Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 14

MET 6 quizzes

Assessment Feedback
Total score: 5 out of 5
1 of score:
5
Total
9 out of 9, 100%
1. 9
Flashcards is ELT jargon for pictures that you can show to students, typically something you can hold up when
1 of
in frontactivities
of the whole
class. into three general categories:
1. standing
Video playback
are divided
True
1. Brainstorming: what you do before you watch a section of recording;
2. Viewing: what you do while you watch;
3. False
Follow-up: what you do after watching.
Verdadero
1 out of 1
GREAT!
Falso They are also useful for handing out as part of various activities.
2 of 5
The
1 2.
out
ofmain
1 aim of storytelling is to get students to focus on lexis, grammar or function.
GREAT!True
2 of 9 False
2. The role of the teacher changes when using video in class:
1. Before presenting the video, the teacher must engage the learners interest in what they will be doing, and
1 outprepare
of 1 them to do it successfully.
WONDERFUL!
The main
aim
storytelling
shouldshould
be theremain
listeners
pleasure
itself.with
By engaging
in this
practice,
2. While learners
view
theofvideo,
the teacher
in the
classroom
the learners
to observe
their
teachers
not
only
model
literacy
skills,
but
they
cultivate
listening
skills
and
promote
vocabulary
acquisition,
as well.
reactions and see what they do not understand, what they are intrigued by, and what bothers them.
3. After viewing, the video/segment, the teacher should review and clarify complex points, encourage discussion,
3 of 5explain, and assign follow-up activities.
3. Fillers are things to do when the teacher has run out of other material, perhaps because the main activity went
Verdadero
much
faster than expected and there is still a few minutes gap at the end of the lesson before the class is over.
True
Falso
False
1 out of 1
GREAT!
1 out of 1
PERFECT!
3 of 9
of 5video segment is about Celebrations. Five friends talk about birthdays.
3. 4This
Identify
stagesof
when
usingisthis
video
segment.
4. Thethe
situation
this filler
The
policeman
in the street. It involves handing one of these sentences to a student
who must mime it well enough for the class to guess the original sentence. It could be a team game with points, too.

True
False

1 out of 1
GREAT!
(a) Preview (b) Viewing (c) Follow-up
5 of
(a)5Follow-up (b) Preview (c) Viewing
5. The Ordering filler involves instructing students to line up shortest to tallest, and discuss what they do on their
vacation and then sit down.
1 out of 1
WONDERFUL!
4 of 9
4. Which activity has been used in stage a?
Preview activities
1. A language focus on lexis, function or grammar that will come up on the recording;
2. Students predict what will happen from some given information or pictures;
3. True
Students discuss a topic that leads into or is connected with the subject on the recording;
4. Students study a worksheet that they will use when watching the recording.

Assessment Feedback
1 of 8
1. What do Back to the board game and Category List game have in common?
In both games students are expected to provide longer streams of speech, so that the right answer is
guessed.
Students play in teams in both games.
In both games, students must write something on the board.

1 out of 1
GREAT!
2 of 8
2. Identify the two lexical games below.

(1) Word seeds (2) Fictionary (or Call my bluff)


(1) Fictionary (or Call my bluff) (2) Word seeds

1 out of 1
WONDERFUL!
3 of 8
3.How does the Word Dominoes game differ from the Word Thieves game?
In the Word Dominoes game students have to justify the reasons for their choices, whereas in the Word
Thieves game they dont.
In the Word Dominoes game, students will need to write, whereas in the Word Thieves game they wont.

1 out of 1
4 of 8
4. Some basic guidelines to keep hold of when using video in class are: ________. (Find the guideline that will NOT
help when using video in class.)
Keep it short
Exploit the material
Switch the TV off when the students dont need to look at it.
Only use video material to extract language for study.
Make sure the video and equipment are ready to be used before you start class so as not to waste time.

1 out of 1
5 of 8
5. What are some other ideas to liven up a video lesson? Match the excerpts in the balloons with the items below.
a. Dont let students mentally switch off; make them think; challenge them. Cover up the screen and ask
questions; Listen to the words/music whats the picture? What are they describing: Where are they?

b.

Then, look at the images and compare.


In pairs, the above idea becomes an instant communicative activity: Tell your partner what you think was
happening. It could lead to drawing and comparison of pictures.

(a) 2 (b) 1
(a) 1 (b) 2

1 out of 1
PERFECT!
6 of 8
6.Teachers have increasingly found ways to exploit computers in classroom time; even if they dont have any
special programs, there are useful things to do with a computer and standard office-user software. Match the
excerpts in the balloons with the items below.
1. Computer-based reference materials are very useful. A good thesaurus dictionary and encyclopedia are
great classroom resources, allowing students to quickly check things during lesson time.
2. Teachers often think in terms of a computer lesson. Thats fine, but also consider planning lessons that
involve short periods of computer usage, e.g., ten minutes writing a text as a follow-on from a previous
classroom activity, and then printing it out for others to read.
3. Teachers can mark students work. They can ask students to submit their homework on e-mail attachment,
and then mark it using a notes-adding or comment option so that students can go back and review their
work and prepare a new draft.

(1) b (2) a (3) c


(1) c (2) b (3) a

1 out of 1

7 of 8
7. Identify the dictation ideas below.

(A) Collocation dictation (B) Keywords dictation


(A) Keyword dictation (B) Collocation dictation

1 out of 1
GREAT!

A suggested answer for the Keyword dictation could be: Life in a big city like New York is very competitive. I
am from Michigan, but I studied in N.Y. I attended New York University. I was a dedicated student and I had
very good grades. During my last semester, I studied genetics. I researched some interesting aspects of
DNA. Tomorrow Im going to my councelors office to find out if my application for a scholarship was
authorized.

The suggested answers for Collocation dictation are: give advice, have an influence, make a donation,
and set an example.
8 of 8
8. Match these six types of drama activities.

(1) a (2) f (3) d (4) c (5) e (6) b


(1)c (2) b (3) d (4) f (5) a (6) e

1 out of 1
VERY GOOD!
Assessment Feedback
Total score: 13 out of 13
1 of 13
1.Put these learners and classes in the correct column.
a. A Japanese marine biologist is preparing to present a research paper in English at an international
conference.
b. An intermediate class of young adults of different nationalities are preparing to sit the Cambridge First
Certificate in English examination.
c. A group of French air traffic controllers are receiving instruction in aviation English.
d. An Argentinean civil right activist is planning a trip to an international conference, and wants to take an
English course, so she can brush up her social English skills.
e. A Croatian businessman, who lives and works in Croatia, has to handle regular email and phone
communication in English, and occasionally take part in conference calls in English.
f. A group of students from China are getting instruction in how to write academic essays in English, in
preparation for post-graduate study at a university in New Zealand.
g. Workers and clerical staff attend an on-site beginners level English class at a paint factory in Poland.

ESP a, b, c, e, f, / General English d, g


ESP a, b, d, e, g / General English c, f

1 out of 1
2 of 13
2. Identify three popular International Exams.

(1) TOEFL (2) IELTS (3) FCE


(1) FCE (2) TOEFL (3) IELTS

1 out of 1
That's right.
3 of 13
3. An examination preparation course should _________. (Four answers are correct.)
1. include language work that is likely to be relevant to that needed in the exam;
2. include tasks and activities to raise general language awareness, ability and skills;
3. include specific practice on exam techniques (e.g. multiple-choice questions, writing essays, etc.);
4. only include lots of mock tests;
5. include work on study skills (e.g. use of dictionaries and grammar books, ways of working with recordings
at home, etc.).
1, 2, 3 & 5
1, 2, 3 & 4

1 out of 1
4 of 13
4. It is often a good idea on exam preparation courses to be even more systematic than usual about what has been
studied and to take care that items, once met, are recycled usefully. Match two ideas used by teachers on exam
courses.

(1)a (2) b
(1)b (2) a

1 out of 1
WONDERFUL!

5 of 13
5.As teachers, we should make practice of exam techniques a little more interesting. Many of these ideas also
perform the essential task of raising awareness about how the tests are marked and the criteria the examiner will
use. Find five ideas that will do so.
1. Students mark each others tests.
2. Students do an exercise at great speed (Blitz it) 10-20 percent of the normal time allowance no thinking
time. Teacher records the grades.
3. Teacher gives students the chalk and let them discuss and work through an exam paper together on the
board (teacherless lesson). Teacher only looks at (and marks) the board when students have completely
finished. (This is also a good group-building exercise, as it becomes a joint responsibility to get the best
possible answers.)
4. Students set tests in a particular style for each other (e.g. they take a text and rewrite it with gaps; they
prepare multiple-choice questions on a text, etc.)
5. Students take some written information about the exam (e.g. from a prospectus or a marking scheme) and
turn it into exercises in the style of typical exam questions.
6. Teacher does the exercise (including a mistake or two!) and the students correct it.
1, 2, 3, 5, 6
1, 3, 4, 5, 6

1 out of 1
GOOD! Grades students get on this kind of activities shouldnt be recorded officially. Teacher should keep the
atmosphere light-hearted- its not a serious test.
6 of 13
6. Identify these two features that depict how teenage students feel about their classes.

(1) Teenage learners respond well when they see that their teachers are well-prepared and their work is clearly
organized. (2) Teenage learners can bring a strong enthusiasm for topics they are interested in.
(1) Teenage learners can bring strong enthusiasm for topics they are interested in. (2) Teenage learners
respond well when they see that their teachers are well-prepared and their work is clearly organized.
1 out of 1
WONDERFUL! Teenage learners can get very focused on specific things relevant to themselves, and they have a
reputation for being demanding on the teacher.
7 of 13
7. Why might teenage classes seem demanding on the teacher? Match the excerpts in the balloons with the items
below.
1. Teenagers have changing interests. They get bored quickly.
2. Its a difficult period of life. Teenagers are often not sure about themselves and how they feel about things.
3. Strong emotions of various kinds may be rising and falling. Sexual or romantic feelings may alter the
workings of some techniques and activities.
4. Motivation may appear to be low, especially if learners feel that they have been forced to attend something
they dont want to.
5. Activities might be rejected or done without personal investment because the learners feel silly or
embarrassed when doing them.
6. Discipline can seem to be a problem. Teenagers seem particularly averse to things that they see as
imposed on them.

(1) c (2) a (3) d (4) e (5) b (6) f


(1) f (2) b (3) e (4) a (5) c (6) d

1 out of 1
WONDERFUL!
8 of 13
8. Some key techniques for teenage classes might include: ____________. (Find the technique that would NOT be
appropriate for teenage classes.)
a willingness to listen and be flexible in response;
following the class as much as leading;
always enforcing discipline and not being afraid of providing a threatening atmosphere if necessary;
where appropriate and possible , sharing the responsibility for key decisions topics, work methods, work rate,
homework, tests, etc.;
ways of getting useable feedback regularly through lessons and courses.

1 out of 1
You're right. This technique is not appropriate for teenage classes.
9 of 13
9. Below you will find additional hints for teaching teeage classes. Match these hints with pictures.

(1) b (2) d (3) a (4) c


(1) a (2) c (3) d (4) b

1 out of 1
GREAT!
10 of 13
9a. Regarding the constraints of teaching in a large class, teachers should reflect on how much a problem is an
inside or an outside issue. Many things that teachers describe as outside constraints - (1) ______________ may be also partially inside constraints -(2) ___________.

1.
2.

imposed by school or parental expectations or syllabus or government


a personal decision not to do something

1.
2.

a personal decision not to do something


imposed by school or parental expectations or syllabus or government

1 out of 1
11 of 13
9b.What are some constraints teachers and students might have in a large class. Match the excerpts in the
balloons with the items below.
1. The teacher cant give attention equally to all students.
2. Interaction tends to be restricted to those closest to the front.
3. The seats at the back tend to attract people who want to do something other than learn English.
4. Lecturing seems to be the only workable lesson type.

(1) d (2) b (3) a (4) c


(1) b (2) c (3) a (4) d

1 out of 1
WONDERFUL!
12 of 13
9c. As we have seen, one of the best ways to work with large classes is using group work, but a key element to do
so is how to organize the groups to suit the students abilities. Match the two halves.

(1) b (2) c (3) d (4) a


(1) c (2) d (3) a (4) b

1 out of 1
GREAT!
13 of 13
1.Put these learners and classes in the correct column.
a. A Japanese marine biologist is preparing to present a research paper in English at an international
conference.
b. An intermediate class of young adults of different nationalities are preparing to sit the Cambridge First

c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

Certificate in English examination.


A group of French air traffic controllers are receiving instruction in aviation English.
An Argentinean civil right activist is planning a trip to an international conference, and wants to take an
English course, so she can brush up her social English skills.
A Croatian businessman, who lives and works in Croatia, has to handle regular email and phone
communication in English, and occasionally take part in conference calls in English.
A group of students from China are getting instruction in how to write academic essays in English, in
preparation for post-graduate study at a university in New Zealand.
Workers and clerical staff attend an on-site beginners level English class at a paint factory in Poland.

ESP a, b, c, e, f, / General English d, g


ESP a, b, d, e, g / General English c, f

1 out of 1
GOOD! English for Specific Purposes includes English for scientists, English for academic purposes, English for
doctors/health care workers, tourism English,etc.

Assessment Feedback
WELL DONE!
Total score: 6 out of 6, 100%
1 of 6
1.ESP stands for English for Specific Purposes. It may mean English for hotel receptionists. English for pharmaceutical
salesmen, English for telephoning, etc.
Verdadero
Falso

1 out of 1
GOOD! ESP implies that the teacher is going to take the clients needs and goals more seriously when planning the
course, and rather than teach general English, he/she is going to tailor everything
2 of 6
2. In teenage classes, the learners are discovering a range of new possibilities for themselves. They are discovering what
impact they can have on the world and can be very motivated.
Verdadero
Falso

1 out of 1
WONDERFUL!
3 of 6
3. ESP often means teaching all the English a teacher already teaches in all the ways he/she knows how to do, but using
lexis, examples, topics and contexts that are relevant to the students and practice relevant specific skills.
Verdadero
Falso

1 out of 1
FANTASTIC!
4 of 6

4. A needs analysis is not necessary in an ESP course.


Verdadero
Falso

1 out of 1
GREAT! We cant really address a students specific needs unless we are absolutely clear about what they are. A typical
ESP Needs analysis might be a questionnaire that the teacher and the client talk through and fill in together.
5 of 6
5. One of the main constraints when teaching a large class is that theres limited eye contact from the teacher to
students and amongst students.
Verdadero
Falso

1 out of 1
GOOD JOB! Two other constraints if the classroom isnt big enough could be:

Neither the students nor the teacher can move easily.

The seating arrangement can prevent a number of activities.


6 of 6
6. There are cases when the constraining factor may be the teachers own worry or doubts, or their fear of trying
something different from what is normally done. E.g. They dont have students move from their seats because of the
noise they might make.
Verdadero
Falso

1 out of 1
GREAT!

Assessment Feedback
WELL DONE!
Total score: 10 out of 10, 100%
1 of 10
1. Identify two kinds of activities you can do with flashcards below.

(1) To introduce phonetic symbols and the sounds they represent (2) To quickly show the meaning of a lexical item
(1) To quickly show the meaning of a lexical item (2) To introduce phonetic symbols and the sounds they represent

1 out of 1
GREAT!

2 of 10
2. Identify two other kinds of activities you can do with flashcards.

(1) To use them as prompts to remind students of a specific grammar point (2) To illustrate the presentation of
language by giving a visual image of a story students already know
(1) To illustrate the presentation of language by giving a visual image of a story students already know.(2) To use
them as prompts to remind students of a specific grammar point.
1 out of 1
WONDERFUL! Stories like The Red Riding Hood can be used to present the Past Continuous Tense, e.g. The little girl
was walking in the forest when..
3 of 10
3. Identify two other kinds of activities you can do with flashcards.

(1) To tell a story, providing occasional images to give students something tangible to look at and help their
understanding, e.g. and then a large red van turned around the corner and drove towards them. (2) To illustrate
presentations of language, by giving a visual image to an imaginary character e.g., This is Tom. Every day he gets up at

(1) To illustrate presentations of language, by giving a visual image to an imaginary character e.g., This is Tom.
Every day he gets up at (2) To tell a story, providing occasional images to give students something tangible to look
at and help their understanding, e.g. and then a large red van turned around the corner and drove towards them.
1 out of 1
PERFECT!
4 of 10
4. Storytelling is a useful short activity for the end of a lesson, perhaps, or mid-lesson to provide a change of mood.
Some basic techniques in storytelling are _____________. (Match the two halves.)

(1) a (2) c (3) b (4) d


(1) c (2) a (3) d (4) b

1 out of 1
GREAT! Remember that storytelling is about real listening; not listening because the teacher is going to hound the
students with questions. There is much academic speculation that students learn language best when they forget about
studying the grammar and get totally involved in the content itself.
5 of 10
5. Traditionally pictures have been used as a starting point for writing exercises, but they are also very useful for
focusing on specific language points or as material for speaking and listening activities. Read the information, and
identify the different approaches used with the material (picture stories) below.

Accuracy to fluency / Fluency to accuracy


Fluency to accuracy / accuracy to fluency

1 out of 1
GOOD JOB! Lets not forget that accuracy to fluency suggests that we start by looking at the language involved in the
story and work on getting this understood and correct before we move on to work on telling the story, whereas fluency
to accuracy starts with a fluency activity and only focuses in on accurate use of language at a later stage.
6 of 10
6. What would you hope to achieve in a first lesson with a new class where the adult learners are meeting each other for
the first time? Match the excerpts in the balloons with the statements below.
1. Learners will have learned some English.
2. Learners will have gained some insights into the methodology of the course.
3. Learners will have learned some information about the course.
4. Learners will have spoken to a number of other students in the class.
5. Learners will have taken part in a number of interesting and involving activities.
6. Learners will have started to find ways of working co-operatively with others.
7. Learners will have started to feel more comfortable in their class.

(1) h (2) f (3) e (4) a (5) c (6) d (7) g (8) b


(1) b (2) c (3) f (4) g (5) e (6) d (7) d (8) a

1 out of 1
PERFECT!
7 of 10
7. Identify three Getting to know you Activities. that can help students learn each others names.

People bingo / Anagrams / The small difference


The small difference / People bingo / Anagrams

1 out of 1
WONDERFUL! The anagrams of the names are: 1. Zaida 2. Diane 3. Abel 4. Brian 5. Marcela 6. Teresa 7. Melina 8. Edgard
9. Julian
8 of 10
8. Unscramble the instructions the students must follow to complete the popular icebreaker Find some who.
a. Tell the learners that they must move around the room, asking other learners questions until they find someone
who replies yes to a question.
b. Give one copy of the handout containing questions to each learner.
c. After each yes, the learners must change partners.
d. The learners should try to complete the form by finding a name to go with every question. Remember that
learners dont just read aloud from the paper. They have to do some work turning the prompts into questions.
e. For example, Find someone who likes chocolate needs to become Do you like chocolate?
f. When they find a yes, they must write that learners name in the space after the question.
(1) f (2) d (3) b (4) c (5) a (6) e
(1) b (2) a (3) f (4) c (5) d (6) e

1 out of 1
GOOD!This would be the right order for this activity:
1. Give one copy of the handout to each learner.
2. Tell the learners that they must move around the room, asking other learners questions until they find someone
who replies yes to a question.
3. When they find a yes, they must write that learners name in the space after the question.
4. After each yes, the learners must change partners.
5. The learners should try to complete the form by finding a name to go with every question. Remember that
learners dont just read aloud from the paper. They have to do some work turning the prompts into questions.
6. For example, Find someone who likes chocolate needs to become Do you like chocolate?
9 of 10

9. In a class with more than a basic level of English, teachers can choose to get students to know each other with
activities like the one below. (Complete the description of the activity.)
Ask students to work in a pair with someone (1) ________. Explain that they should chat for ten minutes
about (2)_____________ life, interest, hopes, etc, - dividing the time about equally between them. Each
student should make (3) ________about his/her partner basic information and any particularly interesting
or unusual things. At the end of the ten minutes, ask three pairs to meet up together in sixes. In each
group, students introduce their partner to the others, saying a few interesting facts about them. The
others can (4) __________ if they want to.
(1)they dont know (2) anything they want to (3) a few notes(4) ask questions
(1)they know (2) some specific topic (3) a lot of notes (4) remain quiet

1 out of 1
GREAT!
10 of 10
9a.Find the assertion that does NOT apply to Projects.
1. Projects are a useful way of providing an ongoing thread to classroom work. They supply a longer term goal to
focus on, and students can invest their energy in something that has a tangible outcome.
2. Projects are successfully done when students have all the same language level.
3. Projects are usually task-oriented rather than language oriented. The learners focus on doing something
practical rather directly on studying language.
4. Projects typically involve learners in decisions about precisely what is done and how to do it, as well as in
collecting information, solving problems and presenting the final outcome as a written or performed
presentation.
5. The planning, decision-making, ideas-collecting, structuring, discussion, negotiation, problem-solving, etc. are all
an integral part of project work.
6. The language learning arises from learners having a reason to communicate authentically in English to achieve a
specific goal.
1
2
4
5

1 out of 1
On the contrary, projects offer a valuable chance for learners of mixed levels to work on something at their own current
ability level.