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Creating the standard of excellence.

2013 World Final Portfolio

Creating the standard of excellence.

Team Introduction

The mission of A1 Racing is to innovate the F1 program and leave a legacy that respects the high standards of work that we have strived to achieve- creating a standard that is A1. These standards of accomplishment justify why and how we intend to
be successful and what guides and motivates us to be successful within F1 in Schools. These standards are:
- To provide a sophisticated professional look, that still presents individuality as a team.
- To resemble an actual Formula One Team to the best of our ability.
- To stay true to our Patriotism and embrace it .
A1 Racing intends to embody these standards and stay true to our beliefs. The ultimate goal is to win the World Championship, but with that we aim to do this whilst having fun and embracing the wonders and opportunities that are F1 in Schools.
Beau Gieskens- Team Manager
The Team Managers role is to basically organise the team. Beau played a vital role in
keeping the team on track and motivated. Beau worked closely with the Collaboration Coordinator, Sam Young, in creating various management tools including budgets and Gantt Charts. Primarily Beaus number one role was to control the weekly
meetings held via Google Plus. Beau discovered by using the hangout option on
Google Plus the team was able to conduct face to face meetings whilst being at different ends of the country. This enabled us to visually show and discuss our ideas
and prompted team progress and development. For these meetings Beau set various
agenda items for the team to discuss and decide upon. Beaus role was to ultimately
keep the team on a successful path. Beaus previous experience in the design process of the car was invaluable, enabling him to dedicate an amount of time and his
expertise towards the engineering side of the team. He put forward ways to improve
the car, provided testing ideas and new opportunities to work with professionals collaborating in their respected engineering areas. Beaus work allowed the engineering team to structure their timeline of testing, designing and manufacturing to fit
within the Gantt Chart regulations.
Luke Meredith - Marketing Manager
Luke is the oldest member of the team and has taken on the role of Marketing Manager with enthusiasm. He has been an extremely valuable asset to the team in developing a relationship with our sponsors. Many new sponsors have been acquired
and past sponsors retained under his guidance. Another key aspect of the role of
Marketing Manager was to organise meetings and collaborate with industry. Luke
has organised meetings and collaborations with a variety of industry partners and
organisations who were extremely beneficial to the team. This gave us the chance to
have a real insight into businesses and showed us what we had to do in order to be
successful. Luke has also been in charge of promoting the team. By using social media such as Facebook and YouTube the team has been able to be seen from a professional stand point, appealing to possible sponsors whilst still keeping us connected
to our peers. Hand in hand with Marketing there is Graphic Design and Luke has created a professional image for the team. This is quite evident on the teams website.
Dylan Sexton - Chief Design Engineer
Dylans role as the Chief Design Engineer means that he is ultimately responsible for
the whole design process of the car. Dylan used the 3D drawing program Catia to
design the car, just like many real F1 teams. With three years experience, Dylan has
been able to work with some amazing people including University professors and
professional engineers to expand his knowledge and to perfect his skills. He also has
had the pleasure of being mentored by a German engineer from Mentor Graphics
to talk about CFD and other ways of enhancing the speed of the car. With this he has
also worked with Triple Eight Racing of Red Bull Racing Australia to discuss design
concepts and how to continue to reach the overall goal of creating a fast car. Dylan
also utilised Bens detailed testing results to continue the car development to the
final car production. CFD was one test utilised but he also used physical wind tunnelling to actually see the air flow over the car prototypes and gain a further understanding.

Sam Young Collaboration Coordinator


Sam is the Collaboration Coordinator whose responsibility is to coordinate effective
and efficient communications between the two collaborating sides of the team. The
team used various communication methods including Facebook, for quick responses
and day-to-day conversation; Google Drive, to share files across the team, and finally
Google Plus which was introduced by the Team Manager, to meet each week and discuss ideas. From these Google Plus meetings Sams role was to take minutes (using
his constructed Minutes System), documenting what was resolved from each meeting and who was responsible for moving forward from the set agenda item. With
the assistance of Beau, Sam has constructed a Management Booklet of tools such as
Gantt Charts in the program Microsoft Project and Budgets in the American program
You Need A Budget (YNAB). This booklet has been an innovative initiative to help
promote the importance of management systems and communication in the F1 in
Schools program. Sam has also used his previous experience to work with Collaboration partner Hip Pocket Workwear and Safety in the creation of the teams uniform.
Ben Marshall Development Engineer
The Development Engineer is responsible for all the finer aspects of the car. Ben did
a terrific job in designing, with Dylans assistance, the independent suspension and
the wheel system on which it runs. Along with some other great innovative ideas
Ben has been able to link up with various collaborators across the globe including
Germany, Switzerland and America. This collaboration allowed for the formulation
of ideas contributing to the final design of the competition car. One of Bens proudest moments has been obtaining some custom made bearings for the team. Ben has
made a tremendous transition from his previous Marketing role to Engineering. With
Jacqui he has been able to share great ideas and provide assistance to Dylan in the
design process. One of Bens biggest responsibilities was to test the various new
designs and innovations to see if they provide us an advantage. He was able to find
new things to test and new innovations to try that would result in vast improvements
to the final car.
Jacqui Cunninghame- Manufacturing Engineer
The Manufacturing Engineers role is to primarily produce the final car ready for racing. Jacqui has done a terrific job in producing different cars to such a high quality. Jacqui used Quick Cam Pro to set up the Balsa Block ready for the cutting out
process. She worked closely with Collaborative partner Hyqual for the use of the
Vacuum Metallisation on the car to give it that extra polished touch to make it stand
out even more. Jacqui has learnt valuable skills and tips that she can now implement
into her everyday life. Jacqui has also been instrumental in the design process by giving great feedback on compilation within the rules and to maintaining a good overall
finish on the car. This has assisted Dylan in changing some of the finer aspects of the
car that were found to be impractical. This will be Jacquis first World Championship
and she is hopeful that her fantastic car finish will contribute to a faster time on the
track. Hopefully by creating a faster time on the track the team is given a greater
advantage and a higher position in the overall standings at the competition.

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Creating the standard of excellence.

History

Before joining forces and forming A1 Racing both the Victorian element of the team and Queensland element were in quite successful teams in their own right. The Victorian members competed as Lightspeed who were former World Finalists whilst
the Queensland members competed under the name Attacca Subito and were also a very successful Australian team in their own right. Both teams have won a host of awards over the years of competition and have had many exciting experiences. By
joining forces the teams hope that we can complement each others strengths and hope that this will give the team an advantage. Overall the team are thrilled with the collaboration decision and are very proud of the journey to become A1 Racing.
2011 World Finals
At the 2011 World Finals in Malaysia the Lightspeed team
formed a collaboration team with four girls from Singapore to
become Trident Racing. As the team had only been together
for a few months expectations were low but there was always hope of a successful campaign. During the competition
Trident Racing were able to pick up the Best Collaboration
award, equal Best Engineer Design and an overall placing of
fifth. This experience gave the Victorian boys a taste of what
a World Championship is like and the team hopes they can
draw back on these experiences for another successful campaign in 2013.

2011 Australian National Finals


Back in 2011 the Queensland half of the team was named the
F1 Super Geeks, and dressed up as superheros on competition
day to show their commitment to their identity. Their car was
based on Superman and everything was about being innovative over pursuing the fastest car award. At this event their
biggest competition was, in fact, Lightspeed, who ended up
being the ones who took out the winning title. The F1 Super
Geeks won the Best Innovation award and got an experience
of what is expected at the higher levels of competition and
what it means to work as a team.

2012 National Finals


In early 2012, Lightspeed competed at the National Finals
in Adelaide. Lightspeed were excited for the opportunity of
moving from the Development Class to Professional Class and
comparing the team to the best teams in the country. At the
championship Lightspeed picked up two awards; the Fastest
Car and the Best Team Portfolio award and finished in third
place overall, narrowly losing by less than ten points. This was
what the team considered their first taste of defeat which
only made the team hunger to reach their goal of another
World Finals challenge.

2012 Australian National Finals


In 2012, the F1 Super Geeks took another shot at making their
way to the international finals. They completely redesigned
their approach and went for simplicity over innovation in an
attempt to get the fastest car and fill in the areas that were
not successful in the previous season. Although no awards
were taken home, Beau and Jacqui were not defeated and
were ready to come through for another shot at it. Throughout this whole process, team members who were not able to
live up to 1st place standards were filtered through naturally,
which ultimately prepared the Queensland dream team for
the next season.

2013 National Finals


Lightspeed competed at the National Finals in Avalon, Victoria for the 2013 National Finals. The team were excited at
the prospect of putting themselves up against a World Finals
quality National Championship and the team were confident
they could be quite successful. At the competition the team
picked up two awards; Best Team Portfolio and Outstanding
Industry Collaboration, as well as the unofficial fastest car.
The team finished third overall for the second year running,
narrowly missing out on that automatic World Finals place.
But fortunately the team was gifted a wildcard to work with
the Attacca Subito team which couldn't have been a better decision for us and the start of the A1 Racing journey.

2013 Australian National Finals


After a thought-provoking renaming and re-identifying process, the F1 Super Geeks became Attacca Subito. Here they
switched to a far more colourful theme. This brought Luke
into the mix and the team bonded amazingly well. Through
everything at these finals, Attacca Subito realised that the
key to winning at an event is not necessarily to have the most
innovative car or the nicest looking pit display (although they
won both of those awards), but to be the greatest team. No
matter what a team has, if they really are a team they can
shine in whatever colours are theirs throughout all of the criteria (except perhaps racing).

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Time Management
A1 Racing agreed that the organisation of the team was essential. Using Microsoft Office Project we came up with a Gantt
Chart to combat this issue. A Gantt Chart is a chart where team members are delegated roles and have set time lines to
complete tasks, therefore making the whole program run smoother. The Gantt Chart was edited regularly to fit in with the
constraints the Formula One in Schools program provides the teams with. All A1 Racing members faced difficulties adjusting
to the constraints but quickly learned by working with the Phoenix College Business Manager, Lorraine Hayes, how to easily
make these adjustments and work to deliver all work on time and to the required standard. Without Lorraines guidance,
support and valuable insight into what it takes to run a successful business (which is what we essentially are) we wouldnt
have got this far and we thank her for it immensely. Thanks to her guidance we were able to divert our attention towards our
task more, and then we were able to complete work to the set deadlines.

Risk Management
Team members planned ahead to identify any potential obstacles, such as cost and time constraints for getting parts
for the car, or team members availability for meetings that
might affect their ability to alter the Gantt Chart. Every risk
was evaluated and a management solution was discussed and
implemented to tackle the current threat. To do so we used
the minutes system. Minutes is a system that many multi-national businesses use to set agendas and take notes from the
meetings held. We implemented this technique into our meetings and by doing so we were able to surpass the threat to the
Gantt Chart. This system showed team members what tasks
needed to be completed to promote the teams development
in the program. This is further explained in the Business Management Booklet which is displayed in our 2013 World Finals
pit display.

Project Management
Finance Management
At the start of the program A1 Racing members sat down and worked out a budget for their respective areas. A clear table
was drawn up in Google Docs so that the team had a list of things to work out what needed to be raised in each area and
for each task. From this Sam was able to use the American program You Need A Budget (YNAB) to create a visual aid that
was easier to read and understand. The estimated required total was around the $100,000 mark which would need to be
raised by sponsorship from our supporters. With money in the account A1 Racing could look towards more expensive ideas
to enhance our performance. These ideas were then referred to the working budget and it was adjusted accordingly. This
allowed us to monitor the cash flow for the up and coming World Finals event in a way that could be grasped clearer than
ever before in our three year history. The teams financial management skills were tested due to the fact that the team was
based in two states. To combat this the team was more streamlined due to our weekly meetings they allowed for updates
on cash flow and cash expenditure meaning team matters could be evaluated more thoroughly and expediently. If it was
not for these meetings the team would never have had a clear idea how our finances were situated and our plans could be
altered to allow for this.

PLAN

CHECK

RISK MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM

EVALUATE

IMPLEMENT

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Collaboration/Communications

Communication
A1 Racing used a number of different communication utilities to stay in touch. Social networks such as Facebook for quick
responses and day-to-day conversation, Google Drive for sending files, and Google Hangout for meetings face-to-face to explain things visually. This gave us ways of completing tasks outside the classroom and finishing the work to a higher standard
and on time. These same social networks were used to communicate with our generous sponsors.
Another way of communication was by sending emails. By sending emails we were able to communicate with potential sponsors on a regular basis thus providing a personal touch with each and every sponsor. Communication was used in all of the
respective areas of the program. Sam used it to communicate mainly with the team and organise the weekly meetings with
the help of Beau on Google Hangout, whilst Luke would mainly use it for communication with potential sponsors and businesses who were interested in collaborating with us.
One personal touch that Beau and Sam initiated was a weekly update via Mailchimp. This gave sponsors and supporters an
update on how everything was going each week and how we were developing the project. This sustained communication
between our connections allowed us to keep everyone updated without having to continually call or email them to ask questions. This made things easier on our team and the supporters. Dylan ,Ben and Jacqui regularly used the online storage programs, Dropbox and Google Drive, to compare files with each other while at home and to talk with engineering companies
for the comparison of their designs and how they could be used for the team. Linked-In was used to find businesses as it was
more effective than the phone book. As the program ran we all discovered that most of the work would have to be done at
home, so without our communication sources we would have been unable to complete the required tasks to the standards
we had set.

Collaboration
Being based at different ends of the country meant that the eternal connection and collaboration of the team was vital for
a successful completion of the program. The team had to overcome various obstacles along the journey but was successful
in doing so.
The most important part of this journey was when the Victorian side of the team visited the Queensland side for a single
4-day weekend. The team had the opportunity to compete in the community fundraising challenge known as the Our Village Community Challenge (in the Moreton Bay Region) and having the chance to bond which is most important in a team
environment.
While the team was all together in person, the opportunity arose to work on various project elements including the pit display layout and conducting a new element of the World Championship; the pressure challenge. By preparing ourselves we
were able to go into the World Championship knowing that we could tackle any obstacle thrown at us as a team.
By heading up to Queensland the team learnt the vital importance of teamwork. By placing trust and applying reliance on
team members the team found more work could be done and this cannot be more evident than in the pressure challenge.
By allowing each member to play to their strengths the team found that we could be more successful in the program and we
could do anything that we set our minds to.
By the time that weekend was over, we were no longer the Victorian half of the team plus the Queensland half of the team.
We were one team, the Australian Team, A1 Racing.

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Industry Collaboration

Collaboration includes all of the teams dealing with industry and other businesses. This teaches team members about the field of interest s in relation to F1 and also the wider workforce. Collaboration plays a key role in team members learning what it
takes to make it out there in the real world and how to follow dreams of becoming an Engineer, Graphic Designer or whatever they endeavour to be. That is what F1 in Schools provides us with; why we have been doing this project for the past three
years and why we ultimately love it.
Hip Pocket Workwear & Safety
Hip Pocket is a retail store in Ballarat. We worked closely with
John Gleeson from Hip Pocket to design our shirts and position and custom design them to our liking. John has taught
us about colour combinations and what would make us be
more professional and most importantly look the best that
we could. He helped with the positioning of the logos and
showed us where our most important sponsors should be
placed to give them the best branding opportunity. With this
he has also sponsored us by embroidering our shirts for free
along with our casual shirts and has promised in the future to
do promotional work with us on radio and in the local newspaper.

Triple Eight Race Engineering (Red Bull Racing Australia)


This collaboration was probably one of the most relevant
partnerships for fundamental design. We were able to speak
with the Chief Aeronautical Engineer of the leading V8 Supercar teams about how we could make the car as good as possible with relation to both the regulations and our past design
knowledge. We even had a tour of the garage to get an insight
on full-scale manufacturing engineering.

Mentor Graphics
Mentor graphics is a leader in electronic design automation.
They enable companies to develop better electronic products
faster and more cost-effectively. We made contact with the
Munich branch (via LinkedIn) and our Development Engineer,
Ben Marshall, liaised with Boris Marovic. Boris and Ben formed
a relationship where Boris agreed to mentor the team, particularly regarding the engineering aspect of Computational
Fluid Dynamics (CFD). This is explained further in the portfolio.

Nordon Cylinders
The team at Nordon Cylinders have always been there for the
students from Pine Rivers State High School. A truly amazing partnership, so much so they now have three past F1 in
Schools students undertaking apprenticeships there, which
has helped their business grow even more. They helped us
with our manufacturing needs, such as our precision machined
wheels and custom axles.

College Business Manager- Ms Lorraine Hayes


Ms Hayes is the Business Manager of Phoenix P-12 Community College (the school that Victorian half of the team attends).
Collaboration Coordinator, Sam Young, approached Ms Hayes
to research the best ways to make a budget and how to operate an organised business. She introduced the team to the
Minutes System and the Program YNAB. This has extended
our previous portfolios and experience and our work regarding this can be found in the Business Management Booklet.

Olympus
Brendan Slaven from Olympus came to spend a day capturing
slow motion footage of our test cars, even sacrificing a portion of his own holidays to come in and spend the day with us.
Brendan was able to teach the team about camera angles and
the high speed recording process. By filming at 1000 framesper second the team could capture the lift instantly happening and work on other techniques to benefit and improve the
speed of the car. The footage was later extracted for further
study from the team and Brendan consistently provided guidance when needed.

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Partnerships

When approaching businesses for sponsorship and in-kind support we like to offer a fair proposal that outlines a mutual relationship between the two parties. We work with a system known as ROI. ROI stands for Return On Investment which means
that everything they give us, we give back in terms of promotion for their company or their product.
Partnerships Proposal
Our Partnership Proposal goal was to gain industry supporters with financial and In-kind support. Without either forms of sponsorship we would not have been able to make our World Finals dream a reality. At first we were finding it tough gaining support so we revised our proposal and held discussions with different industries to research what they would like to gain by supporting us. The outcome of the revision was a Local Business Proposal and a Separate Corporate Proposal for larger industries.
Corporate Proposal
The Corporate Proposal was designed for large industry businesses who we would offer prime advertising opportunities to.
The Sponsorship Packages offered are as follows:
Gold Partnership Package
$5,000
The Gold package offers your company the opportunity to become a prime supporter of our team and includes the following:

- Company Logo displayed on our Car.

- Company Logo displayed on Team Uniform (including jacket).

- Company Logo displayed on our Pit Display.

- Company Logo displayed on our Portfolio and Documents.

- Company Logo displayed on our website (active link).

MEET THE TEAM


A1 Racing is a collaboration team of eight passionate teenagers from across Australia, competing in a
worldwide engineering competition, F1 in Schools. The collaboration consists of two previously and
successful Australian F1 in Schools teams; Attacca Subito from Queensland and Lightspeed from
Victoria. Beau Gieskens, Luke Meredith and Jacqui Cunninghame are representing the Pine Rivers State
High School (North Brisbane, Queensland) whilst Sam Young, Michelle Clark, Casey Shevlin, Ben Marshall
and Dylan Sexton will be representing the team from Phoenix P-12
Community College
(Ballarat, Victoria).
The collaboration was formed soon after our individual teams success at
the 2013 Australian National Finals taking out the Professional Class 2nd
and 3rd place on the podium. We are now in preparation for the F1 in Schools
International Finals being held from 10th 13th November in Austin, Texas.

WHAT IS F1 IN SCHOOLS?
The F1 In Schools Competition is an international initiative aimed to engage and challenge students from
grades 6-12 about the possibilities of careers in engineering, science, marketing, graphic design and
project management. The competition requires teams of 3-6 students to design, analyse, manufacture, test,
market and race miniature Formula One Cars. These cars are propelled by a CO2 canister down a 20 metre
track at speeds up to 80km/h. Most cars complete the track in just over one second.

Platinum Partnership Package


$10,000
The Platinum package offers your company the opportunity to become a prominent supporter of our team and includes
the following:


- Company Logo displayed on our car offering prime media opportunities.

- Company Logo displayed on Team Uniform (including jacket).

- Company Logo displayed on our Pit Display.

- Company Logo displayed on our Portfolio and Documents.

- Company Logo displayed on our website (active link).

- Company name included in our weekly updates.

- After the event you will receive a copy of our portfolio signed by all team members.
Consultancy Rights
$25,000
This level of partnership is a prime opportunity that offers your company the chance to be the ultimate supporter of our
team. In return for your support we would like to offer you the following:










- Decision input rights within the team and naming opportunities.


- Logo always dominantly displayed during all prime media opportunities.
- Company Logo dominantly displayed on our Car.
- Company Logo dominantly displayed on all our Team Clothing.
- Company Logo dominantly displayed on our Pit Display.
- Company Logo dominantly displayed on Team Merchandise.
- Company Logo dominantly displayed on our Portfolio and Documents.
- Company Logo dominantly displayed on all of our Digital Marketing.
- Company Logo included in our weekly updates.
- Online promotion on our team website .
- After the event you will receive a replica of our car, uniform and portfolio signed by all team members.

This partnership package will be discussed further with you should you decide to choose it.

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Without clever marketing people don't know that you exist. This is the reason why we made marketing a key focus for the
team. Our aim was to have our team identity become recognised in our local communities, our regions, our states and across
Australia. We also took our marketing one step further by placing ourselves on the worldwide stage and linking our team to
the global community.
Social Media
Facebook
With more than one billion users, Facebook is easily one of the most
successful forms of media we could use to reach our potential audience. Our marketing strategy has relied on the success of our
teams Facebook page. Facebook allows us to gain new followers
and interact with existing followers in real time.
Google+ (G+)
We also utilsed the new and rapidly growing social media site Google+ (G+). Google+ gave us the opportunity to gain supporters who
perhaps choose to use the less mainstream options of current social media. Our Google+ page is a live work in progress, however it
is becoming just as dominant a marketing tool as our popular Facebook page.
Twitter
Gaining entry to the World Finals and being on a global scale we
took our marketing a step further creating a twitter identity and
gaining a following utilising this extremely popular social media
tool. Our Twitter account operates in a similar manner to the other
social media services by giving our team a voice and an audience.
However we feel it will become a standout at the World Finals when
we attempt to get #A1Racing trending in the top 100 worldwide.

Marketing
Fundraising BBQ
Australias Federal Election was held on 7th September 2013.
Both the Victorian and Queensland team members held a
BBQ to promote F1 In Schools and our venture as A1 Racing
to the World Finals. This day was an exceptional opportunity for linking with the community and raising much needed
funds to fill the budget demands.

Our Village Fundraiser


During the teams collaboration visit in Queensland the team
competed in the Our Village Community Challenge. As the
Wacky A1 Racers the team conducted themselves in various
challenges to help win potential prize money. The team was
able to walk away winning $250 for the teams journey to the
World Championship. This gave the team a chance to promote
the program and themselves to the local Moreton Bay region.
Merchandising
USB Business Cards
The A1 Racing Business Cards put a whole new spin on the marketing advantages of such a
small object. With 2GB of storage our A1 Cards will be the hub to all information about our
team. These cards will have a lesser effect on the environment after competition day as people will be less inclined to throw away a useful form of storage media. The front side of the
cards show off a stunning render of our car on the Circuit of the Americans and on the flip side
is a visually pleasing design which entails our contact details and social media links.

Postcards
Knowing how effective our marketing strategies are played a key role in our success as a team. Facebook allowed us to As we worked so hard to come halfway around the world for the finals we felt it important
conduct deep analysis of the reach of our posts, how many shares and likes we were achieving as well as the increase and to take our marketing world wide. Our A1 Racing postcards give us an opportunity to market
ourselves while allowing people to write a short letter to that special someone back at home.
decrease in our weekly targets and including the demographic of our followers.
These cards showcase the perfection of our car and put out an exceptional standard for our
team and our marketing efforts.

Website
a1rau.com is a modern, user-friendly website where our followers, partners and the public can go to view News, Photos,
Videos and other pertinent information about the team. We highlight our progress and our successes. The websites aim is
to interact with our viewers; we wanted to allow them to feel as though they are part of the team and of our journey.
Multiple companies have contacted us from finding out about our website and fan pages and praised us on our professionalism and promotional skills. We also used our website to advertise our many sponsors with active links to their own
website. We also have a news feed, videos and subscription to our weekly newsletter.

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Uniform & Car Graphics

Uniform
A1 Racings goal with uniform was to emulate a Formula 1 team but also still wanting to be set apart from all the other
teams. After some extensive research and talking to one of our long time collaborators, Hip Pocket Workwear and Safety,
and Game clothing we decided that a formal and casual/travel uniform was the best option. One consideration we had to
make was differentiating the support teams uniform from the official team, but still maintain unity as a team. To do this we
just varied colours of shirts, black being the official teams shirt colour, and charcoal grey being support teams shirt colour.

Formal Uniform
This uniform is for all official aspects of the competition
such as the verbal presentations, racing and awards ceremony. This uniform consists of a short sleeve cotton shirt, embroided with sponsors logos and our team logo. The team
logo is the main feature, an up scaled version placed vertically across the right hand side. This gave the team massive
branding, easily seen at distance. In addition to the shirt, FXD
work pants, used by many race crews and F1 teams and finally
Puma black race shoes. This completes our formal uniform.

Casual/Travel Uniform
This uniform was designed for less formal occasions such as
travelling and other activities. It was designed with practicality and comfort in mind. Consisting of a dye sublimated polo
shirt, again with the team logo as the main feature vertically
down the right side, but also the vertical green and gold lines
on the left. To accompany this we have both track suit pants
and shorts for all weather occasions. To save cost, we multipurposed the shoes from our formal uniform.
In the case of cooler or wet weather, we also have black soft
shell jackets with all team supporters logos embroidered on
the back. This adds a professional touch and opportunity to
promote everyone who has been able to help us along the
way, as we know every little bit helps.

Car Graphics
How the team is represented and virtually marketed is through our car. Therefore the presentation of this is key to promote
and impact the eye and interest of our supporters/followers. By producing a highly appealing car, the team was able to impress future and present supporters wiht the high quality we were able to establish through some of our graphic processes.
Our car has been vacuum metalized in the colour of gold, giving the car a near mirror reflection and a truly flawless finish.
We have added green pin striping throughout the car as finer detail dual purpose to not only add to the aesthetics of the car,
but to frame and highlight our platinum and gold sponsors as one of the most coveted places for our supporters. Branding
our supporters logos on the car also adds to the teams goal to emulate a real Formula 1 team.
The decaling has been done with water slide decal paper. This process allows for transparent backgrounds on each decal,
giving a truly seamless finish, without adding any extra and unnecessary weight to the car.
Overall these processes helped bring out some of the best features of the car but most importantly the sponsors logos. By
highlighting our supporters we have been able to give a little back to people and their businesses who have done so much
in helping us along our journey to the World Championship.

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Creating the standard of excellence.

Logo & Pit Display

Logo
The design of our logo was the first crucial element of developing the team identity of A1 Racing, as it would be applied to
all elements created by the team. It was critical that the logo personified who we are but still was aesthetically appealing.
To do this we came up with numerous designs, and took the best elements from these design concepts to form the final
concept.
As we are an Internal Australian Collaboration we wanted to represent this by selecting a National Symbol. We decided
that the Southern Cross, a national symbol of Australia would be most appropriate. This was applied to the logo and other
elements such as Pit Display. The official logo is very simple, clear and unique. This allows ease of use for processes such as
embroidery for uniform and Pit Display artwork.
After deciding what the official logo would be, we developed our branding guidelines, this is a document used by international companies to stipulate what logos are to be used on different colours, type of documents and any other products the
logo needs to be applied to.

R A C I N G

Pit Display
When developing a team image it is important to keep artwork consistent with the branding of our products to try and
capture the true essence of the team and think about how we wanted to be perceived.
Our Pit Display was the basis for all other artwork which was applied to most of our products. Our aim was to create a
very appealing and well-constructed booth with graphic concepts such as the green and gold lines representing the two
states; Gold being the sunny state of Queensland and Green being the garden state of Victoria and the photo realistic
render on our display. These elements were applied to all our products including the portfolio.
One of the main features of our booth is our photo realistic render on the main poster; our car is placed in a studio environment that we feel encapsulates how we wanted to be perceived as sophisticated and elegant, hence the chosen
graphic.
OFFICIAL LOGO

The colouring of our booth was also important. Because the booths are very constrictive with size we made sure that it
had depth and elegance by having darker colours as the basis of our booth. To add another dimenison to our booth LED
lighting is placed throughout the booth. This created a very balanced and structured booth that will effectively showcase
the
professionalism and passion we have for F1 in Schools.
One feature of our booth is our car development display, having all the car design concepts and vital information for each
running across the lower level bench. In addition to this we have numerous displays such as a 5:1 model of our suspension
as well as all the development stages of this innovation and also an interactive touch screen display. Our sponsors also
feature on our Pit Display on the front of our custom benches.

Page 10

Creating the standard of excellence.

Acetal
We found that weight was a critical issue and that our wheel
systems needed to be as light as possible, not only to combat
our total car weight but also reduce the rolling inertia and allow the wheels to spin at a higher RPM.
We used a lightweight, low friction thermoplastic called Polyoxymethylene, better known as Acetal to manufacture our
wheels and stationary caps. This thermoplastic has a very high
abrasion resistance and heat resistance, making it the perfect
material to manufacture wheels from.

Endplates
Endplates are a crucial aerodynamic feature that has been
implemented into our cars aerofoils. As the air travels over
the aerofoil, low pressure and high pressure form on opposite
faces of the wing. When the two pressures collide it creates
the massive problem of air vortexes. These swirling vortexes
along the horizontal of the car create a suction force that further increases drag. The endplate on the wings reduces the
two pressure meeting and maintains stability and increases
the aerodynamic efficiency of the car by reducing these vortexes.

Research
Controllable and uncontrollable
factors
Controllable:
-Car geometry
-Wheel design
-Bearings
-Reaction time
-Car weight
A moment is a forces tendency to cause rotation or twist over a point. In our case the -Car setup
force from the canister creates a moment that twists the car around the rear wheel (or -Car stopping system
pivot) and causes the rear of the car to lift. In order for the car to be at a perfect equilibrium during launch, the moment force to the right and left of the pivot must be equal. Uncontrollable
-Track setup
-Climate
-Canister weight
-Starter setup
Car Equilibrium
Equilibrium is defined as a state in which opposing forces or influences are balanced.
In our case the equilibrium refers to the cars ability to be balanced with all four wheels
on the track under the force of thrust from the canister. It is especially important for us
to ensure our car is balanced on launch to properly harness the direction of the thrust.
If the car is not balanced and changes pitch on launch, the direction of thrust is not horizontal and therefore we are not achieving the most thrust.

Tweaking the Balance


Before we can adjust the balance of our car we need to calculate the sum of both of the moment forces.
3D Printing
To easily and rapidly produce elements of the car such as the
suspension housing and aerofoils, we utilized the power and
efficiency of 3D printing. These programmed machines allowed us to materialize elements of the car in different substances, such as titanium, aluminium composite, ABS plastic
and clear plastic along with a range of colours. With this machinery we were able to produce prototypes and make changes whenever needed.

Gauge System
To safely and correctly scrutineer our final F1 car, we machined
a set of gauges that are all at set to precise measurements to
critical regulations on maximum and minimum distances. This
way we could quickly measure our car to ensure all regulations
are complied with.

Moment Left of Pivot=


(27.68 x 0.104) + (31.73 x 0.028) + (43.26 x 0.314) + (50.84 x 0.0013) + (51.04 x 0.0009) + (32.61 x 9.05) = 312.58Nmm
Moment Right of Pivot=
(48.57 x 0.0185) + 2(101.82 x 0.0403) x (118.66 x 0.0009) x (118.86 x 0.0008) + (132.95 x 0.0258) + (32.61 x 9.05) = 307.86Nmm
This equation tells us that there is a moment force on the rear of 0.034N or an excess of 4 grams; this would cause the car to
pitch towards the rear and lift the front wheels from the track. We can combat this action in a number of ways. According to
the equation, by adding 4 grams to the front of the car the car would now be at perfect equilibrium on launch. We can control
this using ballast points within the front wheels.
Our suspension is also another key technique used to control these forces. When the moment force is applied most is absorbed by the suspensions spring and therefore the pitch is prevented. You can see by the comparative images, the car on
the right with the suspension prevents the pitch. This equation tells us that there is a moment force on the rear of the car
of 312.58Nm and 307.86Nm on the front. This would cause the car to pitch towards the rear and lift the front wheels from
the track. We can combat this action in a number of ways.The equation can be transposed to give us a weight force required
to balance the car; this can then be applied as ballast. Our suspension is also, another key technique used to control these
forces. When the moment force is applied, most is absorbed by the suspensions spring and therefore the pitch is prevented.
You can see by the comparative images the car on the right with the suspension prevents the pitch.

Page 11

Creating the standard of excellence.

Testing

A1 Racing prides itself on the extensive amount of testing and data recording that went into the final car design. All of this Testing Baseline
information was collected over the year from both sides of the team by utilizing over 20 years of combined expertise and To make all physical track testing as conclusive as possible, A1 racing created a testing baseline to be used in all comparative
experience in the F1 in Schools competition.
track testing. This car is a painted and sanded copy of AONE3, with the same wheel used in our final design and ABEC 5 steel
bearings weighing in at exactly 52g. The very moderate car design was used as it complied with all rules and regulations, and
Testing and Developments Booklet
was the very first prototype to our final design and therefore could be compared to further design stages.
To record and maintain all testing, analysis and development information, A1 Racing maintained a Testing and Developments Booklet. This booklet allowed us to access and review all relevant information with ease. To aid in this we created and When conducting physical testing, we would use the same set of wheels and bearings that were used in the previous set of
continuously used our very own custom spreadsheets to ensure all track testing data can be recoded and analysed easily. laps on the base car and add them to the development car. This way we are able to reduce the chances of a bearing being of
higher quality and having an unrealistic advantage.
CONTENTS
Aerodynamics 1
Testing baseline 2
Tether guides 3
Weight transfer 4

Testing and
Development
Booklet

Suspension 5
Adjustable canister 6
Car developments 7

Canisters
All canisters used in track testing were of the same brand to minimise differentiation
between canisters, and the most crucial part about testing was strictly enforced for
all testing; all canister must weigh the same when fired. If a canister has too little
or too much gas when fired we will not get a realistic result that can be comparable
to what time will be run in the World Finals. To minimise the frequency of having a
faulty canister with a small amount or too much gas when fired, we weighed every
canister, and only canister is between 28.8 and 29.2 grams may be used. To have the
exact same amount to the milligram would result in using only 1 in 38 canisters, which
is an unreasonable amount. When the car had finished its race, the canister would be
weighed, and if it was not close to 21g when empty (equalling almost 8 grams of gas
released) the lap would be re-run until all 10 runs were conclusive.

Starting Blocks
To prevent the car from having an inconclusive lap time due to being on a poor angle when fired, we created a set of starting blocks that when added to each side of the car during setup would ensure that the car would be starting the race on a
Slow Motion Testing
With our collaboration partner, Olympus Australia, we were able to work together to use an Olympus i-speed 3 camera, straight line. This provided much more consistent times within our data.
capable of filming at up to 150,000 frames per second. With this amazing technology, we are able to confirm, not only that
moment occurs during the application of thrust, but the suspension in the wheels is able to dampen the forces and increase
stability in the cars launch and therefore maximise the amount of thrust applied.
Climate
To ensure a conclusive result in testing, things such as humidity and temperature
must be taken into account. Humidity is important to consider as it affects the density of the air and how much resistance the car must endure while racing. If the car is
to be conclusively tested, any testing should be conducted under the same weather
conditions.
Surface Friction
Of the few controllable sources of drag on our car, we have found that skin friction is the most severe. We conducted some
research and found a professor in America who has developed a near frictionless coating called MegaGuard Ultra. MegaGuard Ultra operates in a way that when applied to a surface, it reduces almost all skin friction by creating a boundary layer
slip.
MegaGuard Ultra is an extremely thin coating that fills in all of the minor grooves and bumps in the paint, allowing air to pass
cleanly over and around the car.

Page 12

Creating the standard of excellence.

Analysis

Computation Fluid Dynamics


Computational fluid dynamics, usually abbreviated as CFD, is a branch of fluid mechanics that uses numerical methods and algorithms to simulate the airflow over and around an object, and give a drag, lift and acceleration reading. A1 Racing have had
numerous partners to do our CFD analysis, namely Mentor Graphics and Leap Australia. Both companies approached us and offered to do numerous stages of analysis throughout the season. The results supplied to us gave us the information required
to produce the high quality and aerodynamic car we use today.
Mentor Graphics
Mentor Graphics is a German based company that provides simulation services at a world class level. We were approached by Mentor Graphics keen to check out the F1 In Schools industry and have been long time partners for three years. Mentor
Graphics provided us with countless simulations and data, of which we were able to consider and develop further. Mentor Graphics supplied us with velocity, pressure and streamline images and helped us to interpret and properly analyse the results.
As an outcome of these results we were able to decrease our cars overall drag, deceleration and also properly control aspects of the car designed to cause up and down forces.

Leap Australia
Leap Australia specialize in delivering high quality services to CAD modellers in Australia and New Zealand. Leap provided us with CFD services and in particular helped us understand and analyse the data so we could properly interpret what we were
looking at. With the aid of Leap Australia in combination with our other CFD and analysis services, we were able to confidently confirm that the changes we were making were appropriate and effective in reducing the drag of the design.

Sectional Drag
This image shows the contribution to drag along certain sections of the car. Using
this we can identify high drag areas and can determine the cause of the significant
portions of overall drag. The large spike at the back is due to the low pressure at
the CO2 cartridge nozzle. This is offset by the thrust from the cartridge. The drag
added by the rotating wheels is shown on the red line.

Wall Thickness Analysis


It is critical that we ensure that all aspects of our car design comply with rules
and regulations. One of the easiest rules to break is a minimum body thickness,
therefore analysing the thickness of all areas defined as car body is critical. Using
this analysis tool we are able to set a scale that will show in red areas in danger
of falling under the 3mm limit. We can then tend to issues before they are able to
make it onto the manufacturing stage and become an even bigger issue that may
eventually cause a loss of important World Championship points. Sections shown
in orange are sections that need to be taken care of during manufacturing. If a
section was shown in red it would mean that it needs to be redesigned to meet
regulations.

Finite Element Analysis


Finite element analysis allows us to apply an amount of force on a section of the
car and study how it will react. We determine the amount of force by using the
mathematical equation F= (Mass)x(Acceleration). It was worked out that as the car
hits the towels at the end of the track it is hit with a 20 newton force load. Without
sufficient strength and structural integrity the car is likely to break. After close
analysis of the front section of the car we established that due to the lack of material there is a high chance of breakage on impact. In order to prevent the car from
breaking we designed a stopping block that forms to the contours around the car,
avoiding the brittle front section and therefore preventing a break.

Page 13

Creating the standard of excellence.

Roller Guide MKI


A1 Racing have developed numerous
different tether guides, but a very innovative and world first Roller Guide.
With the intention of creating a guide
that used the faster rolling action
rather than the conventional sliding
action, the roller guide came to mind
when thinking about chair lifts and pulley systems. The idea was forged when
we looked at how chair lifts operated,
where the guide cable ran along a rotating wheel with a concave radius,
which allowed for the line to fit into
perfectly into the guide. To recreate
this system, we printed out two ABS
plastic rollers which housed two 1mm
ID bearings each, which spun on a singular wire crosspiece. To ensure that
the rollers could not slide to each
side, we integrated two vertical arms
to hold them in place and to deem the
guide closed. However, as the rollers
were machined from ABS plastic and
our original stationary guide is made
from PTFE, the rolling action had to
equal or be less than the friction created from the sliding action guide.

Roller Guide MKII


After the failure of the MKI guide, we
researched further into the design of
the roller guide idea. After correcting
the problems of having ABS plastics
0.5 friction coefficient, we turned to
PTFE or Teflon. Teflon's 0.04 coefficient was a drastic improvement
with regard to the sliding action of
the guide. As force will always take
the path of least resistance, whether
sliding or spinning. the guide has an
advantage over the initial design. The
secondary design implemented a singular Teflon crosspiece rolling on the
1mm ID bearings. The crosspiece sat a
few millimetres in front of the actual
circular PTFE guide to comply with the
regulations T7.2 and T7.4 of guide
holes must be completely closed and
the tether guide must have a diameter
of 3mm/5mm. The crosspiece also
sat 2 millimetres above the bottom
of the guide, preventing the line from
ever touching the bottom of the stationary guide by being forced to
always roll.

Average lap time: 1.363

Average lap time: 1.27

Bearings
There are numerous factors of resistance
that a bearing undergoes while racing,
such as its rolling resistance and wearing.
These factors will often make low quality bearings cease or slow. We conducted
tests to see which bearing would be best
for our situation by applying the bearing
and wheel to a belt sander for 10 seconds
and timed how long the wheel would spin
for and if it would cease or break. With
the aid of CGB bearings and Barden, we
were able eliminate or reduce almost all
of these factors by using an ABEC 9 PTFE
coated bearing. ABEC is the system used
to rate the quality of the bearing by the
precision used when creating the bearing and PTFE will drastically reduce the
rolling resistance the bearing will undergo. The Teflon coating allows the bearing
to spin in excess of 250,000 rotations per
minute, and the quality of the bearing
ensures they will not cease or break. The
Teflon that is coating the ball bearings
will move from the ball to the cage and
back to the ball over time. This way the
bearing does not degrade over time and
will remain functioning after numerous
runs at high speed.

Innovation
Suspension
Contrary to most theories the purpose and usefulness is not to minimize the effects of the already smooth and level track,
however where the suspension shines is in its ability to provide a consistent and steady launch for the car. The suspension
acts to reduce the effects of the moment force caused by the instant thrust force from the canister,
cushioning the force and maintaining stability and aerodynamics.
AS.NATIONALS
This first concept involves a bi-wheel suspension with a through axle that uses
springs as dampeners contained within a housing in the car body. Prototyped
from a clear plastic and fastened into the car with a screw, this design is perfect
for a car with no channel.
Pros:
- Simple design and easy setup

LS.NATIONALS
Our very first independent suspension design allowed for every wheel to have
independent movement and no longer required a though axle to operate. We
were able to use the aerodynamic advantage of a channel by incorporating a
stub axle wheel design. This design uses a foam cut-out as the dampeners to
absorb the moments forces.
Pros:
- Independent
- Allowed for a channel

Cons:
- Foam didnt absorb enough force
- Sat outside of the wheel

A1.CONCEPT
With the combination of the two previous designs we created a suspension system that was both independent, but also used springs as the dampener. This
design was small enough to fit within the confines of the wheel itself. Rapidprototyped from ABS this design had both upwards and downwards motion for
the wheel from the two tiny springs.
Pros:
- Independent
- Utilizes the channel
- Uses Springs

Again the roller guide had problems when it was running significantly slower
times than it did without the crosspiece. Through investigation, we discovered
that the minimum height at which the guide was forced to sit was still too high,
and resulted in added pressure on the guide and increased friction. This pressure is unavoidable as the fixtures holding the bearings in place could not get
any lower due to rule T3.6 distance between track surface and any car component not exceeding 2mm to the track. This regulation resulted in us having to
drop the innovation due to the minimum available height of the crosspiece just
being too high.

Cons:
- Requires a through axle
- Must be a full car body

Cons:
- Too small to fit better springs

A1.FINAL
Critical regulation T3.6 distance between track surface and any car component,
except the rolling surface of a wheel must be above 2mm. To comply with this
regulation the final design has been modified to allow only single directional
movement as well as retaining the movement to maintain the car above this barrier at all times.
Pros:
- Independent
- Reliable
- Strong

Cons:
- Single direction movement

Page 14

Creating the standard of excellence.

Purpose
The purpose of this suspension design is not to absorb the impact of track imperfections, but us, designed to absorb the
massive amounts of force that the car undergoes during launch. We have calculated that the car undergoes 18G forces at
launch, however thorugh design adaptations and calculation of moment force and ballast we have been able to reduce the
amount of force applied from 18 grams, down to 4 or 0.078N. The suspension is designed to negate any remaining forces
and to act as a failsafe in case of variables such as canister gas irregularities and if balsa density are incorrect. The suspension
design incorporates a singular spring at a custom tensile strength at either the front or rear wheels, with soft or hard springs
respectively. When the moment of force occurs the car will either apply pressure towards the rear or the front depending
on what disturbs the equilibrium.
Time

Full

Empty

1.231
1.213
1.307
1.212
1.292
1.247
1.248
1.244
1.257
1.311

28.91
28.95
28.95
29.1
28.94
29.2
28.83
29.19
29.06
29.02

20.95
20.92
21.01
21.06
21.22
21.02
20.81
21.11
21.02
21.05

1.2562

29.015

21.017

Hard/soft
Hard/soft
Hard/soft
Hard/soft
Hard/soft
Hard/soft

1.141
1.185
1.101
1.142
1.17
1.128

29.22
28.91
29.11
29.01
28.8
29.29

21.06
20.8
21.07
20.7
20.7
21.13

Hard/soft

1.162

29.22

21.05

Hard/soft
Hard/soft
Hard/soft

1.185
1.195
1.235

29.25
29.23
29.12

21.22
21.23
21.05

1.1644

29.116

21.001

Without
Without
Without
Without
Without
Without
Without
Without
Without
Without

Worth a thousand words


In order to further prove that the suspension works,
collaboration with our partners at Olympus Australia enabled us to record the cars launch at 35,000
frames per second. During the race start, the wheels
can be observed to be absorbing the moment force
as well as absorbing the force of the raised sticker at
the start gate, which was previously thought to have
no impact on the cars performance.

Suspension
Parts Of The Design
The wheels and external hubcap
is manufactured from Acetal This
thermoplastic is very heat and
abrasion resistant, making sure
that the wheels will not become
scratched or morph, therefore
reducing the chances of added
friction.

Evidence
To prove that the independent suspension design works, we conducted
physical track testing, recording 10
runs with and 10 runs without the
suspension design. The results above
reveal that with suspension, the car
increased speed by almost .1 of a second in lap times with a soft rear, hard
front suspension setup.

Bearing
The ABEC 9 PTFE bearing is a custom made, high speed precision
bearing which is capable capable
of spinning in excess of 250,000
rotations per minute under very
little force. It is this bearing that
ensures the car maintains its
speed down the track after thrust
has been applied and exhausted.

Internal Hub-Cap
The internal hubcap attaches to the outside of the car
itself, and also includes an
internal ballast container
that allows us to tweak
the weights to perfect the
weight transfer of the car.

Spring
This tiny spring is used as
the dampener of the wheel.
When the wheel has pressure applied to it, the slide
is forced up and the spring is
able to absorb this force.
Suspension Housing
The suspension housing is the body of the
suspension design, housing the moveable
axle and spring. It has been prototyped
precisely to allow the axle to slide freely
without the risk of it coming out and losing
a wheel.

Slider
The axle setup has a stub axle
design, meaning that the shortened axle only goes though the
bearing. This moveable axle is required as the car design includes
the large, aerodynamic slot and
a full axle would negate this advantage. The axle is connected
directly to the spring and is able
to move up and down inside the
suspension housing.

Suspension End Cap


The suspension lid is screwed in place to the
internal hubcap. The lid is fixed in place to
ensure the slider will not come out of the
housing and is removable incase the spring
breaks or is damaged.

Screw
This tiny screw is inserted
through the internal hubcap
and into the lid of the suspension housing to ensure it
all stays together properly.

Page 15

Creating the standard of excellence.

Development Stages

Developement
The development of the final A1 Racing car wasnt a simple feat. It was an outcome of excellent planning, time management and collaborations. Over the process over 50
designs were tested and analysed.
The process began with the planning. How could we be sure that we would be going in the right direction? Four very different base designs were established, each with a different direction and idea behind them. Each design was thoroughly tested using CFD, FEA, on track testing and balance and launch testing (with a slow motion camera). After
analysis of the data KPIs a clear first direction was found, AONE1.3.
To further develop the design we approached a number of professional businesses with extensive aerodynamic and physics knowledge. Influences on our next three designs
came heavily from concepts discussed with Mentor Graphics, a Sauber F1 Team Senior CFD Engineer and Red Bull Racing Australia. Once again the same planned process was
undertaken to thoroughly test and analyse strengths and weaknesses of each design.
Our final design included a combination of the most effective principles and aerodynamic features, for the final product of a lightning fast and consistent car.

AONE1.3 - EVOLUTION 1
AONE1.3 was inspired by Lightspeeds rocket fast National Finals design. The objective of the design was to minimize the frontal surface area, a direct contributor to
drag, whilst also trying to have a balanced car on launch. Although this car had a low
Cd it had balance issues and as a result runs were inconsistent. The design included a
channel on the underside of the car that allowed a large volume of flow to be undisturbed.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

AONE2.1 - EVOLUTION 2
Heavily inspired by Sauber F1 Teams Senior CFD Engineer, this design was much more
aerodynamic. It retained the main goal of reducing the frontal surface area, but also
introduced aerodynamic concepts such as endplates and a NACA tapered canister
housing. This design reduces and removed several areas identified as turbulent. By
moving the nose cone further back we reduced some large vortexes caused by the
protruding edges. AONE2.1 also had a much improved balance, theoretically proven
by equilibrium equations worked out with Dr. Khalife, a local engineer.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

AONE3.3 - FINAL DESIGN


The beautiful end product of seven months of dedication and hard work; years and
years of knowledge came down to this advanced, innovative, aerodynamic and simply
gorgeous masterpiece produced by the most experienced team in Australia. This final
evolution incorporates the aerodynamic advantages of the bumps, a sleeker and improved forward aerofoil, rounded nose, improved blending on the canister surrounds
and a NACA canister. Its balance was also perfected with the inclusion of ballast points
and suspension. This is the ultimate evidence of the dedication and effort of our team.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Drag Cd: 0.373


Deceleration: 5.186
Fastest Time: 1.048
Ave Time: 1.062

Drag Cd: 0.330


Deceleration: 5.162
Fastest Time: 1.040
Ave Time: 1.051

Drag Cd: 0.318


Deceleration:4.989
Fastest Time:1.003
Ave Time: 1.010

Evaluation
Overall the car development process has been a great success. The car aerodynamics have improved significantly which results in a faster car and therefore more points at competition.
We have managed to improve our average car speed from 1.062 to 1.010 and with the addition of correct weight and balance calculations and a working suspension system, consistency has also drastically improved.
Overall the car is a combination of hard work between the teams engineers and collaboration partners.

Page 16

Creating the standard of excellence.

Throughout our journey to the World Finals we have considered the manufacturing stage as one of the most important
components of the project. We pride ourselves on having the best looking car and the most accurate car at the event; which
is why we take the manufacturing process so seriously. Many processes and specification checks have been administered
throughout the entire process to ensure the highest final quality and accuracy of our car.

Manufacturing
Vacuum Metallization:
Vacuum Metallization is a process in which a fine layer of
metal is applied to the exterior of an object. The vacuum
metallization process is as follows:
1) The first stage in the process is the use of a clear base
coat to ensure a smooth and uniform surface in which the
metallization can occur.

Manufacturing Process:
Machining the cars using a Denford 4th Axis CNC Machine was the primary stage in the manufacture of our cars.
The second stage in the manufacturing process was the most crucial aspect in ensuring the overall accuracy and finish of the
cars; this process consists of continual sanding at different grades. The first grade consisted of a rougher, 400 grit sandpaper to remove excess balsa that the machining left over. This stage was followed by an 800 grit sandpaper for finer, more
detailed sanding.

The front nose cone and the rear aerofoil were then attached using a high strength mixture of clear super glue and araldite.
Undercoating and surface control was the next stage in this crucial process. Septone acrylic primer surfacer was the main
undercoat that was used; however liquid putty was used beforehand during the sanding stages to ensure a smooth surface
with minimal imperfections.
The undercoat was then sanded back using a 1200 grit sandpaper followed by an 1800 grit sandpaper which refined the
surface and left the finish of the cars perfect for vacuum metallizing.
The cars were then wiped back using a damp cloth before being vacuum metallized and dyed gold at Hyqual Australia.

2) The next stage, which happens to also be the most important stage, is that of the evaporation of the aluminium rods
in the vacuum chamber. This vapour then condenses onto
the surface of the cars, leaving a thin layer of metal coating.
3) A top coat is then applied to create an abrasion resistant
surface.
We have not only utilized the vacuum metallization process, but we have enhanced our surface by dying our cars
gold. The dye coating process is achieved in a vat of gold
dye once the vacuum metallization process is complete. The
process of aluminium vacuum metallization is environmentally friendly and certain materials can be recycled. We have
decided to use aluminium as the evaporation base as it is an
element that has a high conductivity rate (second only to silver and copper). Silver was not chosen as it is too expensive
to source and use and copper was not chosen as a gold shine
cannot be accomplished utilising copper.

Decals were applied according to the car livery and coated using a clear acrylic sealer.
The next stage consisted of the assembly of the car. The wheels were attached and the suspension systems were implanted,
all along with the stub axles of the car.
Using our set of scrutineering gauges the car was then checked according to the specifications to ensure overall accuracy
within the competition rules.
4th Axis Machining:
For the machining of our car we have decided to use a fourth axis CNC machine to reduce cutting time and to experiment
with different types of CNC machines. We had never used a fourth axis CNC machine before so it was exciting for the
whole team to observe the machine and also work with it. Unlike the usual CNC machine, that we had previously utilized, it
had many more features and distinct capabilities.
A1 Racing has utilized the 4th axis contour feature to allow the cars to be machined continuously rather than with an index.
The primary advantage in continuous machining being the precision and advance machining of the more complex parts our
car design.
Further advantages of using this technique come when profiling with a ball nose cutter. The ball nose cutter becomes very
weak when it gets closer to the tip; as the flutes are spinning at a slower velocity. The fourth axis CNC machine has the
ability to then use the Sturz Milling technique of angular milling. We experimented with this technique with high hopes;
however found that the overall process wasn't as fast and decided against utilising it.

Page 17

Creating the standard of excellence.

Components

Rear Suspension Unit


The rear suspension unit incorporates a softer tensile spring than
the forward units to allow easier
movement of the rear wheels.

Rear Aerofoil:
The rear aerofoil has been deigned to be
detachable for easier replacement, as
well as including an endplate design. The
rear aerofoil has been designed to have
a 2 degree angle to create more down
force to increase equilibrium.

Side Pod Design:


This side pod design reconnects
the air to the car after the exclusion zone as soon as possible
without creating the problem of
a large, aerodynamic block. Allowing the air to travel in either
direction is achieved due to the
ramps on both top and bottom of
the side pod.

Front Suspension Unit:


Ballast container has been filled with a
specific amount of weight to further balance the car and increase stability.
Forward spring has been designed at a
higher tensile strength. This is to allow the
forward wheel systems to absorb more
moment force from the thrust.

The increased radius and aerodynamic bumps reduce the severity


and reconnect the top chine vortices created off the cars leading
edge of the cars body.

Suspension housing: This container holds


in place the springs inside the wheel. This
is the main piece of the independent suspension.
Axle setup: Allowed to slide vertically inside the suspension housing, the axle and
therefore wheel and bearing are forced
upwards into the spring to cushion the
forces.
The screw at the bottom holds the lid of
the suspension in place; maintains the axle
and setup remains attached to the car.

Front Aerofoil:
Manufactured from SLS Nylon,
this design stops vortex from
forming off the side by preventing the air from ever joining

Tether Guide:
Rigid PTFE coated medical wire
tether guide holds the car to the
track and creates minimalistic
friction.

External Hubcap :
Ensures the wheel will not come off the
end of the axle and stops air from being
caught inside.
Acetal Manufactured Wheel:
Acetal manufactured wheel has
a high abrasion and heat resistance, therefore reducing as much
drag as possible on the smooth
surface.

Page 18

Creating the standard of excellence.

Technical Drawings

In order to further assist the judges in scrutineering our World Finals design we constructed a 20 page Technical Drawings Booklet that illustrates in detail every component of the car. The booklet uses geometric dimensions and tolerances

209

T8.2 DISTANCE BETWEEN


OPPOSING WHEELS (MIN:30)

40

ISOMETRIC VIEW
SCALE: 1:2

15

3
T4.6 BODY THICKNESS

40

15

15

19.5

TOP VIEW

FRONT VIEW

68

3.25

T4.5 EXCLUSION ZONES

T3.4 OVERALL WIDTH (MAX:85)

60

ISOMETRIC VIEW
SCALE: 1:2

60

RIGHT VIEW

KEY:

T3.6 TRACK CLEARANCE (MIN:2)

T4.3 VIRTUAL CARGO

31.5

52

and

BODY (AONE3.3.CA.BD)

T3.3 OVERALL LENGTH (MIN:170/MAX:210)

TOP VIEW

includes pages specifically designed to show rules compliance.

FRONT VIEW

RIGHT VIEW

FRONT WING
REAR WING

ALL MEASUREMENTS ARE IN (mm) UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

ALL MEASUREMENTS ARE IN (mm) UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

A1 RACING

1:1

22

DRAWING NUMBER

WEIGHT (g)

SCALE

BOTTOM VIEW

1/4

CA

24/10/2013

A3
SHEET

51.7

DRAWING NUMBER

WEIGHT (g)

1:1

BOTTOM VIEW
H

BEN MARSHALL

SIZE

A1 RACING

A3
SCALE

RULES COMPLIANCE DRAWING

CHECKED BY:
DATE:

170

DRAWING TITLE

CA - BD

SHEET

2/4

RULES COMPLIANCE DRAWING

BEN MARSHALL
24/10/2013

SIZE

T7.4 GUIDE SEPARATION (MIN:120/MAX:190)

DYLAN SEXTON
23/10/2013

DATE:

CHECKED BY:
DATE:

DESIGNED BY:

DRAWING TITLE

DYLAN SEXTON
23/10/2013

DATE:

DESIGNED BY:

FRONT WING (AONE3.3.FW)

16

WHEEL RIM (AONE3.3.WA.WR)

TOP VIEW

15.5

T8.4 WIDTH (MIN:15/MAX:19)

T8.3 DIAMETER (MIN:26/MAX:34)

26

T10.12 FRONT AND REAR WING THICKNESS (MIN:1.5/MAX:6)


T10.9 FRONT AND REAR WING SPAN (MIN:40)

T10.3 CLEAR AIR SPACE (MIN:3)

1.75

41

SIDE VIEW

SECTION VIEW A-A

FRONT VIEW

SIDE VIEW

FRONT VIEW

REAR WING (AONE3.3.RW)

TETHER GUIDE (AONE3.3.TGF)

T7.2 DIAMETER (MIN:3/MAX:5)

T10.11 FRONT AND REAR WING CHORD (MIN:15/MAX:25)

16

1.8

TOP VIEW

DATE:

5.38

.5

SIDE VIEW

FRONT VIEW

20.4

DYLAN SEXTON
23/10/2013

CHECKED BY:

BEN MARSHALL

DATE:

DATE:

RULES COMPLIANCE DRAWING

4.5

23/10/2013

CHECKED BY:

BEN MARSHALL

1
DRAWING NUMBER

AONE - CA.FW - CA.RW


B

DRAWING TITLE

RULES COMPLIANCE DRAWING

24/10/2013

SIZE

A1 RACING
WEIGHT (g)

DYLAN SEXTON

DATE:

24/10/2013

A3
2:1

DESIGNED BY:

DRAWING TITLE

SIZE

SCALE

ALL MEASUREMENTS ARE IN (mm) UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

ALL MEASUREMENTS ARE IN (mm) UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED


DESIGNED BY:

R1

1.65

FRONT VIEW

A1 RACING

A3
SHEET

SCALE

2:1

3/4
A

WEIGHT (g)

DRAWING NUMBER

AONE - WA.WR - TGF


B

SHEET

4/4
A

Page 19

Creating the standard of excellence.

Evaluations

Team Manager
Being the Team Manager is time consuming, overwhelming and a difficult task. Beau was able to pick up the role and excel
as a Team Manager. At first it was found to be hard to control a group of teenagers in different states, but by introducing
the team to Google Plus and therefore Google Hangout the team then started to meet and improve relations. These weekly
meetings were controlled by the agenda topics set by the Team Manager and made minutes become easier to be take and
more effective meetings could be conducted. Timing was critical in this aspect as well. With a lot to do and discuss it was
vital that the Team Manager made sure that important topics were given enough time to be discussed and the team didn't
get stuck waffling on the same agenda item for an hour. This impressively improved and the Team Manager found as time
went on that the more meetings we had the better results that followed. Evaluating Beaus role as the Team Manager was
easy as he was able to tick all the boxes and put the time and effort in to help improve the performance for the World Championship event. It will be Beaus first World Championship and he hopes his new found leadership skills will help move A1 to
our ultimate goal of being World Champions.

Collaboration Coordinator
The Management Booklet is a strategy that A1 Racing adopted and have been using for this competition. It is a booklet filled
with the resources and strategies we used to organise our journey to the World Championship. In the Management Booklet
we used programs such as YNAB for our budget and Microsoft Project for the Gantt Chart. This has helped the team reach
one of our main goals of being more organised for this competition. Collaboration Coordinator, Sam, also collaborated with
the Phoenix College Business Manager, Lorraine Hayes, to get a professional touch on our work and to learn about the organisation of running a business. He learnt a lot and now the team is able to take these skills into everyday work. As well as
creating the booklet, A1 Racing had to make sure the team could stay in contact as the lead up of to the competition went
through the school holiday periods and the fact that they were based in different ends of the country. To do this we used
social media utilities such as:

Facebook, for day-to day conversation

Google Drive, for sending files

Google Hangout, to meet and explain things visually
These were utilised to the fullest and we believe that they were the best way to stay in contact. Overall Sam has been tremendous in the organisation of the collaboration and his previous experience has helped with the overall process and orManufacturing Engineer
ganisation of the team. This will be Sams third and last season and his second World Finals trip and he hopes the leadership
Manufacturing Engineer Jacquis preparation for the World Championship has been very successful. The processes of 4th skills he has gained from previous experiences will help him to play a mentoring role within the team.
axis machining of the car design and all other aspects were of the highest possible quality. After many trial and error runs
Jacqui finally found the solution to be able to create a good looking car that was also properly manufactured to help improve
on the track. If it wasn't for Jacqui's persistence and never give up attitude the team wouldn't have a well produced car
but hopefully also a fast car on the day to help obtain enough points to keep us in the running. Jacquis final production of Chief Design Engineer
From a design point of view the preparations for the World Championship have been a huge success. Not only have we
the car will unquestionably stand out of the pack at her first World Championship.
managed to develop an aerodynamic design using various collaboration and analysis techniques, we have also managed
to ensure that all new designs could be evaluated in Catia and from the CFD analysis. The design of the car was regularly
developed and tested to ensure that improvements could be made. A new technique that Chief Design Engineer Dylan got
to experiment with was physically wind tunnelling. By actually seeing air being spurred over the car Dylan could see where
Marketing Manager
During the course of the season A1 Racings Marketing Manager, Luke, created a sponsorship proposal. Which enabled us adjustments could be made and then could link back to see if it was affecting the car on track testing that the Development
to go out and meet potential sponsors face to face. There we could easily talk about terms of a sponsorship arrangement Engineer was conducting. All these designs processes we helped by Dylans experience and he was the perfect member to
as well as enabling the company to get to know us as a team. After a month of trialling Luke found it was hard to approach be the head of engineering. Dylan has also played the role of a mentor teaching his craft to Ben and further developing the
smaller businesses with the arrangements we needed to have set. Luke then created a smaller proposal targeted at local teams knowledge and skill set. Dylan has perfected this role during his three seasons and his one World Championship trip.
businesses thus creating a Corporate Partnership Proposal and a Local Business Partnership Proposal. It is evident that Luke
has been successful using his marketing strategies to raise enough funds for A1 Racing to compete at the World Championship. This will be Lukes first World Championship and he hopes that the insight he has been given from various collaboration
meetings gives the team an advantage when presenting ourselves to a board of judges and all the other competing world
class teams.

Development Engineer
Through the course of the World Championship journey we believe the innovation and research aspects of the car have had a
brilliant outcome. With a high focus on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) it was important that our Development Engineer
worked closely with our research collaborators this season to find some valuable sources of information. With this knowledge and innovation applied to the final design of our car, we are extremely proud of the final outcome. With a lot of testing
conducted and many hours of research Ben has definitely put a lot of time and effort in endeavouring to help improve various finer aspects of the car. Like the majority of the team this will be Bens first World Championship and he is really excited
to put his amazing innovations up against the other world qualifying teams.

Page 20