Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 4

The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature

Access the Latest in Psychological Science Research


Sign In

My Tools

Contact Us

HELP

Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools.

Search all journals

Advanced Search

Search History

Browse Journals

Skip to main page content


Home

OnlineFirst

Search this journal

All Issues

Subscribe

RSS

Email Alerts

Advanced Journal Search

Psychological Science
1. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02225.x Psychological
Science December 2008 vol. 19 no. 12 1207-1212
Psychological Sciencepss.sagepub.com
1. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02225.x Psychological
Science December 2008 vol. 19 no. 12 1207-1212

The Cognitive Benefits


Interacting With Nature

of

Marc G. Berman1, 2,
John Jonides1 and
Stephen Kaplan1, 3
+ Author Affiliations
+ Author Affiliations
Marc G. Berman, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan,
530 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 481091043, e-mail:
bermanm@umich.edu.

Abstract
We compare the restorative effects on cognitive functioning of
interactions with natural versus urban environments. Attention
restoration theory (ART) provides an analysis of the kinds of
environments that lead to improvements in directed-attention abilities.
Nature, which is filled with intriguing stimuli, modestly grabs attention
in a bottom-up fashion, allowing top-down directed-attention abilities a
chance to replenish. Unlike natural environments, urban environments
are filled with stimulation that captures attention dramatically and
additionally requires directed attention (e.g., to avoid being hit by a
car), making them less restorative. We present two experiments that
show that walking in nature or viewing pictures of nature can improve
directed-attention abilities as measured with a backwards digit-span
task and the Attention Network Task, thus validating attention
restoration theory.

Articles citing this article


Is Viewing a Nature Video After Work Restorative? Effects on Blood
Pressure, Task Performance, and Long-Term Memory Environment
and Behavior May 22, 2014 0:
0013916514533187v1-13916514533187
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Happiness and Feeling Connected: The Distinct Role of Nature
Relatedness Environment and Behavior January 1, 2014 46: 3-23
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Regulation of the immune system by biodiversity from the natural
environment: An ecosystem service essential to health Proc. Natl.
Acad. Sci. USA November 12, 2013 110: 18360-18367

file:///G|/Trabajo%20Bea/The%20Cognitive%20Benefits%20of%20Interacting%20With%20Nature.htm[02/06/2014 18:05:47]

Previous
|
Next
Article

Table
of
Contents

This Article
1. doi:
10.1111/j.14679280.2008.02225.x
Psychological
Science December
2008 vol. 19 no. 12
1207-1212

1. AbstractFree
2. Full Text
3. Full Text (PDF)

- Services
1. Email this article to
a colleague
2. Alert me when this
article is cited
3. Alert me if a
correction is posted
4. Similar articles in
this journal
5. Similar articles in
PubMed
6. Download to citation
manager
7. Request
Permissions
8. Request Reprints
9. No
patient
INFORMation
available for this
article

- Citing Articles
1. View citing article
information
2. Loading Scopus
citing article data...
3. Loading Web of
Science citing
article data...
4. Citing articles via

Current Issue

May 2014, 25 (5)

The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature

Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
Where's the Wilderness in Wilderness Therapy? Journal of
Experiential Education September 1, 2013 36: 218-232
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Would You Be Happier Living in a Greener Urban Area? A FixedEffects Analysis of Panel Data Psychological Science June 1, 2013
24: 920-928
Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
Preference and Tranquility for Houses of Worship Environment and
Behavior May 1, 2013 45: 504-525
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Mental Demand, Asymmetries, and Tympanic Membrane
Temperature (TMT) Proceedings of the Human Factors and
Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting September 1, 2012 56:
1529-1533
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Superior Visual Search Accuracy after Exposure to Natural Relative
to Urban Environments Proceedings of the Human Factors and
Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting September 1, 2012 56:
1624-1628
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Fertile Green: Green Facilitates Creative Performance Pers Soc
Psychol Bull June 1, 2012 38: 784-797
Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
Biodiversity and the Feel-Good Factor: Understanding Associations
between Self-Reported Human Well-being and Species Richness
BioScience January 1, 2012 62: 47-55
Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue Environment and Behavior
November 1, 2011 43: 827-847
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Underestimating Nearby Nature: Affective Forecasting Errors
Obscure the Happy Path to Sustainability Psychological Science
September 1, 2011 22: 1101-1106
Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
Friends (and Sometimes Enemies) With Cognitive Benefits: What
Types of Social Interactions Boost Executive Functioning? Social
Psychological and Personality Science May 1, 2011 2: 253-261
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Compatibility: An Experimental Demonstration Environment and
Behavior January 1, 2011 43: 90-105
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Does Anthropogenic Noise in National Parks Impair Memory?
Environment and Behavior September 1, 2010 42: 693-706
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)
Favorite green, waterside and urban environments, restorative
experiences and perceived health in Finland HEALTH PROMOT INT
June 1, 2010 25: 200-209
Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
Directed Attention as a Common Resource for Executive Functioning
and Self-Regulation Perspectives on Psychological Science January
1, 2010 5: 43-57
Abstract
Full Text
Full Text (PDF)
An Invitation for Public Participation in Ecological Restoration: The

file:///G|/Trabajo%20Bea/The%20Cognitive%20Benefits%20of%20Interacting%20With%20Nature.htm[02/06/2014 18:05:47]

Google Scholar

- Google Scholar
1. Articles by Berman,
M. G.
2. Articles by Kaplan,
S.
3. Search for related
content

- PubMed
1. PubMed citation
2. Articles by Berman,
M. G.
3. Articles by Kaplan,
S.
4. No NCBI links

- Related Content
1. No related web
pages

- Share

1.

CiteULike
Connotea
Delicious
Facebook
Google+
LinkedIn
Mendeley
Reddit
StumbleUpon
Technorati
Twitter

What's this?

Digg

The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature

Reasonable Person Model Ecological Rest. January 1, 2009 27:


178-186
Abstract
Full Text (PDF)

Alert me to new issues of Psychological Science


Submit a Manuscript
Free Sample Copy
Email Alerts
RSS feed
PDA Link
+ More about this journal
Other journals by APS
Clinical Psychological Science
Current Directions in Psychological Science
Psychological Science in the Public Interest
Perspectives on Psychological Science

file:///G|/Trabajo%20Bea/The%20Cognitive%20Benefits%20of%20Interacting%20With%20Nature.htm[02/06/2014 18:05:47]

The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature

Association for Psychological Science

Most
Most Read
Most Cited
Most Read
Most Cited
Most Read
1. Time, Money, and Morality
2. The New Statistics: Why and How
3. Impact of Bullying in Childhood on Adult Health, Wealth, Crime, and Social Outcomes
4. The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking
5. Young Children Can Be Taught Basic Natural Selection Using a Picture-Storybook Intervention
View all Most Read articles
Most Cited
1. A Neural System for Error Detection and Compensation
2. Fitness Effects on the Cognitive Function of Older Adults: A Meta-Analytic Study
3. To See or not to See: The Need for Attention to Perceive Changes in Scenes
4. False-Positive Psychology: Undisclosed Flexibility in Data Collection and Analysis Allows Presenting Anything as Significant
5. Driven to Distraction: Dual-Task Studies of Simulated Driving and Conversing on a Cellular Telephone
View all Most Cited articles
HOME ALL ISSUES

FEEDBACK

SUBSCRIBE

RSS

EMAIL ALERTS

Copyright 2014 by Association for Psychological Science

Print ISSN: 0956-7976

Online ISSN: 1467-9280

file:///G|/Trabajo%20Bea/The%20Cognitive%20Benefits%20of%20Interacting%20With%20Nature.htm[02/06/2014 18:05:47]

HELP