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Model 24/Mini-X

Series II
Laser Barcode Reader
PRODUCT MANUAL
INCLUDES STANDARD CONFIGURATION 1 (SC1)
MODEL 24 DYNAMIC RASTER (VV)
1000051491

Revision: 2.0

Release Date: 07/02

INTRODUCTION
This is the Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Model 24 and Mini-X
Series II. It provides details on everything you need to know to unpack, set up,
operate, and maintain your system.
This note box is used throughout this manual to indicate supplementary
information important to the current topic.

MANUAL REVISIONS
This Operations and Maintenance Manual is under revision control. Any addenda
or other documents associated with this manual are under separate revision
controls. A revision number is changed by 0.1 whenever technical information is
changed or added to a document. Any revision between 0.1 and 0.9 is
automatically considered preliminary. Any document with a revision greater than
0.9 has been officially released by the Accu-Sort Systems ECN process. The
document revision history can be found in the Revision History section at the end
of this manual.
DISCLAIMER
Information in this manual is subject to change without notice. No part of this
document is to be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic
or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information storage
and retrieval system without the prior written consent of Accu-Sort Systems, inc.
All drawings and specifications contained in this manual are the property of
Accu-Sort Systems, inc. and shall not be reproduced, copied or used in whole or
in part as the basis for the sale or manufacture of devices without written
permission.
Copyright 2001 Accu-Sort Systems, inc.
All Rights Reserved

II

WARRANTY
Accu-Sort Systems, inc. warrants that its unit and component parts will be free
from defects in material and workmanship for a period of one (1) year from the
date of shipment. Unless otherwise stated, warranty for products not
manufactured by ASI is limited to manufacturers warranty. Accu-Sorts sole
obligation with respect to damage (whether direct, incidental or consequential,
resulting from the use or performance of the terminal) is to repair or replace the
defective parts thereof.
EQUIPMENT OR COMPONENT FAILURES DUE TO MISUSE, ABUSE OR
NEGLECT ON THE PART OF THE USER OR HIS AGENTS ARE NOT
COVERED IN THIS WARRANTY.
There is no charge to the customer for any parts or labor required to repair
equipment in warranty when the defective item has been returned to the factory
for repair. On-site warranty service is available in the continental United States
during the one (1) year warranty period at a price equal to 75% of the standard
service charge in effect at the time of service, plus travel related expenses.
Or, if the equipment is installed in the continental United States by an Accu-Sort
service technician and billed at the then current service rate, the on-site service
during the first year is free of all charges including labor, parts and travel
expenses.
Service requests due to abuse, neglect or changes in the original specifications or
service calls not related to the Accu-Sort equipment, will be charged at the then
current service rate plus all travel related expenses. Warranty coverage lasts for
one calendar year. If the device or a part of the device is replaced, the warranty
coverage does not start over; however, the replacement part or unit (no charge) is
covered under warranty for the remainder of the one-year period, with a
minimum time period of 90 days.
Accu-Sort Systems, inc. also offers the Blue Ribbon Extended Service Plan
(BRES) in addition to the standard product warranty. Through this plan,
equipment maintenance and repair are offered with fixed cost and fast turnaround
for unexpected repairs.
Additional details on the coverage, support, and services available for your bar
code scanning and automated systems equipment is available from:
2800 Crystal Drive
Hatfield, PA 19440

Accu-Sort Systems, inc.


511 School House Road
Telford, PA 18969

2398 North Penn Road


Hatfield, PA 19440

Phone: (215) 723-0981


1-800-BAR-CODE
FAX: Telford Main .......... (215) 721-5551
Customer Service ... (215) 723-1515
Systems .................. (215) 996-8181
Sales....................... (215) 996-8282
Acct/Mktg .............. (215) 996-8249
TMS ....................... (215) 996-8787
North Penn ............. (215) 997-4848
Internet: www.accusort.com

III

CUSTOMER SERVICE
If you have any problems or questions that require Accu-Sorts help, direct your
calls to the Customer Service Department.
Accu-Sort Customer Service: phone:

fax:

(215) 723-0981
1-800-BAR-CODE
(ask for Customer Service)
(215) 723-1515

To ensure that Accu-Sorts response is prompt and accurate, please have the
following information ready to give the Customer Service Department when
calling:

Product Serial Number


Product Type or name
Detailed description of the question or problem
Customer contact name and phone number
Product Type

Serial Number

Serial Tag

Serial Number Breakdown:


WWXXXXXX (YY...)
WW - Two digit year of manufacture
XXXXXX - Six digit sequential build number
Y - Optional suffix(es) that reflect actual catalog options for the
off-the shelf units
- ex: M22A would have "A" as suffix
- at least 6 digits can be placed on the tag
- if "Z" is called out, this indicates a custom unit
requiring folder
- this could be used for special designations
The WWXXXXXX fields are bar coded with a Code 128 type bar code.

IV

SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS AND PRECAUTIONS


The Model 24 and Mini-X Series II are electronic microprocessor-based scanning
units. Please follow the safety precautions and warnings found throughout this
manual in order to prevent personal injury or damage to the unit. Failure to
follow these precautions may void your warranty.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential
area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to
correct the interference at his own expense.

The following note boxes are displayed throughout this manual to indicate safety
concerns and/or warnings.
This note box is used to provide precautions and/or guidelines, warning the user
that personal injury or damage to the unit may occur during the task they are
performing.
This note box is used to alert the user they are about to perform an action
involving a dangerous level of voltage, or to warn against an action that could
cause electrical shock.
Measures must be taken to prevent Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) at all times
when the cover is off the unit. Circuit Boards are at the most risk. See Safety
Recommendations and Precautions - Electrostatic Discharge.

WHEN UNPACKING AND MOUNTING

Do not drop the unit


Do not touch the exit window glass
WARNING
This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product can cause radio
interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
(ref. CISPR 22 = EN 55 022:1995)
WARNING
In order to maintain Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Compliance
interconnecting cables must be connected using a 360 shield connection of all
the interface cables with a conductive strain relief for RF shielding purposes
(I.e.:metalized D sub-strain relief). This applies to all I/O cables connected
through D sub-connectors.

GENERAL PRECAUTIONS
Please follow these precautions:

Do not attempt to open the unit.


Avoid staring at the laser beam. Staring at the laser beam for prolonged
periods could result in eye damage.
The use of optical instruments with this product will increase eye hazard. Do
not look into the laser beam with instruments such as telescopes, binoculars,
or cameras.
The use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than
those specified herein may result in hazardous laser light exposure.
Do not create any obstructions of airflow to the unit. Keep the area around
the unit clean to provide for cooling.
Any service should be performed so as not to violate compliance with the
Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Part 1040, Section 10 (21 CFR
1040.10), as administered by the Center for Devices and Radiological
Health, a service of the Food and Drug Administration under the Department
of Health and Human Services. Do not attempt to defeat any safety
provisions.
Learn where the disconnect switches or circuit breakers are for your area.
(Ensure that others using the equipment know this also.)
Use shielded interface cables with this product. To maintain FCC
compliance, the cable shield must make a 360FRQQHFWLRQWRWKHVKLHOGHG
mating connector.
Before performing any type of maintenance, turn off power to the unit and
disconnect the power cord.
Be certain your hands and the floor of your work area are dry before
touching electrical equipment or connecting cords.
Routinely check all connections to your unit. If a cable is damaged in any
way, replace it.
Routinely examine all wiring and plugs for any signs of exposed wire or
deteriorating insulation.
Check mounting hardware periodically for tightness and stability.
Do not use plaster board or wood as a mounting surface for the Model 24.
Use steel or aluminum as a mounting structure.
To prevent possible exposure to laser light that may exceed the CDRHs
Accessible Emission Limit for a Class II laser, your unit has a Scanning
Safeguard feature which shuts off the laser power if the mirror wheel fails to
rotate. This ensures that a stationary laser beam cannot exit the scan head.

GROUNDING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II


The system must be grounded electrically at all times. Please follow these
precautions:

Ensure your AC power outlet has a properly grounded receptacle.


Make sure you have the appropriate power cord for your country before
turning on the unit.
Do not turn on the system until all components are properly cabled and
grounded with three-conductor AC power cords. Do not use a two-prong
adapter.

VI

Do not cut or remove the round grounding prong from the plug under any
circumstances.
Do not use an extension cord to defeat the ground.
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE
Electrostatic discharge (ESD), the transfer of static electricity from one object to
another, is an often-unnoticeable hazard to electronic components. Boards and
other devices with integrated circuits are particularly sensitive to ESD damage.
Product failures may not occur until days or weeks after the component was
damaged.
Static damage to components can take the form of upset failures or catastrophic
failures (direct and latent).
An upset failure occurs when an electrostatic discharge is not significant enough
to cause total failure, but may result in intermittent gate leakage, causing loss of
software or incorrect storage of information.
Direct catastrophic failures occur when a component is damaged to the point
where it is permanently damaged.
The following note box is displayed where ESD precautions must be followed:
Measures must be taken to prevent Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) at all times
when the cover is off the unit. Circuit Boards are at the most risk. See Safety
Recommendations and Precautions - Electrostatic Discharge.

Five Basic Rules for ESD Control

Below are some keys to effectively control unnecessary ESD damage. When
working with ESD-sensitive devices:

Define an ESD protective area and work on the ESD-sensitive devices in this
area only;
Define the sensitivity of devices to be handled in the ESD protective area;
Establish a suitable static control program that both limits static generation to
less than the damage threshold of the most sensitive device in the
environment, and provides a safe, defined path for the dissipation of static
charges;
Prevent contamination of the protective area by unnecessary non-static
controlled materials; and
Audit the ESD protective area regularly to ensure that static control is
maintained. Document the findings for future reference.

VII

LABEL LOCATIONS MODEL 24 SERIES II


The following labels identify areas of the unit that require special precautions or
handling, or provide general information.

Model 24 Series II Labels and Locations

VIII

LABEL LOCATIONS MINI-X SERIES II


The following labels identify areas of the unit that require special precautions or
handling, or provide general information.

Mini-X Series II Labels and Locations

Table of Contents
Chapter One
Model 24/Mini-X Series II Capabilities
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 1-2
ABOUT THE SCANNERS................................................................................................................................. 1-3
MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II............................................................................................................. 1-3
SCANNER SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 1-4
MODEL 24 SERIES II........................................................................................................................ 1-4
MINI-X SERIES II............................................................................................................................. 1-5
SCANNER READ CHARTS .............................................................................................................................. 1-6
MODEL 24 SERIES II ....................................................................................................................... 1-6
MINI-X SERIES II............................................................................................................................. 1-9

Chapter Two
Scanner Unpacking, Setting Up, and Mounting
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 2-2
UNPACKING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II .......................................................................................... 2-3
SETTING UP THE MODEL 24 AND MINI-X SERIES II........................................................................................ 2-3
CONNECTOR LOCATIONS ................................................................................................................. 2-4
LED STATUS INDICATORS ............................................................................................................... 2-6
MOUNTING THE SCANNER ............................................................................................................................ 2-9
MODEL 24 SERIES II ....................................................................................................................... 2-9
MINI-X SERIES II........................................................................................................................... 2-13
ACCESSORIES............................................................................................................................... 2-15

Chapter Three
Configuring the Model 24/Mini-X Series II
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3-2
BARCODE BASICS AND THE MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II ................................................................................ 3-3
APPLICATIONS.............................................................................................................................................. 3-5
USING PHOTOEYES ......................................................................................................................... 3-5
SINGLE BARCODE SETUP ................................................................................................................ 3-7
SINGLE BARCODE WITH MULTIPLE MESSAGES .................................................................................. 3-7
SINGLE BARCODE WITH CHARACTER STRIPPING ............................................................................... 3-7
TWO BARCODES WITH A SEPARATOR ............................................................................................... 3-8
TWO BARCODE TYPES TRANSMITTED AS SETS ................................................................................. 3-8
FIXED MESSAGE WITH VARIOUS BARCODES ..................................................................................... 3-9
INTERFACE TO ADDITIONAL SERIAL DEVICES .................................................................................... 3-9
QUAD RELAY BOX AND RELAY OUTPUTS ........................................................................................ 3-10
GO/NVC RELAYS ......................................................................................................................... 3-12
LIFE LIGHT .................................................................................................................................... 3-12
MATCH RELAY 1 ........................................................................................................................... 3-12
MATCH RELAY 2 ........................................................................................................................... 3-13
MATCH RELAY 3 ........................................................................................................................... 3-13
MASTER/SLAVE CONFIGURATION ................................................................................................... 3-14

Solutions with Vision

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Chapter Four
Making Connections To The Scanner
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 4-2
ASSEMBLING CONNECTORS .......................................................................................................................... 4-3
9-PIN CONNECTORS........................................................................................................................ 4-3
25-PIN CONNECTORS...................................................................................................................... 4-4
SCANNER COMMUNICATION TYPES ............................................................................................................... 4-5
RS232 WITH NO HANDSHAKING...................................................................................................... 4-5
RS232 WITH RTS/CTS HANDSHAKING ........................................................................................... 4-6
RS422 FULL DUPLEX...................................................................................................................... 4-7
RS485 HALF DUPLEX ..................................................................................................................... 4-9
CURRENT LOOP (COM 1 ONLY) ..................................................................................................... 4-10
CONNECTING TO THE SCANNER ................................................................................................................. 4-11
CONNECTING TO A PC OR TERMINAL ............................................................................................ 4-11
CONNECTING TO A TRIGGERING DEVICE........................................................................................ 4-12
CONNECTING TO AN EXTERNAL LOGIC (MODEL 24E SERIES II ONLY).............................................. 4-15
CONNECTING TO A QUAD RELAY BOX ........................................................................................... 4-16
CONNECTING OTHER DEVICES ...................................................................................................... 4-17
OPTIONAL COMMUNICATION TYPES ............................................................................................................. 4-19
ETHERNET .................................................................................................................................... 4-19
DEVICENET .................................................................................................................................. 4-19
PROFIBUS ..................................................................................................................................... 4-20

Chapter Four
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 5-2
SCANNER MAINTENANCE .............................................................................................................................. 5-3
CLEANING AND CHECKING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II......................................................... 5-3
CHECKING OTHER EQUIPMENT ......................................................................................................... 5-3
SCANNER TROUBLESHOOTING ...................................................................................................................... 5-4
MODEL 24 SERIES II ....................................................................................................................... 5-4
MINI-X SERIES II............................................................................................................................. 5-6
PROBLEM/CAUSES/SOLUTION TABLE ............................................................................................... 5-8

Appendices
APPENDIX A - ASCII CHART.........................................................................................................................A-2
APPENDIX B ASCII COMMUNICATIONS .......................................................................................................A-3
STANDARD RS485 MULTIDROP COMMUNICATIONS ...........................................................................A-3
PROTOCOLS USED WITH RS232, CURRENT LOOP, AND RS422 .......................................................A-9
APPENDIX C BEAM APERTURE ADJUSTMENT ............................................................................................A-10
APPENDIX D MOUNTING THE EXTERNAL BLOWER (P/N MDL24-55) ...........................................................A-11
APPENDIX E UNIVERSAL MOUNTING BRACKET..........................................................................................A-13
QUICK RELEASE MOUNTING KIT.....................................................................................................A-13

Glossary
Index
Revision History

Accu-Sort Systems

Chapter One
Model 24/Mini-X Series II Capabilities

1Heading 2

Chapter One

Contents

INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................... 1-2
ABOUT THE SCANNERS ............................................................................. 1-3
MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II................................................................... 1-3
SCANNER SPECIFICATIONS........................................................................ 1-4
MODEL 24 SERIES II.............................................................................. 1-4
MINI-X SERIES II ................................................................................... 1-5
SCANNER READ CHARTS .......................................................................... 1-6
MODEL 24 SERIES II.............................................................................. 1-6
MINI-X SERIES II ................................................................................... 1-9

1-2

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the Accu-Sort Model 24 and Mini-X Series II scanning
systems and how they read bar codes.

Accu-Sort Systems

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II CAPABILITIES

1-3

ABOUT THE SCANNERS


MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II
With various configurations available, the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II scanners
provides medium to long range bar code scanning. The main difference between
the two scanners is the Model 24 Series II is a linear scanner while the Mini-X
Series II is an omnidirectional scanner. Both scanners are small, light weight and
self-contained. The scanners are in many different configurations including the
Standard Configuration (SCx) and the Dynamic Raster (VV).
Accu-Sort Systems developed the Model 24 and Mini-X Series II with the
various needs of their customers in mind. Because of this, the Model 24 and
Mini-X are designed with many powerful features that make bar code scanning
easier to implement and maintain. The standard features include:

Operator LED indicators


High scan rate, which increases flexibility, productivity and efficiency
Long range scanning ability
Wide scan angle for bar code scanning even at a close range
Reads all of the major bar code symbologies
NEMA 12 enclosure, sturdy enough to use in an industrial environment

Optional features designed to enhance the performance of the Model 24 and


Mini-X are also available. These features include:

Dynamic Raster
High density scanning
Two and three zone focusing
Custom applications
DRX technology

Both scanners are configurable via software to use Accu-Sorts patented DRX
Technology. DRX allows the scanners to read bar codes many other scanners
can not. The way this is achieved, DRX uses partial scans and reconstructs the
bar code data with 100% accuracy.
Additional software (TachTrac) has been designed to provide the ability for two
or more boxes to be scanned within the scanners read zone at one time. This
capability allows greater throughput by decreasing the space required between
boxes. A tachometer is required to synchronize the conveyor belt travel with the
scanner, which helps the system track boxes and assign bar codes to the
associated packages.

Solutions with Vision

1-4

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

SCANNER SPECIFICATIONS
MODEL 24 SERIES II
This system must be grounded electrically. Ensure your AC power outlet has a
properly grounded receptacle. Also, make sure you have the appropriate power
cord for your country before powering the unit.
Do not turn the system on until all components are properly cabled and grounded
with three conductor AC power cords. Do not use a two-prong adapter. Do not use
an extension cord to defeat the ground.
Do not under any circumstances cut or remove the round grounding prong from
the plug. The unit must be grounded at all times.

Physical
Size and Weight

Enclosure

Model 24 Series II: 11.88 L x 5.06 W x 8.28 H; 13 lbs.


Model 24 Series II: 30.18 cm L x 12.85 cm W x 21.03 cm H; 5.9 kg
Model 24 VV: 11.88 L x 7.93 W x 8.28 H; 13.82 lbs.
Model 24 VV: 30.18 cm L x 20.14 cm W x 21.03 cm H; 6.27 kg
NEMA 12 standard (gasketed, drip-proof and dust-tight)

Visual Diagnostics

Model 24 SC1, Model 24 VV and Model 24i: Three LED status


indicators: Go/NVC, Trigger, Laser
Model 24e: Two LED "status" indicators: Trigger, Laser

Temperature Range

32 to 122F (0 - 50C)
Units with the heater option (used in extremely cold climates) will
operate between 50 - 60 F

Relative Humidity

20-90% non-condensing

Power Requirements

100-240 VAC, 50/60 Hz, 20 watts

Scan Rate
Laser Pattern

Up to 3000 scans per second


500 scans per second (SC1)
Standard Line

Bar Code Types

Model 24 SC1, Model 24 VV and Model 24i: All 1D

Environmental

Operating Parameters

Model 24e: All 1D, depending upon external logic.


Communications
Connections

Accu-Sort Systems

RS232, RS422, RS485, Current Loop, Ethernet (optional), Profibus


(optional), DeviceNet (optional)
4 serial ports : 3 external, 1 internal
1 trigger input
1 tachometer input
2 form "A" relays (1 optional)
Up to 4 parallel outputs
Up to 2 parallel inputs

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II CAPABILITIES

1-5

MINI-X SERIES II
This system must be grounded electrically. Ensure your AC power outlet has a
properly grounded receptacle. Also, make sure you have the appropriate power
cord for your country before powering the unit.
Do not turn the system on until all components are properly cabled and grounded
with three conductor AC power cords. Do not use a two-prong adapter. Do not use
an extension cord to defeat the ground.
Do not under any circumstances cut or remove the round grounding prong from
the plug. The unit must be grounded at all times.

Physical
Size and Weight

11.41 L x 15.50 W x 6.35 H; 21 lbs.


29.98 cm L x 39.37 cm W x 16.13 cm H; 9.5 kg

Enclosure

Aluminum NEMA 12 (IP 52) rated optical department

Visual Diagnostics

Three LED status indicators: Go/NVC, Trigger, Laser

Temperature Range

32 to 122F (0 - 50C)

Relative Humidity

20-90% non-condensing

Power Requirements

100-240 VAC, 50/60 Hz, 20 watts

Scan Rate

500 scans per second

Reading
Laser Pattern

Tilt: 360 (omnidirectional);


Pitch and skew: Up to 45 (application dependent)
Standard X

Bar Code Types

All 1D

Communications

RS232, RS422, RS485, Current Loop, Ethernet (optional), Profibus


(optional), DeviceNet (optional)

Connections

4 serial ports : 3 external, 1 internal


1 trigger input
1 tachometer input
2 form "A" relays (1 optional)
Up to 4 parallel outputs
Up to 2 parallel inputs

Environmental

Operating Parameters

Solutions with Vision

1-6

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

SCANNER READ CHARTS


MODEL 24 SERIES II
The following read chart illustrates the read ranges for the Model 24 Series II in a
standard configuration (SC1).

Model 24 Series II SC1 Read Chart

Accu-Sort Systems

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II CAPABILITIES

1-7

The following read chart illustrates the read ranges for the Model 24 VV.

Model 24 VV Read Chart

Solutions with Vision

1-8

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

The following read chart illustrates the read ranges for the Model 24 Series II.

Model 24 Series II Read Chart

Accu-Sort Systems

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II CAPABILITIES

1-9

MINI-X SERIES II
The following read chart illustrates the read ranges for the Mini-X Series II in a
standard configuration (SC1).

Mini-X Series II SC1 Read Chart

Solutions with Vision

Accu-Sort Systems

W
I
N
D
O
W

S
C
A
N

Mini-X Series II Read Chart


20"

15"

10"

5"

0"

5"

10"

15"

20"

80"

65"

60"

50"

45"

40"

DISTANCE FROM SCANNER

55"

19" (482mm)@52" (1320mm)

25.0 mil (.63mm)16" - 52" (406 - 1320mm)36" (914mm)

70"

18" (457mm)@47" (1194mm)

20.0 mil (.50mm)21" - 47" (533 - 1193mm)26" (660mm)

75"

17" (431mm)@40" (1016mm)

15.0 mil (.38mm)25" - 40" (635 - 1016mm)15" (381mm)

Maximum Scan
Window

16" (406mm)@36" (914mm)

Depth Of Field

10.0 mil (.25mm)28" - 36" (711 - 914mm) 8" (203mm)

Chart Narrow Element


Reading Range
Colors
Width

35"

30"

25"

20"

15"

10"

0"

W
i
n
d
o
w

E
x
i
t

S
c
a
n
n
e
r

Mini-X Series II Standard Configuration

1-10
MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

The following read chart illustrates the read ranges for the Mini-X Series II

Chapter Two
Scanner Unpacking, Setting Up, and Mounting

2Heading 2

Chapter Two

Contents

INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................... 2-2
UNPACKING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II....................................... 2-3
SETTING UP THE MODEL 24 AND MINI-X SERIES II .................................... 2-3
Connector Locations ........................................................................ 2-4
MODEL 24 SERIES II...................................................................................... 2-4
MINI-X SERIES II ........................................................................................... 2-5

LED Status Indicators....................................................................... 2-6


MODEL 24I AND SC1 SERIES II....................................................................... 2-6
MODEL 24E SERIES II .................................................................................... 2-7
MINI-X SERIES II .......................................................................................... 2-8

MOUNTING THE SCANNER ......................................................................... 2-9


Model 24 Series II .............................................................................. 2-9
1000018296 EXTRUSION MOUNTING HARDWARE KIT .................................... 2-10
1000020522 55/70 ADAPTER BRACKET ....................................................... 2-10
MOUNTING ORIENTATIONS............................................................................ 2-11

Mini-X Series II................................................................................. 2-13


Accessories ..................................................................................... 2-15
PHOTOEYES ................................................................................................ 2-15
TACHOMETER.............................................................................................. 2-16

2-2

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the unpacking, setting up and mounting of the Model 24
and Mini-X Series II scanning system.
Some of the equipment described in this chapter might not be used with your
system. Skip over sections that do not apply.
Do not turn on the system until all components are properly cabled and grounded
with three-conductor AC power cords. Do not use a two-prong adapter. Do not
use an extension cord to defeat the ground.
Ensure your AC power outlet has a properly grounded receptacle. Make sure you
have the appropriate power cord for your country before powering the unit.
Do NOT use the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II power line to operate other
equipment, especially induction motors and solenoids.

Accu-Sort Systems

SCANNER UNPACKING, SETTING UP, AND MOUNTING

2-3

UNPACKING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II


When you unpack the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II scanning system, you will
find all the necessary parts need to install the system. The placement of the
Model 24 or Mini-X Series II accessories inside the box depends on your order.
Remove everything from the box and compare the items listed on the packing
list. If any of the parts of the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II or any of the
accessories are missing or damaged, contact Accu-Sort immediately (Refer to
page iii, Customer Service).

SETTING UP THE MODEL 24 AND MINI-X SERIES


II
The steps below represent one recommended scenario to set up the Model 24 and
Mini-X Series II Scanning System:
1. Remove all materials from the box.
2. Check the materials against the packing list and make sure none of the parts
are missing or damaged.
3. Mount your Model 24 or Mini-X Series II as described in this chapter,
ensuring that cable lengths will enable proper connections to the unit.
4. Make all the appropriate connections to your Model 24 or Mini-X Series II.
5. Begin reading your bar codes.
If you have any problems or questions concerning setting up your Model 24 or
Mini-X Series II, contact Accu-Sort immediately (Refer to page iii, Customer
Service).

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

CONNECTOR LOCATIONS
The illustrations below show the locations of the external connectors for
connecting the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II scanners to other devices.
Model 24 Series II

Model 24i and SC1 Series II Connectors

Model 24e Series II Connectors

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Mini-X Series II

Mini-X Front View

Mini-X Rear View

Mini-X Series II Connectors

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

LED STATUS INDICATORS


Model 24i and SC1 Series II

The Model 24i and SC1 Series II has three LED "status" indicators on the
connector panel that provide operational information. The location of these LEDs
is shown below. The following are descriptions of each LED.
Go/NVC
Trigger
Laser

Green at the end of TRIGGER (CART) indicates a good read. Red at the end of
TRIGGER (CART) indicates a NO READ or NOT VALID CODE.
Solid yellow indicates the TRIGGER (CART) input is active.
Solid green indicates the laser is on.

More information is provided in Chapter Four of this manual (Troubleshooting


Section).

Model 24i and SC1 Series II LED Locations

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2-7

Model 24e Series II

On the connector panel, the Model 24e Series II has two LED "status" indicators
that provide operational information. The location of these LEDs is shown
below. The following are descriptions of each LED.
Trigger
Laser

Solid yellow indicates the TRIGGER (CART) input is active. In continuous read
mode the LED remains solid yellow.
Solid green indicates the laser is on.

More information is provided in Chapter Four of this manual (Troubleshooting


Section).

Model 24e Series II LED Locations

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


MINI-X Series II

On the connector panel, the Mini-X Series II has three LED "status" indicators
that provide operational information. The location of these LEDs is shown
below. The following are descriptions of each LED.
Go/NVC
Trigger
Laser

Green at the end of TRIGGER (CART) indicates a good read. Red at the end of
TRIGGER (CART) indicates a NO READ or NOT VALID CODE.
Solid yellow indicates the TRIGGER (CART) input is active.
Solid green indicates the laser is on.

More information is provided in Chapter Four of this manual (Troubleshooting


Section).

Mini-X Series II LED Locations

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MOUNTING THE SCANNER


MODEL 24 SERIES II
The Model 24 Series II was designed to provide maximum mounting flexibility
to the end user. The body of the unit has four tracks designed to accept industrystandard extrusion drop-in nuts. There is one track each on the top and bottom of
the unit, and two on the front. The unit can be mounted via any one of these
tracks, to best suit existing structures or facilitate the design of new structures.
When you mount the Model 24 Series II, make sure there is enough space around
the unit for the connections to the accessories needed for your application. There
must also be enough room to allow for a nominal amount of airflow around the
unit. The minimum space requirements for the Model 24 Series II are as follows:

Overhead - Leave enough room for air flow


Connector panel 2.25 (57.15 mm) for connections
Sides - Leave enough room for air flow
Front - Make sure there are no obstructions between the scanner and the bar
code to be scanned during the read cycle
When mounting your Model 24 series II, do not use sheet rock or wood as your
mounting surface. Make sure to use steel or aluminum as a mounting structure.

Accu-Sort offers three different mounting kits for the Model 24 Series II, as the
remainder of this section shows.

Model 24 Series II Dimensions With Reference to the Scan Line

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


1000018296 Extrusion Mounting Hardware Kit

This kit simply consists of two drop-in nuts, along with bolts and washers, for
mounting the Model 24 Series II to a customer-designed bracket. The 5/8" bolts
provided in the kit, when used with the flat and lock washers, provide the proper
engagement depth into the drop-in nuts for bracket thicknesses of 1/8" to 3/16".
Screw engagement depth should be between 0.3 (0.76 cm) and 0.4 (1.02 cm)
for secure mounting. See the drawing below:
You can use any type of
fasteners with the bracket, as
long as they are compatible
with the mounting surface.

Maximum Screw Depth in Nut Track

1000020522 55/70 Adapter Bracket

This kit is designed for replacing an Accu-Sort Model 55 or 70 with a Model 24


Series II. The bracket will orient the beam pattern (exit angle and point of origin
for optical measurements) of the Model 24 Series II to match that of the 55/70.
The kit consists of the bracket and hardware necessary to mount the Model 24
Series II.
To mount the Model 24 Series II using this bracket:
1. Place the Model 24 Series II upside down, with the bottom nut track facing
up. Insert the two drop-in nuts from the kit into the nut track, approximately
1 (2.54 cm) from either end of the track.
2. Place the adapter bracket into the nut track in the Model 24 Series II, with the
single mounting hole facing the front of the Model 24 Series II. The studs
adjacent to the angled slot will protrude into the nut track and accurately
locate the bracket onto the unit.
3. Insert the two screws provided in the kit, with their flat and lockwashers,
through the bracket and into the drop-in nuts in the nut track, and tighten.
4. Remove the three mounting bolts from the existing 55/70, remove the unit,
and install the Model 24 Series II mounting plate combination in its place,
using the original bolts.

You can use any type of


fasteners with the bracket, as
long as they are compatible
with the mounting surface.

55/70 Adapter Bracket

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Mounting Orientations

The two diagrams that follow detail the two different orientations the Model 24
Series II can be mounted in: Side Read and Top Read.
Refer to these notes when using the two diagrams:
1. Refer to specifications for actual dimensions.
2. Start trigger photoeye is placed in the plane of the scan beam.
3. End trigger photoeye is used in this position for non-tracking scanners only.

Model 24 Series II Side Read Orientation

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Model 24 Series II Top Read Orientation

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MINI-X SERIES II
When you mount your Mini-X Series II, you must make sure there is enough
clearance around the unit. This will ensure that connections to other equipment
can be made, packages can pass by without hitting any equipment, access panels
can be removed, and heat will dissipate, keeping the scanner cool. The minimum
clearance requirements of the Mini-X Series II are as follows:

Top:
Back:
Sides:
Front:

10.0" (25.4 cm)


10.0" (25.4 cm)
0.5" (12.7 cm)
10.0" (25.4 cm)

You must mount the Mini-X Series II with the connector panel facing the flow of
the conveyor. See page for a drawing showing mounting orientation.

The tables below list standard system dimension measurements and their
descriptions. Each description of the dimension is assigned a corresponding
letter, which appears in the following diagrams.
Letter

Length

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K

Top-Read Installation
Description
Height of bottom of baseplate above conveyor
Overall depth of field
Minimum box height
Optical throw (near distance)
Beginning of Zone 2 (height of Mid PE 2 above conveyor)
Beginning of Zone 3 (height of Near Trigger PE 2 above conveyor)
Beginning of Zone 4 (height of End Trigger PE 2 above conveyor)
Distance from edge of conveyor to center mounting hole
Distance from Start Trigger Photoeye to center mounting hole
Distance from Start Trigger Photoeye to End Trigger Photoeye
Conveyor Width

Letter

Length

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
K

Side-Read Installation
Description
Height of center mounting bracket above conveyor
Vertical scan widow
Distance from Start Trigger Photoeye to center mounting bracket
Distance from Start Trigger Photoeye to End Trigger Photoeye
Optical throw (near distance)
Beginning of Zone 3 (trigger point of End Trigger PE 2)
Beginning of Zone 2 (trigger point of Near PE 1)
Beginning of Zone 1 (trigger point of Mid PE 2)
Overall depth of field
Total vertical scan window

1.
2.
3.

All distances are referenced to the bottom of the scanner base plate. Allow
0.562 (1.428 cm) for shock mounts between scanner and mounting surface
End Trigger photoeye used in this position for non-tracking scanners only.
Two scanners shown to illustrate mounting relationship

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Mini-X Series II Top and Side Read Orientation

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2-15

ACCESSORIES
Photoeyes

This section describes how to mount your photoeyes to their mounting brackets.
Photoeyes work by bouncing a light beam off a reflector and detecting when
something breaks the path of light. In order for your photoeyes to work properly,
you must make sure the following things are done:

The photoeye must have a reflector mounted directly opposite it on the other
side of the conveyor.

Except when using angled zone photoeyes, the following must be done:

The photoeye must be mounted so the light exit window is perpendicular to


the conveyor, facing the reflector.
The reflector must be mounted perpendicular to the conveyor, facing the
photoeye.
Use the drawing below to help you mount your photoeyes.

Reflector
Mtg Surface
Photoeye Mtg
Brkt Surface

Photoeye Mounting Diagram

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


Tachometer

The tachometer (tach) is a wheel that outputs a set number of pulses for each
rotation it makes. This tells the computer the precise conveyor speed, allowing it
to determine the exact position of a package. A tachometer is necessary in
systems with the TachTrac option. Tracking allows for multiple boxes to be
under the scan window at the same time. Bar codes on each box are decoded and
assigned to the correct box. Because the exact layout of many conveyors is
unique, it is impossible to give you exact directions for mounting your
tachometer. Follow the guidelines below as closely as possible when mounting.

Recommend Tach Mounting Kit - xxxxxxx


Tachometers are often used in systems with several conveyor belts. Mount
the tach on the section of the conveyor the scanning is performed on.
Mount the tach on the underside of the conveyor, away from areas where the
conveyor bows downward. A good place to mount the tach is on one end of
the conveyor, underneath the drive shaft.
Make sure the tach assembly angles in the same direction that the underside
of the conveyor travels, as shown in the diagrams on the next page.
The tach must make good contact with the conveyor. Use a weight or spring
assembly to put tension on the back of the tach, ensuring that the wheel
makes strong contact.
See the following drawings to assist you in mounting your tachometer.
Belt Direction
Above
Conveyor

Belt
Direction
Below
Conveyor

Tach mounted on
underside of conveyor

Three Dimensional View

Belt Direction
Above Conveyor
Belt Direction
Below Conveyor

Top View

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2-17
Conveyor
Position A

Conveyor Direction

Mounting/Pivot Position
Position B (Weight)

Side View
Pressure in lbs.
at Position A
on Conveyor

Weight Needed
at Position B
(LBS)

15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5

30
28
26
24
22
20
18
16
14
12
10

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Chapter Three
Configuring the Model 24/Mini-X Series II

3 Heading 2

Chapter Three

Contents

INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................... 3-2
BARCODE BASICS AND THE MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II............................ 3-3
APPLICATIONS .......................................................................................... 3-5
USING PHOTOEYES ............................................................................... 3-5
SINGLE BARCODE SETUP ...................................................................... 3-7
SINGLE BARCODE WITH MULTIPLE MESSAGES ....................................... 3-7
SINGLE BARCODE WITH CHARACTER STRIPPING .................................... 3-7
TWO BARCODES WITH A SEPARATOR ..................................................... 3-8
TWO BARCODE TYPES TRANSMITTED AS SETS ....................................... 3-8
FIXED MESSAGE WITH VARIOUS BARCODES ........................................... 3-9
INTERFACE TO ADDITIONAL SERIAL DEVICES.......................................... 3-9
QUAD RELAY BOX AND RELAY OUTPUTS ............................................. 3-10
GO/NVC RELAYS ............................................................................... 3-12
LIFE LIGHT .......................................................................................... 3-12
MATCH RELAY 1 ................................................................................. 3-12
MATCH RELAY 2 ................................................................................. 3-13
MATCH RELAY 3 ................................................................................. 3-13
MASTER/SLAVE CONFIGURATION ......................................................... 3-14

3-2

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

INTRODUCTION
This chapter will discuss barcode basics and applications associated with the
Model 24 and Mini-X Series II scanners.

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CONFIGURING THE MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II

3-3

BARCODE BASICS AND THE MODEL 24/MINI-X


SERIES II
A barcode is a group of rectangular bars and spaces arranged in a preset pattern.
The pattern is organized to represent elements of data referred to as characters.
The standard industry codes can represent several alphanumeric characters.
There are many different types of barcodes. Each type uses its own symbology,
which defines how the bars and spaces represent the letters and numbers.
The figure below shows each part of a bar code. The labels for each part remain
the same even if the position, orientation, or type of barcode changes.
Quiet
Zone

Space
Width

Bar
Width

Quiet
Zone

Bar
Height

Bar Code Length

Sample Bar Code

The Model 24 and Mini-X Series II scanners are capable of reading eight
different bar codes simultaneously. The code types can be chosen from the
following table:
Interleaved 2 of 5
fixed or variable length

Code 39
fixed or variable length

Code 93
fixed or variable length

Code 128
fixed or variable length

Codabar
fixed or variable length

More commonly called I 2 of 5, this numeric only bar code was developed in the
early 1970's. Because of its high code densities, I 2 of 5 is most often found in
distribution applications. Due to the limited amount of characters I 2 of 5 can use,
and the simple structure of the start and stop characters, even partial scans can
result in valid reads. If I 2 of 5 is chosen for your application, Accu-Sort
recommends that the Model 24 is programmed to a fixed length in all scanning
applications.
Code 39, or Code 3 of 9, was the first bar code developed that used both numbers
and uppercase letters. It is the most recognized and widely used for non-retail
applications. Each character is represented by a stand-alone group of 5 bars and 4
spaces. The basic code set includes 0-9, A-Z, * which is used for the start and stop
characters, and six other symbols - . $ / + and % for a total of 43 characters.
Because each of the characters are discrete and self-checking, Code 39 provides a
high level of data security. The Model 24 automatically checks all data for this
symbology. The Model 24 also recognizes two other forms of the Code 39
symbology called EDP and STK.
Derives its name from the fact that every character is constructed from nine
elements arranged into three bars with their adjacent spaces. This is similar to the
UPC symbol (widely used in the grocery industry). This symbol also includes two
powerful check digits that minimize the possibility of reader substitution errors due
to printing defects.
Code 128 is a continuous code made up of 3 bars and 3 spaces for each
character. The Uniform Code Council and the International Article Numbering
Association have developed standards for the use of bar codes in the global
distribution of retail, industrial, commercial, pharmaceutical, meat and other
products using Code 128 as an application identifier. Since the nature of Code 128
is such that each character depends on the characters before and after it for code
structure, a check digit is incorporated in the bar code. The check digit, which is
automatically checked by the Model 24, provides a high level of data security.
Widely used in libraries, photo-finishing systems, and blood bank applications,
Codabar uses numbers along with 6 special characters. Four different
combinations of start and stop characters can be used to mean specific things for
each application. The Model 24 can be programmed to either transmit or suppress

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

UPCA
(Universal Product
Code, version A)

UPCE
(Universal Product
Code, version E)
EAN-13
(European Article
Number)
EAN-8
Extensions
MOD 10 or MOD 43

the start and stop characters.


This bar code type is most often found in the fast-paced retail and supermarket
industries. The first character, of the 12 character code, is the number system, the
next ten characters identify the product and manufacturer, and the last character is
the check digit. In many applications, the UPC code is compared with a look-up
table for added security.
This version of the UPC bar code shortens the information to 6 characters. This
allows the code to fit on smaller packages.
This bar code type is almost the same as the UPC code. The EAN-13 contains the
same number system, manufacturer, and product information as the UPC code, but
also includes parity information.
A shortened version which identifies the country code in the first two characters,
the next five characters are for data, and the last is a check digit.
Extensions are two or five character additional encodations that are available to
add to the end of UPC or EAN bar code types.
MOD 10 or MOD 43 checks can either be enabled or disabled for each of the four
bar codes selected. A Modulus check character is a mathematical check to ensure
the accuracy of a read. Certain bar codes use Mod check character(s) to determine
if that bar code was scanned correctly.

Barcode Types

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CONFIGURING THE MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II

3-5

APPLICATIONS
This section describes and gives examples of various applications that can be
setup to use the Model 24 and Mini-X Series II scanning systems.
To get started, first install the included Medium Scanner Setup software. Next,
make all the necessary connections between the scanner and any external
equipment. Use the Connector Locations section in Chapter 2 of this manual to
aid in connecting any equipment to its proper connection on the scanner. When
making connections to the scanner, use Com 3 of the scanner as the default
communications port for running the Medium Scanner Setup software. The
communications port of the machine running Medium Scanner Setup software
should be configured as follows:
57600 bps
7 bits
Even parity
2 stop bits
To see the results of any of the examples, a dumb terminal needs to be connected
to Com 1 of the scanner. Setup the communications port of the dumb terminal as
follows:
9600 bps
7 bits
Even parity
2 stop bits
Once all needed connections have been made, and the selection of photoeyes, the
reading of barcodes can begin.
USING PHOTOEYES
Photoeyes work by bouncing a light beam off a reflector and detecting when
something breaks the path of light. In order for photoeye to work properly, you
must make sure the following things are done:
1. The photoeye must have a reflector mounted directly opposite it on the
other side of the conveyor.
2. The photoeye must be mounted so the light exit window is perpendicular to
the conveyor, facing the reflector.
3. The reflector must be mounted perpendicular to the conveyor, facing the
photoeye.
All examples use one of two different configurations for the scanners triggered
input. When using a Model 24 II, typically one photoeye is used to for triggering
the scanner. However, in the case of the Mini-X Series II, the scanner is
configured to use two photoeyes. When either unit is configured for tracking,
typically a single photoeye is used. To setup the scanner to use one or two
photoeyes, two interface configuration files have been provided to assist in
setting up the scanner. To accesses these files, run the Medium Scanner Setup
software, connect to the scanner, click the Modify Configuration tab, click the
Interface button and from the bottom click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double
click the samples folder, select either pe_single.ifb for one photoeye or
pe_dual.ifb for two photoeyes, and click the Retrieve button. To use, click the
Send to Scanner and Save button.

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

For a single photoeye setup, the below illustration shows a typical setup of a
Model 24 Series II using a single photoeye.

Model 24 Series II : Single Photoeye

A photoeye is installed in line with scan line. As the leading edge of the item to
be scanned breaks the plain of the photoeye, the scanner begins looking for
code(s) to be scanned. As trailing edge clears the plain of the photoeye, the
scanner transmits found code(s).
Equipment needed:
Model 24 Series II scanner - PN/1000007097
Single Photoeye - PN/1000020591
For a dual photoeye setup, the below illustration shows a typical setup of a
Mini-X Series II using two photoeyes.
&219(<25
',5(&7,21

S CAN L INE S
PHOT OE YE S

Mini-X Series II : Dual Photoeyes

A photoeye is installed in line with beginning and end of the scan lines. As the
leading edge of the item to be scanned breaks the plain of the first photoeye, the
scanner begins looking for code(s) to be scanned. As trailing edge clears the plain
of the second photoeye, the scanner transmits found code(s).
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CONFIGURING THE MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II

3-7

Equipment needed:
Mini-X Series II scanner - PN/10000017865
(2) Single Photoeye - PN/1000020591
SINGLE BARCODE SETUP
This example demonstrates how to read a single barcode. In this example, the
scanner is setup to read a single 10 character Interleave 2 of 5 barcode, and then
transmit the read on Com 1 with a header message of <stx> and a trailer message
of <cr><lf>. If any no-reads occur, 10 question marks (?) will be transmitted.
The No Valid Code (NVC) message is specified to be a question mark.
To see this example, use one of the two I2of5 barcode examples located at the
end of this chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the
scanner. Once connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab,
then click the Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of
the window, click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled
samples. Locate the file named m24_barcode1.lgc for Model 24 Series II or
mx_barcode1.lgc for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the
Send to Scanner and Save button to begin using this configuration.
To change the header and trailer messages being sent, click the Communications
tab, go to the Protocol Settings section and change the Header or Trailer
message lines. Click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
SINGLE BARCODE WITH MULTIPLE MESSAGES
This example shows how to setup the scanner to read a single barcode, but
transmit multiple messages. In this example, the scanner is setup to read multiple
10 character Interleave 2 of 5 barcodes, and then transmit on Com 1 with a
message that states multiple barcodes read. This example works the same as the
single barcode example, but if more than one barcode is read during the trigger
cycle, the message "Multiple Barcodes" will be transmitted. This message is
defined under the Message Definitions on the Communications tab in the
Medium Scanner Setup software.
To see this example, use both I2of5 barcode examples located at the end of this
chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner.
Once connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click
the Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the
window, click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled
samples. Locate the file named m24_barcode2.lgc for Model 24 Series II or
mx_barcode2.lgc for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the
Send to Scanner and Save button to begin using this configuration.
To change the message being sent for multiple reads, click the Communications
tab, go to the Message Definitions section and change the Multiple Barcode
Message line. Click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
SINGLE BARCODE WITH CHARACTER STRIPPING
This example shows how to setup the scanner to read a single barcode, but strip
certain characters so they are not transmitted after the trigger cycle. In this
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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

example, the scanner is setup to read a single 10 character Interleave 2 of 5


barcode, strip the first and last characters and then transmit on Com 1 the
remainder of the read barcode. This example works using the mask functions of
the Medium Scanner Software setup. In the example, the mask is defined to strip
or not to transmit the first and last characters of the barcode read.
To see this example, use one of the I2of5 barcode examples located at the end of
this chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner.
Once connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click
the Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the
window, click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled
samples. Locate the file named m24_barcode3.lgc for Model 24 Series II or
mx_barcode3.lgc for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the
Send to Scanner and Save button to begin using this configuration.
To change the way the mask strips the read barcode, click the Barcodes tab. In
the "Barcodes to Read" window, look to see what mask number is associated
with the barcode. Go to the "Masks for Barcode Padding/Stripping" section of the
screen and click on the associated mask number. Here characters can be set for
transmit or ignore by clicking on the character. Once changes to the mask are
made, click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
TWO BARCODES WITH A SEPARATOR
This example shows how to setup the scanner to read multiple barcodes, and
transmit them out as one message with a separator between the multiple
barcodes. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a single 10 character
Interleave 2 of 5 and a 12 character Code 128 barcode, and then transmit on
Com 1 with "/" as the separator. This example works using the "Include Multiple
Barcodes in One Message" function of the Medium Scanner Setup Software
To see this example, use one of the I2of5 and on of the Code 128 barcode
examples located at the end of this chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup
software and connect to the scanner. Once connected to the scanner, choose the
Modify Configuration tab, then click the Scanner button to access the scanners
parameters. At the bottom of the window, click the Retrieve from Disk button.
Double click the folder labeled samples. Locate the file named
m24_barcode4.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_barcode4.lgc for Mini-X
Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and Save
button to begin using this configuration.
To change character used as the separator between the barcodes, click the
Communications tab, go to the Message Definitions section and change the
Delimiter between multiple barcodes character. Click Send to Scanner and Save
to begin using.
TWO BARCODE TYPES TRANSMITTED AS SETS
This example shows how to setup the scanner to read multiple barcodes, and
transmit them out as sets. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10
character Interleave 2 of 5 and a 12 character Code 128 barcode, and then
transmit on Com 1 the two barcodes as a set. This example works using the
transmit sets function of the Medium Scanner Setup Software.

Accu-Sort Systems

CONFIGURING THE MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II

3-9

To see this example, use one of the I2of5 and on of the Code 128 barcode
examples located at the end of this chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup
software and connect to the scanner. Once connected to the scanner, choose the
Modify Configuration tab, then click the Scanner button to access the scanners
parameters. At the bottom of the window, click the Retrieve from Disk button.
Double click the folder labeled samples. Locate the file named
m24_barcode5.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_barcode5.lgc for Mini-X
Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and Save
button to begin using this configuration.
To change how the sets are transmitted, Click on the Barcodes tab and Click the
Define Transmit Sets button. With Transmit Sets Enabled checked, select which
barcode to transmit with the set and the order to be transmitted by checking the
check boxes. Click Ok and then click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
FIXED MESSAGE WITH VARIOUS BARCODES
This example shows how to setup the scanner to read multiple barcodes, and
transmit a fixed message. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10
character Interleave 2 of 5, a 12 character Code 128, a 10 character Code 39, a 10
character Code 93 barcode. Then transmit on Com 1 with a header message of
<stx>, 12 characters (either the 12 character Code 128 or the 10 character I1of5
padded with two spaces), 2 characters (either the last two characters from the
Code 39 or Code 93), and a trailer message of <cr><lf>. The set of 12 characters
will be separated with a "/" from the 2 characters. This example works using
mask and transmit sets functions of the Medium Scanner Setup Software
To see this example, use one of each barcode example located at the end of this
chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner.
Once connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click
the Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the
window, click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled
samples. Locate the file named m24_barcode6.lgc for Model 24 Series II or
mx_barcode6.lgc for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the
Send to Scanner and Save button to begin using this configuration.
INTERFACE TO ADDITIONAL SERIAL DEVICES
This example shows how to setup the scanner use a remote display on Com 2. In
this example, Com 2 of the scanner is reconfigured to act as a "Host" port. A
power-up message will be used to initialize the remote display and the header
will be used to issue a control character to clear the display.
To see this example, use one of the two I2of5 barcode examples located at the
end of this chapter. Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the
scanner. Once connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab,
then click the Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of
the window, click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled
samples. Locate the file named m24_barcode7.lgc for Model 24 Series II or
mx_barcode7.lgc for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the
Send to Scanner and Save button to begin using this configuration.

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

QUAD RELAY BOX AND RELAY OUTPUTS


The Quad Relay Box takes control signals from the scanner and uses them to fire
relays to the customer control output. Up to four outputs can be used, one for
each relay. You can choose a wide variety of outputs; some examples being
conveyor belt controls, brakes, diverters, flashing lights, horns, or buzzers. The
block diagram below illustrates connections between the scanner and the
customer control outputs via the Quad Relay Box.
MODE L 24 or MINI-X

LAMPS TACK

QUAD R E LAY B OX

Quad Relay Box and Lampstack Configuration

Connecting the Scanner

The scanner sends signals through the interconnect cable to the J1 port of the
Quad Relay Box. J1 is a 15 pin female D connector that connects the box to a
scanner or to an external power source. You can use the five or ten-foot
interconnect cable (100001457 or 1000014572). The scanner also supplies the
power to the relay box. The box runs on 12VDC.

Input Connections for Quad Relay Box

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3-11

Connecting the Relays

There are four output terminal blocks from the relay box to the control outputs TB1, TB2, TB3, and TB4. TB1 through TB4 are 3 pin terminals that can be used
as relay outputs or solid-state inputs. Various jumper configurations allow for
different combinations of AC/DC inputs and outputs. The shaded areas in the
diagram below illustrate the locations of the relays and the terminal blocks on the
board. The relays are the four long blocks marked M1, M2, M3, and M4. The
terminal blocks are marked TB1, TB2, TB3, and TB4 and are located under the
relays. You can select the style by plugging the relay into M1, M2, M3, or M4.

Connector and Relay locations for the Quad Relay Box

The control outputs are wired to the box by running wire through the three holes
in the side of the box called punch-outs. These holes have watertight strain reliefs
in them. You can wire up to four outputs through the strain reliefs to the relays.

Quad Relay Box Output Punch-outs

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

GO/NVC RELAYS
This example shows how to setup the scanner to fire two relays that represent
either a good or no read. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10
character Interleave 2 of 5. When a read of the I2of5 barcode is good, the scanner
fires Relay 1 (Go) to fire. If a read of the I2of 5 is bad, Relay 2 (NVC) will fire.
This example works using relay functions of the Medium Scanner Setup
Software
To see this example, use one of the two I2of5 barcode examples located at the
end of this chapter and connect an external reporting device to the scanner. Run
the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner. Once connected
to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click the Scanner
button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the window, click the
Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled samples. Locate the
file named m24_relay1.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_relay1.lgc for Mini-X
Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and Save
button to begin using this configuration.
To change which relay fires during the read, Click on the Inputs/Outputs tab. In
the "Relays" section, change Relays 1 or 2 to the desired setting. Click Ok and
then click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
LIFE LIGHT
This example shows how to setup the scanner to fire Relay 1 as a Life Light. In
this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10 character Interleave 2 of 5. When a
read of the I2of5 barcode is good, the scanner fires relay 1 causing a lampstack to
light. This example works using relay functions of the Medium Scanner Setup
Software
To see this example, use one of the two I2of5 barcode examples located at the
end of this chapter and connect an external reporting device to the scanner. Run
the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner. Once connected
to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click the Scanner
button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the window, click the
Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled samples. Locate the
file named m24_relay2.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_relay2.lgc for Mini-X
Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and Save
button to begin using this configuration.
MATCH RELAY 1
This example shows how to setup the scanner to fire Relay 1 when a defined
code has been matched. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10
character Code 39 and Code 93. When the barcode matches ACCUSORT39, the
scanner will fire Relay 1. This example works using relay functions of the
Medium Scanner Setup Software
To see this example, use the Code 39 and Code 93 barcode examples located at
the end of this chapter and connect an external reporting device to the scanner.
Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner. Once
connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click the
Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the window,
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3-13

click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled samples.
Locate the file named m24_relay3.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_relay3.lgc
for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and
Save button to begin using this configuration.
To change which code read fires Relay 1, Click on the Inputs/Outputs tab. In the
"Relays" section, click the Verify Codes button. Click the current field pattern
and click Edit text. Enter the text from the Code 93 barcode and click OK. Click
OK again to save the field pattern. Then click Send to Scanner and Save to begin
using.
MATCH RELAY 2
This example shows how to setup the scanner to fire two relays when a defined
code has been matched. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10
character Code 39 and Code 93. When the start of the barcode matches
ACCUSORT, the scanner will fire Relay 1. If the scanner reads anything other
than ACCUSORT, it will fire Relay 2. This example works using relay functions
of the Medium Scanner Setup Software
To see this example, use the Code 39 and Code 93 barcode examples located at
the end of this chapter and connect an external reporting device to the scanner.
Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner. Once
connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click the
Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the window,
click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled samples.
Locate the file named m24_relay4.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_relay4.lgc
for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and
Save button to begin using this configuration.
To change how Relay 1 and 2 fire, Click on the Inputs/Outputs tab. In the
"Relays" section, click the Verify Codes button. Click the current field pattern
and click Edit text. Enter new text and click OK. Click OK again to save the field
pattern. Then click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
MATCH RELAY 3
This example shows how to setup the scanner to fire three relays when a defined
code has been matched. In this example, the scanner is setup to read a 10
character Code 39 and Code 93. When the end of a barcode matches 39, the
scanner will fire Relay 1. If the end of a barcode does not match 39, the scanner
will fire Relay 2. Relay 3 will fire if the scanner reads nothing. This example
works using relay functions of the Medium Scanner Setup Software
To see this example, use the Code 39 and Code 93 barcode examples located at
the end of this chapter and connect an external reporting device to the scanner.
Run the Medium Scanner Setup software and connect to the scanner. Once
connected to the scanner, choose the Modify Configuration tab, then click the
Scanner button to access the scanners parameters. At the bottom of the window,
click the Retrieve from Disk button. Double click the folder labeled samples.
Locate the file named m24_relay5.lgc for Model 24 Series II or mx_relay5.lgc
for Mini-X Series II, and click the Retrieve button. Click the Send to Scanner and
Save button to begin using this configuration.

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

To change how Relay 1, 2 and 3 fire, Click on the Inputs/Outputs tab. In the
"Relays" section, click the Verify Codes button. Click the current field pattern
and click Edit text. Enter new text and click OK. Click OK again to save the field
pattern. Then click Send to Scanner and Save to begin using.
MASTER/SLAVE CONFIGURATION
This application describes how to setup the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II
scanners for master/slave operation.
Master/Slave Operation

To obtain great conveyer belt coverage or to have the tach and trigger passed
without the use of a tach trigger or "Y" cable, the Model 24 or Mini-X can be
configured for master/slave operation. Via J3 on the scanners, two scanners can
be daisy chained together using cable part number 1000020593. With this cable,
upon power-up, the scanner will detect the cables presence and automatically
configure the scanner software for operation as a master or a slave scanner.
Example: If the cable is detected on port 1, the software configures the scanner as
a slave. If the cable is detected on port 2, the software configures the scanner as
a master. If the cable is detected on both ports 1 and 2, the software configures
the scanner as both master and slave, assuming the scanner with two cables is in
the middle of a chain configuration.
The auto-detection feature can be enabled/disable as needed. To enable/disable
the auto-detect feature, do the following:
1. In the Accu-Sort Medium Scanner setup software, click on the Modify
Configuration tab.
2. From the Modify Configuration tab, click on the Scanner button.
3. From the Modify Logic Setup screen, click on the Communications tab. The
following screen will appear.

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3-15

Modify Logic Setup - Communications Tab (Port 1)

4. Under the Port Configuration section, de-select Enable Auto Master Detect to
disable the auto-detection feature for port 1. To enable the feature for port 1,
select Enable Auto Master Detect.
5. To change the setting on port 2, click the 2 under Select Scanners Comm
Port. The following screen will appear.

Modify Logic Setup - Communications Tab (Port 2)

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

6. Under the Port Configuration section, de-select Enable Auto Slave Detect to
disable the auto-detection feature for port 2. To enable the feature for port 2,
select Enable Auto Slave Detect.
7. Click Save to Scanners E^2 to save and use these settings.
8. Click Close to exit Modify Logic Setup. Click the Accu-Sort tab, and click
Exit to close the scanner setup software.
In addition to the Enable Auto Slave Detect on port 2, additional settings may be
required to setup the scanner. These settings are located under the interface setup
of the Accu-Sort Medium Scanner setup software. These settings will allow the
trigger and/or tach to be passed along the daisy chain without the need for
additional cabling. The following screen shows these settings.

Modify Interface Setup - Interface Tab

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3-17

Interleaved 2 of 5 - 10 Character

0123456789

9876543210

Code 128 - 12 Character

A1B2C3D4E5F6

1A2B3C4D5E6F

Code 39 - 10 Character

ACCUSORT39

Code 93 - 10 Character

ACCUSORT93

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Chapter Four
Making Connections To The Scanner

4Heading 2

Chapter Four

Contents

INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................... 4-2
ASSEMBLING CONNECTORS ...................................................................... 4-3
9-Pin Connectors .............................................................................. 4-3
25-Pin Connectors ............................................................................ 4-4
SCANNER COMMUNICATION TYPES ............................................................ 4-5
RS232 With No Handshaking ........................................................... 4-5
COM 1 AND COM 2 ........................................................................................ 4-5
COM 3.......................................................................................................... 4-5

RS232 With RTS/CTS Handshaking ................................................ 4-6


COM 1 AND COM 2 ........................................................................................ 4-6
COM 3.......................................................................................................... 4-6

RS422 Full Duplex............................................................................. 4-7


POINT-TO-POINT ........................................................................................... 4-7
MULTIDROP................................................................................................... 4-8

RS485 Half Duplex ............................................................................ 4-9


MULTIDROP................................................................................................... 4-9

Current Loop (Com 1 Only) ............................................................ 4-10


CONNECTING TO THE SCANNER .............................................................. 4-11
Connecting To A PC or Terminal................................................... 4-11
PC............................................................................................................. 4-11
TERMINAL ................................................................................................... 4-11

Connecting To A Triggering Device.............................................. 4-12


FORM A TRIGGERING INPUT ......................................................................... 4-12
5-24 VOLT OPTICALLY ISOLATED TRIGGERING INPUT ...................................... 4-13
TTL TRIGGERING INPUT ............................................................................... 4-13
NPN TRANSISTOR TRIGGERING INPUT .......................................................... 4-14
PNP TRANSISTOR TRIGGERING INPUT ........................................................... 4-14

Connecting To An External Logic (Model 24e Series II Only) .... 4-15


Connecting To A Quad Relay Box................................................. 4-16
INTERCONNECT CABLE ................................................................................. 4-16
IF THE INTERCONNECT CABLE IS NOT AVAILABLE ........................................... 4-16

Connecting Other Devices ............................................................. 4-17


MASTER/SLAVE ........................................................................................... 4-18
TACHOMETER.............................................................................................. 4-18
RELAY ........................................................................................................ 4-19

OPTIONAL COMMUNICATION TYPES ......................................................... 4-19


Ethernet............................................................................................ 4-19
DeviceNet ......................................................................................... 4-19
Profibus............................................................................................ 4-20

4-2

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the different ways of making connections to communicate
with the Model 24 and Mini-X Series II scanning system.
Some of the equipment described in this chapter might not be used with your
system. Skip over sections that do not apply.

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MAKING CONNECTIONS TO THE SCANNER

4-3

ASSEMBLING CONNECTORS
For your application to meet CE EMC standards (electromagnetic compatibility
compliance), the metallic strain relief hardware must be installed a described
below.
9-PIN CONNECTORS
1. Strip 1 (2.54 cm) of cable's jacket insulation away leaving foil shield
beneath intact.
2. Fold foil shield back over remaining jacket to expose conductive shield
surface.
3. Remove backing from aluminum tape and wrap around foil/jacket. (Tape
edge should be even with edge of jacket.)
4. Position cable clamp over tape so clamp will rest in slot shown and tighten.
(If clamp is loose after screws are fully tightened, compress center of clamp
with pliers.)
5. Assemble remaining strain relief hardware.

9-Pin Metallic Strain Relief Assembly

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

25-PIN CONNECTORS
1. Before soldering, slide rubber grommet onto cable as shown.
2. Strip 1 (2.54 cm) of cable's jacket insulation away, leaving foil shield
beneath intact.
3. Fold foil back over jacket insulation to expose conductive shield surface.
4. Slide rubber grommet up length of cable so stem of grommet will fit in strain
relief cable aperture.
5. Adhere one section of tape over grommet flange and foil shield.
6. Repeat with remaining tape section, ensuring tape is securely attached to foil
shield and flange of rubber grommet.
7. Position cable clamp over tape so clamp will rest in area provided in strain
relief and attach. If cable clamp is loose after screws are fully tightened,
compress center of clamp with pliers.
8. Install remaining strain relief hardware as shown.

25-Pin Metallic Strain Relief Assembly

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4-5

SCANNER COMMUNICATION TYPES


The Model 24 and Mini-X Series II scanning systems are versatile when you
need to connect to other devices. The drawings below show all the pin
connections for the Model 24 and Mini-X Series II when using serial
communications on Com1, Com2 or Com 3. If you need to create your own
cables to wire the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to another device, use these
drawings as a guide. It is very important that you make the proper pin
connections.
Below is a list of terms used in these drawings:
S. GND
TXD
RTS
RD+
SD+

Signal Ground
Transmit Data (RS232)
Request To Send (RS232)
Receive Data (RS422)
Non-inverting Line (RS485)
Send Data (RS422)

C. GND
RXD
CTS
RDSD-

Chassis Ground
Receive Data (RS232)
Clear To Send (RS232)
Receive Data (RS422)
Inverting Line (RS485)
Send Data (RS422)

RS232 WITH NO HANDSHAKING


Use the following diagrams of the pin configuration as a guide when connecting
the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a device that uses RS232 communications
with no handshaking:
Com 1 and Com 2

Com 3

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

RS232 WITH RTS/CTS HANDSHAKING


Use the following diagrams of the pin configuration as a guide when connecting
the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a device that uses RS232 communications
with handshaking:
Com 1 and Com 2

Com 3

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4-7

RS422 FULL DUPLEX


Use the following diagrams of the pin configuration as a guide when connecting
the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a device that uses RS422 serial
communications:
Point-to-Point

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


Multidrop

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4-9

RS485 HALF DUPLEX


Use the following diagram of the pin configuration as a guide when connecting
the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a device that uses RS485 Multidrop serial
communications:
Multidrop

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

CURRENT LOOP (COM 1 ONLY)


Use the following diagram of the pin configuration as a guide when connecting
the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a device that uses Current Loop serial
communications:

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MAKING CONNECTIONS TO THE SCANNER

4-11

CONNECTING TO THE SCANNER


CONNECTING TO A PC OR TERMINAL
To program the operating parameters of the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II,
connect your unit to a Terminal or PC on Com 2 or Com 3 (recommended) on the
back of the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II. Below are diagrams showing the
wiring configurations for connecting to a PC or Terminal.
PC

Model 24 or Mini-X Series II PC Connectors

Terminal
NOTE: All connectors are shown from the soldering side.

Recommended Cable Type : Manhattan #4606 or equivalent

Model 24 or Mini-X Series II Terminal Connector (typ.)

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

CONNECTING TO A TRIGGERING DEVICE


A triggering device is used to supply an electronic signal or pulse to inform the
scanner of the presence of an object within its reading zone. Connect the trigger
input to J5 of the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II.

Trigger Input Circuit

The following drawings show the most common ways to wire a triggering device
cable to connect directly to the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II. In most cases,
Accu-Sort will supply the trigger photoeye and cable; wiring directly to the
Model 24 or Mini-X Series II is not required.
Form A Triggering Input

Normally Open

DEM-9P
P5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

J5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

I- END TRIGGER
START TRIGGER
S. GND
+12V
I- START TRIGGER
I+ START TRIGGER
S. GND
END TRIGGER
I+ END TRIGGER

Dry Contacts: Minimum current rating = 1mA or less


Contact bounce = 5mS or less
Connections to pins 7 and 8 are not used for
single trigger photoeye applications.

Wiring the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a Form A Triggering Input

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4-13

For most applications, Accu-Sort supplies a trigger photoeye that is ready to plug
into the Model 24 and Mini-X series II J5 input (part number 100002059x (1, 2, 5,
or 6 see page 1-3).

5-24 Volt Optically Isolated Triggering Input

Wiring the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a 5-24 Volt Optically Isolated Triggering Input

TTL Triggering Input

Wiring the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a TTL Triggering Input

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


NPN Transistor Triggering Input

Wiring the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a NPN Transistor Triggering Input

PNP Transistor Triggering Input

Wiring the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a PNP Transistor Triggering Input

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MAKING CONNECTIONS TO THE SCANNER

4-15

CONNECTING TO AN EXTERNAL LOGIC (MODEL 24E SERIES II ONLY)


In order to decode bar codes, the Model 24e Series II must be connected to an
external logic. The types of logic that can be used are the Model 9200 DRX
Decoder Logic, the Model 9000 DRX Decoder logic, and the Model 6000
Decoder Logic. The drawings below show all the pin connections for the Model
24e Series II when connecting a logic to port J3. It is very important that you
make the proper pin connections. The recommendation for the 25-pin connector
J3 is the Assmann part # 1000012239 or equivalent.

Model 24e Series II to 6000 Decoder Logic via Scan Head Interface Board
You must use shielded interface cables with this product. To maintain FCC
compliance, the cable shield must make a 360 connection to the shielded mating
connector.

Model 24e to 9000 or 9200 Decoder Logic

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

CONNECTING TO A QUAD RELAY BOX


When connecting the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to an Accu-Sort Small
Scanner Quad Relay Box, it is recommended that you use the interconnect cable
provided with your interface box (p/n 1000014575, 5 ft. (1.6 m), or p/n
1000014572, 10 ft. (3.1 m)), as shown below:

Interconnect Cable

Interconnect Cable

This cable has two 15-pin "D" connectors.


1. Connect the female end of the cable to the 15 pin "D" male connector (J2) on
the rear of the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II, and tighten the screws with a
small flat-head screwdriver.
2. Connect the other end of the cable to the 15-pin "D" female connector
labeled SCANNER J1 on the Quad Relay Box, and tighten the screws with a
small flat-head screwdriver.
If The Interconnect Cable Is Not Available

If the interconnect cable is not available and one needs to be created, the
following drawing shows the pin connections for the 15-pin "D" male connector
on the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II and the 15-pin "D" female connector on the
Quad Relay box. The maximum length of this cable is 10 feet (3.1 meters).
Use the following diagram of the pin configuration as a guide when connecting
the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II to a Small Scanner Quad Relay Box. Connect
the box to the relay port on the back of the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II.

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4-17

Pin Connections Between the Quad Relay Box and the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II
For additional information about the Small Scanner Quad Relay Box please refer
to your Small Scanner Quad Relay Box Hardware Operations Manual.

CONNECTING OTHER DEVICES


Accu-Sort supplies cables for some applications and options. The table below
lists cable part numbers.
Model 24/Mini-X Series II Cables
Description
Master/Slave Cable 3
Tachometer Cable (provided with tachometer if ordered)
Daisy Chain Cable 3

Part Number
1000020593
1000020597
1000015603

If you want to create your own cables, use the following drawings as a guide.

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


Master/Slave

Use the master/slave port (J3) if you are daisy-chaining (connecting together)
two or more Model 24 or Mini-X Series II units.

Daisy Chain Cabling

Tachometer

The tachometer provides conveyor speed information to the Model 24 or Mini-X


Series II. It connects to port J6 on the unit.

Tachometer Cabling

There are a few types of tachometers that you can connect to the Model 24 or
Mini-X Series II. The following table provides a selection of standard
tachometers that you can attach to your scanner and their number of pulses for
each revolution.

Accu-Sort Systems

Standard Tachometers

Pulses/Rev

RH 12AJ/12
RH 20AJ/12
RH 24AJ/12
RH 48AJ/12

12
20
24
48

MAKING CONNECTIONS TO THE SCANNER

4-19

Relay

Four Optional Form A Relays can be provided with the Model 24 or Mini-X
Series II (J2). Their contacts are rated at 30V AC/DC, 0.75 amp maximum. If
switching requirements are greater than 30 volts, use the Small Scanner Quad
Relay Box.

Relay Cabling

OPTIONAL COMMUNICATION TYPES


This section discusses optional communication types for the Model 24 and
Mini-X Series II. If you ordered one of these options, you should receive setup
instructions separately.
ETHERNET
Ethernet is a local area network (LAN) technology that transmits information
between computers at speeds of 10 and 100 million bits per second (Mbps).
AccuSort uses a Lantronix serial to Ethernet converter. The unit is set with the IP
address of 192.0.1.229. To configure the unit, access the unit remotely via the IP
address. Once the unit is accessed, changes to the configuration can be made. For
further information regarding unit configuration, see the accompanying
Lantronix documentation.
DEVICENET
DeviceNet is a low-cost industrial network to connect industrial devices such as
limit switches, photoelectric cells, valve manifolds, motor starters, drives, and
operator displays to PLCs and PCs. The network eliminates expensive hard
wiring while providing device-level diagnostics.
The Profibus module default settings are as follows:
MAC ID - MSD - 0
MAC ID - LSD - 1
DeviceNet BAUD RATE - 125kb
RS232 BAUD RATE - 9600b
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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

For further information regarding DeviceNet configuration, see the


accompanying documentation.
PROFIBUS
PROFIBUS is a vendor-independent, open field bus standard for a wide range of
applications in manufacturing and process automation. PROFIBUS allows
communication between devices of different manufacturers without any special
interface adjustment. PROFIBUS can be used for both high-speed time critical
applications and complex communication tasks.
The Profibus module default settings are as follows:
MODE ADDRESS - MSD - 0
MODE ADDRESS - LSD - 1
For further information regarding Profibus configuration, see the accompanying
documentation.

Accu-Sort Systems

Chapter Four
Maintenance and Troubleshooting

5Heading 2

Chapter Five

Contents

INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................... 5-2
SCANNER MAINTENANCE .......................................................................... 5-3
CLEANING AND CHECKING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II .............. 5-3
CHECKING OTHER EQUIPMENT ............................................................... 5-3
SCANNER TROUBLESHOOTING .................................................................. 5-4
MODEL 24 SERIES II.............................................................................. 5-4
MINI-X SERIES II ................................................................................... 5-6
PROBLEM/CAUSES/SOLUTION TABLE .................................................... 5-8

5-2

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

INTRODUCTION
The Model 24 and Mini-X Series II hardware was specifically designed for a
tough industrial environment. The unit does not need anything more than some
basic cleaning and check-ups every month, depending on the harshness of your
environment. This section provides a cleaning procedure and some
troubleshooting techniques.

Accu-Sort Systems

MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING

5-3

SCANNER MAINTENANCE
The Model 24 and Mini-X Series II was specifically designed for a harsh
industrial environment. They are NEMA12 (IP 52) rated, which means they are
intended for indoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection against dust,
falling dirt, and dripping non-corrosive liquids. Routine maintenance tasks are
listed below:

Clean the Exit Window


Clean the Tachometer Wheels
Clean/Replace the Filter
Check the Mounting Hardware
Check the Tachometer
Check the Photoeye(s)

If the unit needs to be serviced, contact the Accu-Sort Customer Service


Department (refer to Customer Service in the front of this manual).
CAUTION: Before performing any hardware maintenance be sure your conveyor
system is OFF (not just stopped) and take any other appropriate and required
safety precautions!

CLEANING AND CHECKING THE MODEL 24 OR MINI-X SERIES II


The Model 24 and Mini-X Series II units require very little maintenance. It is
NEMA 12 rated, which means it is dust and drip tight. The interior requires no
cleaning. The only maintenance required is routine external cleaning and checks
to see that all connections and mounts are tight.
Maintenance should be performed at least once a month. If the Model 24 or
Mini-X Series II is located in a dirty or harsh environment, then maintenance
should be performed as often as once a week.
Follow the steps below to perform a maintenance check:
1. Turn off the Model 24 or Mini-X series II unit.
2. Clean the exterior of the unit (except the laser exit windows) with a clean,
soft-bristle brush.
3. Wash the exterior of the unit (except the laser exit windows) with a clean,
soft cloth dampened slightly with a mild detergent solution.
4. Make a solution of seven parts denatured alcohol to three parts water.
5. Clean the laser exit windows with a soft, lint-free cloth or lens paper
moistened with the solution made in Step 4.
6. Remove any streaks or remaining moisture from the windows with a dry,
soft, lint-free cloth or lens paper.
7. Check the scanner mounting hardware for tightness; tighten loose
connections.
8. Check all communications and power connections for tightness; tighten any
loose connections.
CHECKING OTHER EQUIPMENT
Routinely check to make sure all peripheral equipment (e.g. photoeye,
tachometer, etc.) is clean, securely mounted, and properly connected.
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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

SCANNER TROUBLESHOOTING
MODEL 24 SERIES II
Use the following chart to help troubleshoot the Model 24 Series II. If your
Model 24 Series II is damaged, contact our Customer Service Department (Refer
to the page iii, Customer Service).

Start
Is the 24
transmitting to
the host?

No

No

Is the
laser LED
on?

No

Is AC
power connection
made to scanner?
Is power
switch on?

Yes

No

Yes

Correct
connections

FC2

Yes
(see next page)
Is the
scanner not
reading the
bar codes?

Is power
LED on?

Yes
Is the
laser on?

No

Is mirror
wheel
spinning?

No

Yes

Possible
bad laser

Possible bad
power supply

No

Possible bad
motor or
logic board

Call Customer
Service
1-800-BAR-CODE

Clean exit
window
or check bar
code quality

Is unit
now reading
correctly?

No

Yes
Optics need
adjustment

Model 24 Troubleshooting Flowchart

Accu-Sort Systems

Return to Start

No

Yes

Is a portion
of the read zone
not reading?

Yes

MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING

5-5

FC2

Is the
Trigger LED
blinking on/off
as boxes
pass?

No

Check
Trigger
Photoeye

Yes
(If tach
is used)

Is the
Tach LED
blinking?

No

Fix Tach

Yes
Is
the
cable connected properly from
Port 1 to the
Host?

No

Tighten or
rewire cable

Yes
Call Customer
Service

Model 24 Troubleshooting Flowchart (continued)

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

MINI-X SERIES II
The following flowcharts will help you diagnose problems that may arise in your
Mini-X.
Start

Is the Mini-X
transmitting?

No

No

Is the
power on?

No

FC2

Is power supplied
to the scanner?

No

Turn on
power switch.

Is the scanner
not reading the
bar codes?

Is power on?

Supply power

Yes

Yes
Return to start.

No

Yes

Is the laser on?

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Is the
power
switch on?

No

Is the mirror wheel


spinning?

Yes

Possible bad power


supply; check fuse

Possible bad laser.

No

Yes

Is a portion of the read


zone not reading?

Yes

Optics need
adjustment

Accu-Sort Systems

Possible bad motor


or interface board.

No

Clean exit window or


check bar code quality.

Is the unit now


reading correctly?

Call Customer Service


1-800-BAR-CODE

No

MAINTENANCE AND TROUBLESHOOTING

5-7

FC2

Is the Trigger
LED blinking on/off
as boxes pass?

No

Check Trigger
Photoeye

No

Tighten or rewire
cable

Yes

Is the cable
connected properly
from Port 1 to the
Host?

Yes

Call Customer
Service at
1-800-BAR CODE

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

PROBLEM/CAUSES/SOLUTION TABLE
The following is a list of events that can occur with your scanning system. Below
each event is a cause(s) and solution(s).
Problem There is no laser beam exiting from the scanner when power is supplied.
Cause(s) No power is applied to the Model 24 or Mini-X Series II.
Solution(s) Check to ensure power is plugged in and the power switch is on.
Check that the "LASER" LED turns on.
Problem The Model 24 or Mini-X Series II is not reading bar codes.
Cause(s) Code type is not enabled or wrong code length.
Code passes by at too large an angle (tilt, pitch, skew).
Cable from scanner to logic not connected properly. (Model 24e only).
Scanner is on but logic is not. (Model 24e only).
Solution(s) Enable code type or correct code length.
Make sure the laser beam is on when the code passes by.
Listen for motor spinning (avoid staring into exit window).
Problem Model 24 or Mini-X Series II has poor read rate.
Cause(s) Scanner window is dir ty, label is not within reading range, or label quality is poor.
Code passes by at too large an angle (tilt, pitch, skew).
Solution(s) Clean scanner exit window and check reading distance with a known good
quality code sample.
Problem Model 24 or Mini-X Series II has poor read rate in hardware trigger.
Cause(s) Photoeye not adjusted, or requires alignment.
Solution(s) Adjust the photoeye.
Problem Model 24 Mini-X Series II has poor read rate in serial trigger.
Cause(s) Serial trigger is not timed properly with the arrival of the bar code.
Solution(s) Adjust the timing of your serial trigger so it turns on before the bar code and turns off after the
bar code.
Problem Trouble connecting to scanner or scanner is communicating at unexpected Communications
settings.
Cause(s) Model 24 or Mini-X Series II may have inadver tently configured itself as a master or slave
scanner.
Solution(s) Make sure the communications cable being used does not connect the RTS and CTS lines to
the scanner.
Disable auto master/slave detection for the por t.
Problem Scanner not communicating with a MUX after connecting to it using the MUX pass-thru mode
Cause(s) Diagnostic connection on Model 24 or Mini-X Series II was not correctly closed.
Solution(s) Power the scanner off and on again
Reopen the Mux pass-thru connection, and select "Close Scanner Connection" from the
Scanner menu on the main Accu-Setup window before terminating the MUX pass-thu link.
Problem Scanner responds to ever y terminal mode input with an ACK or NAK character.
Cause(s) Model 24 or Mini-X Series II did not properly exit Accu-Setup mode when entering the Accu-Sor t
terminal window.
Solution(s) Exit and reenter the terminal mode.
Type USE<esc> to manually exit Accu-Setup mode.
Problem Scanner stuck in pass-thru mode (GO LED is still flashing constantly).
Cause(s) Accu-Setup crashed while in pass-thru or lost scanner command when exiting pass-thru.
Solution(s) Power the scanner off and on again.
Using Accu-Setup, initiate another pass-thru connection (which could place a second scanner
into pass-thru mode) and then close that connection. The pass-thru close command should
cause both open connections to close.
Problem Scanner reads two or more codes within a single I2of5 causing misreads.
Cause(s) Star t pattern of I2of5 code not well defined.
Solution(s) Enable Kill I2of5 Pull Outs in Accu-Setup software.

Accu-Sort Systems

Appendices

AHeading 2

Appendices

Contents

APPENDIX A - ASCII CHART .....................................................................A-2


APPENDIX B ASCII C OMMUNICATIONS ...................................................A-3
STANDARD RS485 MULTIDROP COMMUNICATIONS ................................A-3
PROTOCOLS USED WITH RS232, CURRENT LOOP, AND RS422 .............A-9
APPENDIX C B EAM APERTURE ADJUSTMENT ........................................A-10
APPENDIX D M OUNTING THE EXTERNAL BLOWER (P/N MDL24-55) .......A-11
APPENDIX E U NIVERSAL MOUNTING BRACKET .....................................A-13
QUICK RELEASE MOUNTING KIT ..........................................................A-13

A-2

APPENDIX A - ASCII CHART

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

APPENDICES

A-3

APPENDIX B ASCII COMMUNICATIONS


STANDARD RS485 MULTIDROP COMMUNICATIONS
RS485 communications is an Engineering Industries Association standard for the
transmitters and receivers of a digital equipment interface. RS485
communication uses differential signal lines and allows for multiple transmitters
on one signal pair (although only one transmitter may be enabled at any given
time). This is a way of allowing one device to communicate with one or more
other devices using the Master/Slave method.
The Master/Slave system works as follows:
The master device (usually a decoder logic or computer) originates poll
messages. The poll message is a message from the master to a slave requesting
the slave to respond with data (if data is available). The slave is usually a bar
code scanner. The slave device responds to the polls from the master. It is not
allowed to transmit unless it has been asked (polled) by the master. Shown
below is a simplified drawing of one way that RS485 communications works:

Slave
MASTER
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
NOTE: This representation shows one master and six slaves. You can ultimately
have up to 32 slaves for each serial port on the master (depending on the line
length and required response time).
The remainder of this section defines the message formats and timing
requirements for the protocol used on RS485 multidrop (2-wire) communications
lines. The protocol is defined for both the master device and the slave
devices. This protocol is defined for a one-master system only. The following
definitions may help you understand this protocol a little better.
ASCII digit: This means the ASCII code for a single decimal digit. For example,
30h is the ASCII digit that encodes a zero.
HEX digit: This means the ASCII code for a single hexadecimal digit. Some
examples are, 35h is the code for a five, 42h is the code for a "B" (which equals

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

11 base 10), the hexadecimal number "5A" would be encoded by the two HEX
digits 35h and 41h.
Message Formats

The standard communications parameters are as follows:


Standard asynchronous data frame (least significant bit first)
7 data bits
1 even parity bit
2 stop bits
If the master can only support 8 bit data plus a parity bit, then the format is as
follows:
8 data bits
1 odd parity bit
1 stop bit
(Odd parity is required to make sure that the guard character will be all ones with
one for parity.)
You can use any baud rate that is supported by both the master and the slaves.
System performance is usually best when using the highest baud rate possible.
The following is framing for all messages sent by any device on the multidrop
line:
0FFH STX ID(2) TYPE(2) SEQ DATA LRC(2) CR
(FFhex) = Guard Character
This character is "sacrificed" to the line noise that occurs when the unit
transmitter is first turned on. The unit software may (optionally) wait one
character time between transmitter enable and transmission of the STX (the next
character). This eliminates transmitting the guard character. The receiver ignores
this character.
STX(02hex) = Start of text character
This character indicates the start of a message. The receiver should clear any
characters in its receive buffer whenever it receives this character.
ID(2 ASCII digits) = The unit ID
This field indicates the unit identification number of the unit to which the
message is directed, if the message is coming from the master. This field
indicates the unit identification number of the unit transmitting the message, if
the message is from a slave.
A message with an ID of "00" from the master is a broadcast message. All slave
units should act on the message (display data, reset, etc.), but no slave should
respond to the message.
TYPE(2 ASCII digits) = The message type
This field describes the purpose of the message that is sent. There are five
message types as shown in the following table:

Accu-Sort Systems

APPENDICES

A-5

Message Types
01

Poll

02

Data

03

ACK

04

Wake up

05

No data

This message type is sent by the master


unit to request data from a slave.
This message type is sent by either a
master to transfer data to a slave or by a
slave to transfer data to the master after
receiving a poll. The TYPE field will then
be followed by a SEQ field and a data
field.
This message type is sent by the unit that
has just received a valid data message.
This message type is sent by the master.
The slave that receives it should
acknowledge the message.
This message type may be sent by a
slave indicating that the slave has no data
to send in response to a poll. This
message is optional. If the slave has no
data, it may ignore the poll.

SEQ(1 ASCII digit) = The sequence number


This field starts at zero at power up, and is incremented by one for each data
message sent. When the sequence number reaches nine, it wraps around to one.
This field is only present in a data message.
DATA = The content of the data field
This field contains data, if the message type indicates that data is included. This
field may contain no characters (length of zero, poll, acknowledge and wake up
messages do not have data fields.)
LRC(2 HEX digits) = The Linear Redundancy Check Sequence
The LRC is computed by exclusive-oring all the characters in the ID, TYPE,
SEQ, and data fields, then converting the hex number into two ASCII digits. This
mathematical process checks to make sure that the message is valid.
CR (0Dh) = Carriage return
This character indicates the end of the message. When this character is received,
the unit should check to see that the message started with a STX, and check that
the LRC is correct before accepting it as a valid message.
Message Sequencing

The master unit initiates all data transfers by either sending data to a slave or
requesting data from a slave. This protocol is strictly half duplex; only one device
may be transmitting at any time. A slave device should not transmit unless it
receives a valid message that requires a response-- when it does receive such a
message, it must respond quickly (See Timing). The master unit should respond
in a timely manner, but is not under the same constraints as a slave. The
following is the example of processing a Master/Slave interaction:
Master
1. Wake up
2. Poll
3. Poll
4. Poll
5. Data

Slaves response
ACK
Data
No data
-noneACK

Masters response
-noneACK
-none-none-none-

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


Timing

If a slave unit is going to respond to a poll from the master, it must start its
response within two character times of the end of the carriage return at the end of
the poll.
NOTE: This makes the response time dependent upon the baud rate.
The slave must turn on its transmitter within two character times after receiving
the CR of the masters poll. The slave must place the STX at the beginning of its
response, into its serial port no later than three character times after receipt of the
masters carriage return.
Once the slave begins transmitting, it must not allow a gap of more than one half
a character time between characters. Most transmissions will take place under
interrupt, so this should not be a problem; however, it means that serial port
interrupts may not be disabled for an extended period of time during data
transmission.
Master:
RTS
TXD

S0123456Ps
(CR)
B

Time:

Slave:
RTS
S0123456PsS0123456Ps_________S01
(FFh)
(STX)

TXD

S is the start bit, 0123456 are the character bits, P is the parity bit and s
is the stop bit.
Typically, the RTS line is used to control the transmitter. In this diagram,
RTS is high when the transmitter is enabled and low when the transmitter is
disabled (tri-stated).
NOTE: The slaves FF may be replaced with a 1-character time (10/baud rate)
delay between transmitter turn-on and transmission of the STX.
Time Limits
A
B
C

Maximum
Minimum
Maximum
Minimum
Maximum
Minimum

2 character times (20/baud rate)


0
4 character times (40/baud rate)
2 character times (due to guard character + STX transmission time)
1/2 character time (5/baud rate)
0

Both the master and the slave must disable their transmitter as soon as possible
after transmitting the carriage return at the end of the message. The transmitter
must remain enabled while the carriage return is being sent out, however. This
means that the transmitting device must wait for a transmitter empty (as
opposed to a transmitter ready) indication from the serial port before disabling
the transmitter.
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APPENDICES

A-7

This protocol has been designed for a "slow" master to communicate with a
"fast" slave. The only time-critical item for the master is for the master to release
control of the line immediately after sending a message to a slave. While the
slave must respond within a very short time window, there are not such
constraints on the master. The master may have any amount of time between
messages or between characters within its message.
Error Recovery

Error: The slave does not understand a poll message.


Recovery: None. The master will time out, waiting for the slaves response, then
will go on to the next unit.
Error: The slave does not understand a data message from the master.
Recovery: The master will retransmit the data message again after timing out
while waiting for the acknowledgment.
Error: The master does not understand the slaves acknowledgment of a data
message.
Recovery: The master will retransmit the data message after timing out while
waiting for the acknowledgment. The slave will acknowledge the retransmitted
message and discard it, since the message will have the same sequence number as
the last message received.
Error: The master does not understand the slaves data message (response to a
poll).
Recovery: The master will time out waiting for the slaves response, then
continue on to the next poll. Since the slave did not receive an acknowledgment
for the data message, it will retransmit the same message in response to the next
poll.
Error: The slave does not understand the masters acknowledgment of the
slaves data message.
Recovery: The slave will retransmit the same message in response to the next
poll. The master will see that it is a duplicate message, acknowledge it, and
discard it.
Error: The slave does not understand a broadcast message.
Recovery: None. The message will be lost.
The general rules are as follows:
1. Each data message will be acknowledged by the recipient. If a data
message is not acknowledged, the transmitter should retransmit it again up to
three retries. After the third retry, a communications error message should be
displayed and the message discarded (in some systems the message may be
recorded in a disk file or on a printer to prevent data loss).
2. Each new message will have a new sequence number. If a message is
received that has the same message number as the last message received, the
recipient should acknowledge the message and then discard it. The sequence
number should only be checked for equality to the last sequence number
received: there is no requirement that the sequence number must be the next
number expected (although in some systems the master will keep track of out of
sequence errors since they would indicate that messages had been lost).
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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

The sequence number zero is a special case, since it indicates that the data
message is the first data message sent since the device sending it has powered up.
Messages with a sequence number of zero should always be processed as
required, regardless of whether or not they are repeated back to back.
3. Any message that contains parity errors, LRC errors or an unrecognized
message type should be discarded. No acknowledgment should be sent. In
some systems, the master will keep track of these transmission errors.
4. Any message that contains a correct LRC, has no errors, is of a correct
type, and requires an acknowledgment should be acknowledged even if its
sequence number indicates that it is a duplicate message (the sequence
number is the same as the last message). If it is a duplicate message, it should
be acknowledged then discarded. In some systems, the master will keep track of
these duplicate message errors since they would indicate that an acknowledgment
had been lost. A broadcast message (one sent to unit 00) must not be
acknowledged.
Multidrop Protocol Examples

Message framing:
FFh, 02h, idhigh, idlow, type, seq no, ... data..., lrc0, lrc1, 0Dh
(DEL, STX,
?,
?,
?,
?,
?,
?,
?,
CR)
NOTE: The DEL character is used as a guard character to make sure that the
transmission line is quiet for one character time before the STX is sent. The
sequence number only appears on data messages. The LRC stands for linear
redundancy check and appears on all messages.
Polling sequence:
1. MUX polls slave at address 01 with the following format:
STX, unit id (2 char), 0, 1, lrc (2 char), CR
Example: STX 0
1
0
1
HEX:
02h
30h 31h
30h
31h

0
30h

0
30h

CR
0Dh

2. SLAVE answers the poll with the data in the following format:
STX, unit id, 0, 2, seq (1 char), ...data..., lrc, CR
Example:
STX
0
1
1
A
B
C
D
E
7
HEX: 02h
30h
31h
31h
41h
42h
43h
44h
45h
37h

0
3
30h
33h

2
CR
32h
0Dh

0
30h

4
34h

If no data is available:
STX, unit id, 0, 5, lrc, CR
Example:
STX
0
HEX:
02h
30h

1
31h

0
30h

5
35h

CR
0Dh

NOTE: It is normally faster to allow the master to time out (which takes three
character times) than to use the "no data" response.

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APPENDICES

A-9

3. MUX acknowledges data in the following format:


STX, unit id, 0, 3, lrc, CR
Example: STX 0
1
HEX: 02h
30h
31h

0
30h

3
31h

0
30h

2
32h

CR
0Dh

4. MUX polls the next unit . . .


PROTOCOLS USED WITH RS232, CURRENT LOOP, AND RS422
RTS/CTS (Used with only RS232)

This protocol stands for "Request To Send" and "Clear To Send". This is
a common type of "handshaking" that goes on between two units.
When one device wants to transmit to another device, it will drive the
RTS line indicating it has data to transmit. When the receiving device is
ready to receive, it will drive the CTS line indicating it is ready. When
you use RTS/CTS it requires the addition of two more wires on the
communication cable. If they are not needed then it is advised not to
use any other additional lines in the cable.
ACK/NAK
This is a software protocol. When a unit receives a message, it indicates
whether it has received that message correctly. If all information is
received, the unit will transmit an "ACK" (acknowledge). The ACK is a
signal that more information may be transmitted. If the information is
not received correctly, then it will transmit a "NAK" (non-acknowledge).
The NAK is a signal requesting a message be retransmitted. Most
software has a limit to the number of retransmits. Three NAKS is
common.
XON/XOFF
This is a software protocol. XON stands for "transmit on" and XOFF
stands for "transmit off." A unit receiving data may signal the unit
transmitting that it should stop sending data by transmitting and XOFF
(ctrl-S). An XON (ctrl-Q) signals the original unit to begin transmitting
again.

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APPENDIX C BEAM APERTURE ADJUSTMENT


This Appendix only applies to the Model 24 Series II. For certain applications
your Model 24 Series II may include a beam aperture accessory (p/n
1000003985) as shown below.
The beam aperture is used to restrict the scan line so it doesnt exceed the width
of the read zone. This might be required, for instance, in a situation where the
beam is so wide it falls on a neighboring conveyor and provides inaccurate data
to the scanner.
The beam aperture plates are aligned at the factory for your application, but may
need adjustment during installation.

After the scanner is mounted, if the beam aperture needs adjustment, follow the
steps below.
To adjust the beam plates:
1. Loosen the 8-32 cap screws (item 4).
2. Adjust the beam plates as required.
3. Tighten the cap screws.

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APPENDICES

A-11

APPENDIX D MOUNTING THE EXTERNAL


BLOWER (P/N MDL24-55)
This Appendix only applies to the Model 24 Series II. Typically, an external
blower is used to blow dirt and dust off the scanner exit window when the
scanner is installed in a dusty location.
NOTE: In most situations, the blower should be mounted to the scanner
before the scanner is mounted.

To mount the external blower:


1. Insert the two drop-in t-nuts (see below) into the channels on the front of the
scanner (see the mounting drawing on the following page). Hold the t-nuts at
a 45-degree angle to the channel, insert them into the channel, and press on
the edge to set them into the channel.
NOTE: Use the rubber pin to help you maneuver the t-nut into place.

Part No.
1
2
3
4

Desc.
Socket Screw
Lock Washer
Washer
Drop-In T-Nut

Drop-In T-Nut, Socket Screw, and Washers

2. Use the two screws provided to mount the blower to the scanner. The screws
go through the mounting bracket into the t-nuts. Half tighten the screws.
3. Slide the mounted blower as close as you can to the exit window without
blocking laser beam. Tighten the screws.
4. Connect the blower cord to the scanner to provide power. Plug the blower
connector into one of the following ports: J4, J5, or J6.
When the fan is mounted properly, you will be able to put your fingers in front of
the exit window and feel air moving.

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MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Mounting the Model 24 Series II External Blower

Accu-Sort Systems

APPENDICES

A-13

APPENDIX E UNIVERSAL MOUNTING BRACKET


This Appendix only applies to the Model 24 Series II. This bracket allows you to
mount the Model 24 in any position as required for accurate bar code reading on
the Accu-Sort standard mounting structure MT003 or any custom structure.
p/n Ship24-5

QUICK RELEASE MOUNTING KIT


A Quick Release Mounting Kit (Ship24-4) is also available to use with this
bracket.
p/n Ship24-4

Installation

To mount the Ship24-5 and Ship 24-4 assemblies to the appropriate mounting
structure, follow the instructions in diagram (#31433) and/or (#31434) included
with each mounting assembly kit.

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Accu-Sort Systems

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Glossary
Accu-Setup

The Windows-based primary user interface that provides


all the necessary functions to set up, monitor, and diagnose
the operations of an AccuVision System.
AccuVision System

This term identifies the Accu-Sort product line that utilizes


CCD camera technology for imaging and decoding.
ACK

A control character sent to acknowledge that a transmission


block has been received.
Active Image Width

Defines the narrowest possible active image by reducing


the overall area the camera will scan for a valid bar code.
For example: In applications where codes always appear in
one location of packages, the entire package does not need
to be scanned, so the active image width is set smaller, thus
reducing decoding time and demand on processing
resources. This is set in Accu-Setup using the Modify Setup
/ Symbologies / Advanced Decoder Options.
Active/Passive Device

In 20mA current loop communications, a device capable of


providing the current for the loop (active) and a device that
draws the current from the equipment it is connected to
(passive).
Address

A unique designation for the location of data or the identity


of a smart device; allows each device on a single
communications line to respond to its own message.
AEL (Accessible Emission Limit)

The average power limitations of electronic radiation from


a laser light source as defined by the CDRH.
AIM

Automatic Identification Manufacturers, Inc.


Alignment

The position of a scanner or light source in relation to the


target of a receiving element.
Alphanumeric

Consisting of letters, numbers, and symbols.


Ambient Light

The lighting conditions in the scanning area. Ambient light


can interfere with successful scanning of bar codes.
ANSI (American National Standards Institute)

The principle standards development group in the U.S. A


non-profit, non-governmental group supported by over
1000 trade organizations, professional societies, and
companies. Member body to the ISO (International
Standards Organization).
Aperture

Term used on the required CDRH warning labels to


describe the laser exit window.

Application

A use to which something is put, or how it is used.


APM Protocol

Acronym for Application Protocol Messages. A protocol


used by system integrators who want to design system
applications without AdaptaScan Software.
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information
Interchange)

Pronounced as-kee. A standard seven bit plus parity code,


representing 256 characters, established by ANSI to
achieve compatibility between data services.
Aspect Ratio

The ratio of height to width of a bar code symbol. A code


twice as high as wide would have an aspect ratio of 2; a
code twice as wide as high would have an aspect ratio of
or 0.5.
Asynchronous Transmission

Transmission in which the time intervals between


transmitted characters may be of unequal length.
Transmission is controlled by start and stop bits at the
beginning and end of each character.
Autodiscrimination (Autodistinguish)

The ability of bar code reading equipment to recognize and


correctly decode more than one bar code symbology and
process the data without operator intervention. This is a
prerequisite feature of linear bar code scanners employed in
open systems.
Auto Generated Belt Speed (AutoTach)

Use for belt speed timing instead of using a tachometer.


AccuVision systems can be setup to generate a belt speed
automatically for applications where belt speed does not
vary more than 5%. This is generated by the cameras
SMIO board when the function is selected from the AccuSetup Modify Setup / Tracking Tab. Also referred to as
AutoTach
Autoload

The process of automatically transferring scanned character


strings and the symbology type into a match entry value.
AVCHI (AccuVision Custom Host Interface)

The AccuVision Custom Host Interface (AVCHI) is a


customer-specific application designed to provide a
customized interface for systems utilizing a host computer.
AVCHI provides all communications between the
AccuVision system and host, including the formatting and
transmission of messages and responses to host commands.
AVCore

The main WindowsNT-based application running on the


AccuVision decoder that provides a program interface for
the decoder as well as advanced image collection and
diagnostics. Additionally, AVCore contains multiple
threads for real-time data movement and time critical
processing.

Solutions with Vision

Bar

The dark elements of a printed bar code symbol. Referred


to as elements in 2D symbologies.
Bar Code (Refers to 2D Symbologies as well)

An array of rectangular bars/elements and spaces arranged


in a predefined pattern to represent elements of data
referred to as characters.
Bar Code Character

A single group of bars and spaces that represent an


individual number, letter, or other symbol.

A bar code symbol capable of being read successfully


independent of scanning direction.
Bit (Binary Digit)

The contraction of binary digit, the smallest unit of


information in the binary system; a one or zero condition.
Bottom Read

When the scanner is mounted under the conveyor to read


codes on the bottom of the boxes or on the front or back of
the boxes. If used there is not enough clearance for a
standard front or back read.
BPS (Bits per Second)

Bar Code Density

The number of characters that can be represented in a linear


unit of measure. Bar code density is often referred to in
characters per inch (CPI).
Bar Code Label

A label that carries a bar code and can be affixed to an


article.

Unit of data transmission rate. See baud rate.


Bridge

An interface between links in a communication network


that routes messages from one link to another when a
station on one link addresses a message to a station on
another link.
Bright Surface Gain

Bar Code Reader

A device that examines a printed spacial pattern and


decodes the encoded data.

This is a setting (by percentage) used when imaging


multiple sides of packages, typically in a tunnel application.
This is set via Accu-Setup. (See Modify Setup / Tunnel
Tab.)

Bar code symbol

A group of bars that represent a character or group of


characters whose width and spacing is determined by a set
of rules. In most cases, human readable characters are
printed below the bars.
Bar Height

The height of the shortest bar in a bar code.

Buffer

A temporary storage device used to compensate for a


difference in data rate and data flow between two devices
(typically M).
Bus

An internal pathway along which electronic signals travel


between the components of an electronic device.

Bar Length

The bar dimension perpendicular to the bar width.


Bar Width

The thickness of a bar measured from the edge closest to


the symbol start character to the trailing edge of the same
bar.

Button

A graphic user interface that allows users to select a given


software function. Instead of physically pressing a button,
the user simply clicks on the desired button to access a
menu, tab screen, or function.
Button Menu

Baud Rate

A unit used to measure communications speed or data


transfer rate; represents the number of discrete conditions
or events per second.

A graphic user interface that offers several buttons. The


Accu-Setup Main Window offers a menu of buttons that
include Save to Camera, Modify Setup, Exit, etc. Instead of
physically pressing a button, the user simply clicks on the
desired button to access a menu, tab screen, or function.

BCC (Block Check Character)

Used to check transmission accuracy, a character


transmitted by the sender after each message block and
compared with a block check character computed by the
receiver.
Bed Width

The width of the conveyor bed measured in inches.


BEL

A control character that is used when there is a need to call


for attention; it may control alarm or attention devices.
Belt Width

Byte

A binary element string functioning as a unit, usually


shorter than a computer word. Eight-bit bytes are most
common. Also called a character.
Camera, Camera Module

Identifies the AccuVision module that is responsible for


scanning and/or imaging packages that pass through the
scanning area. The camera includes several subcomponents (including the camera head and SMIO board)
and is responsible for the interconnections with other
devices (e.g.: decoder, trigger, tach, illumination, etc.).

The width of the conveyor belt measured in inches.

Camera Head

Bidirectional

Component subassembly of the AccuVision camera that


includes the lens, auto-focusing optics (if applicable), and
CCD sensor array.

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Code Orientation

The relationship of the bar code with reference to the scan


heads reading zone. Typical code orientations are Ladder
and Picket Fence.
CART

(Also known as trigger) A signal, typically provided by a


photoeye or proximity switch, that informs the scan head of
the presence of an object within its reading zone.
CCD (Charge Coupled Device)

Used in scanners to sense the light and dark areas of a


symbol.
CCD Sensor Array

A series of Charged Coupled Device (CCD) photo


receptors used by the camera to convert light energy into
electrical energy. (See also Tap(s).)

Code Placement

Variation in code placement affects the ability of a scanner


to read a code. The terms Tilt, Pitch, and Skew deal with
the angular variations of code placement in the X, Y and Z
axes. Variations in code placement affect the pulse width
and therefore the decoding of the code. Pulse width is
defined as a change from the leading edge of a bar or space
to the trailing edge of a bar or space over time. Pulse width
is also referred to as a transition. Tilt, pitch, and skew
impact the pulse width of the code.

CDRH (Center for Devices and Radiological Health)

This organization (a service of the Food and Drug


Administration) is responsible for the safety regulations
governing acceptable limitations on electronic radiation
from laser devices. Accu-Sort is in compliance with the
CDRH regulations.
Capture count

The number of consecutive identical valid decodes that


result in a valid read.
Character

A single group of bars and spaces in a code that represent


an individual number, letter, punctuation mark or other
graphic element. Used as part of the organization, control,
or representation of data.
Character self-checking

The feature which allows a bar code reader to determine if


a scanned group of elements is a valid symbol character. If
a symbology is described as character self-checking, a
single printed defect (edge error) in any symbol character
does not produce a valid character.
Character set

Those characters available for encodation in a particular


automatic identification technology.
Check Character

A character (usually at the end of the code) that is used to


perform a mathematical check to ensure the accuracy of a
scan of the bar code.
Codabar

For details, see Symbologies


Code 128

For details, see Symbologies


Code 39

For details, see Symbologies


Code 93

For details, see Symbologies

Changes to this code presentation cause the bar codes to


appear smaller to the scanner which results in a smaller
pulse width. Each of these variation has a different effect
on a scanner reading these codes and the combination of
the variations leads to more complicated effects.
Code Quality

The number of scans successfully decoded during a read


cycle.
Code set

The specific assignment of data characters to symbol


characters.
Com Initialization String

A user-definable string of ASCII characters that can be set


for the SMIO Ports by using the Modify Setup /
Communications Tab of Accu-Setup.
Command Version

Identifies the version of software commands used in the


cameras SMIO, AVCore, or Decoder Engine program.
(See Accu-Setup Main Window / Camera Type / SMIO
Tab.)
Communications Protocol

The rules governing exchange of information between


devices connected together on the same communications
line.
Configuration

The arrangement and interconnection of hardware


components within a system, and the hardware (switch and
jumper) and software selections that determine the
operating characteristics of the system.
Configuration file

The set of attributes which belongs to and defines the


operation of a single physical device.

Code Length

The length of the bar code measured from the start of the
first bar to the end of last bar.

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Continuous code

A bar code symbology where all spaces within the symbol


are parts of the characters (Interleaved 2 of 5). There is no
interactive gap in a continuous bar code symbology.

Decoder Logic

The electronic package that receives signals from the scan


head, interprets the signals into useful data, and provides
the interface to other devices.

Conveyor Speed

The speed that the conveyor is moving measured in feet per


minute. Conveyor speed directly impacts the time that the
code is in front of the scanner; therefore, it affects the
number of reads that are possible. Camera systems require
consistent conveyor speeds to assure accuracy.

Default(s)

Original parameters as programmed by Accu-Sort at the


factory. Accu-Setup can be used to review the default
settings and modify them, when necessary.
Delimiter Between Codes

An illumination source that is in the same plane / line of


sight of the cameras CCD sensor array. The AV3700
offers an LED coplanar illumination option.

The separator used between multiple bar codes decoded


and transmitted to the host in the same message. The
delimiter is set in Accu-Setup. (See Modify Setup /
Communications Tab / Host Message.)

CPI

Depth of Field

Coplanar Illumination

CR (Carriage Return)

The distance between the maximum and minimum plane in


which a symbol can be read. This range is from the
specified optical throw to the far reading distance.

An ASCII or EBCDIC control character that moves the


cursor or print mechanism to the left margin.

Density

Characters per inch. See density.

CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check)

A CRC is generated by treating a message as a single, large


binary number and dividing it by a specific number and
keeping the remainder, which becomes the CRC. This can
be set in Accu-Setup. (See Modify Setup / Communications
Tab / Host Messages / Data Verification.)
CRT (Cathode-Ray Tube)

Device similar to a television screen for sending, receiving,


and displaying serial data. Also known as Dumb Terminal,
Display screen, or Monitor.

The number of data characters which can be represented in


a linear unit of measure. Bar code density is often
expressed in characters per inch (CPI).
Diagnostics

Refers to the various features of the Accu-Setup and SMIO


Commands software that enable a trained and qualified
technician to monitor and troubleshoot the operation of an
AccuVision system.
Dimensioning, Dimensioning System

The Modem interface signal that indicates to the DTE


device to begin transmission.

Used in applications that require more than the package


height data provided by a photoeye or light curtain. Either
dimensioning software or an Accu-Sort DM-3000
Dimensioning System is used to provide package
dimensioning to camera-based systems.

Current Loop

DIP Switches

Method of interconnecting terminals and transmitting


signals, whereby a mark (binary 1) is represented by
current on the line and a space (binary 0) is represented by
the absence of current.

Switches that are the approximate size of an integrated


circuit.

CTS (Clear to Send)

Discrete code

For details, see Symbologies

A bar code or symbol where the space between characters,


intercharacter gap, are not part of the code as with Code 39.
See continuous code.

Data Verification

Dot Matrix Printer

There are three data verification options available when


defining the host message via Accu-Setup: None, BCC, and
CRC. (See Modify Setup / Communications Tab / Host
Message.)

A dot matrix printer is an impact printer that consists of a


series of pins arranged in an array. The pins strike an inked
ribbon against the label stock to form the bar code and
characters. This is the most common type of printer used to
print labels on-demand. Some dot matrix printers use a
moving print head and stationary stock. The print head
moves across the label, printing one dot at a time, to
complete one line. The print head then begins printing the
next line. Other dot matrix printers use a stationary print
head. These printers typically print one line at a time and
are therefore much quicker than a printer with a moving
print head.

Data Matrix

Decode

The process of translating a bar code into data characters


using a specific set of rules for each symbology.
Decoder

As part of a bar code reading system, the electronic


package which receives the signals from the scanner,
performs the algorithm to interpret the signals into
meaningful data and provides the interface to other devices.

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Dots Per Inch (DPI)

EIA-485

DPI is a measure of resolution and indicates the number of


pixels per linear inch as measured at the object plane.
Unless otherwise qualified, DPI generally refers to the
cameras resolution perpendicular to the motion of the
transport (i.e.: across the conveyor). Minimum DPI
identifies the lowest DPI that occurs in the system. This
figure generally limits the smallest symbology element that
may be detected. Minimum DPI Reference Distance is the
linear measurement between the cameras reference plane
(often the mounting base) and the point where the
minimum DPI occurs. This is generally the largest possible
distance to which the camera can be focused. Maximum
DPI identifies the highest DPI that occurs in the system.
Maximum DPI Reference Distance is the linear
measurement between the cameras reference plane (often
the mounting base) and the point where the maximum DPI
occurs. This is generally the smallest possible distance to
which the camera can be focused.

The recommended standard of the Electronic Industry


Association that specifies the electrical characters of
generators and receivers for use in balanced digital
multipoint systems.

Downloading

The process of sending configuration parameters, operating


software or related data from a central source to remote
stations.
Down Sampling

A software function that reduces the amount of storage and


processing time used when displaying or saving images
from within Accu-Setup. This slider bar is found on the
Modify Setup / Pkg. Mgt. Diag. Tab.

Element

Dimensionally the narrowest width in a character - bar or


space.
Element width

The thickness of an element measured from the edge


closest to the symbol start character to the trailing edge of
the same element.
Emitter/Receiver Pair

An emitter sends a light beam to a receiver that detects


when the beam from the emitter is interrupted. Typically
used in applications where tape or lamination on an object
on the transport could mimic the reflector used in a
retroreflective pair. Can be used as a TRIGGER.
Encoded area

The total linear dimension consisting of all the characters


of a code pattern, including start and stop characters and
data.
ENQ (Enquiry)

A transmission control character used as a request for a


response from a remote station. (^E)

Drop-down menu

ESC (Escape)

A graphical user interface that allows the user to select


from a list of options that are displayed when a specific
function has been selected. This options list drops down
from the selected function. A list of drop-down menus can
be found across the top of the Accu-Setup Main Window.

A control character which is used to provide additional


control functions. It alters the meaning of a limited number
of continuously following bit combinations. (^[)

DSR (Data Set Ready)

An RS232 modem interface control signal which indicates


that the terminal is ready for transmission.

Error

A discrepancy between a computed, observed or measured


value or condition and the true, specified or theoretically
correct value or condition.
ETX (End of Text)

DSR (Data Terminal Ready)

Modem interface signal which alerts the modem that the


DTE device is ready for transmission.
Duplex Transmission

See Full and Half Duplex.

A transmission control character that terminates a text.


Even Parity

A data verification method in which each character must


have an even number of on bits.
Expansion Bus

European Article Number System. The international


standard bar code for retail food packages.

Allows the microprocessor to communicate with controllers


for peripheral devices, such as a network card or an internal
modem.

EDI (Electronic Data Interchange)

Far Distance

EAN

A method by which data is electronically transmitted from


one point to another.
EIA-232

Interface between data terminal equipment and data


communication equipment employing serial binary data
interchange.

The distance (in inches) from the face of the scanner to the
farthest point at which a code can be successfully scanned.
Feet Per Minute (FPM)

Typically used to define the speed of a conveyor. Conveyor


speed may also be defined in meters per second.
Field of View (FOV)

EIA-422

Electrical characteristics of balanced-voltage digital


interface circuits.

Defines the coverage area across the conveyor belt width


over which the scanner or camera can detect and read bar
codes. FOV is a linear measurement of the length of the

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scan line and should be qualified with a throw distance
(e.g.: 24 FOV @ 60 throw).
A maximum theoretical FOV is the absolute maximum scan
line length assuming sufficient uniform illumination along
the whole scan line. Effective FOV is the useful length of
the scan line as limited by the illumination and/or the
camera. (For example: At a throw of 60, a camera may
have a maximum theoretical FOV of 24 but the
illumination may only cover a 20 FOV, so the effective
FOV of the camera/illumination system would be 20.)

one of three files stored on the APC100 that can be


modified via the Utilities Menu / Modify Gain Table. (See
Chapter 5.) Gain table modification should only be done by
an ASI trained and authorized technician.
Gateway

A device used to connect networks using different


protocols so that information can be passed from one
system or network to the other(s). (See Subnet Mask.)
Gateway Address

Flip Lens

A moveable lens inside a scanner that increases Depth of


Field.
Flying Lead

A lead that exits the back of the connector hood on the


outside of the cable jacket. It is normally attached to the
drain wire or shield and connected to the chassis of the
switch, modem, etc. It can also be a hardware control lead.
Focus, Focusing

Identifying the camera or scanners means of gathering


light onto the sensor through the use of a lens and, in the
case of some cameras, a focusing mechanism (e.g.: voice
coil). Dynamic Focusing refers to adjusting the camera
focal length on the fly to accommodate varying package
heights or varying distances between the camera and
packages. Input is required from a light curtain or
dimensioning system. Fixed Focus identifies cameras with
a focal length that remains the same (i.e.: fixed); used by
cameras to image packages that are all the same distance
from the camera. The Focus Table is one of three files
stored on the APC100 that can be modified via the Utilities
Menu / Modify Focus Table. Focus table modification
should only be done by an ASI trained and authorized
technician.

Like all other devices on a network, the device serving as


the Gateway must also have an IP address so that devices
wishing to communicate with devices outside its own
network can fine the Gateway which will forward its data.
Like all other addresses, it is displayed in the dotteddecimal format.
Gray Image Data

Gray scale image data is the image captured by the camera


of a product as it passes through the scanning area. The
gray image data is not required for symbology decoding,
but may be provided from the cameras GRAY IMAGE
DATA port to the frame grabber in the APC100 and
subsequently to the clients host computer for processing.
Guard bars

1) The bars at the ends and center of a UPC and EAN


symbol that ensure a complete scan of the bar code. 2) The
optional bars outside the quiet zone of an Interleaved 2 of 5
symbol that ensure a complete scan of the bar code.
Half Duplex (HDX)

Transmission in either direction, but not simultaneous.


Handshaking

Frame Grabber

Exchange of predetermined signals between two devices


establishing a connection. Usually part of a
communications protocol.

Board installed in APC100 that is used to capture image


data. (See GRAY IMAGE)

Hardware Cart

Front Read

The scanner is mounted to read bar codes on the leading


edge of a box as it passes the scanner. In a front read
application, the scanner can be mounted above or on the
side of the conveyor.
Front/Top Read

The camera is mounted to read the front and top of


packages as they pass through the scanning area. In a
front/top read application, the camera is usually mounted
above the conveyor positioned at a 45 degree angle to
enable it to scan both the front and top of packages
Full Duplex (FDX)

Simultaneous, two-way, independent transmission in both


directions.
Gain

A measure of amplification. More gain means more


amplification. Too much gain may lead to saturation (i.e.:
signals reaching a maximum value). Accu-Setup enables
the user to define a Gain Mode via the Modify Setup /
Imaging Tab. The Gain Table is a look-up table of gain
setting values tabulated for various heights and speeds. It is

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This is an electrical signal from a relay, photoeye, or


proximity switch indicating that an object is passing by the
scanner.
Header

A means of identifying the beginning of a message to be


sent to the host. One example is <STX> or Start of Text.
Height of Scan

The maximum vertical scanning dimension of a moving


beam scanner at a specific distance from the face of the
scanner.
Helium Neon Laser

A type of laser commonly used in bar code scanning.


Because the laser beam is bright red, bars must not be
printed with red ink since they would be indistinguishable
from the codes background.
Hexadecimal

A base-16 numbering system that uses the symbols


0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,A,B,C,D,E,F.

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Host

1) A central controlling computer in a network system. 2)


Any device on a network system that provides a controlling
function to another device on the network. 3) Any
intelligent device for which another device is providing a
communication interface to a network.

7
A bar code in which characters are paired together using
bars to represent the first character and spaces to represent
the second.
Inter-symbol no-read count

The minimum number of no-reads that must occur between


symbols scanned when Self-Triggered (continuous decode)
is selected as the decode trigger. Symbols that are not
preceeded by the minimum nuber of no-reads are ignored.

Illumination

Light source used with a camera to provide the lighting


needed to illuminate the scanning area. Some cameras use
self-contained illumination. There are three types of
illumination used by AccuVision: 1) sodium, 2) LED, or 3)
Coplanar LED.
Image Capture

Term used to define the process used by AccuVision


cameras to acquire images of products as they pass through
the scanning area.
Induct Photoeyes

The cart cycle begins when the start of cart photoeye is


blocked and continues until the cart photoeye is unblocked.
Blocking the INDUCT photoeye causes relay decisions and
data communication. For this placement the distance
between the CART and INDUCT photoeyes must be less
than the minimum box size plus the minimum box spacing.

I/O

The abbreviation for input/output. The keyboard and a


printer, are examples of I/O devices. I/O activity is
different from computational activity. When a program
sends a document to the printer, it is engaging in I/O
activity; when the program sorts a list of terms, it is
engaging in computational activity.
IP Address (Internet Protocol Address)

IP Address is the numeric address given to a network card


which enables other devices on a network to find it. For
readability, this number is displayed in dotted-decimal
format (e.g.: 127.0.0.1) as opposed to the binary equivalent
(e.g.: 01111111000000000000000000000001).
Jumper

A wire that connects a number of pins on one end of a


cable only, such as looping back Request to Send from
Clear to Send pins 4 and 5.

Ink Jet Printing

Ink jet is a non-contact printer that projects drops of ink at a


printing surface. The sprayed drops are controlled
electronically to form a bar code.

Ladder Orientation

When the bar codes bars are positioned horizontally on the


product, causing them to appear as a ladder. The ends of all
bars will enter the scan window first.

Input/Output Modules

OPTICALLY ISOLATED INPUT/OUTPUT MODULES.


Flexible modules which allow the scanner to control high
voltage outputs that are susceptible to noise. Since they are
isolated from each other the noise is not picked up in the
scanner.
The modules come in both input and output versions. The
output versions are controlled by a 5VDC input. The output
of the modules can range from 24VAC - 140VAC or 3VDC
- 200VDC. Foreign voltage ranges are available. The
maximum current that the modules can supply is limited by
the output voltage and the module type. The input versions
are controlled by either a DC or AC input ranging from
3VDC - 32VDC or 90VAC - 140VAC. Foreign voltage
ranges are available. The output of the modules is a 5VDC
level. The maximum current is limited by the input
modules. These output modules are commonly used to
control diverters, alarms, external relays, etc. The input
modules can be used for photoeye inputs.
Intercharacter Gap

The space between two adjacent bar code characters in a


discrete code.
Interface

A shared boundary defined by common physical


interconnection characteristics, signal characteristics and
meanings of interchanged signals.
Interleaved Bar Code

LAN

The acronym for local area network. A LAN system is


usually confined to the same building or a few nearby
buildings, with all equipment linked by wiring dedicated
specifically to the LAN.
Laser Gun

A hand-held non-contact laser scanner that is usually


activated with a trigger.
Laser Scanner

An optical bar code reading device using a low energy laser


light beam as its source of illumination.
Laser Printing

Laser printers use a pulsed or rastered laser light source to


positively charge an image on a dielectric cylinder of an
electrostatic printing mechanism. Toner used in the laser
printing process adheres to the charged portion of the
cylinder. This toner is then transferred to paper using heat.

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LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)

A low-power display often used for notebook computers.


An LCD consists of a liquid crystal solution between two
sheets of polarizing material. An electric current causes
each crystal to act like a shutter that can open to allow light
past or close to block the light.

For details, see Symbologies


Memory

A computer can contain several different forms of memory,


such as RAM, ROM, and video memory. The term memory
is generally used to define RAM. When a computer has 8
MB of memory, it actually has 8 MB of RAM.

LDI (Lamp Driver Interface Board)


Memory Address
LED (Light Emitting Diode)

A semiconductor generally made from gallium arsenide,


that can serve as a visible or near infrared light source
when voltage is applied continuously or in pulses. LEDs
have extremely long lifetimes when properly operated.
LED Illumination

Low-power light emitting diode (LED) light source used by


cameras to illuminate the scanning area in applications with
little or no DOF requirements where high speed is not a
consideration.
Lens

Optics used in cameras for focusing light onto the CCD


sensor array. Lens Focal Length (mm) defines the lens
focal length in millimeters. The AV3700 cameras have four
lens options: 38 mm, 50 mm, 85 mm, and 135 mm.
LF (Line Feed)

An ASCII control character that moves the cursor or print


mechanism to the next line. (^J)

A specific location, usually expressed as a hexadecimal


number, in the computers RAM.
Message

1) A meaningful combination of alphanumeric characters


that establishes the content and format of a report. 2) In a
communication network, the unit of exchange at the
application layer.
Message buffer

Storage register for the temporary storage of data that


allows decoding to continue while the host is retrieving
data from the serial port.
Message buffer warning

An output condition that occurs when the message buffer


has used a defined amount of the message buffer.
MHz

The abbreviation for megahertz.


Microprocessor

Light Curtain

A sensing device connected to a system that uses a series of


transmitters and receivers to create a curtain of light that
is both 90 degrees and perpendicular to the conveyors
direction of travel. This device is used by the system to
detect either the presence and/or the height of packages as
they enter the cameras scanning area.
Linear Bar Codes

Also referred to as 1D or 1-dimensional symbologies.


Examples: Code 39, I2of5, UPC.

The primary computational chip inside the computer,


referred to as the brain. The microprocessor contains an
arithmetic processing unit and a control unit. Software
written for one microprocessor must usually be revised to
run on another microprocessor.
Mil

One thousandth of an inch (0.001 inch). Bars and spaces of


codes are commonly referred to as being a certain number
of mils wide.
Misread

Lines Per Inch (LPI)

Identifies the lines per inch. LPI is a measurement of


resolution that indicates the number of sensor scan lines
that are collected for every inch of transport movement. In
effect, LPI is the DPI in the direction of conveyor travel.
LMM (Light Monitoring Module)

The scanner incorrectly decodes a bar code as it passes


through the scan zone.
Modulo check digit or character

A calculated character within a data field used for error


detection. The calculated character is determined by a
modulus calculation on the sum or the weighted sum of the
data field contents.

mA

The abbreviation for milliampere(s).

Mouse

A condition in which decoded data matches data in the


match entry.

A pointing device that controls the movement of the cursor


on a screen. Mouse-aware software allows the user to
activate commands by clicking a mouse button while
pointing at objects displayed on the screen.

Match entry

Moving-Beam

Match

An output condition in which decoded data matches and the


data in a match entry configuration.
Matrix 2D Symbology

Examples: Aztec, DataMatrix, MaxiCode, QR Code


MaxiCode

^Jp=p

Rather than using a stationary laser beam and relying on


product movement for a single scan, a multi-facet mirror
wheel and motor is used to move the beam across the
code several times while in motion itself.

dilpp^ov

Moving-Beam Bar Code Scanner

A device that dynamically searches for a bar code symbol


by sweeping a moving optical beam through a field of view
called the scanning zone. Automatic bar code reader that
reads codes by sweeping a moving optical beam through a
field of view. Moving-beam scanners are usually mounted
in a fixed position and read codes as they pass by.
MTBF

The abbreviation for mean time between failures.


Multidrop Line

A single communications circuit that interconnects many


stations, each of which contains terminal devices. See EIA485.
NAK (Negative Acknowledgment)

A control character used to indicate that the previous


transmission block was in error and the receiver is ready to
accept retransmissions.

9
13 Enclosures are intended for indoor use primarily to
provide a degree of protection against dust, spraying
of water, oil, non-corrosive coolant.
Net Mask

A numeric value that is used by devices to determine


whether the device it wishes to communicate with is on the
same network. If not, the data must be forwarded via a
Gateway. May also be referred to as Subnet Mask. (See
Gateway, Gateway Address.)
Network

A series of stations (nodes) connected by some type of


communication medium. A network may be made up of a
single link or multiple links.
NVC

The acronym for non-valid code. Defines the condition that


occurs when an object has been scanned and no bar code
could be decoded. Usually, this indicates that either no
code was on the object or the code was badly damaged and
could not be decoded.
Node

Narrow Bar (NB)/Narrow Space (NS)

Smallest code element, bar or space, in the bar code


symbol. Also known as the X dimension.
NCDRH (National Center for Devices and Radiological
Health)

This organization (a service of the Food and Drug


Administration) is responsible for the safety regulations
governing acceptable limitations on electronic radiation
from laser devices. Accu-Sort is in compliance with the
NCDRH regulations.
Near Distance

The distance (in inches) from the face of the scanner to the
closest point at which a code can be successfully scanned.

The connection point at which media access is provided.


No-match

An output condition in which decoded data does not match


an entry in the match code table.
No-Read

When the scanner or camera is unable to decode a bar code


as it passes through the scan zone.
Non-Read

The absence of data at the scanner or camera output after


an attempted scan due to no code, defective code, scanner
failure or operator error.
Odd Parity

NEMA

In order to rate the quality of an enclosure the National


Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has
developed a system for rating all enclosures. A partial list
of the NEMA enclosures is shown below along with what
particles it is designed to restrict.
Ratings
3
Enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use
primarily to provide protection against windblown
dust, rain, and sleet, and is undamaged by the
formation of ice on the enclosure.
4
Enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use
primarily to provide protection against windblown
dust and rain, splashing water, and hose-directed
water; undamaged by the formation of ice on the
enclosure.
4X Enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use
primarily to provide protection against corrosion
windblown dust and rain, splashing water, and hose
directed water; undamaged by the formation of ice on
the enclosure.
6
Enclosures are intended for use indoors or outdoors
where occasional submersion is encountered.
12 Enclosures are intended for indoor use primarily to
provide a degree of protection against dust, falling
dirt, and dripping non-corrosive liquids.

A data verification method in which each character must


have an odd number of on bits.
Omnidirectional

Orientation is unpredictable and can be ladder, picket


fence, or any angle in between. A single scan line is not
sufficient to scan bar codes oriented omnidirectionally.
One-dimensional Symbologies

Also referred to as linear codes. Examples: Code 39, I2of5,


and UPC are all 1D or linear bar codes.
Operating Range

The sum of the scanners optical throw and depth-of-field.


Optical Throw

Measured distance from the scanners window to the near


reading distance of the depth of field. Typically, this is the
closest a bar code can be to the scanners window and still
be properly decoded.
Optimum Reading Distance

Typically, the center of the depth of field.


OCR

Optical Character Recognition. Cameras can be used in


OCR based systems.

Solutions with Vision

10

OCR Image Engine

Photoeye

Refers to a camera that does not include a bar code


decoder. Image data is provided by the camera directly to a
customer-supplied OCR decoder.

Used as a presence detector to identify objects in the


scanner or cameras reading zone. The photoeye emits a
beam and is used with a reflector to create a photoelectric
circuit. When the beam is blocked by an object, breaking
the circuit, a signal called CART is sent to the scanner or
camera.

Orientation

The alignment of the codes bars and spaces to the scan


head. Often referred to as vertical (picket fence) and
horizontal (ladder).
Output counter

A counter that is associated with each output condition.


The counter increments by 1 each time the condition
occurs.

Picket Fence Orientation

When the bar codes bars are positioned vertically on the


product, causing them to appear as a picket fence. The first
bar will enter the scan window first.

Oversquare

Used to describe bar codes that are taller (from top to


bottom of the bars) than they are wide (from first to last
bar).
Package Spacing

This is the spacing between items on a conveyor. Package


spacing is measured one of two ways: Leading edge of one
box to leading edge of the next or trailing edge of one box
to trailing edge of the next. Package spacing is critical to
system operations.

Pitch

Parameter

PLANET

A value or opinion that you specify to a program. A


parameter is sometimes called a switch or an argument.
Parity Bit

A bit that is set at 0 or 1 in a character to ensure that


the total number of 1 bits in the data field is even or odd.
PDF417

For details, see Symbologies


Percent good reads

The number of successful reads per refresh period. This is


valid only when the refresh period is set to 0.
Performance indicator

Rotation of a code pattern about the X-axis. The normal


distance between center line or adjacent characters.
For details, see Symbologies
Polarized Laser

A specialized laser source used in high glare environments.


Polling

A means of controlling devices on a multipoint line.


Port

Refers to the physical connectors located on the


AccuVision camera and other devices. The AccuVision
cameras ports include: TRIG, TACH, SYNC OUT,
FOCUS, ILLUM, HOST, COM, I/O, GRAY IMAGE
DATA, and GRAY IMAGE DATA AUX.

A bar code decoder function that counts the number of


decodes during a trigger period. When the period = 0, the
performance indicator provides the number of decodes (up
to 100 attempts). Use the performance indicator to provide
a general indication of bar code symbol quality or verify
proper setup of the scanner.

POSTNET

Performance indicator limit

Pulses Per Inch (PPI)

A set point that will produce a discrete output if the


performance indicator falls below the set point value.
Pen Scanner

A pen-like device either connected by wire to a device, or


self-contained, used to read bar codes. Requires direct
contact with the symbol.
Peripheral Device

An internal or external device, such as a printer, a disk


drive, or a keyboard, connected to a computer.

^Jp=p

For details, see Symbologies


Protocol

A formal set of conventions governing the formatting and


relative timing of message exchange between two
communicating systems.
Defines the number of pulses per inch of transport travel as
provided by the tachometer.
Pulse Width

A change from the leading edge of a bar or space to the


trailing edge of a bar or space over time. Pulse width is also
referred to as a transition.
Quad Relay Box

Optional Accu-Sort hardware device used to control up to


four parallel I/O from the cameras SMIO I/O Port.

dilpp^ov

Queue

A buffer used to hold data in order until it is used or


transmitted.
Quiet Zone

11
This is the time (in seconds) after the relay is energized that
it should be turned off.

Relay Output Delay

Required distance before the first bar and after the last bar
of the code that must be free of marks or printing.

The time lapse between an event and the energizing of the


relay.

Radio Frequency

Request To Send (RTS)

Non-optical automatic identification devices that use radio


waves to transmit data.

An RS232 modem interface signal which indicates that the


DTE has data to transmit.

Raster

Resolution

The process of projecting the laser beam at varied angles


spaced evenly from each other. Typically, the mirror wheel
surfaces are angled to create multiple scan lines instead of a
single beam.

The narrowest element dimension which can be


distinguished by a particular reading device or printed with
a particular device or method.
Response Time

Raster Mirror Wheel

The standard mirror wheel forms the laser line that is


projected from the scanner. Although the mirror wheel
projects 8 separate lines (for an 8-sided mirror wheel), the
speed of the sweep makes it appear that it is actually one
line. This type of mirror wheel is adequate for a ladder
orientation because the laser line will pass from the bottom
to the top of the code. For a picket fence orientation the
standard mirror wheel is not always adequate. One problem
facing the picket fence orientation is that the same portion
of the code is being repeatedly scanned. If the printing
quality at this point is not good the label may not be
scanned even though other parts of the label are good.
Another problem for a picket fence orientation is the
placement of the label. If the placement is off enough a
single scan line will not read all the bar codes presented to
the scanner.
Read-only

A read-only file is one that you are prohibited from editing


or deleting. A file can have read-only status if:
Its read-only attribute is enabled.
It resides on a physically write-protected diskette.
It is located on a network in a directory to which the
system administrator has assigned read-only rights to
you.
Read Zone

Area in front of the scanners window in which the bar


code should appear for scanning. This zone consists of the
scan window and the raster width (if used).
Reflectance

The amount of light returned from an illuminated surface.


Relative Camera Angle

The mounting angle of the camera as it relates to the


conveyor surface and direction of travel.
Relay

Relays are simply electrical switches that are typically used


to control external diverts, alarms, etc. Relay types
available are FORM A and FORM C. FORM C type relays
have both normally open and normally closed contacts
available while FORM A type relays have only normally
open contacts available.
Relay Output Duration

The elapsed time between the generation of the last


character of a message at a terminal and the receipt of the
first character of the reply. It includes terminal delay and
network delay.
Retroreflective Pair

An emitter bounces a light beam off the reflector and


detects when the beam is broken. Often referred to as a
photoeye or PE. Typically used as a TRIGGER.
RS-644

Parallel Interface used with Gray Image Data and Gray


Image Data Aux Ports of an AccuVision cameras
ROM

The acronym for read-only memory. The computer


contains programs essential to its operation in ROM. A
ROM chip retains its contents even after you turn off your
computer.
RPM

The abbreviation for revolutions per minute.


RS-232

Interface between data terminal equipment and data communication equipment employing serial binary data
interchange.
RS422

The Electronic Industries Association standard that


specifies the electrical characteristics of balanced voltage
digital interface circuits.
RS485

The Electronic Industries Association standard that


specifies the electrical characters of generators and
receivers for use in balanced digital multipoint systems.
Scan

A single pass of the laser beam over the code or a portion


of the code. The search for a bar code symbol that is to be
optically recognized.
Scan Area

The area intended to contain a symbol.


Or
The location of the conveyor being scanned by the camera
for codes or image data.

Solutions with Vision

12

Scan Line

The line in the object plane that is currently being imaged


by the camera. (See also DPI, Dots Per Inch.)
Scan Line Clock (SLC)

Identifies the signal that causes the camera to finish


collecting light for the current scan and to shift the
collected data out of the camera (and begin collecting light
for the next scan).The frequency of the scan line clock may
vary with object height and/or speed.
SLC (lines/sec. or hertz) = LPI * transport_speed
(inches/sec.)
Scan=Window

The usable length of the scanning beam that may detect the
bar codes. The scan window is perpendicular to the depth
of field.
Scanner

An electronic device that optically converts printed


information into electrical signals. These signals are sent to
the decoder logic.
Scanner Orientation

Relationship of the scan head with reference to the bar


codes location on products. The scan head must be set up
to insure that all code bars and spaces are bisected at the
same time. Typically, either side read or top read is used
for picket fence or ladder code orientations.
SCSI

The acronym for small computer system interface. An I/O


but interface with faster data transmission rates than
standard ports. The user can connect up to seven devices to
one SCSI interface.
Self Cart

This form of cart requires no input signal. The scanner is


continuously attempting to decode bar codes. When a
scanner is in self cart, there is no way of determining if
there is a package present or a NO-READ
Self-checking

A bar code or symbol using a checking algorithm which


can be independently applied to each character to guard
against undetected errors.
Sensor

A device that detects or measures something and generates


a corresponding electrical signal to an input circuit of a
controller.
Serial Port

An I/O port located on a scanner or camera used most often


to connect a host, decoder, modem or a mouse to device,
identifiable by its 9-pin connector.
Serial Transmission

The most common transmission mode; serial, information


bits are sent sequentially on a single data channel.
Serial Asynchronous Transmission Of Data

The following are common communications interfaces:


RS232, RS422, RS485, 20mA current loop and RS423.

^Jp=p

When data is transmitted serially from a communications


port, the information is transferred between the two devices
one data bit at a time. The data flow can follow one of three
different communications modes: simplex, half duplex, or
full duplex. Each character of data within the data flow is
transported in a binary bit frame called the asynchronous
data frame.
The start bit begins each frame. A low voltage signal on the
data communications line marks the beginning of the start
bit, at which point the receiving device begins looking for
binary zeros and ones (0s and 1s).The following five to
eight data bits (the number depends on the format used)
comprise the binary character. For error detection, an
optional parity bit can define whether the total number of
zeros or ones was even or odd. There are five different
parity selections as shown below:
ODD
last data bit is a logical 0 if the total number of logical 1s
in the first seven data bits is odd.
EVEN
last data bit is a logical 0 if the total number of logical 1s
in the first seven data bits is even.
MARK
last data bit is always a logical 1 (i.e.: high/mark).
SPACE
last data bit is always a logical 0 (i.e.: low/space).
OFF (NONE)
last data bit is not present.
The method used to catch errors by using parity bits is as
follows: When the transmitter frames a character, it tallies
the number of 0s and 1s within the frame and attaches a
parity bit. (The parity bit varies according to whether the
total is even or odd.) The receiving end then counts the 0s
and 1s and compares the total to the odd or even recorded
by the parity bit. If a discrepancy is noticed by the
receiving end, it can flag the error and request a
retransmission of the data.
A stop bit is used to signal the end of the character. (Stop
bits are typically one or two bits in length. The slower the
transmission speed, the more stop bits required for
recognition of the end of the data frame.)
In addition to the direction of data flow and the data
framing, there are other considerations to insure uniform
transmissions. Certain operating parameters must be
followed to prevent the loss of valuable data.
The first consideration is the speed of transmission, known
as baud rate. Serial data transmission is measured in bits
per second (BPS). The baud rate selections typically
available are: 110, 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 and 19200.
To enable two devices to interact, they must both be
transmitting/receiving data at the same baud rate. If it is not

dilpp^ov

13

possible to do this, there must be a buffer (typically


additional storage memory) that accommodates the
differences in communications speed.

Shielding

Many serial communications links also use a flow control


system to handle data transmission in addition to memory
buffers.

Side Read

X-ON/X-OFF Protocol
A common type of flow control is the X-ON/X-OFF
protocol. When a receive buffer nears its memory capacity,
the receiving device sends an ASCII X-OFF signal to the
transmitting device, telling it to stop sending data. When
the memory buffer has enough space to handle more data,
the X-ON signal is sent to the transmitting device, telling it
to start sending data again.

Signal

ACK/NAK Protocol
Another common protocol is ACK/NAK protocol. When
the device transmits a message to the host, the host
responds with either an ACK (06H) or a NAK (15H). If the
host transmits an ACK to the device, the device deletes its
transmit message and the communication sequence is
complete. If the host transmits a NAK, the device will
retransmit. The device resends data a maximum of three
times. Optionally this may be changed to 1, 2, 3, or infinite
retransmits by the user. If the device receives a fourth
NAK, it will delete the data in its transmit buffer and
display MAX REXMITS.
A transmitting device ignores ACK and NAK characters
received during data transmission. If, for example, a device
receives a NAK during a data transmission, it will not
resend the data at the completion of the transmission.
The device also has a retransmit timer. This timer is
activated each time the device transmits data to the host. If
the timer runs for two seconds (this is also changeable) and
the device does not receive an ACK or NAK from the host,
a timeout occurs and the device retransmits its data. Each
time the device retransmits because of a timeout, it treats
the timeout the same as receiving a NAK from the host
computer. If the device does not receive an ACK before the
end of the fourth timeout, it will delete the data in its
transmit buffer and display MAX REXMITS. The device
deletes data in its transmit buffer and displays the error
message when any combination of four timeouts and NAKs
from the host occurs.
When the device receives a message from the host, it
calculates the BCC for the message and compares the
calculated BCC to the received BCC. If the two values
match, the device transmits an ACK, ending the
communication. If the values do not match, the device
transmits a NAK to the host and waits for the host to
retransmit the message. The host, like the device, should
retransmit a maximum of three times.
The sequence number starts at zero (30H) and is
incremented each time a device transmits a new message.
When the sequence number reaches nine (39H), it wraps
around to one (31H). If the sequence number skips a
number, the receiving device knows that a message was
lost. If the same sequence number is received on two
sequential messages, the second message is responded to
with an ACK or NAK (as appropriate) and ignored.

Protective covering that eliminates electromagnetic and


radio frequency interference.
The scanner is mounted to read the side of a box as it
passes by the head.
An impulse or fluctuating electrical quantity (i.e.: a voltage
or current) the variations of which represent changes in
information.
Skew

Rotation about the Y-axis. Rotational deviation from


correct horizontal and vertical orientation; may apply to
single character, line or entire encoded item.
Slider bar

A graphical user interface that enables the user to select an


ascending/descending value for a definable parameter by
clicking on the slider bar and then sliding (via the mouse)
until the desired value is shown. For example: Maximum
Package Length is selected using a slider bar on the Modify
Setup / Trigger Tab screen.
Smart I/O (SMIO)

Also referred to as the SMIO, this term identifies both the


main connector panel and internal board that acts as the
control center of the AccuVision camera system. All
physical interconnections between the camera, other
AccuVision modules, and the outside world occur through
the SMIO. The SMIO is a single-board computer that
provides real-time control of the illumination, package
detection, and package tracking, while monitoring the
operation of the system, controlling imaging, and handling
all communications with the decoder, Accu-Setup user
interface, and host computer.
SMIO Talk

A WindowsNT application that provides aTCP/IP


communication interface from the cameras SMIO to the
outside world. Enables multiple external processes to occur
simultaneously. AVCore, Accu-Setup, and AVCHI
communicate with the camera through SMIO Talk.
Sodium Illumination

High-power sodium lamp light source used by cameras to


illuminate the scanning area in applications with larger
DOF requirements and/or where faster conveyor speeds are
a consideration.
Software Cart

A serial message from an external device that controls the


cart cycle.
Space

The lighter elements of a bar code symbol formed by the


background between bars.

Solutions with Vision

14
Specular Reflections

A condition when the laser light is reflected back from the


codes surface at an angle equal, or nearly equal, to the
angle of incidence of the laser light. This condition makes
it difficult for the scan head to detect the differences in
light variation caused by the codes bars and spaces.

code elements per character resulting in a more compact


code. It features a unique start and stop character for
bidirectional and variable length decoding, both bar and
space character parity for character integrity, a check
character for symbol integrity, a function character for
symbol linking, and spare function characters for unique
application definition and/or future expansion.

Spot

The undesirable presence of an area of low reflectance in a


space. start and stop characters
Stacked Codes

16K and Code 49 are examples where a long symbol is


broken into sections and "stacked" one upon another
similar to sentences in a paragraph. Extremely compact
codes.
Start Bit

In asynchronous transmission, the first bit or element in


each character, normally a space, that prepares the
receiving equipment for the reception and registration of
the character.
Start and End of Cart Photoeyes

The cart cycle begins when the start of cart photoeye is


blocked and continues until the end of cart photoeye is
unblocked. Relay decisions and data communication take
place after the end of cart photoeye is unbroken.
Stop Bit

The last bit in an asynchronous transmission, used to


indicate the end of a character, normally a mark condition,
that serves to return the line to its idle or rest state.
STX (Start of Text)

A transmission control character that precedes a text and is


used to terminate a heading. (^B)
Symbol

A combination of characters including start/stop and


checksum characters, as required, that form a complete
scannable bar code.
Symbologies

Codabar
Self-checking, numeric bar code encoding numbers and
several characters (e.g.: $, -, +, ?) with a slightly higher
density than Code 39. Includes two bar/space sizes.
Code 39
A bar code with a full alphanumeric character set, a unique
start and stop character, and three other characters. The
name is derived from its code structure, which is three wide
elements out of a total of nine elements. The nine elements
consist of five bars and four spaces.
Code 93
Similar to Code 39 but requires two check characters. Code
93 was designed to provide a higher density symbology
with higher security than Code 39. Although code 93 is a
higher density, it is not self-checking and therefore requires
two checksums.
Code 128
A bar code symbology capable of encoding the full ASCII
128 character set. It encodes these characters using fewer

^Jp=p

Data Matrix
2D (two-dimensional) symbology. Two distinct characteristics make it easy to identify: 1) a solid line along two
adjacent sides, accompanied by 2) a pattern of alternating
squares on the opposite sides. In the most common version
of the symbol (known as ECC200), the alternating square
side 'corner' is always a space.
EAN
European Article Numbering System used in retail industry
(a superset of UPC) used on product packaging to uniquely
identify a product and manufacturer.
Interleaved 2 of 5 (I 2of5)
A bar code with a numeric character set with different start
and stop characters. The name is derived from the method
used to encode two characters. In the symbol, two
characters are paired together using bars to represent the
first character and the spaces to represent the second. This
interleaved structure allows information to be encoded in
both the bars and the spaces. A start character, bar and
space arrangement, at one end, and a different stop
character bar and space arrangement at the other end,
provide for bidirectional decoding of this symbol.
MaxiCode
2D (two-dimensional) symbology developed by the United
Parcel Service. Square data elements and a round bullseye
at the center of the symbol (known as the central finder
character). Maxicode has been released to the public
domain for use by anyone.
PDF417
2D (two-dimensional) symbology developed by Symbol
Technologies. Appears like multiple linear codes stacked
one on top of the other. As a result of being based on linear
bar codes, PDF417 is one of a few 2D symbologies that can
be scanned by laser scanners.
PLANET
Postal alpha numeric encoding technique is a tall bar/short
bar symbology used by the United States Postal Service for
special services such as CONFIRM and CIPS. PLANET
digits consist of three tall and two short bars and is
designed as a compliment of POSTNET.
POSTNET
Postal numeric encoding technique is a tall bar/short bar
symbology used by the United States Postal Service to
encode ZIP information on letter and flat mail. POSTNET
is also being used overseas: AccuVision can read both the
Japanese and Australian versions. POSTNET digits consist
of two tall and three short bars.

dilpp^ov
QR Code
2D (two-dimensional) symbology. Easily recognized by
square data elements and it's three part finder pattern. Sets
of square-in-a-square patterns are located in three corners
of this square symbol.

15

Thermal Printing

The rules dictating how you must type a command or


instruction so the computer will understand it.

Thermal printers use heated print heads and special heat


activated paper. There are two types of thermal printers.
One uses a method similar to the dot matrix printer where
an array of heated dots move along the paper and form the
character or bar code. The other method uses a heated bar
and the paper moves across the bar. Another type of
thermal printer is called a Thermal Transfer printer. The
main difference between this type of printer and a thermal
printer is the use of heat sensitive ribbons as opposed to
heat sensitive paper. This type of printing is permanent on
label stock.

System.ini file

Thermal Transfer

UPC
Acronym for Universal Product Code. The standard bar
code type for retail packaging in the United States and
Canada.
Syntax

When you start Windows, it consults the system.ini file to


determine a variety of options for the Windows operating
environment. Among other things, the system.ini file
records which video, mouse, and keyboard drivers are
installed for Windows. Running the Control Panel or
Windows Setup program may change options in the
system.ini file.
Tach (Tachometer)

Hardware device used to provide conveyor speed


information to the scanner or camera in x pulses per inch.
Tag

A collection of information associated with a single


variable or I/O point.

A printing system like thermal except a one-time ribbon is


used and common paper is used as a substrate. Eliminates
the problems of fading or changing color inherent in
thermal printing.
Tilt

Rotation around the Z axis. Used to describe the position of


the bar code with respect to the laser scan line.
Tracking

Process of keeping track of packages as they travel through


the scanning area. Tracking can be done based on the
leading edge or trailing edge of packages. Belt speed (as
monitored via the TACH signal) and camera mounting also
figure into the tracking process. (See Modify Setup /
Tracking tab.)

Tap(s)

Taps (or channels) refer to the number of data paths out


of the linear CCD sensor. A linear CCD sensor consists of a
line of light-sensitive areas. The charge collected in all
these areas is shifted to a parallel array of non-light
sensitive holding areas all at once. The charges are then
shifted along the second set of areas in a bucket brigade
fashion with the last areas charge being shifted off the
sensor entirely (for further processing). This holding area
does not have to all be shifted out of a single port the
holding line may be broken into several sections, each with
its own exit from the sensor. Each exit is called a
tap or channel. Generally, the more taps the more
quickly the image data may be shifted out of the sensor.
Current camera configurations offer either 2 or 4 taps. Tap
Frequency (MHz) is the clock rate at which pixels are
shifted out of the CCD sensor.
TCP/IP

An industry standard suite of protocols providing


communications in a heterogeneous network environment.
TCP/IP stands for Transport Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol.
Two-width symbology

A bar code symbology whose bar and spaces are


characterized simply as wide or narrow. Codabar, Code 39,
and Interleaved 2 of 5 are examples of two-width
symbologies.
Terminal Program

Computer software that sends, receives, and displays serial


data.

Trailer

A means of identifying the end of a message sent to the


host. One example is <ETX> or End of Text.
Transmit Point

The time it takes to transmit the decoded results from the


time the object is first sensed (by PE or light curtain) until
the completion of transmission to the host. Transmit point
is shorter (faster) for cameras because it is not required to
accommodate a scanning pattern length.
Trigger

(Also known as cart) A signal, typically provided by a


photoeye or proximity switch, that informs the scan head of
the presence of an object within its reading zone.
Trigger or Cart Cycle

The time during which the scanner is attempting to read the


bar code.
Two-dimensional Symbologies

More complex bar code capable of containing much larger


amounts of data in a smaller image size because of using
either a stacked or matrixed construction when compared to
the 1D codes. Example 2D codes: DataMatrix, MaxiCode,
and PDF417.
UCC (Uniform Code Council)

The organization which administers the UPC and other


retail standards.
Undersquare

Solutions with Vision

16
Used to describe bar codes that are longer (from the first to
last bar) than they are high (from the top to bottom of the
bars).

bar and narrow space are equal and the wide bar and wide
space are equal then you calculate only one ratio.

UPC

Acronym for Universal Product Code. The standard


bar code type for retail food packaging in the United
States.

Window

UPS

Window (Camera)

The abbreviation for uninterruptible power supply. A


battery-powered unit that automatically supplies power to
your computer in the event of an electrical failure.
Utility

A program used to manage system resources including


memory, disk drives, and printers.
Vane Raster

Decreases the amount of scans possible due to a smaller


percentage of scans bisecting the code.

A display area that the users interacts with to operate


a tool.
1) The physical location on the camera where the CCD
sensor receives reflected light from the surface of products.
2) The physical location on a camera or illumination
module from which the illumination exits the device. Often
referred to as the exit window. 3) A software graphical user
interface that appears on a monitor with which the users
interacts (via keyboard and/or mouse) to operate various
user-definable functions. In both AVCore and Accu-Setup,
there are several tabs, buttons, and drop-down menus
available from the Main Window.
Word

Values File, VAL File

One of three files stored on the APC100 that can be


modified via Accu-Setup. Values that are changed using
the series of Modify Setup tabs will only be saved when the
Save to Camera or Save to Disk functions
Verifier

A device that makes measurements of the bars, spaces,


quiet zones and optical characteristics of a symbol to
determine if the symbol meets the requirements of a
specification or standard.
Vibrating Vane

A variable raster that can have an unlimited number of


raster lines. It covers a larger area and is adjustable.
Visible Laser Diode

A light source used in scanners to illuminate the bar code


symbol. Generates visible red light at wavelengths
between 660 and 700 nM. Replaced Helium-Neon tubes in
most scanners because diodes are small and consume less
power.
Void

The undesirable presence of an area of high reflectance in a


bar.
Wand Scanner

A hand-held contact laser scanner that an operator guides


across the bar code.
Wedge

A device that plugs in between a keyboard and a terminal.


It allows data to be entered either by keyboard or by
various types of scanners.
Wide Bar (WB)/Wide Space (WS)

Widest code element, bar or space, in the bar code symbol.


Wide to Narrow Ratio

Dividing the size of the wide elements by the size of the


narrow elements of a bar code yields the bar and space
ratios. Bar and space ratios can differ. NOTE: If the narrow

^Jp=p

A unit of data which contains two bytes (16 bits).


Write-protected

Read-only files are said to be write-protected. You can


write-protect a 3.5-inch diskette by sliding its write-protect
tab to the open position and a 5.25-inch diskette by placing
an adhesive label over its write-protect notch.
"X" Dimension

The dimension of the narrowest bar and narrowest space in


a bar code.
XON

A control character sent by the receiving device to signal


the transmitting device to begin sending data.
XOFF

A control character sent by the receiving device to signal


the transmitting device to stop sending data.

Index
Index

1
1000018296 Mounting Hardware Kit............................2-10
1000020522 55/70 Adapter Bracket ..............................2-10

A
Abuse..................................................................................ii
Address
Internet ...........................................................................ii
Mailing...........................................................................ii
ASCII Chart....................................................................A-2

EAN-8............................................................................. 3-4
Electrostatic Discharge ..................................................... vi
Controlling.................................................................... vi
Enclosure ................................................................. 1-4, 1-5
Environmental Specifications .................................. 1-4, 1-5
ESD................................................................................... vi
Catastrophic Failures .................................................... vi
Controlling.................................................................... vi
Upset Failures............................................................... vi
Ethernet communications.............................................. 4-19
Extended Service Plan ....................................................... ii
Extensions....................................................................... 3-4
Eye Hazards
Staring at the Laser Beam...............................................v
Use of Optical Instruments .............................................v

B
Bar Code
Basics ..........................................................................3-3
Height..........................................................................3-3
Length .........................................................................3-3
Sample ........................................................................3-3
Symbologies................................................................3-3
Types............................................................ 1-4, 1-5, 3-3
Width ..........................................................................3-3
Blue Ribbon Extended Service Plan...................................ii
BRES..................................................................................ii

C
Calling Customer Service..................................................iii
Cleaning the Mini-X........................................................5-3
Codabar ...........................................................................3-3
Code 128 .........................................................................3-3
Code 39 ...........................................................................3-3
Code 93 ...........................................................................3-3
Code of Federal Regulations .............................................. v
Communications.............................................. 1-4, 1-5, A-9
RS232 ........................................................................A-9
Serial ...........................................................................4-5
Communications, optional
DeviceNet .................................................................4-19
Ethernet.....................................................................4-19
Profibus.....................................................................4-19
Connections
wiring Quad Relay Box cable ...................................4-16
Connections, wiring
trigger........................................................................4-12
Customer Service...............................................................iii

D
DeviceNet communications...........................................4-19
Dimension Measurements Table ...................................2-13
Dimensions With Reference to the Scan Line .................2-9
Disclaimer ...........................................................................i
Document Reproduction......................................................i

E
EAN-13 ...........................................................................3-4

F
FAX Numbers.................................................................... ii
FCC Compliance.................................................................v
Features
Optional...................................................................... 1-3
Standard...................................................................... 1-3

G
General Precautions ............................................................v
Go/NVC LED ........................................... 1-4, 1-5, 2-6, 2-8
Grounding ...........................................................................v

I
Interleaved 2 of 5 ............................................................ 3-3
Internet Address................................................................. ii
Introduction......................................................................... i

L
Label Locations................................................................ vii
Laser Beam
Staring ............................................................................v
Laser LED.......................................... 1-4, 1-5, 2-6, 2-7, 2-8
LEDs
Go/NVC ............................................... 1-4, 1-5, 2-6, 2-8
Laser .............................................. 1-4, 1-5, 2-6, 2-7, 2-8
Locations ............................................................. 2-6, 2-7
Trigger ........................................... 1-4, 1-5, 2-6, 2-7, 2-8

M
Mailing Addresses ............................................................. ii
Manual Revisions ............................................................... i
Master/Slave Configuration ........................................... A-3
Message Formats ........................................................... A-4
Message Sequencing...................................................... A-5
Misuse................................................................................ ii
MOD 10.......................................................................... 3-4
MOD 43.......................................................................... 3-4
Model 24
Setting Up............................................................ 2-3, 4-5
Unpacking .................................................................. 2-3

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL


Modulus Checks ..............................................................3-4
Mounting
1000018296 Mounting Hardware Kit .......................2-10
1000020522 55/70 Adapter Bracket..........................2-10
dimensions ................................................................2-13
Dimensions with Reference to the Scan Line..............2-9
Orientations...............................................................2-11
Photoeyes ..................................................................2-15
Side Read ..................................................................2-11
Tachometer ...............................................................2-16
Top Read...................................................................2-12

N
Neglect ...............................................................................ii
Note Boxes ........................................................................iv

O
Operating Parameters .............................................. 1-4, 1-5
Optional Features ............................................................1-3
Orientations
Side Read ..................................................................2-11
Top Read...................................................................2-12

P
Phone Numbers ..................................................................ii
Photoeyes
Mounting...................................................................2-15
Physical Specifications............................................ 1-4, 1-5
Power
Requirements ...................................................... 1-4, 1-5
Precautions ........................................................................iv
Problem/Causes/Solution Table.......................................5-8
Profibus communications ..............................................4-20

S
Safety Recommendations and Precautions........................ iv
Scan Rate ................................................................. 1-4, 1-5
Scanning Range ....................................................... 1-4, 1-5
Serial Communications................................................... 4-5
Serial Number Breakdown................................................ iii
Serial Tag.......................................................................... iii
Service Plan ....................................................................... ii
Setting Up ....................................................................... 2-3
Side Read Orientation ................................................... 2-11
Size .......................................................................... 1-4, 1-5
Space Width.................................................................... 3-3
Specifications........................................................... 1-4, 1-5
Standard Features............................................................ 1-3

T
Tachometer
Mounting .................................................................. 2-16
TachTrac Option ........................................................... 2-16
Temperature Range.................................................. 1-4, 1-5
Top Read Orientation.................................................... 2-12
Trigger input wiring...................................................... 4-12
Trigger LED....................................... 1-4, 1-5, 2-6, 2-7, 2-8
Troubleshooting
Problem/Causes/Solution Table.................................. 5-8

U
Unpacking....................................................................... 2-3
UPCA.............................................................................. 3-4
UPCE .............................................................................. 3-4

V
Visual Diagnostics ................................................... 1-4, 1-5

Q
Quiet Zone.......................................................................3-3

R
Revision History..................................................................i

Accu-Sort Systems

W
Warranty ............................................................................ ii
Weight...................................................................... 1-4, 1-5

Revision History
Revision History
Document Revision
Number

ECN
Number

Date

1.0
2.0

7026
Xxxx

01/25/02
07/02

Changes Made
Initial release
Added specs and read chart for Model 24 VV

MODEL 24/MINI-X SERIES II OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL

Accu-Sort Systems