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LESSON PLAN (50 min)

Subject: General Science

Class: 2E

Unit: Interactions

Date: 11th July 2013

Topic: Effects of Heat Energy


Prior Knowledge
Students should already know:
1. The three states of matter- solid, liquid and gas
Specific Instructional Objectives
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
1.
infer that solids, liquids and gases generally expand when heat is absorbed and contract
when heat is given out
2.
describe some effects and applications of expansion and contraction in everyday life such
as :

riveting

gaps in bridges, pavements and MRT lines

thermostats
Time
(min)
5

Lesson Development

Rationale

Resources

Introduction
Teacher to tell students that the chapter that they
will be learning today is Effects of Heat Energy.

Power-point,
laptop,
projector

Teacher to briefly introduce himself to the class


and state the expectations that he has for the
class.
Teacher then goes on to mention the outline of the
chapter to the students so as to give them an
overview of what they will be learning.

Lesson Development
5

Trigger Activity

Teacher to show students a video on hot air


balloon. Teacher then asks students some
questions:
1. Why does a hot air balloon floats?
Students should be able to mention that when air
is heated, it expands and becomes less dense
than the surrounding air. This explains why it
floats.
2. What would happen if the air inside in the
balloon is cooled?
Students should be able to mention that the
contraction of air occurs when the air inside of the
balloon is cooled. This causes the air in the
balloon to be denser and balloon falls. Teacher
can add that this is the way to make sure that the
hot air balloon make its landing

To arouse students
interest and as a
motivation for
learning the chapter

Power-point,
laptop,
projector,
video

Engaging Prior Knowledge

Teacher to mention to students that they will be


exploring a key idea which is
What are the effects of heat gain or heat loss
in matter? Teacher will do a recap of the things
that they should know so as to better understand
this chapter.

To engage their prior


knowledge and
refresh their memory
on the topic. If they
show understanding
of the topic, the pace
can be quickened.

Projector,
laptop,
Whiteboard

To provide a mental
clutch for students to
visualize the effects
of heat energy on
the atoms of matter
during expansion
and contraction

Laptop,
Projector,
PHET applet

Teacher to ask students the following questions:


1. What are the three states of matter?
Students should be able to reply solid, liquid
and gas.
2.

Water can exist in the solid, liquid and gas


states. What will happen when we heat
ice? What will happen when we put water
into the freezer? Students should be able to
state that ice becomes water and water
becomes ice respectively. Teacher then
states that there is a change of state when
water gains or loses heat.
3. We have been talking about matter since
the start of the class. What actually is
matter? Do all of you still remember the
particulate model of matter? Teacher to help
students recap that matter is made up of tiny
particles that are in continuous random motion
as reflected in the particulate model of matter.
Teacher to use PHET simulation applet to
demonstrate how heat energy affects the tiny
particles of matter in the case of expansion and
contraction. Teacher to interpret the simulation to
students that as substance expands, its volume
increases and density decreases.
Teacher then tell students that they will be
studying some effects of expansion and
contraction in their daily lives and the particulate
model of matter will be useful in understanding
expansion and contraction.
10

Expansion & Contraction (Solid, Liquid


& Gas)

Teacher to state that generally objects expand or


increase in size when they are heated and that
objects generally contract or decrease in size
when they are cooled. In addition, teacher to tell
students that this expansion and contraction
applies to solids, liquids and gases in general.

Power point,
laptop,
projector

Teacher to ask students to predict the outcomes of


the animated and non-animated examples of
expansion and contraction of solids, liquids:
1. Metal bar & gauge
2. Metal ball & ring
3. Test tube of colored water in beaker of
hot/cold water
4. Colored water droplet in test tube of air in
hot/cold environment

To demonstrate the
experimental
evidence for
expansion and
contraction so
students can better
appreciate the
concepts learned

Teacher to mention that gases expand more than


liquids and liquids expand more than solids.
5

Forces of Expansion & Contraction

Power point,
laptop,
projector

Teacher to highlight to students that large forces


can be generated by expansion and contraction.
Teacher shows students the apparatus that can be
used to study the large forces of expansion and
contraction.
10

Real-Applications of Expansion &


Contraction

Teacher to show students a video on real life


examples of expansion and contraction. Teacher
then explains some of the applications of
expansion and contraction in more details. The
following examples that will be highlighted:
1. Gaps in pavements, bridges and MRT lines
2. Riveting
3. Thermostats

To let students
relate theory to their
daily lives by having
a real-world context
so that it promotes
conceptual
understanding of the
concepts

Video,
projector,
laptop

To consolidate what
has been taught and
let students have
some hands-on
practice so as to
have assessment to
support learning

Power point,
laptop,
projector,
worksheets

Lesson Closure
Teacher to summarize the important key concepts:
Expansion & Contraction
1. Most solids, liquids and gases expand when
heated and contract when cooled.
2. Gases expand more than liquids and liquids
expand more than solids.
3. As a substance expands, volume increases
and density decreases.
Forces
1. Expansion and contraction can produce large
forces
Particulate Model of Matter
1. Expansion and contraction can be explained
on the atomic level.

Real-Life examples of Expansion and Contraction


1. Gaps in pavements, bridges and MRT
lines
2. Riveting
3. Thermostats

Students to do the assigned worksheets and


complete those questions that are covered in
class.

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