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COMP17022: Introduction to Computer Systems Module Guide
Learning; comprehension; & introspection

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COMP17022: Introduction to Computer Systems Module Guide
Learning; comprehension; & introspection

NOTE 1: Problem logging into module web site

contact ARS (Action Request System) [fill in web


form]:
Action Request System http://csis.cs.man.ac.uk/

Module Guide

Was: dutyoffice@cs.man.ac.uk
Module Title:

COMP15111: Fundamentals of Computer Architecture

IMMEDIATELY

New code

Old code

Unit title

Short code

COMP15111

COMP10031

Fundamentals of Computer Architecture

151

http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~graham/code-map.html

The Module reference number:


COMP15111

The URL for reference information associated to this course:

e.g. if the web site [Blackboard] goes down the


server may have crashed
The Action Request System should be contacted
NOT the lecturer...

Blackboard select: COMP15111: Fundamentals of Computer Architecture

www.manchester.ac.uk/portal
Past Exam URL: http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx
Support URL: http://intranet.cs.man.ac.uk/Study_subweb/courses/COMP15111/
Support URL: http://www.cs.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/programmes/courseunits/syllabus.php?code=COMP15111
Support URL: http://intranet.cs.man.ac.uk/Study_subweb/Ugrad/coursenotes/komodo/
Download Location of Keil uVision 4 ARM Sim URL: http://www.keil.com/demo
Then select: ARM Evaluation Software and then fill in the registration form - IT's FREE...
ARM University Program- Academic pages is: www.arm.com/community/university

The name of School responsible for module:

Computer Science
The academic year of presentation:

Semester 1
Reading WEEK 6
For University calendar information Ref: Future semester dates available [on-line]
@ http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/dates/semester/

Method Of assessment:
Exam:75%; Coursework: 0%; Lab: 25%.

Exam: coursework = 75:25


Exam is in semester 1. A number of Labwork components, worth 25%.

NOTE 2: Copies of past exams


Past Exam URL: http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx

1/ Are at the end of this module guide;


2/ Are on the module web site at the end of the
*.pdf version of the module guide on the web
site
You will be reminded of this when [if] you email
me [a few days before the exam] and ask where are
the past papers!!!!

JG: if you look on the website:


http://www.cs.manchester.ac.uk/ugt/2012/COMP15111/
there are the last two past papers with model answers and the
examiners' general feedback on how the questions were answered.

You may be aware that Student Services Centre now only display the last three years of past exam
papers at the following link:

NOTE: The up-to-date version of this module guide is kept on the


associated web site available [on-line] @
Blackboard select: COMP15111 Fundamentals of Computer Architecture
www.manchester.ac.uk/portal

The University's link is (only previous 3 years):http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx


Computer Science full archive is here (we don't publish the 2010/2011 papers until after the resit
period:http://www.cs.manchester.ac.uk/assessment/

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Learning; comprehension; & introspection

INDEX

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Learning; comprehension; & introspection

PAGE NUMBER

PAGE NUMBER ........................................................................ 3


INDEX
Basic data about the module ...................................................................................... 5
Short introduction of the module ............................................................................... 6
Rationale .................................................................................................................... 6
Aims of the Module ................................................................................................... 6
The Learning outcomes for the module ..................................................................... 7
Key and Cognitive skills ............................................................................................ 7
Blanks [Spaces] in Lecture notes ............................................................................... 7
Introduction to compiling GLOSSARIES ................................................................. 8
Introduction to studying this module ......................................................................... 8
Overview of the main content ............................................................................ 8
Syllabus .............................................................................................................. 8
Overview of types of classes .............................................................................. 9
Lecture schedule (this section only refers to R. Nevilles lecture series) .......... 9
Recordings for [these] lecture(s) ...................................................................... 10
Coursework schedule ....................................................................................... 10
Importance of student Self-study managed learning time ................................ 10
Self directed learner Support.................................................................................... 11
Course Level Requirements ..................................................................................... 11
Feedback .................................................................................................................. 12
Real time feedback [Level Three]: ..................................................................... 12
Types of feedback: ............................................................................................... 12
Weekly teaching and learning programme............................................................... 12
Class contact time ............................................................................................ 12
Module Organisation and structure .................................................................. 12
Self-study managed learning ............................................................................ 13
Presentation of information.............................................................................. 13
Plan of topics in classes/lectures DETAILED Learning Outcomes:- ........... 13
Assessment of programme ....................................................................................... 15
Assessment criteria and feedback proforma .................................................... 15
Details of assessment for the module............................................................... 15
Dates of University Examination Periods ................................................................ 15
Exams........................................................................................................................... 15
Queries ..................................................................................................................... 16
Communication ................................................................................................ 17
CONTACT DETAILS: FOR THE SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
AND MANCHESTER BUSINESS SCHOOL ................................................ 17
School of Computer Science - Support staff............................................................ 17
Learning support material ........................................................................................ 17
Core reading ..................................................................................................... 17
WWW Infomation ........................................................................................... 19
Module Evaluation Form ......................................................................................... 19
Ammusing Emails Form students ............................................................................ 19
Appendix 1: (Past exam Paper)................................................................................ 26
Revision advice - Important Exam advice: .............................................................. 26
3

You may be aware that Student Services Centre now only display the last three years
of past exam papers at the following link: ................................................................... 26
The University's link is (only previous 3 years):- ........................................................ 26
http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx .................................................... 26
Computer Science full archive is here (we don't publish the 2010/2011 papers until
after the resit period:- ................................................................................................... 26
http://studentnet.cs.manchester.ac.uk/assessment/ ...................................................... 26

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Learning; comprehension; & introspection

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COMP17022: Introduction to Computer Systems Module Guide
Learning; comprehension; & introspection

Just a reminder on location of G12 in Kilburn.

School of Computer Science


Module Guide for Students
Basic data about the module
Module title:

Fundamentals of Computer Architecture

Module reference number:

COMP15111

Level:

Module credit value:

10

Semester in which Module is presented:

Semester 1

Student study hours [min]: 100hours in total (per semester)


(Contact lectures Duration: 11 weeks in first semester
Lectures: 22 in total, 2 per week
Examples classes: 5 in total, 1 per fortnight
Labs: 10 hours in total, one 2-hour session per fortnight
~20hours and Self-study managed 80hours+)

Reading week WEEK 6


Method Of assessment:
75% exam + 25% coursework
Exam: coursework = 75:25
Exam is in semester 1. Labwork, worth 25%.
"All students note: KEEP A COPY OF ALL LABWORK YOURSELF"
Pre-requisites:

none

Primary course(s):

Degree

Year:

One

a) It is on the very bottom floor of the Kilburn Building;


b) There is [actually] a side entrance through two sets of double doors on the very bottom floor of the
Kilburn Building;
c) Straight after the double doors turn sharp RIGHT; [There is a phone on the right; if you swipe card
does not let you in; use the phone list to (by the phone) to ring me.]
d) You will see a door on your RIGHT; [Which is swipe card accessed]
e) Through this door;
f) Turn LEFT; [Once through the door]
g) Halfway down the corridor;
h) Door with Richard Neville on Door should be open
If you are not sure ring me on internal [CS Kilburn number] 63317
or 0161 276 3317.

Short introduction of the module


The module introduces the concepts involved in Fundamentals of Computer Architecture. Its
aim is to enable the student to develop the skills required to comprehend Computer Systems,
be they terminology, models, methodologies, structures (or topologies), timing, number
representation and a general introduction to basic computer systems.
This unit builds on the skills developed in your background, covering material that will enable
students to comprehend basic computer architecture structures and topologies. In particular, students
will be able to comprehend the basic of computer systems.

Rationale
[Knowledge of] Fundamentals of Computer Architecture is becoming increasingly important
in business and finance. They are applicable to problems which have been considered
mainstream computing. Students should not complete a course in computing (computer
science) without some exposure to the subject. Since research is taking place in this subject
within the school it is also appropriate that such expertise is passed on to our students.
Aims of the Module
The aim of this module is to introduce the concepts behind the Fundamentals of Computer
Architecture approach to implementing IT solutions. A broad variety of standard Computer
Systems methodologies and theories will be introduced. The theory, techniques, and
methodologies will be illustrated to enable students to comprehend the theory. The
associated areas of computer hardware and topology of computer systems are also covered to
some degree.

Author(s) [of this module guide]: Dr Richard Neville


r.neville@manchester.ac.uk
Room: G12 in the Kilburn building
My office is G12 in the Kilburn building.
FINDING G12 in the Kilburn Building:
Just some help to find me in the [real] ground floor of the
Kilburn building - IMPORANT information below:

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Learning outcomes; On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
Understand the basic Von Neumann/Imperative computational model. (A)
Understand the binary nature of digital computers, and how bit patterns can be used to represent such things
as characters, numbers and instructions. (A)
Understand the essentials of the ARM instruction set and its registers. (A)
Be able to understand the basics of assembly language programs. (C)
Understand the correspondence between imperative code & data and assembly language. (A)
Be aware of the role of Compiler, Assembler, Library, Linker, Loader, Interpreter and Operating System, and
of some of the interactions between these and the underlying computer hardware. (A)

The Learning outcomes for the module


On completion of the module the student should be able to comprehend the following
theoretical concepts:
Degree Level
All students who undertake this Level 1 module must undertake the Lab
work.
The Degree level Fundamentals of Computer Architecture module assessments are
75% exam & 25% Labwork.

Key and Cognitive skills


The key and cognitive skills which the student may be able to develop during the module:
The module will expand the students vocabulary with respect to the technical
terminology and understanding of methodologies utilised associated to Fundamentals of
Computer Architecture, this will enable the student to extend his/her communication skills.
The student will be empowered to learn by utilising multi-format lectures, and Selfstudy-learning techniques. The majority of the module is presented through a set of lectures1.
Each lecture has a set of associated questions (i.e. at the end of each lecture handout), which
are supported by answers provided on the web (normally two weeks after the lecture has been
given2). Guidance will be given to students private study in respect of directed reading. The
lectures are also supported by a set of Lab assignments that expand the students knowledge
utilizing a learning by doing approach.
Blanks [Spaces] in Lecture notes

[Means] A few additions to notes are required.

Blocks of works are removed:


The reasons for this are:
1

Lectures are supported by audio recordings that are placed on the modules web site after each lecture.
Answers to all lecture note questions will be placed on the associated web site nominally two weeks after the
lecture.

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1/ The open University disseminates notes which the student has to update (or add to);
2/ The idea is to prompt note taking;
3/ The main physical context is to:
3.1/ Make the student personalise their notes;
3.2/ Utilise a more complex learning mechanism eye, brain, hand
combinations.
Introduction to compiling GLOSSARIES
Why build a Glossary for each course unit you undertake?
Each module you undertake uses its own jargon.
This can be a problem for new students, whom are trying to comprehend the
new domain knowledge attached to a particular new module.
One way to get to know the new jargon is to build your own GLOSSARIES
for each course module.
The glossary at the end of each lecture is a stating point for this module [unit].
Please feel free to add to the glossary's throughout the unit
The glossary is full of potential exam questions of the form "define X" or "briefly explain X".
Introduction to studying this module
Overview of the main content
Syllabus
The module will cover the following topics:
LECTURE
1: (Jim): Introduction
2: (Jim): ARM & KMD
3: (Jim): Storing Values
4: (Jim): ARM assembly programming
5: (Jim): Arithmetic
6: (Jim): If+While
7: (Jim): Addresses & addressing
8: (Jim): Methods
9: (Jim): More methods
10: (Jim) Case study
Reading Week
11: (Jim) Switch
12: (Jim) Boolean
13: (Richard): Input/Output (1)
14: (Richard): Input/Output (2)
15: (Richard): System Software
16: (Richard): Assemblers & Compilers
17: (Richard): Java bytecode
18: (Richard): Java Memory Usage
19: (Richard): Arrays 1
20: (Richard): Arrays 2

Week

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

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Learning; comprehension; & introspection

[THIS weeks] version have a go answering all Q3 questions, students should try to answer
all three as will give them examples of typical [types] short exam questions.

> This week (10-14/Dec) there will be examples classes at the usual
> times (I will email the cribs as usual) BUT there will also be lab
> marking sessions (i.e. no new exercise) in LF31 on the Thursday and
> Friday afternoons (at the same time as the final COMP16121 labs):
>
Y Thursday 15th 1-3 instead of Monday 11-1
>
X Thursday 15th 3-5 instead of Tuesday 1-3
>
A+Z Friday 16th 1-3 instead of Wednesday 9-11
>
W Friday 16th 3-5 instead of Tuesday 10-12 (the Thursday marking
> sessions are at the same time as the examples classes.)
Email Jim to Check this!!!
12

Overview of types of classes


Lecture schedule (this section only refers to R. Nevilles lecture series)
The lectures are used to present the majority of the core concepts relating to Fundamentals of
Computer Architecture.
Each lecture [RNs] is recorded. This is in line with good pedagogic approaches; as per
quote(s):

Lectures are recorded and the lecture slides, recordings and all [question answers] are
available , [1].
Students have access to all lectures slides, audio lecture recordings, and additional material,
including course software, [1].
___
Footnote: [1] Falkner N., Sooriamurthi R., and Michalewicz Z., "Puzzle-Based Learning for Engineering and
Computer Science," in IEEE Computer. vol. 43: IEEE, April 2011, pp. 20-28.

The lecture itself is composed of several components:


(1) Q1; Short Exam Question one question from the previous weeks lecture
a.
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)

or in the case of the first lecture general knowledge the students should be aware of.

Overview of lecture containing:


a. Learning outcomes;
The core lecture;
Self-study part of Core lecture [Real time Video] {reference previous section entitled:
Importance of student Self-study managed learning time.}
Course Time Line Information;
COMP15111 Examples classes info.

Summary of key points [Nominally included] {Associative Mind maps};


[Make your own] List of Questions to ask lecturer: Before the 9a.m. start lecture the
lecturer will be half an hour early and you can ask [any and all] questions in that half
hour; before the lecture:
(10) Getting ready for next week; do next weeks Q3s at the end (or after) the lecture].
(11) Q3; Short Exam Questions three questions from the previous weeks lecture; for you
[the student] to work through in your own time; may be a good revision aid when
starting to revise; prior to testing yourself on the past exam paper short questions.
a. or in the case of the first lecture general knowledge the students should be aware of.
NOTE: There are two copies of Q3 in each lecture:
9

Questions; Long [& Short] Exam Questions:


b. relating to the lecture material;
(12) Background reading book list
a. in a ranked list with the most appropriate book listed first (were possible
auxiliary web site information will also be included);
(13) Glossary; the glossary is full of potential exam questions of the form "define X" or
"briefly explain X":
a. the glossary is a part of the self-study part of the module it is left as an
exercise for the student to complete
i. however if learning is about developing the linguistics ability to talk technically
about a subject (e.g. intro. to computer systems) then it would be essential that the
student understands all the associated concepts and works aligned to intro. to
computer systems;
(14) Further summaries, questions may follow the glossary section.
"AGAIN All students note: KEEP A COPY OF ALL LABWORK YOURSELF"

Recordings for [these] lecture(s)


The recording for this lecture will be available in Blackboard [soon after the lecture] @
Blackboard select: COMP15111: Fundamentals of Computer Architecture
www.manchester.ac.uk/portal
Downloads also available at Windows Live SkyDrive @ <URLs to be specified after lecture>
Recordings also available on YouTube @ <URLs to be specified after lecture>
Please check THIS page on Blackboard after the lecture for URL; which will be active
only after this lecture.

Coursework schedule
Coursework is designed to fit within the module workload. The student is expected to spend
a portion of their Self-study managed learning time to complete the coursework.
Labwork: 25%
Coursework Description: A number of Labwork assignments are set.
"All students note: KEEP A COPY OF ALL LABWORK YOURSELF"
For University calendar information Ref: Future semester dates available [on-line]
@ http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/dates/semester/

Importance of student Self-study managed learning time


The student is required to comprehend many new concepts over the course of the module. To
enable the student to gain a full understanding of the concepts they should attend all lectures.
It is the students responsibility to attend all sessions and to fully participate in the module.
To facilitate this we advise the student to attempt all the questions at the end of each lecture
handout. The student is expected to gain knowledge of Introduction to Computer Systems
during the module and in-order to enhance participation it is advised that the points
mentioned in the Self-study managed learning section below are followed during non class
contact times. The student is encouraged to take an active role in managing their learning
time. The student should take responsibility for his or her own learning. The student should
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gain confidence to learn on his or her own. The student should be empowered to support
himself or herself when learning. Without self-study the student may not be able to gain a
good honours degree
Self directed learner Support
In order to support the development of the self-directed learner who can set goals and select
appropriate knowledge, skills, etc. as well as supporting tools for a particular purpose of
studying this course at a deep level. The following self-directed learner goals are promoted:
1) Goal of answering Q1s prior to each lecture;
2) Goal of undertaking all Q3s for this weeks lecture [at the end of the lecture notes];
3) Goal of watching the real time lecture of the lectures covered this [each] week;
4) Goal of watching the Real Time video(s) of ARM Komodo Programs associated with this
Lecture;
5) Goal of reading the Self-study NOTES section of this weeks lectures;
6) Goal of watching the Real Time video(s) of the Self-study NOTES section of this
weeks lectures;
7) Goal of revising [reading prior to] this weeks example class or laboratory class; and
starting each prior to the class;
8) Goal of re-visiting [reading or watching real time video(s)] summaries of this weeks
lecture to reinforce the associations, key works, and theory covered in the lectures;
9) Goal read relevant section in text book [if there is one];
10) Goal of undertaking Explicit Background Reading - directly related to this [these]
lecture(s);
11) Goal of building a glossary - directly related to this [these] lecture(s);
12) Goal of reading, watching, or listening to Learning Resources - directly related to this
[these] lecture(s);
13) Goal of undertaking each lectures end of lecture [long and short exam] Questions directly related to this [these] lecture(s).

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Feedback
The feedback I received on my work was helpful is the goal of this modules real time and
coursework feedback.
Real time feedback [Level Three]:
This type of feedback is two-way dialogue where learning can occur. Examples include the
following times when real time feedback is given [in real time]:
Time #1: before the lecture starts;
Time #2: At the end of the lecture; &
Time #3: Specific feedback periods specified by the lecturer, nominally in Labs.
Time slots #1 to #2 are normally in the lecture room specified [scheduled for the module].
Time slot #3 may be in the scheduled lecture room (or lab.) or in the lectures office.

Types of feedback:
The feedback is normally pedagogical3 and relates to several areas:
1) Discussion of relevant [related] topics in lecture;
2) Misunderstanding of theory be it mathematical, concept, or basic;
3) Reinforcement of theoretical beliefs;
4) Reviewing a concept of theory discussed during the lecture in a different way;
5) Comprehension of process;
6) Question answers discussion either process or exact steps taken to evolve (calculate)
answer;
7) Course work requirement;
8) Coursework process;
9) Coursework general questions.
Any other topic, concept, or theory relating to the module can also be discussed in a feedback
session.
Finally, provision for LABWORK feedback (return of marks for coursework) is specified in Arcade.
Weekly teaching and learning programme

Course Level Requirements


By undertaking this course the student is expected to master the courses level requirements
for Further Learning.
The programme contains sufficient computing content; so that Graduates should have been
assessed on the following abilities:
1. Computing-related cognitive abilities:
1.1. Demonstrate a systematic understanding of the knowledge of the domain of their
programme of study, with depth being achieved in particular areas. This should include the
foundations of the discipline.
1. 2. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the essential principles and practices of
the domain of the programme of study.
2. Computing-related practical abilities:
2.1 Demonstrate the ability to apply the principles and practices of the discipline.

Class contact time


Module Organisation and structure
Length of module:
One Semester
For University calendar information Ref: Future semester dates available [on-line]
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/dates/

Time spent each week in total studying and attending


lectures:

(Contact lectures ~20 2 and Self-study managed 2 80+)

11

200 in total (per semester)

Pedagogical (pronounced: pedagogical): relating to, or befitting a teacher (or student) or education (of student).

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Self-study managed learning


Students are advised to use the following guidelines in respect of Self-study managed
learning time:
1. After the lecture re-read the lecture notes.
2. Summaries are provided at the end of each set of lecture notes. Use the summaries as
mental prompts. If you do not understand the key points in the summary re-read the core
sections relating to the key point in the lecture notes. (If the student does not comprehend
the concept after re-read the core sections they are advised to read the section relating to
the concept in the module textbook. After this the student should ask one of the module
team.)
3. A handout is given for each lecture, which has a set of questions at the end. The student
is advised to attempt all the questions, as these will enable the student to learn the course
material as the course continues.
4. To enable the student to comprehend the core concepts in this module the student is
advised to buy the module textbook at the start of the module. This will enable the
student to carry out background reading that focuses on specific topics a list of
background reading books are supplied at the end of each lecture series notes (e.g. in the
case of RNs notes).
5. The programming examples provided during the course of the lecture series should be
utilized to full comprehend the theory presented in the lectures. The examples should be
downloaded and placed in the simulator.
It is suggested that the student should set aside several hours per week to carry out the above
tasks.

Presentation of information
Plan of topics in classes/lectures DETAILED Learning Outcomes:LECTURE 13-14 [WEEK 8]:
Lecture 13: Input/Output (1)
To be able to provide simple definitions of the terms:
1) List a variety of peripherals;
2) Indicate what is meant by polling;
3) Explain how ARM polling utilises status registers and data registers;
4) Illustrate why interrupts are used instead of polling;
5) State the 5-steps taken to handle an interrupt;
6) Identify the different sections in a simple ARM interrupt handler routine.
Lecture 14: Input/Output (2)
To be able to:
1) Distinguish between ARMs interrupts [interrupt vector table];
2) State what is meant by DMA.
LECTURE 15-16 [WEEK 9]:
Lecture 15: System Software
To be able to:
1) Determine why operating systems are hard to live without;
2) List the six constituent parts of an operating system;
3) Recognise the provision the kernel provides;
4) Identify the three ARM hardware protection modes;
5) State the three resource managers in the kernel.
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Lecture 16: Assemblers and Compilers


To be able to:
1) Distinguishes between the levels of programming languages;
2) Differentiate between an Assembler and a Compiler;
3) List the four Assembly Steps;
4) Explain in detail what each Assembly Step does;
5) Summarise the five Compiler steps;
6) Contrasts the Compiler steps [in detail];
7) State what is meant by the term Libraries.
LECTURE 17 & 18 [WEEK 10]:
Lecture 17: Java bytecode
To be able to:
1) Gives examples of what [and why] Java uses Bytecode; [May be supported by
a diagram!!!];
2) Explain the concepts behind Zero address [Instructions].
Lecture 18: Java Memory Usage
To be able to:
1) Differentiate between memory usage in a JVM;
2) Illustrate an understanding of JVM memory usage with respect to Java:
method code [parameters and local vars]; variables; object instance
variables;
3) Identify the 3-basic java areas of storage;
4) List the 3-steps taken creating a new object in memory;
5) Explain the function of the Heap;
6) List the 3-components stored in a new area of heap store for a new object;
7) State how objects are allocated in a heap;
8) Define what is mean by a Garbage collector.
LECTURE 19 & 20 [WEEK 11]:
Lecture 19: Arrays (1): Array Implementation
To be able to:
1) Illustrate how data is represented in ARM;
2) State how arrays are implemented & accessed in ARM;
3) Differentiate between: reference pointer, array base, array index;
4) Specify methodology of indexing into an array;
Also state how base & index are used in conjunction;
Also posit how index mathematics is undertaken;
5) Give examples of three levels of complexity of Indexing in Programs1;
6) Discriminate between shift and rotate operations;
7) Justify why LSL speed up [some] multiply operations.
Lecture 20: Arrays (2)
To be able to:
1) Identify how array out of bounds occur;
2) Devise a method for array checking;
3) Illustrate how arrays of objects are created and referenced;
4) Indicate how multi dimensional arrays are:
Created [Instantiated];
Referenced; and
Addressed

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Learning; comprehension; & introspection

NOTE: the student should understand that the guide, as shown


above, is an indication of how the module ideally fits into the structure
of the semester. Although every attempt will be made to try and
follow this structure, there may be times when it is impossible to do
so. Students may be re-assured though; that the majority of the
material listed will be covered.

Re-sit Examinations: 24th August 4th September 2015

Assessment of programme

2016 - 2017

2015 - 2016
Semester 1 Examinations: 18th 29th January 2016
Semester 2 Examinations: 19th May 8th June 2016
Re-sit Examinations: 22nd August 2nd September 2016

Semester 1 Examinations: 16th 27th January 2017

Assessment criteria and feedback proforma


Details of assessment for the module
Assessment weightings will be 75% for exam and 25% Labwork.
Exam:Labwork = 75:25
Exam is in semester 1. A number of Labs, worth 25%.

Examination 75% 1 1/2 hours


Examination: You must answer Question 1, which is worth 50% of the paper, and any one
questions from questions 2, and 3, which are each worth 50% of the paper. Calculators may
not be used.
Length of Examination: 1 1/2 Hours

Semester 2 Examinations: 18th May 7th June 2017


Re-sit Examinations: 21st August 1st September 2017

2017 - 2018
Semester 1 Examinations: 15th 26th January 2018
Semester 2 Examinations: 16th May 6th June 2018
Re-sit Examinations: 20th 31st August 2018
- See more at: http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/crucial-guide/academiclife/exams//#sthash.hRY7zzt1.dpuf

Dates of University Examination Periods

Exams
The following exam pages provide lots of useful information; including how to access past papers and
examination timetable, conduct during exams and what to do if you need to resit.
University exam periods for academic year 2012 are as follows:

Queries
For further information contact the Exams team, Student Services Centre, Burlington Street (campus map
ref 57) at:

Tel: +44 (0)161 275 5000 (select option 3).

Exams

http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/crucial-guide/academic-life/exams//

The following exam pages provide lots of useful information; including how to access past
papers and examination timetable, conduct during exams and what to do if you need to resit.

1)

School Student Support Office:

http://studentnet.cs.manchester.ac.uk/student-services/index.php?view=staff

The University examination periods for academic years 2013-14 to 2017-18 are as follows:
2)

2013 - 2014

Study Support:

https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/support/

Semester 1 Examinations: 13th 24th January 2014


Semester 2 Examinations: 15th May 4th June 2014

3)

General personal support:

https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/personal-life/

Re-sit Examinations: 18th August 29th August 2014


4)

2014 - 2015

University's Counselling Service:

http://www.staffnet.manchester.ac.uk/personalsupport/counselling/

Semester 1 Examinations: 12th 23rd January 2015


Semester 2 Examinations: 14th May 3rd June 2015

5)

University's Disability Support Office:

http://www.dso.manchester.ac.uk/

15

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6)

Categor

Financial issues:

https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/financial-life/
7)

Meaning

Essential purchase by student. Students will read more than 40% of the material in books in this
category. The University of Manchester Library will normally purchase only a very limited number of
books in this category as it is assumed that students will purchase such books.

Recommended reading by students, but not purchase. The University of Manchester Library will
normally purchase a number of copies of books in this category, based upon the number of students
expected to take the course unit.

Background reading. Books in this category include those in which only a section or chapter must be
consulted by students. The University of Manchester Library will normally purchase a limited number of
copies of books in this category.

International students:

https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/university-life/mutual-support-groups/international-students/
8)

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International student visa support:

https://my.manchester.ac.uk/d/crucial-guide/academic-life/immigration/
9) Students' Union: http://manchesterstudentsunion.com/home/index and
http://manchesterstudentsunion.com/adviceservice

If you feel that a student would benefit from talking to someone in the Counselling Service or
Disability Support Office, then please do complete read the University's Guidance on Student
Mental Health:
http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/DocuInfo.aspx?DocID=11618
There is a 'Student referral to University Support Services form' at:
http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/DocuInfo.aspx?DocID=647 which should be completed
for each student you refer on to Counselling or DSO.

Communication
Communication with students will be by lecture announcements, notice board, Web, email.
Times of availability of staff in office (office number G12 in the Kilburn building): This
will depend on appointments booked on email.

IMPORTANT
The only time we are available in the week to talk to students is during the lecture
on the allotted schedule every week.
Appointments may be made by email. You should not seek appointments by
knocking on my (staff) door outside of surgery sessions. If module teaching staff
are unavailable within a reasonable time - i.e. if it takes more than a week to
obtain an appointment - you should contact the module leader in the lecture.

Category A: ARM Assembly Language: Fundamentals and Techniques; In English, by


William Hohl, Published by CRC, ISBN-10: 1439806101, ISBN-13: 978-1439806104
[BOOK].
Library catalogue:
http://manfe.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&d
oc=44MAN_ALMA_DS21164902390001631&indx=1&recIds=44MAN_ALMA_DS21164902390001631&rec
Idxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=&dscnt=1&frbg=&scp.scps=s
cope%3A%2844MAN%29%2Cprimo_central_multiple_fe&tab=local&dstmp=1375690717919&srt=rank&mod
e=Basic&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=ARM%20Assembly%20Language%3A%20Fundamentals%20and%20Tech
niques&vid=MU_VU1

ARM Assembly Language Programming, Pete Cockerell, available [on line] @


http://www.peter-cockerell.net/aalp/html/frames.html, (Last date accessed 21-06-2011)
[eBook].
ARM Assembly Language, Wikiversity, available [on line] @
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/ARM_Assembly_Language, (Last date accessed 21-06-2011)
[eBook].
ARM Assembly Language - an Introduction, available [on line] @
http://books.google.co.uk/books , (Last date accessed 21-06-2011) [eBook].

CONTACT DETAILS: FOR THE SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MANCHESTER BUSINESS SCHOOL
School of Computer Science - Support staff
http://www.cs.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/people/index.php?section=Administrative Support staff

Learning support material


Core reading

ARM system-on-chip architecture, available [on line] @ http://books.google.co.uk/books,


(Last date accessed 21-06-2011) [eBook].
Library catalogue:
http://manfe.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?tabs=detailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&d
oc=44MAN_ALMA_DS21153398330001631&indx=1&recIds=44MAN_ALMA_DS21153398330001631&rec
Idxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=poppedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=&dscnt=1&frbg=&scp.scps=s
cope%3A%2844MAN%29%2Cprimo_central_multiple_fe&tab=local&dstmp=1375690763574&srt=rank&mod
e=Basic&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=ARM%20system-on-chip%20architecture&vid=MU_VU1

ARM architecture reference manual, D. Seal, available [on line] @


http://books.google.co.uk/books, (Last date accessed 21-06-2011) [eBook].
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Definitive guide to the ARM Cortex-M3, Joseph Yiu, available [on line] @
http://books.google.co.uk/books, (Last date accessed 21-06-2011) [eBook].
ARM system developer's guide: designing and optimizing system software, Andrew N. Sloss,
Dominic Symes, Chris Wright, available [on line] @ http://books.google.co.uk/books, (Last
date accessed 21-06-2011) [eBook].
Principles of computer hardware (4th edition)
Library catalogue:

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** [My email comments back to student] * Basically if you are trying to achieve a high level degree 2.1 or a
1st it is best to buy the books.
and now cannot find any copy on loan from the library.
I wanted to know that is it enough if we thoroughly revise the lecture notes and do the questions indicated in the
revision sheet?
** [My email comments back to student] * You should be able to pass the module - but to obtain a good 2.1
or a 1st you
really need the course book.
I want to score well in the exam, so in case the revision from the book is essential I will go ahead and buy it.
** [My email comments back to student] * If you are after a 2.1 or a 1st buy the module text book A.S.A.P.
** [My email comments back to student] * Good luck.

http://manfe.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/display.do?frbrVersion=5&tabs=det
ailsTab&ct=display&fn=search&doc=44MAN_ALMA_DS21193873600001631&indx=1&re
cIds=44MAN_ALMA_DS21193873600001631&recIdxs=0&elementId=0&renderMode=pop
pedOut&displayMode=full&frbrVersion=5&dscnt=1&frbg=&scp.scps=scope%3A%2844M
AN%29%2Cprimo_central_multiple_fe&tab=local&dstmp=1375690790851&srt=rank&mod
e=Basic&dum=true&vl(freeText0)=Principles%20of%20computer%20hardware%20&vid=
MU_VU1

Kind Regards
Sxxxxxx (Name hidden for privacy reasons)

Reading list is available on line: Readinglists.co.uk available [on line] @

Now I feel very silly.

http://www.readinglists.co.uk/sv/28429

The exam is on Wednesday, and I need to revise (well, OK, in my case, "vise"), so could you point me to the
correct place on the internet so I can get the notes?

WWW Infomation
WWW Introduction to Computer Systems information:

Thanks...

Blackboard select: COMP15111: Fundamentals of Computer Architecture

Please help !

Another EMAIL from a student a day before the exam:


I find myself in the embarrassing position of having not picked up any lecture notes... I thought I had managed it
for all my courses...

John XXXX

Past Exam papers at end of this module guide.


If you find any good sites please email me the full site name @ r.neville@manchester.ac.uk

Another EMAIL from a student prior to exam:

Module Evaluation Form

Another, positive feedback from a First year:


Greetings,

To help Module authors and Lecturers adapt teaching to students needs, an evaluation from will be given to the
student near the end of the set of lectures.

Ammusing Emails Form students


An Email question from a student at the end of the module - one week before the exam:
Hi,
Message in text below:
-----Original Message----From: Sxxxxxx Bxxxxx [mailto:siddharth_bxxxx@hotmail.com]
Sent: 15 May 2001 20:04
To: R.Neville@co.umist.ac.uk
Subject:

I just wanted to take a break from watching your Fundamentals of Computer


Architecture lecture series recorded with Camtasia to thank you for
producing the series. To be able to re-watch the lecture, whilst consulting
the hand-outs and writing out my own notes has been (not surprisingly)
fantastic for revision. I wanted to do this as we went along throughout
semester 1, but coursework tasks kept getting in the way, so I've been
working through them since Christmas. The addition of stepping through ARM
code examples has also been good.
The lectures themselves were good the first time around too, of course - do
you lecture any of semester 2?
Hope you've had a good break.
XXX RXXXXXX, Year 1

Dear Dr.Neville,

My feedback to them:

I had a question on the revision of CT XXX. I did not buy any book for the course

Hi JXXX,
Thank you very Much, your comments are gratefully accepted.

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RE: QUESTION: - do you lecture any of semester 2? NO


But remember on your feedback [on all courses] you
- and invite all your friends - could say something like:
"I would be good to see real time VIDEO
lecture series recorded with Camtasia
for all lecture - PLEASE"

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changes in the syllabus there was only one relevant past paper and no mock questions were provided by the
lecturer (they chose not to, for fear of similarity to the actual exam!). Ultimately this meant repetition of notes
and group sessions were the only real ways to prepare. Which meant I definitely wasn't as confident walking into
this exam.
If you have any suggestions for different techniques for revision given this kind of situation, that would be
appreciated.

But, getting back to my job; best advice, if you want a First - is


seriously put together a revision method: use the one I nagged you about at
the end of the last lecture - if you can update it and use KanBan - tell me
how you did it...

Another - Note great feedback from student, before Exam:


From the above student

Again Thanks for your feedback, hope the real time VIDEOs help(ed).

Greetings,

Good luck with the exams.

I just wanted to take a break from watching your Fundamentals of Computer Architecture lecture series
recorded with Camtasia to thank you for producing the series. To be able to re-watch the lecture, whilst
consulting the handouts and writing out my own notes has been (not
surprisingly) fantastic for revision. I wanted to do this as we went along throughout semester 1, but
coursework tasks kept getting in the way, so I've been working through them since Christmas. The
addition of stepping through ARM code examples has also been good.

Best wishes
Richard

Note great feedback from student, before Exam:

Hello Richard,

The lectures themselves were good the first time around too, of course - do you lecture any of semester
2?

I hope you had great Christmas/New Year.

Hope you've had a good break.

XXXX

XXX XXX, Year 1

On a side note, I'm using the 'self-assessment' technique you've recommended (for revision) and have
written myself a 30 question test for one of my modules which I do every other day. It's proving very
useful!
Thanks,
Xxxxxx

Another - Note great feedback from student, after Exam:


From the above student
Hi!

The point here is:


Is that a student has used the 'self-assessment' technique; and said:
It's proving very useful!

Another - Note great feedback from student, before Exam:


From the above student
With regards to #RN3, the self-assessment questions definitely allowed me to retain and recall large amounts of
domain knowledge. It was especially useful in shorter questions and proved more beneficial than simply rereading notes in a repetitive manner.
To build/reinforce this knowledge I found it useful to answer questions/teach others, finding that if I could not
sufficiently explain to a peer the concept, then I did not truly understand it myself. I'm not a massive fan of group
revision, but we organised several Q&A sessions in small groups which worked well.
I think the final piece of the puzzle and something which is hard to 'revise', is knowledge application. For one of
my modules I was extremely well prepared with my own self-assessment, past-papers and mock-questions; I
therefore had a substantial amount of experience in applying my knowledge come the exam.

I just found out my results --- finished with a first (75.25% from my
calculations) --- and I just wanted to say thank you for your tutorials, they were awesome!
You are the best lecturer and teacher that I ever met and it was a great pleasure attending both your
lectures(in the first semester) and your tutorials. From my point of view, your tutorials were all a
student could
want: you are a great speaker and you are a great motivational tutor. You made me want to study and
learn new things and you made me want to succeed in everything i try to do.
I wish you the best and I hope I'll have the chance of talking with you even though our tutorials are gone
and even though you may not be my 3rd year supervisor.
I wish you the best!
XXX XXX XXX

Subject: Thank you for your course!

Hi Richard,
My name is XXX XXX and I was one of your students from last semester in COMP15111.

However for another module there was a lack of available material with which to apply my knowledge, due to
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I've been waiting for my exam results all this time, and finally I received 77.5%. The only reason why
I did so well on ARM, is because of your teaching methods! If it wasn't for your videos I would
probably fail the entire course.
I didn't understand a single thing from Xxxx's lecture nor his outlined lecture handouts.I think he has
to re-evaluate his teaching approach.
With all my heart I thank you, your enthusiasm, your passion, your handouts and videos!
I hope to God, that Faculty would listen to you and our evaluations and make all instructors create
same videos for their lectures as you did for your own.

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I must tell you that I personally spent 1500 to buy my own tablet; so I
could provide you real time tutorials and summary mind maps and real time
videos.
I personally spent 150 to but the internationally renowned Camtasia real
time video recording software studio.
I have talk to heads of school about these tools and they have said you
could have written a case or a proposal how these would have improved your
teaching - and we may have funded you; I am sorry but I can NOT wait to
change your lives or help you learn; so the support you get on MY course is
totally funded by me personally; out of my own pocket - with no support
from the University what so ever; sorry to get on my soap box; as you can
guess I never talk to anyone about this SORRY...

I gave you 10 out 10 on evaluation sheet, because you deserve it! And I gave Pete 0 out 10, well,
because he definitely deserves that!

Finally, great news [77.5%] really it was down to you and your study skills
- I can even help you evolve them so they are even better; it is my job
after all.

Thank you once again, and I hope to see you as my instructor for next year too!

Best wishes
Richard Neville

Sincerely,
XXXX

My email response to the above student:


Dear XXXXXX,
You are extremely kind, If I can help you next year - as I am lecturing on
the COMP25111 course - let me know then.
If you think I can do anything better, during next year's course email me;
but our [yours and mine] real mission is to try to help other lecturing
colleges to help you too; so this is how I suggest you [and I] do it first please do not shout about Richard Neville's course or lecturing
skills - SHOUT about the Pedagogic techniques that will benefit all
students.
This is how you can help me and yourself and other students:
1/ In every CEQ [computer (school) questions for students to give feedback]
think about writing something like:
1.1/ Please add Real time videos to this course [unit] as other units have
them and they work very successfully;
1.2/ Please add Real time audios to this course [unit] as other units have
them and they work very successfully;
1.3/ Please add Learning Outcomes [Los] to every single lecture to this
course [unit] as other units have them and they work very successfully;
1.4/ Please add example [long and short] exam type questions to each
lecture to this course [unit] as other units have them and they work very
successfully;
1.5/ Please add Real time video tutorials to this course [unit] as other
units have them and they work very successfully;
And of course anything else you think they could do to...
Really what I am trying to say is - give feedback on our paper feedback and
on our web based feedback - and we can hopefully improve the Pedagogic
practice of all lecture.
I am really pleased to hear you achieved 77.5%.

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This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of Lecture materials. Copyright and all
rights therein are retained by authors (i.e. Copyright Richard Stuart Neville.). All persons
copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each
authors copyright. These works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the
copyright holder Copyright Richard Stuart Neville.
Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material
for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or
redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works
must be obtained from Copyright Richard Stuart Neville.
Proper referencing of this material is essential. The expected norm for referencing the material is:
Citation [reference in body of text] (Harvard style): (Neville, 2010).
Reference: Neville, R., (2010). Lecture notes (and all associated materials) for COMP15111:
Fundamentals of Computer Architecture; Lecture series, developed and presented by R. Neville.

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Appendix 1:

(Past exam Paper)

Manchester University Past exam Papers [StudentNet] @ URL:


http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx

Revision advice - Important Exam advice:


Past exams are on the web and at the end of the module guide given to you in the first lecture (and on
the web) [Web Site - Blackboard select - COMP17022 Introduction to Computer Systems:
www.manchester.ac.uk/portal];
2. Answer all questions giving FULL WORKING OUT correct answer with no working out will get
less marks than correct answer with WELL presented working out;
3. Read the EXAM GUIDANCE on the course web site, and explicitly it gives: Examination Guidance
and an <<Revision Template.xls>>;
4. You should produce an Exam revision time table an example is given in <<Revision Template.xls>>;
5. Also a full technical description of an advanced exam technique required to get high marks is given
in <<Revision Template.xls>> entitled: Specific revision guidance for COMP17022 Introduction to
Computer Systems;
6. Write your answers on the exam paper in a big font. In previous exams, I have tried to decipher writing
that was equivalent to 5 or 6 font far too small. If you have trouble reading it, so will the examiner.
7. Take care writing in the answer book, so [at least] the answers and diagrams and mathematical workingout is readable, tidy, clear and written in good Plain English.
8. Students need to layout their answers, in their answer book, so each different answer is CLEARLY
differentiated from the next. Leave a clear line between each answer.
9. If number conventions such as 2., then 2.a, then 2.a.ii PLEASE use them.
10. Please try to answer your questions in order.
11. Please explain any diagrams [or tables] you draw [up] in full. Full marks cannot be awarded unless full
explanations are given to answer each question full and comprehensively.
1.

Past Exam URL:


http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx
[Last 3-years only]
You may be aware that Student Services Centre now only display the last three years of past exam papers at the
following link:
The University's link is (only previous 3 years):http://documents.manchester.ac.uk/pastpapers.aspx
Computer Science full archive is here (we don't publish the 2010/2011 papers until after the resit period:http://studentnet.cs.manchester.ac.uk/assessment/
The Computer Science archive (which includes the 2010-2011 exans) can be found at the following link:http://studentnet.cs.manchester.ac.uk/assessment/exam_papers/index.php

25

if you look on the website:


http://www.cs.manchester.ac.uk/ugt/2012/COMP15111/
there are the last two past papers with model answers and the
examiners' general feedback on how the questions were answered.

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All copies of past exam papers are now on Blackboard 9.


There are three variants:

I:

Past Exam Papers

II:

Past Exams AND Marking Scheme

III: Past Exans AND Marking Scheme Plus Feedback


The majority of these are RNs half of the exam only, so see the lead lecturer of
the course for their versions of the above.

27