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Course: Political History of SEE

First part
Lecturer: Dr. Slobodan G. Markovich, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Political
Science of the University of Belgrade
1. Where are the Balkans geographically?
Readings:
Robert Lee Wolff, The Balkans in Our Time (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press,
1974), see chapter 2 entitled The Scene: A Description of the Balkan Countries, pp. 1024; or: L. S. Stavrianos, The Balkans since 1453 (London: Hurst and Company, 2000),
Part I.1 The Land and the People, pp. 1-14. pp. 140-160 (chapter entitled Between
Classification and Politics: The Balkans and the Myth of Central Europe).
Further reading:
Jovan Cviji, La peninsule balkanique, geographie humaine, avec 31 cartes et croquis dans le
texte et 9 cartes hors texte. Paris, A. Colin, 1918.

2. The Balkans as a Western metaphor


Readings:
Maria Todorova, Imagining the Balkans, see introduction entitled Balkanism and
Orientalism: Are they Different Categories?, pp. 3- 20;
Misha Glenny, Only in the Balkans, London Review of Books, vol. 21, No. 9 (1999).
Steven K. Pavlowitch,
Europe and the Balkans in a Historical Perspective, 18041945,
Journal of Southern Europe and the Balkans, vol. 2, No. 2 (2000), pp. 141-148.
Further reading:
Vesna Goldsworthy, Inventing Ruritania. The imperialism of imagination (New Haven
and London: Yale University Press, 1998). Andrew Hammond, Introduction, in Andrew
Hammond (ed.), The Balkans and the West. Constructing the European Other, 1945-2003
(Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004), pp. xi- xxiii. Slobodan G. Markovich, British Perceptions
of Serbia and the Balkans 1903-1906 (Paris: Dialogue, 2000), pp. 195-204.
3. The Balkans as borderlands and economic periphery
Readings:
John Lampe. Imperial Borderlands or Capitalist Periphery? Redefining Balkan
Backwardness, 1520-1914, in Daniel Chirot (ed.), The Origins of Backwardness in
Eastern Europe; Economics and Polities from the Middle Ages until the early Twentieth
Century (Berkley: University of California Press, 1989), pp. 177-209. Stergios

Babanassis, Long-Term Economic Development Trends in South-Eastern Europe (18502003), South Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, vol. 1 (Fall 2003).
Further reading:
John R. Lampe and Marvin R. Jackson, Balkan Economic History 1558-1950
(Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982). Michael Paliaret, Balkan Economies
1800-1914. Evolution without Development (Cambridge: CUP, 1997).
4. Emergence and Rise of Nationalism in the Balkans
Readings:
Paschalis Kitromilides, Imagined Communities and the Origins of the National
Question in the Balkans, European History Quarterly, vol. 19 (1989), pp. 149-192.
Traian Stoyanovich, Balkan Worlds. The First and Last Europe (New York and London:
M. E. Sharpe, 1994), 158-178 (subchapters: Kinship, clanship, and Mens and Womens
Societies, From Re-Volution to Revolution, and Theory of Nationality).
Further reading: Nationalism A Report by a Study Group of Members of the Royal
Institute of International Affairs (London: OUP, 1939), see chapter vi entitled: Other
European National Movements, pp. 81-85, 90-93 [Greece], 95-99 [Hungary], 99-100
[Romania], 104-107 [Bulgaria and Serbia], 111-113 [Conclusion]; John Lampe, Balkans
into Southeastern Europe (New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2006), pp. 15-30; 89-104.
Andr Gerolymatos, The Balkan Wars (New York: Basic Books, 2002), pp. 120-194.
5. The Balkans in continuous war (1912-1922)
Readings:
John R. Lampe, Balkan into Southeastern Europe (New York: Plagrave Macmillan,
2006), pp. 31-62;
or
Stevan K. Pavlowitch, The Balkans 1804-1945 (London and New York: Longman,
1999), pp. 196-229;
For what happened during the Balkan Wars one may consult: Jacob Gould Schurman, The
Balkan Wars 1912-1913 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1914, or reprint: New
York, Cossimo Classics, 2005); The most concise account of SEE during WW1 may be
found in: Leften Stavrianos, The Balkans since 1453 (London: Hurst and Company,
2000), pp. 545-570.
Further reading: John Reed, War in Eastern Europe. Travels through the Balkans in 1915
(London: Phoenix, 1995). Dimitrije Djordjevi, Migrations during the 1912-1913 Balkan
Wars and World War One, in Migrations in Balkan History (Belgrade: Serbian Academy
of Sciences and Arts, 1989), pp. 115-129.
6. SEE between two world wars (1919-1941)
John R. Lampe, Balkan into Southeastern Europe (New York: Plagrave Macmillan,
2006), pp. 63-140, or Stevan K. Pavlowitch, The Balkans 1804-1945 (London and NY:
Longman, 1999), pp. 230-306.
Further reading:

Leften Stavrianos, The Balkans since 1453 (London: Hurst and Company, 2000), pp.
571-760.
Second part
Lecturer: Dr. Predrag Simi, full time professor at the Faculty of Political Sciences of the
University of Belgrade.
7. Balkans After the World War II
Readings:
Richard J. Crampton, The Balkans Since the Second World War, Longman, Londin 2002;
John R. Lampe, Balkans into the Southeastern Europe, Palgrave Macmilllan, New York
2006; Barbara Jelavich, History of the Balkans, vol. 2, Cambridge University Press, New
York 1983.
Further readings:
Dennis Hupchnik, The Balkans: from Constantinople to Communism, Palgrave
Macmillan, New York 2002.
8. Cold War in the Balkans
Readings:
John R. Lampe, Balkans into the Southeateastern Europe, Palgrave Macmilllan, New
York 2006; Richard J. Crampton, The Balkans Since the Second World War, Longman,
Londin 2002; Barbara Jelavich, History of the Balkans, vol. 2, Cambridge University
Press, New York 1983.
Further readings:
John Lewis Gaddis, We Know Now: Rethinking the Cold War History, Oxford University
Press, New York 1997;
9. Yugoslav Experiment
Readings:
Lorraine M. Lees, Keeping Tito Afloat: The United Sates, Yugoslavia, and the Cold War,
Pennsylvania State University Press, University Park (PA) 1997; Dennison Rusinow, The
Yugoslav Experiment 1948-1974, University of California Press, Berkeley 1977; Alvin Z.
Rubinstein, Yugoslavia and the Non-Aligned World, Priceton University Press, Princeton
1970; Stevan K. Pavlowitch, Yugoslavia: The Improbable Survivor, Ohio State University
Press, Columbus (OH) 1988.
Further readings:
John R. Lampe, Yugoslavia as History: Twice There was a Country, Cambridge
University Press, New York 1996.

10. The End of the Cold War in the Balkans


Readings:
Predrag Simic, Do the Balkans Exist?, in: Dinitrios Triantaphillou (ed.), The Soluthern
Balkans: Perspectives from the Region, Chaillot Papers April 2001; Rober Bideleux and
Ian Jeffries, The Balkans: a Postcommunist History, Routledge, New York 2007; John R.
Lampe, Balkans into the Southeateastern Europe, Palgrave Macmilllan, New York 2006;
Giuliano Amato (ed.), The Balkans in Europes Future, International Commission for the
Balkans, 2005; Jacques Rupnik (ed.), The Western Balkans and EU, Chaillot Papers June
2011, ISS, Paris 2011;
Further readings:
Lenard J. Cohen and John R. Lampe, Embracing Democracy in the Western Balkans:
From Postconflict Struggles towards European Integration, Woodrow Wilson Center
Press, Washington, D.C. 2011.
11. Civil War in Yugoslavia 1991-1995
Readings:
Christopher Cviic, Remaking the Balkans, Pinter for RIIA, London 1991, Laura Silber
and Allan Little, The Death of Yugoslavia, BBC Books, Penguin 1996; Richard C.
Holbrooke, To End a War, Modern Library New York 1999; R. Craig Nation, War in the
Balkans, 1991-2002, SSI, U.S. Army War College, Carslisle 2003,
Further readings:
Central Intelligence Agency, Office of Russian and European Analysis, Balkan
Battlegrounds: A Military History of the Yugoslav Conflict 1990-1995, U.S. Government
Publishing House, Washington D.C. 2002.
12. Civil War in Yugoslavia 1995-2000
Readings:
Predrag Simi, The Road to Rambouillet: Kosovo Crisis 1995-2000 (in Serbian language),
NEA, Beograd 2000; Miranda Vickers, Kosovo Between the Serb and Albanian, Hurst and
Company, London 1998; Oksana Antonenko, Russia, NATO and European Security After
Kosovo, Survival, Winter 1999-2000, No. 41-42; Tim Judah, Kosovo War and Revenge,
Yale University Press, Yale 2000;
Further readings:
Predrag Simic, Russia and the Kosovo Metohija Problem, in: Michael Korinmann
and John Laughland, Russia: A New Cold War?, Vallentyne Muchel Academic,
Edgware 2008.

Grade:
Mid-term essay (containing 2.000-2.200 words), 50%
Final essay (containing 2.000-2.200 words), 50%
Mid-term essay will be related to the first six lectures and final essay will be
related to the last two lectures.