presented here differ significantly from the generic information
identified in the Woodward Governor Company bulletins.

The four procedures that follow, along with the plant-specific information sheets at the end of the
procedures, define the complete package for calibration of the EG governor control system for
all RCIC turbines.
I.

Initial calibration of the RGSC module

II.

Initial calibration of the EG-M control box with the RGSC module

III.

Recalibration of the RGSC module and the EG-M control box

IV

Calibration of the EG-R hydraulic actuator with the RGSC module and the
EG-M control box

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For the specific tasks identified, the procedures should be performed in the sequences that
follow:
Task

Procedure Sequence

Initial calibration

I, II, and IV

RGSC replaced or repaired

I, III, and IV

EG-M replaced or repaired

II and IV

EG-R replaced or repaired

IV

Periodic system checkout and recalibration

III and IV

Procedures I, II, and III are static; they are performed without turbine operation. Procedure IV is
dynamic; it is performed with the turbine in operation.

CAUTION: There are several models of Woodward components used for the turbine control system. Due
to variations in specific terminal point designations, it is critical that the appropriate plant wiring
diagram be used in defining the correct wiring terminations.

I.

Initial Calibration of the Ramp Generator and Signal Converter (RGSC) Module

Test Setup:
1. Check the resistance of the RGSC module:
a. There must be no external wiring connections to the terminal strip or chassis of the
RGSC module during this check.
b. Using a volt-ohm meter, measure the resistance from each terminal to the chassis. The
correct reading is infinity.
c. Verify the following resistance values:
Terminal 7 to TP-1:
Terminal 5 to TP-2:
Terminal 5 to Terminal 11:
Terminal 9 to Terminal 11:

30 (+/- 3) K ohm
0 ohm
51 (+/- 5) ohm
75 (+/- 5) ohm

NOTE: For RGSC Module 8270-957, check only terminal 7 to TP-1 and terminal 5 to TP-2 for resistance
values.

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2. Connect a 36 (+/- 2) VDC power supply to terminal 1 (+) and 2 (-). Do not turn the power
supply on at this time.
CAUTION: If the RGSC module is to be powered by the EG-M control box for this procedure, verify that
the load is connected to EG-M terminals 4 and 5. The load can be the EG-R hydraulic actuator or a 30 to
50 ohm, 10 watt resistor.

3. Connect a jumper between terminals 9 and 10 for a flow-controller signal of 4 to 20


milliamps, or connect a jumper between terminals 10 and 11 for a flow-controller signal of
10 to 50 milliamps. For a flow-controller signal of 1 to 5 volts, a jumper is not used.
NOTE: The RGSC Module 8270-957 is hard-wired inside for either 4 to 10 or 10 to 50 milliamps. No
jumper is used. This module does not have the capability of receiving a 1 to 5 volt input signal.

4. For a 4 to 20 or 10 to 50 milliamp flow-controller signal, connect a calibrated DC milliamp


source to terminals 6 (+) and 5 (-). Set it within its 4 to 20 or 10 to 50 milliamp range.
For a 1 to 5 volt flow-controller signal, connect a calibrated DC voltage source to terminals
10 (+) and 5 (-). Set it within its 1 to 5 volt range.
5. Set the RGSC ramp slope, idle, converter zero, and converter gain potentiometers to 1/2
travel (mid-position).
NOTE: All RGSC potentiometers are 25 turn devices. The 1/2 travel can be obtained by turning the
potentiometer more than 25 turns in one direction and then turning it in the opposite direction for
12 1/2 turns. More than 25 turns will not damage these potentiometers due to their internal slip clutch.

6. Further adjust the RGSC potentiometers by the number of turns shown in the plant-specific
information sheet.
NOTE: These potentiometer adjustments are approximate initial settings. Their use should shorten the
time spent in calibration. The final potentiometer positions can be achieved only by performing all of the
steps in the calibration procedures.

7. Connect a temporary ramp start (open/close) switch between terminals 3 and 4, with the
switch open.
8. Connect a DC voltmeter to TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-).
9. From the plant-specific information sheet, look up the idle voltage. It is used in the steps that
follow.

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Procedure:
10. Verify that the test setup (Steps 19) has been properly completed. Turn on the power supply
and adjust for 36 (+/- 2) VDC. Turn on the milliamp source, as applicable.
11. Turn the temporary ramp start switch to the closed position. The voltage at TP-1(+) and TP-2
(-) should ramp upward.
NOTE: If the voltage ramps downward, turn the ramp slope potentiometer clockwise (CW) until the
voltage ramps upward. If the voltage does not ramp at all when the switch is closed, open the switch and
turn the idle potentiometer counterclockwise (CCW) several turns, and then repeat Step 11.

12. Adjust the input source for 4 milliamps (or 10 milliamps or 1 volt, as applicable) and
then adjust the converter zero potentiometer for 0.0 (+/- 0.2) VDC on the DC voltmeter at
TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-). Turn the converter zero potentiometer CW to increase the voltage
and CCW to decrease it.
13. Adjust the input source for 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps or 5 volts, as applicable) and then
adjust the converter gain potentiometer for the preliminary converter gain voltage of 12.0
VDC on the DC voltmeter at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-). Turn the converter gain potentiometer
CW to increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
14. Repeat steps 12 and 13 as required until 4 milliamps (or 10 milliamps or 1 volt) produce 0.0
(+/- 0.2) VDC, and 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps or 5 volts) produce 12.0 (+/- 0.5) VDC.
NOTE: This repetition is necessary because adjustments of the converter zero potentiometer and the
converter gain potentiometer interact with each other.

15. Set the input source to 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps or 5 volts, as applicable).
16. Switch the temporary ramp start switch to the open position.
17. Adjust the idle potentiometer for the proper idle voltage on the DC voltmeter at TP-1 (+) and
TP-2 (-) (refer to Step 9). Turn the idle potentiometer CW to increase the voltage and CCW
to decrease it.
18. Close the ramp start switch and time the interval required for the voltage, as measured from
TP-1 (+) to TP-2 (-), to increase from idle voltage to 12.0 VDC. Adjust the ramp slope
potentiometer to obtain a 10 to 15 second ramp time. Turn the ramp slope potentiometer CW
for a faster ramp time and CCW for a slower ramp time.

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NOTE: If the voltage at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-) ramps downward when the ramp switch is closed, turn the
ramp slope potentiometer CW until the voltage ramps upward. Adjustment of the ramp slope
potentiometer to set the ramp time does not interact with the idle voltage adjustment. Adjustment of the
idle potentiometer affects the ramp time, however.

This concludes Procedure I. Turn off the power supply and remove its leads from the RGSC
module. If Procedure II or III will be done next, leave the ramp start switch and the 4 to
20 milliamp signal (or 10 to 50 milliamp, or 1 to 5 volt signal) connected to the RGSC module.
II.

Initial Calibration of the EG-M Control Box With the RGSC Module

Test Setup:
1. Check the resistance of the EG-M control box:
a. There must be no external wiring connections to the terminal strip or chassis of the EG-M
control box during this check.
b. Using a volt-ohm meter, measure the resistance from each terminal to the chassis. The
correct reading is infinity.
2. Connect the RGSC module and the overspeed test potentiometer to the EG-M control box as
shown on the applicable wiring diagram. Four wires connect the RGSC to the EG-M, and
three wires connect the overspeed test potentiometer to the EG-M.
NOTE: Make sure that the overspeed test potentiometer is correctly wired to the EG-M control box. With
the overspeed test potentiometer fully CCW, there should be zero ohms across EG-M terminals 6 and 7,
and approximately 200 ohms across terminals 7 and 8. In lieu of the overspeed test potentiometer, a
jumper can be installed across EG-M terminals 6 and 7, with a 200 ohm fixed resistor across EG-M
terminals 7 and 8.

3. Connect a temporary ramp start switch across terminals 3 and 4 of the RGSC, with the switch
closed. This equipment might already be connected from Procedure I.
4. For a 4 to 20 or 10 to 50 milliamp flow-controller signal, connect a calibrated milliamp
signal source to terminals 5 (-) and 6 (+) on the RGSC module. This equipment might
already be connected from Procedure I.
For a 1 to 5 volt flow-controller signal, connect a calibrated voltage signal source to
terminals 5 (-) and 10 (+) of the RGSC module. This equipment might already be connected
from Procedure I.

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5. Connect the EG-R actuator (or a 30 to 50 ohm, 10 watt resistor to simulate the EG-R
actuator) to EG-M terminals 4 and 5.
CAUTION: Do not connect or disconnect this load with power supplied to the EG-M control box.
Resultant voltage spikes could damage components.

6. Connect a sign wave frequency generator to EG-M terminals 9 and 10. The signal voltage
level should be between 1.5 and 4 VAC, root mean square (RMS).
7. Connect a DC voltmeter to EG-M terminals 4 and 5, with Terminal 4 as common. Connect a
second DC voltmeter to TP-1 and TP-2 on the RGSC module, with TP-2 as common.
8. Set the EG-M high-trim potentiometer to its mid-range position (five full turns off either
end). Further adjustment of this potentiometer is not required.
NOTE: The EG-M high-trim (and low-trim) potentiometers are 10 turn devices. Do not force them
against their turn stops.

9. Set the EG-M low-trim potentiometer to a half turn off the full CCW end.
10. Set the EG-M amp gain potentiometer to 7 and the EG-M stability potentiometer to 5.
11. Set the overspeed test potentiometer to its CCW end.
12. Connect a 48 (+/- 4) VDC power supply to EG-M terminals 1 (+) and 2 (-). Do not turn the
power supply on at this time.
13. From the plant-specific information sheet, look up the preliminary converter gain voltage and
the idle voltage. Also, look up the low governor frequency, high governor frequency, and
null voltage. This data is used in the steps that follow.
Procedure:
14. Verify that the test setup (steps 113) has been properly completed. Turn on the power
supply and adjust it to 48 VDC (+/- 4) on EG-M terminals 1 (+) and 2 (-). Measure the
voltage at RGSC terminals 1 (+) and 2 (-). The correct voltage is 36 (+/- 2) VDC.
15. Set the RGSC input signal to 4 milliamps (or 10 milliamps, or 1 volt, as applicable). Check
that the ramp start switch is closed. With the frequency generator output set at approximately
1800 Hz, verify that the voltage at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-) is a negative
value between 7.5 and 9.0 VDC. Adjust the EG-M gain potentiometer if necessary. If these
criteria are not satisfied, verify the operability of the EG-M gain potentiometer and the
amplifier printed circuit board.
16. Adjust the frequency generator output to the low governor frequency (refer to Step 13).
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17. With the ramp start switch closed, measure the voltage at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-) on the RGSC
module. Voltage should read 0.0 (+/- 0.2) VDC. If necessary, readjust with the converter zero
potentiometer on the RGSC module. Turn the converter zero potentiometer CW to increase
the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
18. Adjust the low-trim potentiometer on the EG-M control box to obtain a null voltage of -0.75
to -1.00 VDC at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-).
NOTE: To raise the voltage in the positive (+) direction, turn the low-trim potentiometer CW; to lower
the voltage in the negative (-) direction, turn it CCW. The null-voltage value is the actuator offset or, null,
voltage, and is the steady-state output voltage value. It must be used instead of zero.

19. Set the input signal to the RGSC module to 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps, or 5 volts, as
applicable). Verify that the voltage at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-) increases to
between +7.5 and +9.0 VDC. Adjust the EG-M gain potentiometer if necessary. If this
criteria is not satisfied, verify the operability of the EG-M gain potentiometer and the
amplifier printed circuit board.
20. Adjust the frequency generator output to the high governor frequency (refer to Step 13).
21. Adjust the converter gain potentiometer on the RGSC module to obtain a null voltage
of -0.75 to -1.00 VDC at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-).
22. Repeat the low and the high governor adjustments in steps 15 through 21 until the nullvoltage value is satisfied for both the low and the high governor frequency points. On
completion of Step 21, record the final null voltages.
NOTE: This repetition is necessary because adjustments of the potentiometers interact with each other.

23. Return the input signal to 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps, or 5 volts, as applicable). Record
the RGSC module voltage at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-). This is the final converter gain voltage.
24. Check the idle voltage:
a. Open the temporary ramp start switch across terminals 3 and 4 of the RGSC module.
b. Measure the voltage across the RGSC TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-). The voltage should be the
idle voltage (refer to Step 13). If necessary, readjust with the idle potentiometer. Turn the
idle potentiometer CW to increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it. Record the final
idle voltage.

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25. Check the ramp time:


a. With a voltmeter at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-) of the RGSC module, close the temporary
ramp switch to energize the ramp circuit. Monitor the time required for the voltage to
increase in a positive direction, from the idle voltage to the final converter gain voltage
(refer to Step 23).
b. The ramp time should be 10 to 15 seconds. Adjustments are made with the ramp slope
potentiometer on the RGSC module. Turn the ramp slope potentiometer CW for a faster
ramp time and CCW for a slower time.
Initial Calibration of the EG-M Tachometer
26. Disconnect the tachometers at EG-M terminals 14 (+) and 13 (-).
27. Adjust the mechanical zero on the tachometers so that the meter reads zero. Then reconnect
the tachometer(s) at EG-M terminals 14 (+) and 13 (-). Set the EG-M high-tach and low-tach
potentiometers to their mid-position.
NOTE: Be sure to adjust the EG-M tach potentiometers, not the EG-M trim potentiometers, when
calibrating the tachometers. The high-tach potentiometer is adjusted for the low-speed setting and the
low-tach potentiometer is adjusted for the high-speed setting.

28. Set the frequency generator to 1600 (+/- 10) Hz.


29. Adjust the EG-M control box high-tach potentiometer to obtain a reading of 2000 (+/- 50)
rpm on the tachometer. Turn the high-tach potentiometer CW to decrease the meter reading
and CCW to increase it.
30. Set the frequency to 3200 (+/- 10) Hz.
31. Adjust the EG-M low-tach potentiometer to obtain a reading of 4000 (+/- 50) rpm on the
tachometer. Turn the low-tach potentiometer CW to increase the meter reading and CCW to
decrease it.
32. Steps 28 through 31 interact and must be repeated until the meter reads 2000
(+/- 50) rpm and 4000 (+/- 50) rpm.

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33. Verify the adequacy of the tachometer system with the following frequency input and rpm
readings:
Frequency Input
Hz (+/- 10)
800
1600
2400
3200
4000

Tachometer Reading
rpm (+/- 100)
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000

This concludes Procedure II. Turn off the power supply and disconnect the test equipment.
Restore all wiring per the applicable wiring diagram.

NOTE: The jumper on RGSC terminals 9 and 10 for the 4 to 20 milliamp signal or on terminals 10 and
11 for the 10 to 50 milliamp signal is permanent wiring and must remain.

III.

Recalibration of the RGSC Module and the EG-M Control Box

Test Setup:
1. Verify that all wiring has terminal designation tags to aid in reconnection.
2. Remove the power supply from the EG-M control box terminals 1 (+) and 2 (-). Tape and
protect these live wires.
3. Connect a sine-wave frequency generator across EG-M terminals 9 and 10. There is no
necessity or desire to disturb the existing wiring. The signal voltage level should be between
1.5 and 4 VAC, RMS.
4. Connect a normally open switch across terminals 3 and 4 on the RGSC module. There is no
necessity or desire to disturb the existing wiring.
5. For a 4 to 20 or 10 to 50 milliamp flow-controller signal, remove the control signal wires
from terminals 5 and 6 of the RGSC module. Tape and protect these live wires. Connect a
0 to 50 milliamp DC current source to these terminals, with 5 (-) and 6 (+). Connect a 0 to
50 milliamp meter in series with the current source.
For a 1 to 5 volt flow-controller signal, remove the control signal wires from terminals 5 and
10 of the RGSC module. Tape and protect these live wires. Connect a 0 to 10 volt DC
voltage source and a voltage meter to these terminals with 5 (-) and 10 (+).

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Woodward EG-Type Governor

6. Connect the following DC voltmeters:

EG-M control box terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-)

RGSC module TP-1 and TP-2 (common)

CAUTION: If this procedure is performed during a turbine inspection outage, verify that the EG-R
hydraulic actuator is still electrically connected to EG-M terminals 4 and 5. If not, connect a 30 to 50
ohm, 10 watt resistor for hydraulic actuator load simulation.

7. From the plant-specific information sheet, look up the RGSC modules idle voltage. Also
look up the low governor frequency, the high governor frequency, and the null voltage. This
data is used in the steps that follow.
Procedure:
8. Verify that the test setup (steps 17) has been properly completed. Reconnect the power
supply to the EG-M control box terminals 1 (+) and 2 (-) and energize the test equipment.
9. With the switch across terminals 3 and 4 on the RGSC module in the open position and
the current or voltage source within its rated range, verify the idle voltage at TP-1 (+) and
TP-2 (-) (refer to Step 7). Readjust the idle potentiometer on the RGSC module, if required.
Turn the idle potentiometer CW to increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
10. Set the frequency generator for low governor frequency (refer to Step 7).
11. Adjust the input signal to 4 milliamps (or 10 milliamps, or 1 volt, as applicable).
12. Close the ramp start switch across terminals 3 and 4 on the RGSC module. The voltage at
TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-) should ramp upward from the idle voltage.
13. Verify that the RGSC output voltage is 0.0 (+/- 0.2) VDC at TP-1/TP-2. Readjust the RGSC
converter zero potentiometer, if required. Turn the converter zero potentiometer CW to
increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
14. Verify a null voltage of -0.75 to -1.00 VDC at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-).
Readjust the low-trim potentiometer on the EG-M control box, if required. Turn the low-trim
potentiometer CW to increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
15. Adjust the input signal to 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps, or 5 volts, as applicable). Verify
that the voltage at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-) increases to between +7.5 and
+9.0 VDC. Adjust the EG-M gain potentiometer if necessary.
16. Set the frequency generator for high governor frequency (refer to Step 7).

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Woodward EG-Type Governor

17. Verify a null voltage of -0.75 to -1.00 VDC at EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 (+/-).
Readjust the RGSC converter gain potentiometer, if required. Turn the gain potentiometer
CW to increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
18. Any adjustments made in steps 10 through 17 interact and must be repeated until the null
voltage remains within the specified range for both the low and the high governor frequency
conditions.
19. Record the final null voltage for future reference.
20. Return the input signal to 20 milliamps (or 50 milliamps, or 5 volts, as applicable). Record
the RGSC voltage at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-) for future reference. This is the final converter
gain voltage.
Recalibration of the EG-M Tachometer
21. Verify the adequacy of the tachometer system with the following frequency input and rpm
readings:
Frequency Input
Hz (+/- 10)
800
1600
2400
3200
4000

Tachometer Reading
rpm (+/- 100)
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000

If the above tachometer check is acceptable, go to Step 29. If not, continue with the
tachometer recalibration, as follows:
22. Disconnect the tachometers at EG-M terminals 14 (+) and 13 (-).
23. Adjust the mechanical zero on the tachometers so that the meter reads zero. Then reconnect
the tachometers at EG-M terminals 14 (+) and 13 (-).
NOTE: Be sure to adjust the EG-M tach potentiometers, not the EG-M trim potentiometers, when
calibrating the EG-M tachometer. The high-tach potentiometer is adjusted for the low-speed setting and
the low-tach potentiometer is adjusted for the high-speed setting.

24. Set the frequency generator to 1600 (+/- 10) Hz.


25. Adjust the EG-M control box high-tach potentiometer to obtain a reading of 2000
(+/- 50) rpm on the tachometer meter. Turn the high-tach potentiometer CW to decrease
the meter reading and CCW to increase it.
26. Set the frequency generator to 3200 (+/- 10) Hz.
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Woodward EG-Type Governor

27. Adjust the EG-M low-tach potentiometer to obtain a reading of 4000 rpm on the tachometer
meter. Turn the low-tach potentiometer CW to increase the meter reading and CCW to
decrease it.
28. Steps 24 through 27 interact and must be repeated until the meter reads 2000 (+/- 50) rpm
and 4000 (+/- 50) rpm. Then verify the adequacy of the tachometer system per Step 21.
29. Recheck the idle voltage:
a. Open the switch connected to terminals 3 and 4 on the RGSC module.
b. Verify that the RGSC output voltage across TP-1/TP-2 is the idle voltage (refer to Step
7). Readjust the idle potentiometer on the RGSC module, if required. Turn the idle
potentiometer CW to increase the voltage and CCW to decrease it.
30. Recheck the ramp time:
a. With a voltmeter at TP-1 (+) and TP-2 (-) of the RGSC module, close the temporary
ramp switch to energize the ramp circuit. Monitor the time required for the voltage to
increase in a positive direction from the idle voltage to the final converter gain voltage
(refer to Step 20).
b. The ramp time should be 10 to 15 seconds. Adjustments are made with the ramp slope
potentiometer on the RGSC module. Turn the ramp slope potentiometer CW for a faster
ramp time and CCW for a slower time.
This concludes Procedure III. Disconnect the test equipment and restore all wiring per the
applicable wiring diagram.
IV.

Calibration of the EG-R Hydraulic Actuator With the EG-M Control Box and the
RGSC Module

Test Setup:
1. Verify that the RGSC module and the EG-M control box have been calibrated per the
preceding procedures.
2. Using the appropriate wiring diagrams, verify that the EG-R hydraulic actuator is connected
to the EG-M control box with the correct polarity.
3. If this is the first run for the EG-R hydraulic actuator, set its needle to 1/8 to 1/4 turn open.
4. Connect a DC voltmeter across terminals 4 and 5 of the EG-M, with Terminal 4 common. An
analog meter is preferred for this procedure.

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Procedure:
5. Verify that the test setup (steps 14) has been properly completed. Place the control system
in manual and set it for minimum turbine operating speed. Start the turbine under local
manual control of the T & T valve, and increase speed to its minimum operating value.
Verify control system operability, and then fully open the T & T valve. With the control
system still in manual, increase turbine speed to its maximum rated condition, and adjust the
pump discharge test return throttling valve to obtain rated pump flow at a discharge pressure
within 20 percent of its maximum rated condition. Allow the turbine to warm to its normal
operating temperature.
6. With the turbine governor in control, the turbine speed variation should be less than
+/- 25 rpm. Upset the system by making small step changes in the turbine speed setpoint
and verify that the speed returns to steady-state.
If speed variation is excessive, adjustment is required on the EG-R hydraulic actuator needle
valve and/or on the EG-M control box gain and stability potentiometers. Closing the EG-R
needle valve, increasing the stability potentiometer setting, or reducing the gain
potentiometer setting results in improved stability. Conversely, opening the EG-R needle
valve, reducing the stability potentiometer setting, or increasing the gain potentiometer
setting makes the system more responsive.
NOTE: If the EG-M amp gain potentiometer is adjusted more than two divisions to achieve stable turbine
operation, the previous speed range calibration work will be affected. Procedure III should be performed
(or repeated) using the new gain setting, followed by repeating this procedure. The EG-M stability
potentiometer and the EG-R needle valve have no effect on the previous calibration work.

7. Manually reduce the turbine speed to approximately 90% of rated speed (this margin will
allow for potential turbine speed variations during null-voltage screw adjustment) and verify
that the speed variation is still less than +/- 25 rpm. Readjust pump discharge conditions if
required.
8. The null voltage across EG-M terminals 4 (common) and 5 should be within -0.75 and -1.00
VDC. If the null voltage is not correct, the null voltage screw in the EG-R hydraulic actuator
must be adjusted.
NOTE: If the null voltage is not correct, the governor still controls the turbine; however, the actual
turbine speed is different from the true demand speed.

9. Remove the screw from the center of the actuator cover and carefully insert a 1/8 in. hex
wrench into the null voltage screw.

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CAUTION: Use extreme care when inserting the hex wrench. Do not engage the null-voltage screw by
more than 1/4 in. Pushing down on the centering springs can result in severe speed transients.

10. Turn the hex wrench slowly, in small increments, until the null voltage is within -0.75
and -1.00 VDC, matching the final null voltage recorded in Procedure II, Step 22 or
Procedure III, Step 19. Turning the wrench CW (when viewed from above) increases the null
voltage and CCW decreases it.
11. Remove the hex wrench and verify that the null voltage is correct. Replace the cover screw.
Typical Control Settings
Gain potentiometer
Stability potentiometer
EG-R needle valve

5 to 8, usually 7
4 to 6, usually 5
1/8 to 1/2 turn open, usually 1/8

NOTE: Final control settings that are significantly outside the ranges identified above might indicate
other control system problems, such as binding control valves, worn or sticking linkage, improper flow
controller calibration, or other system problems.

This concludes Procedure IV.


Plant-Specific Information Regarding Control Settings

NOTE: The following information is generic. Governor frequency ranges can vary for plant-specific
operating conditions.

Typical RCIC Turbine, With Milliamp Output Flow Controller


Flow-controller signal
4 to 20 MA or 10 to 50 MA
RGSC potentiometers
(recommended initial setting is from mid-position):
Ramp slope
2 1/2 turns CW
Idle
1 1/2 turns CCW
Converter zero
1 turn CCW
Converter gain
3 turns CCW
Preliminary converter gain voltage
12 (+/- 0.5) volts DC
Idle voltage
-1.0 (+/- 0.2) volts DC
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Woodward EG-Type Governor

Low governor frequency


High governor frequency
Null voltage

600 (+/- 10) Hz (750 rpm)


3600 (+/- 10) Hz (4500 rpm)
-0.75 to -1.00 volts DC

Typical RCIC Turbine, With Voltage Output Flow Controller


Flow-controller signal
1.0 VDC to 5.0 VDC
RGSC potentiometers
(recommended initial setting is from mid-position):
Ramp slope
1 1/2 turns CW
Idle
1 1/2 turns CCW
Converter zero
2 turns CCW
Converter gain
8 1/2 turns CCW
Preliminary converter gain voltage
12.0 (+/- 0.5) volts DC
Idle voltage
-1.0 (+/- 0.2) volts DC
Low governor frequency
600 (+/- 10) Hz (750 rpm)
High governor frequency
3600 (+/- 10) Hz (4500 rpm)
Null voltage
-0.75 to -1.00 volts DC

22.3 System Operation Deviating from Design Basis


The system design basis is to deliver a constant flow rate to the reactor vessel over a wide range
of reactor pressures.
The turbine control system is designed and calibrated to satisfy this design basis.
Operating experience has shown that it is sometimes desirable to reduce the vessel injection flow
rate. This off design operation is difficult to control, due to two basic conditions:

The pumps head versus flow characteristic is relatively flat as flow is decreased below its
rated value
There is excess turbine horsepower capacity at the high-pressure operating condition.
Reduced pump flow, and the corresponding reduction in horsepower, compounds the already
challenging control system requirements.

Reducing the systems flow below 75% of its rated value promotes the likelihood of control
system instability.
If control system instability occurs, it is recommended that the flow controller be put in manual
mode. This action results in an open loop control with the flow-controller output becoming a
fixed speed demand signal to the turbine governor. This effort will provide stable, constant
turbine speed control, but will require operator action to maintain the desired vessel injection
flow rate.

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CAUTION!! The pump should not be operated below 50% of rated flow for sustained periods of time.
Operation at a 10 to 20% minimum flow condition is intended for startup and shutdown transients only.
This is not an intended normal operating condition for the pump because severe internal cavitation at the
high-head condition can result in pump damage.

22.4 Troubleshooting
The most common historic problems associated with use of the EG governor are identified in the
following list. This list can be used as an aid in determining the cause of improper control system
operation. The most common problems include:

An incorrect power supply voltage to the EG-M control box terminals 1 (+) and 2 (-). The
control box must receive a nominal 48 VDC for proper operation. The minimum acceptable
voltage is 42 VDC.

Improper wiring termination and/or use of jumpers when connecting the controller input
signal to the RGSC module.

The overspeed test potentiometer is incorrectly wired to the EG-M control box. With the
potentiometer fully counterclockwise, the resistance across EG-M terminals 6 and 7 should
be zero; across EG-M terminals 7 and 8, the resistance should be approximately 200 ohms.

The polarity is reversed between the EG-M control box and the EG-R hydraulic actuator.

CAUTION: The applicable electrical schematics must be used when connecting wires and jumpers to the
various models of the electronic components in the control system.

The wrong EG-R hydraulic actuator is installed. Verify the model number, rotation, and
polarity.

The power supply and/or control signal is grounded. The Woodward control system is
floating with respect to the plant ground.

The EG-R hydraulic actuator coil is shorted or open. Coil resistance is a nominal 30 to
50 ohms.

There is a damaged magnetic speed pickup pole piece or coil.

There is a damaged or loose connector to the magnetic speed pickup.

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Woodward EG-Type Governor

NOTE: The resistance of the magnetic speed pickup and its wiring harness (lift the wires on EG-M
terminals 9 and 10 and measure the wiring loop resistance) should be 150 to 250 ohms The voltage
generated by the magnetic speed pickup, when connected to EG-M terminals 9 and 10, should be a
minimum of 1.5 VAC, RMS at rated turbine speed, and a minimum of 1.0 VAC, RMS at idle speed.
Voltage measured through the wiring harness, when disconnected from the EG-M control box, should be
15.0 to 20.0 VAC, RMS when operating near rated speed.

An incorrect gap between the magnetic speed pickup and its sensing gear. The correct gap is
0.008 to 0.010 in.

Loose or damaged speed-sensing gear.

Incorrect tubing size between the EG-R hydraulic actuator and the remote servo. The correct
tubing is 3/8 in. outside diameter, with a maximum wall thickness of 0.049 in.

A contaminated (particulate, sludge, rust, and water) oil system.

A contaminated EG-R hydraulic actuator. The presence of particulate, sludge, rust, and
water, or internal corrosion hampers proper operation. Remove the top cover from the EG-R
hydraulic actuator and inspect the coil area. Conditions in the coil area relate to the
conditions within the hydraulic actuator. Abnormal conditions indicate the potential necessity
for replacing the EG-R hydraulic actuator and for flushing the control lines between the
EG-R hydraulic actuator and the remote servo.

The EG governor system is out of calibration. Successful calibration of the EG governor


control components basically verifies the operability of the components.

22.5 List of Figures


Figure

Description

22-1

Woodward EG Governor Control System Schematic

22-2

Woodward EG-R Actuator and Remote Servo Schematic

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Figure 22-1
Woodward EG Governor Control System Schematic

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Figure 22-2
Woodward EG-R Actuator and Remote Servo Schematic

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23

WOODWARD PG-TYPE GOVERNOR


At the present time, the Woodward PG-type governor is not used on any RCIC turbines.

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24

TRANSIENT CONTROL IMPROVEMENT


Several transient control improvements are available to enhance the performance of the governor
control system.

24.1 Steam Bypass Systems


The governor valve for RCIC turbines is spring-loaded open in the standby condition. This
design configuration enables turbine startup without requiring the use of an external motordriven oil pump. However, this design configuration also requires a responsive turbine control
system, capable of moving the governor valve from fully open to fully closed during the initial
turbine acceleration transient (which is typically 3500 rpm per second). The slightest response
delay of a turbine control component can result in a turbine overspeed trip.
A significant reduction in the severity of the acceleration transient can be accomplished by
starting the turbines with a steam bypass around the main steam admission valves. This bypass
supplies sufficient steam to roll the turbine to a low speed, but not enough to overspeed. After a
time delay, during which the governor can take control, the main steam admission valve opens
allowing a controlled acceleration to rated speed.
The bypass steam supply should be sized (by means of an orifice) to drive the turbine to an
approximate speed of 1200 to 1500 rpm, using maximum rated steam inlet pressure. With a
RGSC idle speed of 750 to 1000 rpm, and with an approximate 10 second time delay before
opening the main steam admission valve and closing the RGSC ramp circuit, the following
startup sequence is achieved:

Initial turbine acceleration reaches a peak speed of 1500 rpm, reduced from a typical peak of
4000 to 4500 rpm.

The turbine control system returns the turbine speed to the RGSC idle speed of 750 to
1000 rpm, with the turbine governor valve in the controlling position.

At the completion of the time delay, the main steam admission valve opens, the RGSC ramp
circuit closes, and the turbine accelerates to its rated speed condition under governor control.

The bypass piping itself should be kept as short as possible to avoid condensation in the piping.
Solenoid-operated bypass valves for this modification have proven to be unreliable.

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Transient Control Improvement

24.2 Characterized Steam Admission Valves


As an alternative to installing a separate bypass valve, the main steam admission valve has been
successfully modified on a number of systems to accomplish the same end result. This
alternative consists of a modified flow/lift characteristic design valve trim, combined with timing
logic to control the opening rate of the valve. In some cases, the timing logic or stop/start logic
alone has been sufficient to accomplish the desired slower start.
This alternative eliminates the necessity for the bypass valve, which has been an historical
maintenance problem with regard to steam leakage.

24.3 Linkage Adjustment for Minimum Required Governor Valve Stroke


The turbine instruction manual defines a basic generic stroke length for the RCIC turbine
governor valve of 5/8 to 7/8 in. (16 to 22 mm). This valve stroke range is obviously excessive for
some turbine assemblies. Adjusting the governor valve stroke to the minimum required will
have a positive effect on reducing the severity of the turbines quick-start acceleration transient.
The controlling minimum valve stroke is the governor valve position required for the turbine to
deliver its design horsepower at minimum steam inlet pressure and maximum turbine exhaust
pressure. Changes in exhaust pressure have a major impact on the steam energy available to the
turbine.
Governor valve stroke is adjusted by moving the threaded engagement of the valve spring seats
and the governor lever block on the valve stem. After adjusting the governor valve stroke,
positive overtravel of the remote servo in the governor valve closed position must be verified.
With the connecting pin removed, the governor valve fully closed and the remote servo fully
inserted, verify that the pin hole in the remote servo link is below the pin hole in the governor
lever.

24.4 Valve Travel Gags


A few turbines have travel gags installed on the governor valve linkage, thereby reducing valve
stroke. These gags are not required or recommended because the desired effect can be achieved
through valve travel adjustment without the potential for distorting and binding the governor
linkage.

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25

TURBINE OVERSPEED TRIP SYSTEM


The purpose of an overspeed trip system is to prevent excessive speed and subsequent damage to
the turbine and its driven equipment, following a malfunction of the normal speed control system
or an abnormal operating condition, which would render the speed control system inadequate.

25.1 General Description


All RCIC turbines are equipped with a mechanical overspeed trip assembly. Some turbines are
also equipped with an additional electronic overspeed trip assembly. Both trip assemblies are
identified as shutdown systems, as opposed to a control system. Both trip systems are totally
independent of the normal turbine control system and are set to operate at a nominal 110 to
125% of the maximum normal turbine operating speed. When activated, either overspeed trip
system will shut off the flow of steam to the turbine, via the turbines trip and throttle (T & T)
valve, and allow the turbine and its driven equipment to come to a stop.

NOTE: The overspeed trip setpoint has been lowered on some turbine assemblies to reduce the systems
pump discharge pressure during a potential overspeed trip transient. The overspeed trip setpoint should
remain at least 10% above the maximum normal operating speed of the turbine.

The mechanical overspeed trip assembly, once tripped, requires local operator action to reset.
The assembly is not provided with remote reset capability.
Those turbines that are equipped with the additional electronic overspeed trip can be configured
to provide for remote reset of the trip. This capability is useful only if the mechanical trip was
not also activated.
As a protective system, the overspeed trip assemblies do not function under normal operating
conditions. It is therefore mandatory that periodic testing of the systems be scheduled and
documented to ensure their operability when necessary.

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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

25.2 Mechanical Overspeed Trip System Components


The mechanical overspeed trip system consists of the following basic components:

An overspeed governor

An overspeed trip tappet

A tappet nut and head lever assembly

The connecting linkage to the T & T valve

25.2.1 Overspeed Governor


The overspeed governor consists of a spring-loaded trip weight, eccentrically located on, or in,
the turbine shaft. At the turbine trip speed, the trip weight extends, lifts the tappet assembly, and
commences the trip sequence. Two overspeed governor design configurations are used, a disctype and a pin-type.
25.2.1.1

Disc-Type Overspeed Governor

Reference Figures 25-1 and 25-2


The disc-type overspeed governor was used on RCIC turbines manufactured prior to the late
1970s.
A lever-type trip weight is secured to the overspeed trip disc by means of its weight screw. The
weight screw also serves as the pivot point for the trip weight. A bearing is fitted into the trip
weight to minimize friction when the weight moves. Original trip assemblies used a needle
bearing. Current assemblies use a Garlock bushing, which improves the repeatability of the trip
system. When assembling the trip weight onto the overspeed trip disc, it is critical that the 0.010
to 0.015 in. (0.25 to 0.38 mm) clearance (required for free movement and thermal expansion) be
maintained between the back face of the trip weight and the face of the disc. The weight screw is
then locked into position with its setscrew, which is located on the periphery of the disc (some
assemblies use a locking jam nut on the back face of the disc). The setscrew is lightly staked into
position.
The trip weight is heavy at its free end and this unbalanced force is opposed by the trip weight
spring. The compression force on the spring is adjusted by means of its adjusting screw, so that
centrifugal force at the free end of the weight overcomes the opposing force of the spring when
the desired trip speed is reached. The trip weight then pivots about the weight screw and the free
end of the weight extends. The extended weight lifts the tappet and commences the turbine trip
sequence.
After all components are assembled onto the overspeed trip disc, the disc is balanced and
mounted on the turbine shaft.

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25.2.1.2

Pin-Type Overspeed Governor

Reference Figure 25-3


The pin-type overspeed governor is used on RCIC turbines manufactured after the late 1970s.
The pin-type overspeed governor consists of a sleeve mounted on the turbine shaft, into which
the following components are assembled:

The pin-shaped trip weight

The weight spring

The weight-adjusting screw with its locking setscrew

The spring-adjusting screw with its locking setscrew

The pin-shaped trip weight fits into the turbine shaft and sleeve in one direction only. It is
located in position by the weight-adjusting screw and is held in position by the weight spring.
The weight spring is compressed by the spring-adjusting screw, to a value determined by testing.
The spring-adjusting screw has a hollow center, through which the trip weight extends when
turbine trip speed is encountered.
Upon reaching turbine trip speed, the centrifugal force of the rotating turbine shaft causes
displacement of the trip weight outward from the shaft centerline. Positive displacement of the
weight in the correct direction is achieved by locating the trip weight with the weight-adjusting
screw, so that the weights center of gravity is offset from the centerline of the turbine shaft in
the direction required to overcome the force of the weight spring. This offset produces a positive
snap action displacement of the weight at the predetermined trip speed.
At the predetermined turbine trip speed, the extended trip weight lifts the tappet assembly, thus
commencing the turbine trip sequence.
25.2.2 Overspeed Trip Tappet
The overspeed trip tappet is the intermediate component in the overspeed trip assembly. It
transfers the movement of the extended overspeed governor trip weight into the separation of the
tappet nut and the head lever assembly, resulting in the trip of the turbine assembly.
Reference Figures 25-4 and 25-5
The overspeed trip tappet design used on all RCIC turbines consists of a polyurethane head
attached to a threaded aluminum stem. The tappet assembly is located within and is positioned
by a tappet guide, which is located on the turbines governor end journal bearing cap. Following
is its design history:

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The original tappet design was a polyurethane ball, swaged into the end of the aluminum
stem. The intent was for the ball to have free rotation within the stem upon impact.
However, the ball would swell and become brittle, and was subject to chipping and
cracking when struck by the overspeed trip weight. The frequency and the extent of the
damage were more severe with the pin-type overspeed governor than with the disc-type.
This tappet design was discontinued in 1985. It was replaced by a polyurethane head
with a spherical impact surface, which is molded to the aluminum stem. It is
recommended that any ball tappets remaining in service be replaced with the
polyurethane head tappet design at the next available outage, and that any ball tappet
warehouse stock be scrapped.
The first design of the polyurethane head tappet used the polyurethane material as the
guide surface within the tappet guide. Oil absorption and thermal expansion resulted in
some binding problems with the tappet to tappet guide interface.
The design was modified, undercutting the polyurethane diameter and providing a
shoulder on the aluminum stem to be used as a guide within the tappet guide. This design
has been in operation since 1990 and is the recommended replacement for all turbine
assemblies.
Upon reaching turbine trip speed, the extended trip weight in the overspeed governor lifts the
tappet assembly. The tappet assembly translates its movement into separation of the tappet nut
and the head lever assembly, resulting in the trip of the turbine assembly.
25.2.3 Tappet Nut and Head Lever Assembly
Reference Figures 25-4 and 25-5
The tappet nut and head lever assembly is the heart of the trip and reset function for the
mechanical overspeed trip system.
The tappet nut is threaded onto the tappet assembly. This threaded engagement is critical to the
ultimate adjustment of the overspeed trip system. During normal operation, with the overspeed
trip system in its reset position, the reset spring holds the bottom surface of the tappet nut in
contact with the head bracket. Tappet nuts are now hardened to Rockwell C 50, minimum, and
have two usable head lever contact surfaces, located 180 apart.
The head lever is pin-assembled to the head bracket and has a setscrew that locks the head lever
to the pin. The head lever is nitride-hardened for improved wearing characteristics with the
tappet nut. When properly installed, the contact surface between the head lever and the tappet nut
is 0.030 to 0.060 in. (0.76 to 1.52 mm) wide.

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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

During normal operation, with the overspeed trip system in its reset position, the spring-loaded
connecting rod assembly maintains the contact interface between the tappet nut and the head
lever. When the mechanical overspeed trip system trips, the head lever rotates under the tappet
nut, which holds it and the tappet assembly in a lifted position. This action prevents damage to
the tappet assembly from the extended trip weight.
A hand-trip lever is provided for local turbine trip capability.

Note: It is critical that the tappet nut and head lever assembly be maintained in a clean condition, free
from lubricants and foreign material buildup.

25.2.4 Connecting Linkage to the Trip and Throttle Valve


Reference Figure 25-6
The trip linkage is the interconnecting hardware between the overspeed trip system and the
T & T valve. Upon actuation of the overspeed trip system, the connecting linkage translates the
separation of the tappet nut-head lever interface into the unlatching of the T & T valves trip
hook. This action closes the valve.
The trip linkage consists of a connecting rod with a ball-type rod end on one end, and a clevis on
the other.
The rod end is attached to the overspeed trips head lever. The clevis end mates with a slotted
lever associated with the trip hook on the T & T valve. An impact (hammer blow) space is
provided at this connection.

NOTE: Early turbine assemblies were originally provided with a short (approximately 1 1/2 in.) brass
material connecting rod clevis. When the turbine was remotely tripped by means of the trip solenoid, the
trip lever (or radius lever) would hit the bottom throat of the short clevis, transferring an impact load to
the tappet nut-head lever interface. This impact load frequently resulted in inadvertent separation of the
tappet nut-head lever interface and/or bending of the overspeed trip tappet stem. The short clevis was
replaced with a longer (approximately 3 1/2 in.) steel material connecting rod clevis. This longer clevis
was provided as an original part on later turbines. If the short clevis is still installed, it should be
replaced with the longer clevis at the first available maintenance opportunity. This replacement will
require either shortening or replacement of the existing connecting rod.

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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

The connecting rod is spring-loaded toward the turbines governor end journal bearing cap.
When the tappet nut-head lever interface is separated by the lift of the overspeed trip tappet, the
spring-loaded connecting rod moves toward the bearing cap. This action pulls the T & T valves
trip hook free from the latchup lever, closing the valve.

25.3 Mechanical Overspeed Trip Adjustments


Adjustment of the overspeed trip system has been defined in three sections:

Tappet Installation and Engagement Adjustment

Connecting Linkage Adjustment

Trip Speed Adjustment

25.3.1 Tappet Installation and Engagement Adjustment


Proper function of the overspeed trip system requires that the tappet be correctly located with
respect to the overspeed governors trip weight. If the system is disassembled for inspection or if
replacement parts are installed, the following setup procedures must be used to ensure correct
position and function of the components.
25.3.1.1

Polyurethane Head Tappet With the Disc Overspeed Governor

Reference Figures 25-4 and 25-6


Remove the governor end journal bearing cap and/or the pump bracket cap for access to the
overspeed governor.
Manually exercise the trip weight and visually inspect the governor components for damage and
abnormal conditions. It is not necessary to disassemble the components unless damage is seen or
abnormal operating conditions have been observed.
Disassemble the overspeed components that are mounted on the bearing cap. Clean and inspect
these components. Pay careful attention to the tappet (discoloration, hairline cracks, flat spots,
uneven surfaces, or other surface defects), its reset spring (distortion or off-set conditions), the
tappet guide (worn or distorted inside diameter), and the tappet nut-to-head lever square edge
interface. Replace any damaged or questionable components.
Reassemble the overspeed components onto the bearing cap. With the tappet nut in contact with
the head bracket, verify the required 0.030 to 0.060 in. (0.76 to 1.52 mm) engagement between
the tappet nut and the head lever.

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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

Recommended Measurement Technique (Refer Figures 25-4 and 25-6)

Remove the connecting rods trip spring.

Place a dial indicator on the end of the overspeed trip tappet stem, to measure vertical lift.

With slight finger pressure, hold the head lever in contact with the tappet nut.

While monitoring the dial indicator, slowly push down on the hand trip lever, lifting the
tappet nut.

When the head lever moves, record the dial indicator reading.

Remove the dial indicator and reconnect the connecting rods trip spring.

Manually rotate the trip weight to its fully extended position and install a temporary wedge
block. Typically, the wedge is installed between the trip weight and the weight spring or between
the trip weight and the adjusting screws mounting stud (if the spring and adjusting screw have
been removed). An improved alternate is to install a soft taper pin (sized by trial and error)
between the trip weight and the weights stop pin. This technique results in a more positive
extension of the trip weight.
Reinstall the bearing cap and/or the pump bracket cap.
With the tappet nut held down firmly against the head bracket, screw the tappet down
(clockwise) until it just contacts the extended trip weight. This position can best be determined
by rotating the turbine shaft while slowly turning the tappet down until contact is felt.
Position the turbine shaft so that the extended trip weight is not in contact with the tappet. Then,
turn the tappet down (clockwise) one full turn (approximately 0.042 in. axial displacement).
Temporarily lock this tappet position by installing a 5/16-24 jam nut onto the tappet stem and
lightly tighten it against the top surface of the tappet nut.
Cut the tappet stem to within 1/16 inch (2 mm) of the top of the jam nut. Provide a slot
approximately 1/16 inch (2 mm) deep on the top of the tappet stem for a flat-blade screwdriver.
Install the connecting linkage assembly and adjust the spring tension and the impact gap (as
defined in Section 25.3.2).
Disengage the tappet nut via the local hand trip lever, and verify no interference between the
tappet stem and the head lever.
Reset the T&T valves connection rod, and verify proper engagement between the head lever and
the tappet nut.
Open the T & T valve approximately two turns.
Rotate the turbine shaft in its designated direction and verify that the trip assembly functions
properly, closing the T & T valve.
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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

If the assembly does not trip, continue to turn the tappet down (clockwise) in 1/8 turn increments
until successful operation is demonstrated.

CAUTION!! Do not exceed 2 full turns from initial tappet contact because damage to the head of the
tappet might occur.

If the trip function cannot be demonstrated with the maximum tappet to trip weight engagement,
re-verify the actual tappet engagement, free movement of the tappet assembly, tappet reset
spring force, tappet nut-to-head lever engagement, connecting rod spring force, and impact space
at the clevis end of the connecting rod and try again.
After demonstrating successful trip function, locate a dial indicator on the end of the tappet stem.
While holding the head lever away from the tappet nut, slowly rotate the turbine shaft in its
designated direction and verify that the total tappet lift does not exceed 0.085 in. (2.16 mm).
With the tappet nut held down firmly against the head bracket, verify that the metallic guide
portion of the tappet stem is within the end of the tappet guide.
Following successful verifications as defined, drill a 9/64 in. (3.6 mm) diameter hole through the
tappet nut and the tappet stem and install a 1/8 in. (3 mm) cotter pin to maintain this assembly.
Remove the temporary tappet stem jam nut at this time.
Remove the trip weight extension wedge or taper pin.
If the adjusting screw, spring seat, and weight spring were removed, they should be reinstalled at
this time and returned as closely as possible to their pre-disassembly position. If that position is
not known, turn the adjusting screw clockwise until all looseness is removed from the trip weight
assembly and then adjust an additional half-turn clockwise. Lock the adjusting screw jam nut.
This is a good starting point.

CAUTION!! Verify that the adjusting screw does not protrude beyond the outside diameter of the
overspeed trip disc.

Following this effort, verification of proper operation and the actual turbine speed setpoint for
overspeed trip is required (Reference Section 25.4).

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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

25.3.1.2

Polyurethane Head Tappet With the Pin Overspeed Governor

Reference Figures 25-5 and 25-6


The pin-type overspeed governor assembly is a potential crud trap, especially if there have been
any problems with oil cleanliness. Prior to installing and adjusting the overspeed trip tappet, it is
recommended that the overspeed governor be inspected for proper cleanliness and for damaged
components.
Remove the governor end journal bearing cap and/or the pump bracket cap for access to the
overspeed governor.
Loosen its setscrew, and remove the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw). Remove the trip
weight and the weight spring.

CAUTION!! Do not disturb the spring-adjusting screw (the hollow-center screw).

Clean the components, the bore in the turbine shaft, and the overspeed governor sleeve.
Inspect the trip weight and weight spring for damage and pay particular attention to the tip of the
trip weight for scratches and burrs. Rework or replace, as necessary.
Reassemble the components into the overspeed governor.
Fully extend the trip weight by turning the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw) clockwise
until the trip weight is firmly seated in the turbine shaft.
Disassemble, clean, and inspect the overspeed components that are mounted on the bearing cap.
Pay careful attention to the tappet (discoloration, hairline cracks, flat spots, uneven surfaces, or
other surface defects), its reset spring (distortion or off-set conditions), the tappet guide (worn or
distorted inside diameter), and the tappet nut-to-head lever square edge interface. Replace any
damaged or questionable components.
Reassemble the overspeed components onto the bearing cap. With the tappet nut in contact with
the head bracket, verify the required 0.030 to 0.060 in. (0.76 to 1.52 mm) engagement between
the tappet nut and the head lever.
Recommended Measurement Technique (Refer Figures 25-5 and 25-6)

Remove the connecting rods trip spring.

Place a dial indicator on the end of the overspeed trip tappet stem, to measure vertical lift.

With slight finger pressure, hold the head lever in contact with the tappet nut.
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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

While monitoring the dial indicator, slowly push down on the hand trip lever, lifting the
tappet nut.

When the head lever moves, record the dial indicator reading.

Remove the dial indicator and reconnect the connecting rods trip spring.

Reinstall the bearing cap and/or the pump bracket cap.


With the tappet nut held down firmly against the head bracket, screw the tappet down
(clockwise) until it just contacts the extended trip weight. This position can best be determined
by rotating the turbine shaft while slowly turning the tappet down until contact is felt.
Position the turbine shaft so that the extended trip weight is not in contact with the tappet. Then,
turn the tappet down (clockwise) one full turn (approximately 0.042 in. axial displacement).
Temporarily lock this tappet position by installing a 5/16-24 jam nut onto the tappet stem and
lightly tighten it against the top surface of the tappet nut.
Cut the tappet stem to within 1/16 inch (2 mm) of the top of the jam nut. Provide a slot
approximately 1/16 inch (2 mm) deep on the top of the tappet stem for a flat-blade screwdriver.
Install the connecting linkage assembly and adjust the spring tension and the impact gap (as
defined in Section 25.3.2).
Disengage the tappet nut via the local hand trip lever, and verify no interference between the
tappet stem and the head lever.
Reset the T&T valves connection rod, and verify proper engagement between the head lever and
the tappet nut.
Open the T & T valve approximately two turns.
Rotate the turbine shaft in its designated direction and verify that the trip assembly functions
properly, closing the T & T valve.
If the assembly does not trip, continue to turn the tappet down (clockwise) in 1/8 turn increments
until successful operation is demonstrated.

CAUTION!! Do not exceed 2 full turns from initial tappet contact, because damage to the head of the
tappet might occur.

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Turbine Overspeed Trip System

If the trip function cannot be demonstrated with the maximum tappet-to-trip-weight engagement,
re-verify the actual tappet engagement, the free movement of the tappet assembly, the tappet
reset spring force, the tappet nut-to-head lever engagement, the connecting rod spring force, and
the impact space at the clevis end of the connecting rod and then try again.
After demonstrating successful trip function, locate a dial indicator on the end of the tappet stem.
While holding the head lever away from the tappet nut, slowly rotate the turbine shaft in its
designated direction and verify that the total tappet lift does not exceed 0.085 in. (2.16 mm).
With the tappet nut held down firmly against the head bracket, verify that the metallic guide
portion of the tappet stem is within the end of the tappet guide.
Following successful verifications as defined, drill a 9/64 in. (3.6 mm) diameter hole through the
tappet nut and the tappet stem and install a 1/8 in. (3 mm) cotter pin to maintain this assembly.
Remove the temporary tappet stem jam nut at this time.
Reset the weight-adjusting screw (the solid screw) by backing it out CCW two full turns from
the fully seated position. Lock the weight-adjusting screw in this position with its setscrew and
lightly stake the setscrew into position.

NOTE: This procedure for locating the weight and weight-adjusting screw differs from the procedure in
the turbine manuals but results in a more precise and repeatable assembly.

Following this effort, verification of proper operation and the actual turbine speed setpoint for
overspeed trip is required (Reference Section 25.4).
25.3.2 Connecting Linkage Adjustment
Reference Figure 25-6
Two critical adjustments must be set and maintained on the connecting linkage assembly, the
connecting rod spring tension and the impact (hammer blow) space at the clevis end of the
connecting rod.
NOTE: These adjustments must be made with the T&T valves connecting rod reset, verifying proper
engagement between the head lever and the tappet nut (Refer Figures 25-4, -5, and -6).

The spring tension on the connecting rod must be set to obtain a force of 28 to 32 lbs (125 to
140 N) at the T&T valves slotted lever.

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NOTE: The corresponding required pull force for separation of the T & T valves trip hook should be
less than 25 lbs (110 N).

CONNECTING ROD SPRING INSPECTION: In the springs free length condition, the spring coils
are solid. Any coil distortion or separation would indicate a necessity for spring replacement.

A spring elongation of 2 1/4 to 2 3/4 in. (60 to 70 mm) typically provides the required
connecting rod force.
Original connecting rods were pre-drilled for the spring attachment, with the hole located to
obtain the required spring elongation. The only adjustment capability with this design was to
drill an additional locating hole. Current connecting rods are threaded, with adjustment capability
achieved by relocating the spring holder on the connecting rod.
Verification of the spring force can be obtained in the following manner:

Connect a calibrated spring scale to the clevis end of the connecting rod and hold it in line
with the axis of the connecting rod.

Apply force in the direction of the T&T valve (as if to increase the trip spring elongation)
until first movement of the emergency connecting rod is observed. The trip spring must be
adjusted so that the spring scale reads 28 to 32 lbs (125 to 140 N).

CAUTION!! For the threaded connecting rod, lock the spring holder to the rod with its jam nuts after
final adjustment. For the pre-drilled rod, adjustment means drilling a new spring location hole or
replacing the connecting rod.

To ensure separation of the T&T valves trip hook from the latchup lever, an impact (hammer
blow) space of 1/8 to 3/16 in. (3 to 5 mm) is provided at the clevis end of the connecting rod
(between the assembly pin hole of the clevis and the end of the slotted lever). This impact space
is achieved by adjusting the overall length of the connecting rod.
25.3.3 Trip Speed Adjustment
Verification of proper trip function and trip setpoint should be performed during each refueling
outage, and after any maintenance activity that could affect the operability of the overspeed trip
system. The following instructions define the adjustment of the trip setpoint, if required.

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25.3.3.1

Disc-Type Overspeed Governor

Reference Figure 25-1


Loosen the adjusting screws locknut. Turn the adjusting screw clockwise (CW) to raise the trip
setting and counterclockwise (CCW) to lower it.
A trial adjustment of approximately a half-turn of the screw is recommended. By noting the
amount of speed change obtained for the amount turned on the adjusting screw, a final setting
can be readily attained.

CAUTION!! Take care not to increase the weight spring compression to a point where the spring can
coil bind before the weight contacts its stop pin.

CAUTION!! Trip speed can only be altered by the described adjustment procedure. Do not attempt to
make any adjustments to the trip setpoint by altering the position of the tappet relative to the weight.

If the trip does not function or does not repeat at the same setpoint (+/- 2%), inspect for
anomalies such as dirt, burrs, and corrosion.
Measure and record the compressed length of the weight spring. This dimension will be
used during reassembly.
Loosen its jam nut and remove the adjusting screw, the spring seat, and weight spring.
Loosen its locking setscrew and remove the weight screw and the trip weight.
Inspect the trip weight for burrs or rough surface finish. Polish as necessary or replace.
Inspect the trip weight bearing for wear, eccentricity, and other damage. Replace the
weight assembly if necessary.

NOTE: If the needle bearing trip weight assembly is installed, it is recommended that it be replaced with
the improved Garlock bushing design. The Garlock bushing trip weight must be installed with a new
weight screw, as a complete assembly.

Inspect the weight spring for distortion and coil damage. Replace if necessary.

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CAUTION!! The weight springs vary in size for different trip setpoint speed ranges. It is important that
only replacement springs supplied by Dresser-Rand be used. Contact Dresser-Rand if a change from the
original trip speed setpoint is desired.

Clean all parts and reassemble.


Position the adjusting screw to obtain the compressed length of the weight spring as
measured prior to disassembly. Lock the adjusting screw jam nut.
For a major readjustment of turbine trip speed, turn the adjusting screw clockwise until all
looseness is removed from the trip weight assembly. Then, adjust an additional half-turn
clockwise. This is the minimum trip speed for any given weight-spring combination and should
be the starting point for testing and adjusting to the desired trip setpoint.

CAUTION!! Verify that the adjusting screw does not protrude beyond the outside diameter of the
overspeed trip disc.

25.3.3.2

Pin-Type Overspeed Governor

Reference Figure 25-3


Loosen its locking setscrew sufficiently to allow movement of the weight spring adjusting screw
(the hollow-center screw). Turn the adjusting screw CW to raise the trip setpoint and CCW to
lower it.
Adjustment should be made a quarter-turn at a time. By noting the amount of speed change
obtained for the amount turned on the adjusting screw, a final setting can be readily attained. The
typical response is approximately 200 rpm per full turn.

CAUTION!! Trip speed can be altered only by the adjustment procedure described. Do not attempt to
make any adjustments to the trip setpoint by repositioning the trip weight or by altering the position of the
tappet relative to the trip weight.

If the trip does not function, or does not repeat at the same setpoint (+/- 2%), inspect for
anomalies such as dirt, burrs, and corrosion.

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Disassemble by loosening its setscrew and removing the weight-adjusting screw (the
solid screw), trip weight, and weight spring. Do not remove the spring-adjusting screw
(the hollow-center screw) unless visual in-place inspection identifies damage.
Inspect the trip weight for burrs or a rough surface finish. Polish as necessary or replace.
Inspect the weight spring for distortion and coil damage. Replace if necessary.

CAUTION!! The weight springs vary in size for different trip setpoint speed ranges. It is important that
only replacement springs supplied by Dresser-Rand be used. Contact Dresser-Rand if a change from the
original trip speed setpoint is desired.

Inspect the bore of the turbine shaft and the governor trip disc for a smooth finish. Polish
as necessary.
Clean all parts and reassemble.
The correct position of the trip weight is established by screwing the weight-adjusting
screw (the solid screw) in until the trip weight is firmly seated in the turbine shaft. Then,
turn the weight-adjusting screw two full turns counterclockwise (CCW). Lock the
weight-adjusting screw in this position with its setscrew and lightly stake the setscrew
into position.

NOTE: This procedure for locating the weight and weight-adjusting screw differs from the procedure in
the turbine manuals but results in a more precise and repeatable assembly.

For a major readjustment of turbine trip speed, the initial setting of the spring-adjusting screw
(the hollow-center screw) is flush with the governor trip disc. This is the minimum trip speed for
any given weight-spring combination and should be the starting point for testing and adjusting to
the desired trip setpoint.

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25.4 Mechanical Overspeed Trip Testing


Reference Figure 25-6
Verification of freedom of movement and proper reset action of the mechanical trip system
should be performed after each surveillance test. The following steps are recommended:

While holding the connecting rod and head lever away from the tappet nut, manually lift the
tappet stem and verify free movement of the tappet and tappet nut. Release the tappet stem
and verify complete reset of the tappet (that is, verify that the tappet nut is in firm contact
with the head bracket).

Release the connecting rod and verify proper interface contact between the head lever and the
tappet nut.

With the T & T valve approximately two turns open, trip the turbine via the local hand-trip
lever and verify that the T & T valve closes.

Return the T & T valve operator local hand-wheel to the closed position and reset the
connecting rod. Verify proper reset of the tappet and proper interface contact between the
head lever and the tappet nut.

Return the system to standby conditions.

Testing of the complete overspeed trip system and verification of proper setpoint should be
performed during each refueling outage. It is required after any maintenance activity that could
affect the operability of the overspeed trip system.

Overspeed trip tests should be run uncoupled from the pumps to prevent damage or overpressure conditions.

It is recommended that the overspeed trip tests be performed on low-pressure (100250 psig
or 6901725 kPa) steam to allow easier control and minimize the chance of a runaway
turbine.

If applicable, the electronic overspeed trip device must be disabled prior to testing the
mechanical overspeed trip.

It is also recommended that turbine vibration be monitored during the overspeed trip tests.
Installation of the coupling gag could result in misalignment of the coupling sleeve, which
could cause abnormally high vibration levels.

With the turbine running on governor, and at maximum speed, use the overspeed test
controller (or bias speed-setting potentiometer) to slowly increase turbine speed to the
specified overspeed trip setpoint. Record the actual trip speed.

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CAUTION!! Regarding the overspeed test controller: due to manufacturing tolerances, there is a finite
difference in the values of the fixed 200 ohm resistor and the potentiometers 200 ohm resistor. This
difference will result in a small step change in turbine speed when the controllers action switch is put in
the test position.

NOTE: When testing the overspeed trip system, the turbine acceleration rate should be in the range of
25 to 50 rpm per second. A slow acceleration rate can result in erratic, non-repeatable trip speeds. A fast
acceleration rate can result in the inability to identify the actual trip speed, due to the speed overshoot
condition.

CAUTION!! It is critical that the potentiometer be returned to its fully counterclockwise position
following each overspeed trip test. Failure to reset the potentiometer will result in a subsequent
uncontrolled restart of the turbine.

If trip does not occur at the specified setpoint, increase the turbine speed an additional
500 rpm maximum. If trip still does not occur, shut down and investigate.

NOTE: Refer to Section 25.3.3 for trip speed adjustment instructions. Ironically, following maintenance
activity on the disc-type overspeed governor, the first trip speed is typically high. Do not adjust! Run a
second verification test prior to making an adjustment.

Recommended tolerance on the trip speed is +/- 2% of the turbine nameplate definition.

The overspeed trip test should be repeated a minimum of three times, with the consecutive
trips being within the speed acceptance criteria. The trip speeds should be non-trending (that
is, neither continuously increasing nor continuously decreasing). The trending trip speeds
could actually be a shifting trip setpoint due to looseness of components, trip spring damage,
binding, dirt, or possible improper assembly. Inspection and corrective action is required.

NOTE: Trending is not an issue or a concern if the three trip speeds are within 50 rpm of each other.

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25.5 Motor Drive for Overspeed Trip Testing


In lieu of requiring steam to spin the turbine for overspeed trip testing, a motor-driven device is
available for providing the motive power required to accelerate the turbine to its trip speed
condition. Information on this device, identified as the Terry Turbine Overspeed Device
(TTOD), is available from the manufacturer, ILD, Inc. (located in Baton Rouge, LA).
Basically, the device provides a variable frequency power input to an induction motor that is
coupled to the turbine shaft through a proprietary power transmission system. The resulting
turbine acceleration rate is controlled with precision, thus resulting in repeatable trip speed
demonstrations. A number of sites are using the TTOD with complete satisfaction.

25.6 Electronic Overspeed Trip System


Some turbines were originally equipped with an electronic overspeed trip system in addition to
the standard, mechanical overspeed trip system. The electronic overspeed trip setpoint was set at
a turbine speed below the mechanical overspeed trip setpoint, typically set at 110% of rated
turbine speed.
The original intent of the electronic trip was two-fold:

To provide an overspeed trip with remote reset capability (using a motor operator on the
T & T valve) in the event that the turbine tripped during the startup transient.

To provide an additional level of overspeed trip protection. This was a justified intent due to
the reliability problems encountered early on with the ball tappet assembly used on the
mechanical overspeed trip system.

Operating experience with startup transients indicated that the turbine acceleration was rapid
enough that when an overspeed did occur, both the electronic and mechanical trips operated.
This eliminated the remote reset capability because the mechanical trip does not have remote
reset capability.
The inability to provide the remote reset capability during startup, and problems with availability
of qualified replacement components, led many plants to remove the electronic trip altogether.
Other plants increased the setpoint to approximately the same as the mechanical overspeed trip.
The electronic trip system consists of four components:

A magnetic speed pickup, which generates a pulsed voltage with a frequency proportional to
the turbine speed

A tachometer module with switching capability, which measures the frequency from the
magnetic pickup and operates a relay at the predetermined trip speed

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A contactor, which is energized when the tachometer relay operates, thus powering a trip
solenoid

The trip solenoid, which closes the turbine T & T valve

Calibration of the electronic trip system is performed by using a sine wave audio frequency
generator to simulate the magnetic pickup output and then adjusting the tachometer switch
setpoint to the required frequency.
The required frequency is calculated from the desired setpoint, the number of teeth on the
magnetic pickup gear, and the gear ratio between the turbine shaft and the gear:
Frequency = (setpoint in rpm/gear ratio) x (number of gear teeth/60)
Testing of the electronic trip can be performed using a signal generator, as in calibration, or
during testing of the mechanical overspeed trip.

25.7 List of Figures


Figure

Description

25-1

Disc-Type Overspeed Governor

25-2

Disc-Type Overspeed Governor Trip Weight Clearance

25-3

Pin-Type Overspeed Governor

25-4

Disc-Type Trip with Molded Tappet

25-5

Pin-Type Trip with Molded Tappet

25-6

Trip Linkage

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Figure 25-1
Disc-Type Overspeed Governor

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Figure 25-2
Disc-Type Overspeed Governor Trip Weight Clearance

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Figure 25-3
Pin-Type Overspeed Governor

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Figure 25-4
Disc-Type Trip with Molded Tappet

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Figure 25-5
Pin-Type Trip with Molded Tappet

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Figure 25-6
Trip Linkage

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26

CRITICAL FITS AND DIMENSIONS


English units are defined in Section 26.1 and international units are defined in Section 26.2.

26.1 English (British) Units


General Information
Trip and Throttle Valve Weight
Turbine Upper-Half Casing Weight, GS-1
Turbine Upper-Half Casing Weight, GS-2
Turbine Rotor Weight
Turbine Wheel Diameter

450 lbs, approximate


500 lbs, approximate
800 lbs, approximate
200 lbs, approximate
24 in., nominal

Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve


Description

New

Remarks

Pilot Valve Stem Runout

Less than 0.002 in.

Replace if > 0.003 in.

Valve Stem/Bushing
Clearance

0.003 to 0.005 in.

Replace if stem/bushing clearance


is > 0.006 in.

Pilot Valve Lift

1/8 in., nominal

Coupling Assembly
Endplay
(coupling, spindle, washers)

0.002 to 0.004 in.

Assembly Pins Runout

0.002 in., TIR

Replace if > 0.002 in., TIR

26-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Governor Valve


Two and One Half Inch Single-Seated V-Port Valve
Description

New Condition

Remarks

Valve Plug Outside


Diameter

2.536 (+0.000/-0.002) in.

Maximum allowable wear = 0.005 in.

Valve Plug Guide Feet


Diameter

2.498 (+0.000/-0.002) in.

Maximum allowable wear = 0.005 in.

Valve Seat Bore Diameter

2.500 (+0.000/-0.001) in.

Maximum allowable wear = 0.005 in.

Valve Guide Bore Diameter

2.540 (+0.001/-0.000) in.

Maximum allowable wear = 0.005 in.

Valve Guide/Seat
Concentricity

0.002 in., TIR, maximum

Seat Contact

75% minimum

Valve Stem Diameter

0.4990 (+0.0000/-0.0005) in.

Valve Stem Runout

0.002 in. TIR, maximum

Valve Bonnet Bores


Carbon Spacer/Steel
Washer Area
Guide Bushing Area
Valve Stem Carbon Spacer
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Thickness
Valve Stem Steel Washer
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Thickness

26-2

0.030 to 0.090 in. contact line width

Measure at mid-point, with the stem


supported in V-blocks

1.005 (+0.001/-0.000) in.


1.130 (+0.001/-0.000) in.
0.5005 (+0.0005/-0.0000) in.
0.990 (+0.001/-0.001) in.
0.125 (+0.001/-0.001) in.
0.625 (+0.030/-0.005) in.
1.000 (+0.003/-0.003) in.
0.060 in.

Minimum cold clearance, stem to


spacer = 0.0015 in.

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Governor Valve


Two and One Half Inch Single-Seated V-Port Valve (cont.)
Description
Valve Stem Guide Bushing
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Fulcrum Support Spring
Seat
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter

New Condition

Remarks

0.503 (+0.003/-0.000) in.


1.125 (+0.002/-0.005) in.

0.520 (+0.005/-0.000) in.


1-12 UNF-2A

Three Inch Venturi Seat Valve


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Valve Plug Outside Diameter

2.9995 (+/-0.0005) in.

Valve Bonnet Guide Sleeve


Inside Diameter

3.005 (+0.001/-0.000) in.

Minimum plug/sleeve
clearance = 0.005 in.

Seat Contact

75% minimum

0.030 to 0.090 in. contact


line width

Valve Bonnet Sleeve Fit OD

6.060 (+0.000/-0.001) in.

Valve Body Fit ID

6.062 (+0.001/-0.001) in.

Valve Bonnet Flange Spigot OD

8.498 (+0.000/-0.003) in.

Valve Body Flange Spigot ID

8.500 (+0.005/-0.000) in.

Valve Stem Diameter

0.4990 (+0.0000/-0.0005) in.

26-3

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Three Inch Venturi Seat Valve (cont.)


Description
Valve Stem Runout
Disassembled from Plug

New Condition

Remarks

0.002 in. TIR, maximum

Assembled with
Valve Plug
Adjacent to Valve Plug
Mid-Point
Adjacent to Threaded
Area
Valve Stem/Plug Contact

Measure at mid-point, with the


stem supported in
V-blocks

0.002 in. TIR, maximum


0.007 in. TIR, maximum
0.012 in. TIR, maximum

Measure with valve plug


supported in V-blocks

Valve Stem Nut Torque

8 to 10 ft-lb

Valve Bonnet Bores


Carbon Spacer/Steel
Washer Area
Guide Bushing Area

1.005 (+0.001/-0.000) in., or


1.062 (+0.001/-0.000) in.
1.130 (+0.001/-0.000) in.

Valve Stem Carbon Spacer


Inside Diameter

0.5005 (+0.0005/-0.0000) in.

Outside Diameter
Thickness

75%, minimum

0.990 (+0.001/-0.001) in.


0.125 (+0.001/-0.001) in.

Valve Stem Steel Washer


Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Thickness

0.625 (+0.030/-0.005) in.


1.000 (+0.003/-0.003) in.
0.060 in.

Valve Stem Guide Bushing


Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter

0.520 (+0.003/-0.000) in.


1.125 (+0.002/-0.005) in.

Fulcrum Support Spring


Seat
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter

0.520 (+0.005/-0.000) in.


1-12 UNF-2A

26-4

Lightly stake the threads

Minimum cold clearance, stem


to spacer = 0.0015 in.

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Governor Valve Linkage


Description

New Condition

Pins and Bushings

Remarks
Maximum clearance = 0.003 in.

Total axial clearance


between the governor lever
radius faces and the spring
seat faces

0.005 to 0.010 in.

Total side clearance


between the governor lever
fork and the remote servo
slip link

0.010 to 0.015 in.

Adjust at assembly to maintain


0.005 to 0.010 in.

Turbine Journal Bearings


Description

New Condition

Turbine Shaft Diameter

2.2450 (+0.0005/-0.0005) in.

Bearing Clearance

0.006 (+0.003/-0.000) in.

Bearing Shell Interference


Fit

0.0005 to 0.0020 in.

Spur Gear Runout

0.002 in. TIR, maximum

Speed Pickup/Spur Gear


Gap

0.008 to 0.010 in.

Remarks

Replace at 0.014 in., diametrical

Set near high side

Turbine Thrust Bearing


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Turbine Shaft Endplay

0.000 to 0.006 in.

Replace if original clearance


increases by 0.003 in.

Turbine Shaft Runout at


Drive Gear Spacer

0.001 in.

Wheel Lap

1/16 to 3/32 in.

This is a visual estimate, not a


critical measurement

26-5

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Shaft Oil Seals


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Diametrical Clearance

0.008 in., minimum

Replace if damaged

Axial Clearance

0.020 in., minimum

Turbine Shaft Steam Seals


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Turbine Shaft Diameter

2.8720 (+0.0005/-0.0005) in.

Gland Case Partition


Thickness

Approximately 3/16 in.

Clean machine sealing faces to


0.093 in., minimum

Carbon Ring/Shaft
Clearance

0.002 to 0.004 in.

Replace if > 0.007 in.

Turbine Governor Drive Gear Assembly


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Gear Drive Shaft Axial


Thrust Clearance

0.008 to 0.015 in.

Replace if > 0.020 in.

Gear Assembly Backlash

0.008 to 0.015 in.

Replace if > 0.020 in.

Gear Teeth Wear Pattern

None

No heat discoloration

Drive Shaft Runout

Less than 0.001 in.

Replace if > 0.001 in.

Drive Shaft/Bushing
Clearance

0.003 to 0.005 in.

Turbine Shaft Runout


Drive Gear Spacer Area

Less than 0.001 in.

26-6

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly


Description
Turbine Shaft Runout
Adjacent to main coupling
Coupling end bearing
journal
Coupling end gland
journal
Wheel rim, axial direction
Governor end gland
journal
Governor end bearing
journal
Adjacent to governor drive
gear
Turbine Shaft Diameters
Bearing journal area
Gland journal area
Main coupling area

New Condition

Remarks

Less than 0.001 in., TIR


Less than 0.0002 in., TIR
Less than 0.0005 in., TIR
Less than 0.030 in., TIR
Less than 0.0005 in., TIR
Less than 0.0002 in., TIR
Less than 0.001 in., TIR

2.2450 (+0.0005/-0.0005) in.


2.8720 (+0.0005/-0.0005) in.
2.1250 (+0.0005/-0.0000) in.

Main Coupling Hub


Diameter

2.123 (+0.001/-0.000) in.

Shaft/Wheel Interference
Fit

0.0030 to 0.0045 in.

Wheel Lap

1/16 to 3/32 in.

Spur Gear Runout

0.002 in. TIR, maximum

Speed Pickup/Spur Gear


Gap

0.008 to 0.010 in.

This is a visual estimate, not a


critical measurement

Set near high side

26-7

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

26.2 International System of Units (SI)


General Information
Trip and Throttle Valve Weight
Turbine Upper-Half Casing Weight, GS-1
Turbine Upper-Half Casing Weight, GS-2
Turbine Rotor Weight
Turbine Wheel Diameter

205 kg, approximate


230 kg, approximate
365 kg, approximate
100 kg, approximate
610 mm, nominal

Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve


Description

New

Remarks

Pilot Valve Stem Runout

Less than 0.05 mm

Replace if > 0.08 mm

Valve Stem/Bushing
Clearance

0.08 to 0.13 mm

Replace if stem/bushing clearance


is > 0.15 mm

Pilot Valve Lift

3 mm, nominal

Coupling Assembly
Endplay
(coupling, spindle, washers)

0.05 to 0.10 mm

Assembly Pins Runout

0.05 mm, TIR

26-8

Replace if > 0.05 mm

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Governor Valve


Two and One Half Inch Single-Seated V-Port Valve
Description

New Condition

Remarks

Valve Plug Outside


Diameter

64.41 (+0.00/-0.05) mm

Maximum allowable wear = 0.13 mm

Valve Plug guide feet


Diameter

63.45 (+0.00/-0.05) mm

Maximum allowable wear = 0.13 mm

Valve Seat Bore Diameter

63.50 (+0.00/-0.02) mm

Maximum allowable wear = 0.13 mm

Valve Guide Bore Diameter

64.52 (+0.02/-0.00) mm

Maximum allowable wear = 0.13 mm

Valve Guide/Seat
Concentricity

0.05 mm TIR, maximum

Seat Contact

75% minimum

Valve Stem Diameter

12.675 (+0.000/-0.013) mm

Valve Stem Runout

0.05 mm TIR, maximum

Valve Bonnet Bores


Carbon Spacer/Steel
Washer Area
Guide Bushing Area
Valve Stem Carbon Spacer
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Thickness
Valve Stem Steel Washer
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Thickness

0.76 to 2.29 mm contact line width

Measure at mid-point, with the stem


supported in V-blocks

25.53 (+0.02/-0.00) mm
28.70 (+0.02/-0.00) mm
12.713 (+0.013/-0.000) mm
25.15 (+0.02/-0.02) mm
3.18 (+0.02/-0.02) mm

Minimum cold clearance, stem to


spacer = 0.038 mm

15.88 (+0.76/-0.13) mm
25.40 (+0.08/-0.08) mm
1.5 mm

26-9

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Governor Valve


Two and One Half Inch Single-Seated V-Port Valve (cont.)
Description
Valve Stem Guide Bushing
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Fulcrum Support Spring
Seat
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter

New Condition

Remarks

12.78 (+0.08/-0.00) mm
28.58 (+0.05/-0.13) mm

13.21 (+0.13/-0.00) mm
1-12 UNF-2A

Three Inch Venturi Seat Valve


Description

New Condition

Valve Plug Outside


Diameter

76.187 (+/-0.013) mm

Valve Bonnet Guide Sleeve


Inside Diameter

76.33 (+0.02/-0.00) mm

Minimum plug/sleeve clearance =


0.13 mm

Seat Contact

75% minimum

0.76 to 2.29 mm contact line


width

Valve Bonnet Sleeve Fit


OD

153.92 (+0.00/-0.02) mm

Valve Body Fit ID

153.97 (+0.02/-0.01) mm

Valve Bonnet Flange Spigot 215.85 (+0.00/-0.08) mm


OD
Valve Body Flange Spigot
ID

215.90 (+0.13/-0.00) mm

Valve Stem Diameter

12.675 (+0.000/-0.013) mm

26-10

Remarks

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Three Inch Venturi Seat Valve (cont.)


Description
Valve Stem Runout
Disassembled from Plug
Assembled with Valve
Plug
Adjacent to Valve Plug
Mid-Point
Adjacent to Threaded
Area

New Condition

Remarks

0.05 mm TIR, maximum

Measure at mid-point, with the


stem supported in V-blocks

0.05 mm TIR, maximum


0.18 mm TIR, maximum
0.30 mm TIR, maximum

Measure with valve plug


supported in V-blocks

Valve Stem/Plug Contact

75%, minimum

Valve Stem Nut Torque

10 to 15 N-cm

Valve Bonnet Bores


Carbon Spacer/Steel
Washer Area
Guide Bushing Area

25.53 (+0.02/-0.00) mm, or


26.97 (+0.02/-0.00) mm
28.70 (+0.02/-0.00) mm

Valve Stem Carbon Spacer


Inside Diameter

12.713 (+0.013/-0.000) mm

Outside Diameter
Thickness

Lightly stake the threads

Minimum cold clearance, stem to


spacer = 0.038 mm

25.15 (+0.02/-0.02) mm
3.18 (+0.02/-0.02) mm

Valve Stem Steel Washer


Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter
Thickness

15.88 (+0.76/-0.13) mm
25.40 (+0.08/-0.08) mm
1.5 mm

Valve Stem Guide Bushing


Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter

13.21 (+0.08/-0.00) mm
28.58 (+0.05/-0.13) mm

Fulcrum Support Spring


Seat
Inside Diameter
Outside Diameter

13.21 (+0.05/-0.00) mm
1-12 UNF-2A

26-11

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Governor Valve Linkage


Description

New Condition

Pins and Bushings

Remarks
Maximum clearance = 0.08 mm

Total axial clearance


between the governor lever
radius faces and the spring
seat faces

0.13 to 0.25 mm

Total side clearance


between the governor lever
fork and the remote servo
slip link

0.25 to 0.38 mm

Adjust at assembly to maintain


0.13 to 0.25 mm

Turbine Journal Bearings


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Turbine Shaft Diameter

57.023 (+0.013/-0.013) mm

Bearing Clearance

0.15 (+0.08/-0.00) mm

Bearing Shell Interference


Fit

0.013 to 0.051 mm

Spur Gear Runout

0.05 mm TIR, maximum

Speed Pickup/Spur Gear


Gap

0.20 to 0.25 mm

Set near high side

Description

New Condition

Remarks

Turbine Shaft Endplay

0.00 to 0.15 mm

Replace if original
clearance increases by
0.08 mm

Turbine Shaft Runout at


Drive Gear Spacer

0.02 mm

Wheel Lap

2 to 3 mm

Replace at 0.36 mm,


diametrical

Turbine Thrust Bearing

26-12

This is a visual estimate,


not a critical
measurement

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Shaft Oil Seals


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Diametrical Clearance

0.2 mm, minimum

Replace if damaged

Axial Clearance

0.5 mm, minimum

Turbine Shaft Steam Seals


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Turbine Shaft Diameter

72.949 (+0.013/-0.013) mm

Gland Case Partition


Thickness

Approximately 5 mm

Clean machine sealing faces


to 2.4 mm, minimum

Carbon Ring/Shaft
Clearance

0.05 to 0.10 mm

Replace if > 0.18 mm

Turbine Governor Drive Gear Assembly


Description

New Condition

Remarks

Gear Drive Shaft Axial


Thrust Clearance

0.20 to 0.38 mm

Replace if > 0.51 mm

Gear Assembly Backlash

0.20 to 0.38 mm

Replace if > 0.51 mm

Gear Teeth Wear Pattern

None

No heat discoloration

Drive Shaft Runout

Less than 0.02 mm

Replace if > 0.02 mm

Drive Shaft/Bushing
Clearance

0.08 to 0.13 mm

Turbine Shaft Runout


Drive Gear Spacer Area

Less than 0.02 mm

26-13

EPRI Licensed Material


Critical Fits and Dimensions

Turbine Rotor, Shaft/Wheel Assembly


Description
Turbine Shaft Runout
Adjacent to Main
Coupling
Coupling End Bearing
Journal
Coupling End Gland
Journal
Wheel Rim, axial direction
Governor End Gland
Journal
Governor End Bearing
Journal
Adjacent to Governor
Drive Gear
Turbine Shaft Diameters
Bearing Journal Area
Gland Journal Area
Main Coupling Area

New Condition
Less than 0.02 mm, TIR
Less than 0.005 mm, TIR
Less than 0.013 mm, TIR
Less than 0.76 mm, TIR
Less than 0.013 mm, TIR
Less than 0.005 mm, TIR
Less than 0.02 mm, TIR

57.023 (+0.013/-0.013) mm
72.949 (+0.013/-0.013) mm
53.975 (+0.015/-0.000) mm

Main Coupling Hub


Diameter

53.92(+0.02/-0.00) mm

Shaft/Wheel Interference
Fit

0.076 to 0.114 mm

Wheel Lap

2 to 3 mm

Spur Gear Runout

0.05 mm TIR, maximum

Speed Pickup/Spur Gear


Gap

0.20 to 0.25 mm

26-14

Remarks

This is a visual estimate,


not a critical measurement

Set near high side

EPRI Licensed Material

27

RECOMMENDED BOLT TORQUE


The following standard torque values are recommended for the bolting on the turbine assembly.
Use the high-strength torque column for steam pressure boundary and structural bolting. Use the
normal torque column for all other assembly bolting.
Torque requirements for specific components, which differ from the standard torques, are
defined in applicable sections of this guide.
These torque values require the use of an acceptable thread lubricant on the fastener male threads
and the fastener bearing surface. A properly calibrated torque wrench is also required.
Fastener Size

Normal Torque

10-32

1015 in-lb (110170 N-cm)

1/4-20

4050 in-lb (450570 N-cm)

5/16-18

5060 in-lb (560680 N-cm)

3/8-16

812 ft-lb (1015 N-m)

7/16-14

1520 ft-lb (2025 N-m)

1/2-13

2535 ft-lb (3545 N-m)

9/16-12

4050 ft-lb (5570 N-m)

5/8-11 and -18

5060 ft-lb (7080 N-m)

7585 ft-lb (100115 N-m)

3/4-10 and -16

90100 ft-lb (120135 N-m)

125135 ft-lb (170185 N-m)

7/8-9

140160 ft-lb (190215 N-m)

190210 ft-lb (260285 N-m)

1-8

220240 ft-lb (300325 N-m)

300330 ft-lb (400450 N-m)

1-12
1 1/8-7

330360 ft-lb (450490 N-m)


350390 ft-lb (475530 N-m)

1 1/8-12
1 1/4-7

1 3/8-12

450500 ft-lb (610680 N-m)


500550 ft-lb (680745 N-m)

500550 ft-lb (680745 N-m)

1 1/4-12
1 3/8-6

High-Strength Torque

680750 ft-lb (9251020 N-m)


725785 ft-lb (9851065 N-m)

650730 ft-lb (880990 N-m)

850950 ft-lb (11551290 N-m)


9401040 ft-lb (12751410 N-m)
27-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Recommended Bolt Torque

1 1/2-6

775875 ft-lb (10501185 N-m)

1 1/2-12
1 3/4-5

10401140 ft-lb (14101545 N-m)


11401240 ft-lb (15451685 N-m)

14001500 ft-lb (19002035 N-m)

1 3/4-8

20002200 ft-lb (27152985 N-m)


30003200 ft-lb (40704340 N-m)

The following tightening procedure is recommended for the bearing pedestal-to-turbine casing
interface:
1. Proceed with one nut at a time. Leave all other nuts tight and as found.
2. Loosen the nut. Ensure that the nut is turning on its stud and that the stud stays securely
seated in its tapped hole. If the stud turns with the nut, the stud must be removed. The nut
must be freed from the stud, and the stud must be reset into its tapped hole using Loctite 277
or the equivalent.
3. Using an appropriate wrench, re-tighten the nut to a snug position (approximately 10 ft-lb
torque).
4. Using the guidelines that follow, tighten the nut to the additional angle of turn required for
each location.
NOTE: Removal of the upper-half turbine casing and the turbine rotor is required to gain access to the
bottom nuts on the governor end pedestal.

Required Angle of Turn


Governor end, two studs near horizontal centerline,
accessible from outside of bearing pedestal

47 to 52

Governor end, three studs approximately six inches below


horizontal centerline, accessible from below case

19 to 21

Coupling end, six studs accessible from coupling


end of turbine

47 to 52

Coupling end, one stud at bottom center, accessible


from under turbine

19 to 21

5. Proceed to the next location and repeat steps 14 until all governor end locations and all
coupling end locations are tightened.

27-2

EPRI Licensed Material

28

ALIGNMENT
Proper alignment must be maintained between the turbine and its driven pump assembly, so that
the operating vibration levels remain within the acceptance criteria of the ASME Boiler and
Pressure Vessel Code.
For alignment criteria, the original, project-unique turbine instruction manuals define a turbine
shaft centerline rise based on thermal conditions encountered during the design bases event (that
is, maximum ambient temperature and maximum turbine exhaust pressure and temperature). It is
unlikely that these combined conditions would ever occur and, if they did, it would be for a
matter of minutes, not hours.
Based on years of operating experience, it is recommended that the following criteria be used for
the cold alignment of the turbine and its driven pump:

Turbine centerline thermal rise of approximately 0.004 in. (0.10 mm)

Coupling faces open at the top by approximately 0.001 in. (0.03 mm)

The maximum allowable coupling misalignment has been defined at 0.004 in. (0.10 mm), TIR
for both the rim and the face of the coupling hubs.
There has been little history of problems associated with turbine vibration. This is probably the
result of adequate alignment procedures and the use of a coupling assembly that compensates for
some misalignment conditions.
Misalignment has been identified as one of the potential causes for increased turbine vibration. If
alignment activity is required, it is recommended that the pump be aligned to the turbine. If the
turbine is moved for alignment, there is the potential for impacting the governor end pedestal
sliding foot alignment, as well as the alignment of governor linkages.

28-1

EPRI Licensed Material

29

TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDES
The process of troubleshooting requires a definition of the problem, an assembly of all of the
available data, an evaluation of cause and effect relationships, and the systematic elimination of
non-contributing factors.
Section 22-4 identifies specific troubleshooting guidelines for operational problems associated
with the turbine control system.
This section provides a general troubleshooting guide, addressing problems encountered during
operation of RCIC turbines. Many, if not most, of these problems can be traced to the infrequent
operation and long shutdown nature of the systems. Table 29-1 lists various problems or
symptoms, along with potential or contributory causes.
Table 29-1
General Troubleshooting Information, RCIC Turbines
Problem or Symptom
Overspeed trip on startup

Potential or Contributory Causes


Misadjusted, misaligned, sticking, or binding governor valve linkage
Sticking or binding governor valve stem
Improper governor control system calibration
Inoperable governor control system components
Damaged or inoperable speed pickup
Damaged or disconnected speed pickup connector
Improper governor valve or trip linkage adjustment
Improper trip valve latch engagement
Improper overspeed trip tappet nut-to-head lever engagement
Worn or damaged trip linkage components
Inappropriately painted trip or governor linkage components
Misalignment of the remote servo
Inadequate governor valve plug-to-sleeve clearance
Speed pickup sensing gear loose on shaft
Entrained air in governor hydraulic circuits
Undersized hydraulic tubing between hydraulic actuator and remote
servo
Wrong governor rotation
Steam admission valve opening time too fast
Excessive condensate in the inlet steam

29-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Troubleshooting Guides
Problem or Symptom
Spurious trips

Non-repeatable or drifting
trip speed setpoint

Overspeed trip will not


reset

Overspeed trip not


operational

29-2

Potential or Contributory Causes


Improper governor valve or trip linkage adjustment
Worn or damaged trip linkage components
Worn or damaged trip valve latch hook
Improper engagement or surface area contact between the trip
valves trip hook and latchup lever
Trip hook contact surface angle greater than 90
Improper tappet nut-to-head lever engagement
Wear of the tappet nut-to-head lever interface
Damaged or fatigued weight spring
Damaged reset spring
Short overspeed trip connecting rod clevis
Plant logic trip signals
Sticking or binding tappet assembly
Sticking or binding trip weight
Damaged or fatigued weight spring
Trip weight-to-pivot screw head side clearance inadequate
Worn or damaged trip weight bearing or bushing
Loose trip weight-adjusting screw
Worn or binding trip linkage
Improper trip weight, weight spring, and adjusting screw combination
Inconsistent or inadequate test procedure
Dirty, worn, or damaged trip linkage
Bent connecting rod
Inappropriately painted trip components
Binding or bent tappet assembly
Binding trip weight
Improper trip linkage adjustment
Improper trip linkage impact space
Improper tappet nut-to-head lever engagement
Worn tappet nut-to-head lever interface
Worn or damaged trip valve latching components
Damaged reset spring
Electronic overspeed trip signal present
Plant logic trip signals
Damaged tappet assembly
Corroded or frozen trip weight
Connecting rod spring tension inadequate
No separation between the trip valves trip hook and latchup lever
Trip hook contact surface angle less than 90
Improper tappet-to-trip weight engagement
Improper trip speed setting

EPRI Licensed Material


Troubleshooting Guides
Problem or Symptom
Damaged or bent trip
tappet

Potential or Contributory Causes

Excessive startup speed


transient

Inability to achieve
maximum rated conditions

Speed instability or hunting

Improper engagement with trip weight


Sticking tappet assembly
Excessive connecting rod spring tension
Excessive tappet stem length
Excessive clearance between tappet nut and head bracket
Short overspeed trip connecting rod clevis
Excessive connecting rod travel
Excessive standby temperature
Oil absorption
Sticking or binding governor valve stem
Misadjusted, misaligned, sticking, or binding governor linkage
Contaminated oil
Oil temperature too low
Control system calibration error
Entrained air in governor hydraulic circuits
Steam admission valve opens too fast
Excessive condensate in inlet steam
Inadequate governor valve travel
Internal damage to governor valve assembly
Speed control not at its maximum
Ramp initiation circuit problems
Improper test return valve setting
Inadequate inlet steam pressure or quality
Control system calibration error
Flow controller problems
Steam admission valve or trip valve not fully opened
Obstructed steam inlet strainer
Sticking or binding governor valve linkage
Dead travel or excessive clearance in governor linkage
EG-M control box gain setting too high
EG-M control box stability setting too low
Improper EG-R hydraulic actuator compensating needle valve
adjustment
Contaminated oil
Worn or damaged governor drive mechanism
Interaction with flow controller
Control system calibration
Misalignment of governor servo
Frayed electrical wire or loose electrical connections
Defective wiring shield
Degraded test return valve

29-3

EPRI Licensed Material


Troubleshooting Guides
Problem or Symptom
Setpoint error

Governor does not control

Acceleration transient too


fast or too slow

Governor valve stem


binding

Excessive governor valve


stem leakage

29-4

Potential or Contributory Causes


Control system calibration error or drift
Null voltage mismatch between EG-M control box and
EG-R hydraulic actuator
Flow controller calibration
Governor valve sticking or binding
Incorrect governor valve linkage adjustment
Governor component inoperable
Governor drive mechanism or coupling malfunction
Damaged or inoperable speed pickup or pickup connector
Speed pickup sensing gear loose on shaft
Speed pickup air gap incorrect
Excessive governor valve leakage
Adverse environmental conditions
Contaminated oil
RGSC ramp time error
Control system calibration error
Low oil temperature or pressure
Entrained air in governor hydraulic circuits
Contaminated oil
Valve stem corrosion
Valve stem material
Inadequate valve stem-to-carbon spacer clearance
Thermal expansion concerns
Valve stem runout
Plugged valve stem drain
Leaking steam admission valves
Misalignment between remote servo and governor valve lever
Misalignment of valve stem guide bushings or carbon spacers
relative to valve stem
Broken or loose carbon spacers in valve bonnet packing
Loose or improperly installed retaining rings in valve bonnet packing
Short duration surveillance testing
Immediate securing of gland seal vacuum pump or air compressor,
where applicable
Worn or broken carbon washers in valve bonnet packing
Corroded or eroded valve bonnet seal bore
Corroded or pitted valve stem
Broken or missing retaining rings in valve bonnet packing
Restricted or blocked leakoff piping
Inadequate gland condenser vacuum, where applicable
Inadequate gland containment system air pressure, where
applicable
Excessive condensate in inlet steam
Misaligned valve linkage or valve stem guides
Leaking steam admission valves

EPRI Licensed Material


Troubleshooting Guides
Problem or Symptom
Casing joint leakage

Excessive shaft carbon


seal leakage

High bearing or oil drain


temperature

Journal bearing wear or


damage

Thrust bearing wear or


damage

Potential or Contributory Causes


Loose flange bolting
Improper torque sequence
Flange faces not flat
Damaged flange faces
Excessive inlet water
Oversize or undersize gland housings
Inlet or exhaust steam piping strain
Inappropriate joint sealant
Incorrect sealant application
Foreign material between flange faces
Bypass body bolting interference
Worn carbon rings
Broken carbon rings or springs
Corroded or stuck carbon rings
Corroded gland case partitions
Improper or excessive application of joint sealant
Damaged, pitted, or peeling chrome plate
Restricted or blocked gland leakoff piping
Inadequate gland condenser vacuum, where applicable
Inadequate gland containment air pressure, where applicable
Improper valve lineup
Excessive exhaust pressure
Foreign material contamination
Inadequate initial bearing clearance
High supply oil temperature
Alignment
Low oil pressure
Restricted lubrication supply
Scored or wiped bearings
Coupling wear, damage, or lubrication
Inadequate bearing clearance
Fouled or damaged oil ring(s)
Leaking steam admission valve
Inadequate initial bearing clearance
Alignment
Inlet or exhaust steam piping strain
Restricted sliding foot
Coupling wear, damage, or lubrication
Bearing pedestal alignment
Lubricating oil contamination
Bearing loose in pedestal
Inadequate thrust clearance
Contaminated lubricating oil
Alignment
Coupling wear, damage, or lubrication
Improper assembly or disassembly techniques
Restricted lubrication supply
Excessive grease pack in main coupling

29-5

EPRI Licensed Material


Troubleshooting Guides
Problem or Symptom
Oil contamination

Oil foaming, flooding, or


overflowing

High oil supply temperature

High oil supply pressure

High oil filter pressure drop


Oil pump noise

Low oil pressure

Deposits in lubrication
system bearing pedestals
or equalizer pipe

Lubricating oil relief valve


noise

29-6

Potential or Contributory Causes


Contaminated make-up supply
Leaking carbon shaft seals
Leaking oil cooler
Damaged bearings or governor drive gears
Insulation blankets containing shaft seal leakage
Leaking steam admission valve
High oil level due to adding oil while turbine is running
High oil level due to static system over-filling
Air in-leakage on suction side of oil pump
Restricted bearing drain line(s)
Inadequate bearing drain line size
Plugged, missing, or improper oil feed orifices
Excessive oil header pressure
Relief valve discharge to oil pump suction
Oil contamination
Plugged oil cooler
High cooling water temperature
Restricted cooling water flow
Wiped or damaged bearings
Plugged oil feed orifices
Improper relief valve setting
Inoperable relief valve
Low oil temperature
Wiped or damaged bearings
Plugged or dirty oil filter element(s)
Contaminated lubricating oil, particularly with water
Improper transfer valve operation
Restricted oil pump suction, cavitation
Damaged oil pump
Oil pump/oil pump drive alignment
Pump suction air leakage
Low oil level
High oil temperature
Damaged turbine bearings
Improper relief valve setting
Inoperable relief valve
Damaged oil pump internals
Restricted oil pump suction
Contaminated lubrication oil
Excessive standby oil temperature
Vapor phase lubricating oil
Leaking carbon shaft seals
Contaminated make-up oil
Incorrect lubricating oil
Incompatible lubricants
Incorrect valve internals
Excessive oil flow

EPRI Licensed Material


Troubleshooting Guides

Problem or Symptom
Alignment

Excessive or increasing
turbine vibration

Condenser system,
condensate pump cycling,
or continuous operation

Condenser system, low or


no vacuum

Exhaust check valve


cycling
Rupture disc bursting

Potential or Contributory Causes


Excessive steam piping strain
Turbine/pump not doweled to baseplate
Loose interface between the bearing pedestal and the turbine
casing
Alignment
Improper support or alignment of the coupling sleeve during
overspeed trip testing
Coupling wear, damage, or lubrication
Inlet or exhaust steam piping strain
Restricted sliding foot
Improper coupling to spacer assembly, match marks not aligned
Inadequate bearing lubrication
Tight carbon seal rings
Stuck or seized carbon seal rings
Loose rotor parts
Rotor balance
Excessive bearing clearance
Restricted or inoperable case drain(s)
Excessive shaft runout
Bearing(s) loose in pedestal
Cooling water in-leakage or excessive flow during system operation
Turbine exhaust drain flooding
Siphoning from the suppression pool
Level switch inoperable
Level switch calibration
Restricted condensate discharge path
Pump internal damage or wear
Leaking steam admission valve
Excessive steam leakage from seals
Excessive air in-leakage from shaft seals
Vacuum pump damaged or inoperable
Leakoff piping damaged
Valve lineup
Water-choked vacuum pump discharge
Stuck discharge check valve
Low steam flow
Inadequate operating procedures
Closed or throttled exhaust isolation valve
Sticking exhaust check valve
Transient condensate, due to inoperable steam inlet or exhaust
drains
Inoperable exhaust line vacuum breakers
End of life

29-7

EPRI Licensed Material

30

REFERENCES
This list of references is not all-inclusive. There are also two other computer-based information
resources located at the INPO Operating Experience Web page and the Terry Turbine Users
Group Bulletin Board.

30.1 EPRI Documents


Terry Turbine Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 1995.
TR-105874.
Terry Turbine Controls Maintenance Guide, Revision 1A Revision to NP-6909. EPRI, Palo Alto,
CA: 1998. TR-016909-R1.
Preventive Maintenance Basis, Volume 36: Terry TurbinesSingle Stage. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA:
TR-106857-36.

30.2 Tuthill Pump Company


Service Instruction # 21, Installation and Service Instructions for Series CE and CF Pumps

30.3 Woodward Governor Company Manuals


37705, EG-M Control Box
37710, EG-R (and EG-3C) Actuators
82359, Ramp Generator and Signal Converter

30-1

EPRI Licensed Material


References

30.4 Terry Corporation Design Improvement (DI) Packages


DI-01, RCIC and AFW Turbines, EG-R Actuator Oil Sump and Support Bracket
DI-03, RCIC Turbine, Coupling End Pedestal Bolting Lock Tabs and Dowel Pins
DI-06, RCIC and AFW Turbines, EG-R Actuator Oil Sump and Support Bracket
DI-09, RCIC Turbine, Leakoff Connection Support Bracket
DI-12, RCIC and AFW Turbines, Model GS, Oil Piping Modification
DI-14, RCIC and AFW Turbines, Structural Bolting Requirements

30.5 General Electric Service Information Letters (SILs)


SIL-030, HPCI and RCIC Turbines, Exhaust Line Vacuum Breakers
SIL-031, Revision 2, Warm-Up of HPCI and RCIC Steam Supply Lines
SIL-094, HPCI and RCIC Turbines, Controls Improvement
SIL-319, Revision l, HPCI and RCIC Turbines, Drive Gear Assembly
SIL-336, Revision 1, Surveillance Testing Recommendations
SIL-351, Revision 2, HPCI and RCIC Turbines, Control System Calibration
SIL-377, RCIC Turbine, Startup Transient Improvement
SIL-382, RCIC Turbine, Removal of Electronic Overspeed Trip
SIL-393, RCIC Turbine, Journal Bearing Locating Pin
SIL-525, RCIC Turbine, Improved Mechanical Overspeed Trip Tappet Design
SIL 548, Increased Containment Oxygen Concentration During RCIC System Operation
SIL 580, HPCI and RCIC Turbine Drains
SIL 623, HPCI and RCIC System Peak Pump Discharge Pressure During Surveillance Testing
SIL 640, RCIC/HPCI EG-M Control Box Electrolytic Capacitor

30-2

EPRI Licensed Material


References

30.6 NRC Documents


30.6.1 Information Circulars and Notices
IC 78-02, Proper Lubrication Oil
IN 80-29, Broken Studs on Terry Turbine Steam Inlet Flange
IN 85-50, Complete Loss of Main and Auxiliary Feedwater at a PWR Designed by B&W (DavisBesse)
IN 85-76, Recent Water Hammer Events
IN 86-14, PWR Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Turbine Control Problems/Overspeed Trip
IN 86-14, Supplements 1 and 2, Overspeed Trips of AFW, HPCI, and RCIC Turbines
IN 88-67, PWR Auxiliary Feed Pump Turbine Overspeed Trip Failure
IN 90-45, Overspeed of the Turbine Driven Auxiliary Feedwater Pumps
IN 90-51, EG-M Governor Voltage Dropping Resistor Failures
IN 90-76, Failure of Turbine Overspeed Trip Mechanism Because of Inadequate Spring Tension
IN 93-51, Repetitive Overspeed Tripping of Turbine-Driven Auxiliary Feedwater Pumps
IN 93-67, Bursting of High Pressure Coolant Injection Steam Line Rupture Discs
IN 94-66, Overspeed of Turbine-Driven Pumps Caused by Governor Valve Stem Binding
IN 94-66, Supplement 1, Overspeed Trip of Turbine Driven Pumps Caused by Binding in Stem of
Governor Valve
IN 94-84, Air Entrainment in Terry Turbine Lubricating Oil System
IN 98-24, Stem Binding in Turbine Governor Valves in Reactor Core Isolation Cooling and
Auxiliary Feedwater Systems
IN 2000-01, Operational Issues Identified in BWR Trip and Transient (01-26-00 Reactor Scram
at Plant Hatch Unit 1)

30-3

EPRI Licensed Material


References

30.6.2 AEOD/C602, Case Study Report


Operational Experience Involving Turbine Overspeed Trips
30.6.3 NUREG-1154
Loss of Main and Auxiliary Feedwater Event at the Davis-Besse Plant on June 9, 1985
30.6.4 NUREG-1177
Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Restart of Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station Unit 1,
Following the Event of June 9, 1985
30.6.5 NUREG-1275, Volume 10
Operating Experience Feedback ReportReliability of Safety-Related Steam Turbine-Driven
Standby Pumps

30.7 INPO Documents


30.7.1 Significant Operating Experience Reports
SOER 81-13, Concurrent Loss of High Pressure Core Cooling Systems
SOER 82-08, Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Turbine Trip and Throttle Valve Indication
SOER 82-14, Reliability of BWR High Pressure Core Cooling Systems
SOER 86-01, Reliability of PWR Auxiliary Feedwater Systems
SOER 89-01, Testing of Steam Turbine/Pump Overspeed Trip Devices
30.7.2 Significant Event Report/Notice
SER 18-80, Repetitive Overspeed Trip of Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Turbine Trip Throttle Valve
SER 20-80, Inability to Reset Turbine-Driven Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Turbine Trip Throttle
Valve
SER 23-80, Emergency Feedwater Pump Turbine Trip on Overspeed
SER 34-81, BWR HPCI/RCIC Malfunctions
30-4

EPRI Licensed Material


References

SER 72-81, Emergency Feedwater Pump Overspeed


SER 64-82, Concurrent Failure of HPCI and RCIC
SER 18-83, Terry Turbine Control Valve Failure
SER 36-83, Loss of All Feedwater
SER 53-83, Failure of Hydraulic Actuator Coil, HPCI Turbine Woodward Governor
SER 29-85, with Supplement 1, Loss of Main and Auxiliary Feedwater
SER 44-85, Speed Control Deficiency Degrades Auxiliary Feedwater System Performance
SER 26-87, HPCI Turbine Inoperability
SER 03-90, Inadequate AFW Testing
SER 07-90, Turbine Driven Pump Overspeed
SER 24-93, HPCI Turbine Exhaust Diaphragm Rupture
SER 04-95, Terry Turbine Governor Valve Stem Binding Due to Corrosion
SEN 55, Failure of Woodward Governor Results in AFW Pump Overspeed
SEN 101, HPCI Turbine Exhaust Diaphragm Rupture Results in Personnel Injury
SEN 112, Recurring Event, RCIC Turbine Exhaust Diaphragm Rupture
30.7.3 Operations and Maintenance Reminders
O&MR 024, Effect on Turbine Restarting of Governor
O&MR 050, Positive Indication of Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Overspeed Trip
O&MR 061, Auxiliary Feedwater, RCIC, and HPCI Turbine Maintenance and Inspection
O&MR 199, Failure of Turbine-Driven Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Due to Steam Inlet Valve
Adjustment
O&MR 249, Failure of HPCI Exhaust Line Rupture Disc
O&MR 303, Auxiliary Turbine Startup Transient Improvement
O&MR 316, Defective Emergency Head Levers Supplied for Auxiliary Feedwater Pump Turbine
Drives, Manufactured by the Terry Corporation
O&MR 373, Potential Damage from Running Turbines Uncoupled from Pumps

30-5

EPRI Licensed Material

31

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS


AEOD
AFW
ASME
ASTM
B&W
BWR
cm
DC
DI
EG
EG-M
EG-R
EPRI
ft-lb
GE
gpm
HPCI
IC
in.
IN
INPO
kg
kPa
l
lpm
m
ml
mm
N
N-m
NMAC
NPT
NRC
O & MR

Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data


Auxiliary Feedwater
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Society for Testing and Materials
Babcock and Wilcox
Boiling Water Reactor
Centimeter
Direct Current
Design Improvement
Electronic Governor
Electric Governor Magnetic Pickup
Electric Governor Remote
Electric Power Research Institute
Foot-Pound
General Electric
Gallons per Minute
High-Pressure Coolant Injection
Information Circular
Inch
Information Notice
Institute of Nuclear Power Operations
Kilogram
KiloPascal
Liter
Liter per Minute
Meter
Milliliter
Millimeter
Newton
Newton-Meter
Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center
National Pipe Thread
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Operations and Maintenance Reminders
31-1

EPRI Licensed Material


Abbreviations and Acronyms

OEM
PG
PGA
PGD
PGG
PG-PL
psi
psid
psig
PWR
RCIC
RGSC
RMS
rpm
S&K
SCFM
SEN
SER
SIL
SOER
SPST
SSU
T&T
TIR
TTUG
VSI

31-2

Original Equipment Manufacturer


Pressure-Compensated Governor
Pressure-Compensated Governor Air Speed Setting
Pressure-Compensated Governor Dial Speed Setting
Pressure-Compensated Governor Gear Speed Setting
Pressure-Compensated Pipe Line Governor
Pounds per Square Inch
Pounds per Square Inch, Differential
Pounds per Square Inch, Gauge
Pressurized Water Reactor
Reactor Core Isolation Cooling
Ramp Generator and Signal Converter
Square Root of Mean Square
Revolutions per Minute
Schutte & Koerting, Division of Ketema, Inc.
Standard Cubic Feet per Minute
Significant Event Notice
Significant Event Report
Service Information Letter
Significant Operating Experience Report
Single-Pole Single-Throw
Saybolt Seconds Universal
Trip and Throttle
Total Indicated Reading
Terry Turbine Users Group
Vapor Space Inhibitor

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