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REVIEW THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR MOTIVATING THE CLIENT FOR

CHANGE AND RECONFIRM THESE SELF-MOTIVATIONAL THEMES.


We cannot make precontemplators change, but we can help motivate them to move to
contemplation.
There are four fundamental processes in MI.
1. Engaging: The relational foundation
Listening; accurate empathy; striving to understand fully from the clients perspective
without agenda; client-centered style; using OARS non-directively (to understand
BOTH sides of the ambivalence or dilemma); avoiding righting reflex or fixing.
2. Focusing: Guiding client to a target behavior that is important to them.
Helping client identify a target area about which s/he is ambivalent or struggling to
make a change. Using agenda setting, bubble chart, asking the client whats important
to him/her or what area of present behaviour might get in the way of his/her goals.
Being transparent about what the target is, once identified.
3. Evoking: Drawing out clients intrinsic motivationm(reasons/importance for change)
and their own ideas for change.
Drawing out clients own ideas and reasons for change; listening for and recognizing
change talk; selectively reinforcing change talk; summarizing change talk (change
talk bouquet). Avoiding expert trap. Using Elicit-Provide-Elicit and advice with
permission only after asking the client his or her own ideas and reasons (What
makes this change important to you? What makes you confident you can do it?,
etc.)
4. Planning: The Bridge to Change (formerly called Phase II)

Consolidating commitment by selectively reinforcing commitment language; asking


key questions to determine readiness for action planning; assisting with change plans;
revisting change plans to determine need for more work in former stages and/or
changes/additions to the plan, etc.
Clients' motivation is key for treatment effectiveness. Providing clients with
personalized feedback on the risks associated with their own use of a particular substance and
how their consumption pattern compares to norms--especially for their own cultural and
gender groups--is a powerful way to develop a sense of discrepancy that can motivate
change.
When clients hear about their evaluation results and understand the risks and
consequences, many come face to face with the considerable gap between where they are and
where their values lie.
Helping client identify a target area about which there is ambivalent or struggling to
make a change. Using agenda setting, bubble chart, asking the client whats important to
them or what area of present behaviour might get in the way of their goals. Being transparent
about what the target is, once identified.
Clients sometimes work in opposition to their therapists, a phenomenon known as
"resistance." Understanding client resistance is also the most important part to make sure the
client achieve the stage of change.
STAGE OF CHANGE
There are five stage of change and some scholars said six. But either five or six, Stage
of Change is the most important part to know either client is ready to change or not.

And the five Stage of Change are:1. Precontemplation


2. Contemplation
3. Preparation
4. Action
5. Maintenance
These Stage of Change is very important to counsellor to know in which stage the client are.
So after determine the client in what stage, the counsellor can use the suitable process and
theory to help the client to change