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affect any other Microsoft Office applications.

1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when
the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed.affect any other Microsoft Of
fice applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when

the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,


the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed.affect any other Microsoft Of
fice applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when
the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign

documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed.affect any other Microsoft Of
fice applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when
the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed.affect any other Microsoft Of
fice applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of

a workbook containing macros.


Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when
the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed.affect any other Microsoft Of
fice applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when
the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.

nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed.affect any other Microsoft Of
fice applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros
with notification option, except that when
the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her

you trust a project that has been digitally signed.


Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use compoChapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel so
lution with other Microsoft Office applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has

i
s

i
s

expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use compoChapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel so
lution with other Microsoft Office applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when i
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll s
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use compoChapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel so
lution with other Microsoft Office applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in

your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use compoChapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel so
lution with other Microsoft Office applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t

i
s

i
s

o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use compoyour Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier
chapters are re-created using ActiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 ayour Excel 2007
projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using ActiveX technologi
es
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple

i
s

i
s

user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 a
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages

i
s

i
s

of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when i
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll s
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in

nd Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,

this book will provide you with that information.


I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data i
nto your Excel 2007 projects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio

i
s

i
s

Tools for Office 2005.Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.
Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide. Its examples
show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.
Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L
ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming lang
uages: ease of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when i
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll s
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear

n. Excel 2007 has


expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.
Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide. Its examples
show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.
Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L
ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming lang
uages: ease of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex

cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when i
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll s
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.
Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide. Its examples
show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.
Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L
ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming lang
uages: ease of reuse, easier

code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.


You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when i
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll s
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablChapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techni
ques. The Immediate, Locals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.
Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide. Its examples
show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.
Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L
ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.

Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming lang
uages: ease of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTablin Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming lang
uages: ease of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.of this book, it has many, many possibilities,
and it is relatively easy to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec

i
s

i
s

tion tools. Excel


charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: eas
e of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.of this book, it has many, many possibilities,
and it is relatively easy to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: eas
e of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in

i
s

i
s

Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.of this book, it has many, many possibilities,
and it is relatively easy to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: eas
e of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.of this book, it has many, many possibilities,
and it is relatively easy to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: eas
e of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear

i
s

i
s

n. Excel 2007 has


expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.of this book, it has many, many possibilities,
and it is relatively easy to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide.
Its examples show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.
Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L
ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.
Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide. Its examples
show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.

Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L


ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming lang
uages: ease of reuse, easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.
in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: ease of reuse,
easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear
n. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your

i
s

i
s

client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.of this book, it has many, many possibilities,
and it is relatively easy to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.
This book also addresses object-oriented programming to a great degree. Just bec
ause
you re not writing a .NET or even a classic Visual Basic application, there s no
son you can t
use object-oriented coding techniques in your projects. It provides you with the
same advantages
in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: ease of reuse,
easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theof this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy
to learn. Excel 2007 has
expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.
This book also addresses object-oriented programming to a great degree. Just bec
ause
you re not writing a .NET or even a classic Visual Basic application, there s no
son you can t
use object-oriented coding techniques in your projects. It provides you with the
same advantages
in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: ease of reuse,
easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of theDid you ever wonder whether there is more to Excel than data displayed i
n rows and columns
or pretty charts? If you want to learn how to bring data into your Excel 2007 pr
ojects, or
learn to work with XML, or see how object-oriented programming can be used in Ex
cel 2007,
this book will provide you with that information.
I wrote this book because I ve always enjoyed writing applications in Excel when
t is the
required solution. Excel is often overlooked in coding situations, but as you ll
ee in the pages
of this book, it has many, many possibilities, and it is relatively easy to lear

rea

rea

i
s

n. Excel 2007 has


expanded XML support. XML data is easily brought into and out of an Excel projec
t so your
client spreadsheet data can be shared. Excel UserForms give you the ability to c
reate simple
user interfaces for your clients and allow you to create easy-to-use data collec
tion tools. Excel
charting and PivotTables have always been a strong suit for data summary, and in
Excel 2007,
PivotTables are greatly enhanced.
This book also addresses object-oriented programming to a great degree. Just bec
ause
you re not writing a .NET or even a classic Visual Basic application, there s no rea
son you can t
use object-oriented coding techniques in your projects. It provides you with the
same advantages
in Excel that you get in the full-fledged programming languages: ease of reuse,
easier
code maintenance, encapsulation, and more.
You will find sample files and code solutions in the Source Code/Download sectio
n of the
Apress web site, at www.apress.com.
Who This Book Is For
This book is intended for developers who would like to learn to use Visual Basic
for Applications
(VBA) to extend the power of Microsoft Excel 2007. You should have some knowledg
e of
or experience using the VBA or classic Visual Basic programming languages and th
eir related
development environment.
Anyone with VBA, Visual Basic, Microsoft Access, or .NET experience will readily
understand
the concepts in this book, but anyone with any coding experience should have no
problem with the material.
How This Book Is Structured
This book gives a view into the many features available to today s Excel developer
, from a
tour of the Visual Basic Editor, where coding is done, to its debugging features
. It also provides
modern coding techniques, including object-oriented programming. You ll learn
about data access, XML, charting, and PivotTables, UserForms, and more.
Chapter 1 is a basic tour of Excel 2007 coding features, from the development en
vironment
to other tools you ll use. It begins with an examination of the Visual Basic Edito
r and
xvii
shows some of its features. It then looks at the Excel Macro Recorder and the co
de it generates
for you, talks about the different types of code modules available to you, and d
iscusses the
types of code you can write.
Chapter 2 details methods of bringing data into and out of Excel projects. It co
vers
importing from Microsoft Access data, text files, and SQL Server data. It also d
iscusses the
many data access options available, including DAO, ADO, and ODBC.
Chapter 3 discusses using the XML features in Excel 2007. Examples include impor
ting
and exporting data to an XML file and appending data from an XML file. It shows
how to build

a custom object in a class module to work with XML files. It also shows how to b
uild a custom
user interface component using XML.
Chapter 4 looks at Excel 2007 UserForms and the tools they provide. Its examples
show
how to build simple and complex data entry forms, and how to use classes to add
functionality
to the UserForms.
Chapter 5 explores charting in Excel 2007. After examining the code created by t
he Macro
Recorder, it shows how to use the Chart object in code.
Chapter 6 takes a look at Excel PivotTable reports. PivotTables are powerful dat
a analysis
tools, and they re easy to create and modify. The code samples show how to create
and modify
PivotTable reports.
Chapter 7 is an overview of VBA debugging tools and techniques. The Immediate, L
ocals,
and Watch windows are shown in detail. The section on error handling shows how t
o effectively
trap for errors and how to provide positive feedback to the user.
Chapter 8 is all about integrating your Excel solution with other Microsoft Offi
ce applications.
Its examples include building a chart report in Word 2007 and building a PowerPo
int
presentation that includes text and charts from an Excel workbook.
Chapter 9 shows how to use components built in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Studio
2005 in
your Excel 2007 projects. Examples from earlier chapters are re-created using Ac
tiveX technologies
in Visual Basic 6 and .NET assemblies using Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio
Tools for Office 2005.
Prerequisites
Microsoft Excel 2007 is required for the examples in this book. For Chapter 8, Of
fice Integration,
you ll need Microsoft Word 2007 and PowerPoint 2007.
SQL Server 2005 Management Studio Express is used in our SQL data examples. This
is available for download from the Apress web site (www.apress.com), in the Sour
ce Code/
Download section.
To create the code for Chapter 9, ActiveX and .NET, you ll need Visual Basic 5 or 6
(for
the ActiveX section) and Visual Studio 2005 and Visual Studio Tools for Office 2
005 SE (for the
.NET section). If you do not have one or both of the above, the compiled compone
nts for each
example are provided on the Apress web site. The .NET Framework 2.0 should be in
stalled on
your PC for the .NET examples to run. If you do not have Visual Studio 2005, you l
l be able to
run the samples, but you won t have direct access to the code.
xviii nINTRODUCTION
Downloading the Code
The source code for this book is available to readers at www.apress.com, in the
Source Code/
Download section. Please feel free to visit the Apress web site and download all
the code there.
You can also check for errata and find related titles from Apress.
Contacting the Author
Contact Jim DeMarco at jim.demarco@hcheq.org. For more information on HCHEQ and

its mission, go to www.hcheq.org. For information on Jim s musical endeavors, go t


o www.
fiftyhabit.com or contact him at info@fiftyhabit.com.
nINTRODUCTION xix
The Macro Recorder and
Code Modules
This book is written for experienced coders. You may have experience in many lan
guages,
but not in the Excel (or Office) VBA IDE. We will be writing quite a bit of code
as we move
along, but before we do that, let s take a quick look at Excel s Macro Recorder and
the Visual
Basic Development Environment. The Macro Recorder has been a part of Excel for q
uite a
long time, and it s still the best way to get a look at some of the objects that m
ake up the Excel
Document Object Model (DOM), and a great way to get the core of your code writte
n for you
as you start your development projects.
Macro Security Settings
Excel s default security settings do not allow any macro activity. Before you begi
n exploring
macros in Excel and the Macro Recorder, you will need to tell Excel which securi
ty settings to
use to control what happens when you open a workbook that contains macros (or on
e that
will contain macros). If you use antivirus software that works with Microsoft Of
fice 2007 and
you open a workbook that contains macros, the virus scanner will check the workb
ook for
viruses before opening it.
You can make changes to the macro security settings in the Trust Center:
1. Click the Microsoft Office button, which looks like the following:
2. Click the Excel Options button, select Trust Center, click the Trust Center S
ettings
button, and finally click the Macro Settings item.
Alternatively, on the Developer ribbon, click the Macro Security button in the C
ode Group
section. (Depending on the network security level at your organization, you may
or may not
have rights to change these settings).
nNote Macro setting changes made in Excel s Macro Settings section apply to Excel
only; they do not
affect any other Microsoft Office applications.
1
C H A P T E R 1
Table 1-1 lists the Excel macro security settings and explains each setting.
Table 1-1.Macro Security Settings
Setting Purpose
Disable all macros without notification Use this setting if you don t trust the so
urce of
a workbook containing macros.
Disable all macros with notification This is the default setting. Use it when yo
u
want macros to be disabled, but you want to
get security alerts if there are macros present.
You can decide when to enable those macros.
Disable all macros except digitally signed macros This is the same as the Disable
all macros

with notification option, except that when


the macro is digitally signed by a trusted publisher,
the macro can run if you have trusted
the publisher.
Enable all macros (not recommended, potentially Use this setting to allow all ma
cros to run.
dangerous code can run)
Trust access to the VBA project object model This setting is for developers only
.
nCaution The Enable all macros setting makes your computer vulnerable to potential
ly malicious code.
It is not recommended that you use this setting permanently. For the examples in
this book, we use this setting,
but it is highly recommended that you choose another option in your production c
ode.
Trusted Publishers
This section lists the currently trusted certificates that can be used by develo
pers to sign
documents and add-ins. When you open a digitally signed document, the digital si
gnature
appears on your computer as a certificate. The certificate names the VBA project s
source,
plus additional information about the identity and integrity of that source. A d
igital signature
does not necessarily guarantee the safety of a project, and you must decide whet
her
you trust a project that has been digitally signed. If you know you can always t
rust macros
from a particular source, you can add that macro developer to the list of truste
d sources
when you open the project.
Trusted Locations