Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 76

TELANGANA PROFILE

Capital
City

: Hyderabad

Area

: 114,840
Sq. Kms.

Districts : 10
Househ
olds

: 83.58
Lakhs

Populati : 351.94
on
Lakhs

Telangana is the 29th state of India, formed on the 2nd of June 2014. The state has an area of
1,14,840 Sq Km and has a population of 3,52,86,757. The Telangana region was part of the
Hyderabad state from Sept 17th 1948 to Nov 1st 1956, until it was merged with Andhra state to
form the Andhra Pradesh state.
After decades of movement for a separate State, Telangana was created by passing the AP
State Reorganization Act in both houses of Parliament. Telangana is surrounded by
Maharashtra and Chhattisgarh in the North, Karnataka in the West and Andhra Pradesh in the
South and East directions. Major cities of the state include Hyderabad, Warangal, Nizamabad
and Karimnagar.

Telangana Statistics
Items

Quantity

Capital City

Hyderabad

Area

114,840 Sq. Kms.

Districts

10

Revenue Divisions

42

Towns (as per Census, 2011)

158

Municipal Corporations

Municipalities

38

Nagara Panchayaths

25

Zilla Praja Parishads

Mandal Praja Parishads

443

Gram Panchayaths

8778

Revenue Mandals

464

Revenue Villages

10,761

Inhabited Villages

10,128

Un-inhabited Villages

633

Households

83.58 Lakhs

Household size

Population

351.94 Lakhs

Male

177.04 Lakhs

Female

174.90 Lakhs

Sex Ratio (Female per 1000 Males)

988 Ratio

Density of Population

307 per Sq. Km

Decadal Growth Rate (2001-2011)

13.58 Rate

Rural Population

215.85 Lakhs

Rural Population Male

107.97 Lakhs

Items

Quantity

Rural Population Female

107.88 Lakhs

Rural Population Sex Ratio (Female per 1000 Males)

999 Ratio

Rural to Total Population

61.33 %

Urban Population

136.09 Lakhs

Urban Population Male

69.07 Lakhs

Urban Population Female

67.02 Lakhs

Urban Population Sex Ratio (Female per 1000 Males)

970 Ratio

Urban to Total Population

38.64 %

SC Population

54.33 Lakhs

SC Population Male

27.05 Lakhs

SC Population Female

27.28 Lakhs

ST Population

32.87 Lakhs

ST Population Male

16.60 Lakhs

ST Population Female

16.27

Child Population (0-6 years)

39.20 Lakhs

Child Population (0-6 years) Male

20.28 Lakhs

Child Population (0-6 years) Female

18.92 Lakhs

Child to Total Population

11.14 %

Child Sex Ratio (Female per 1000 Males)

933 Ratio

Literates

207.84 Lakhs

Literates Male

117.49 Lakhs

Literates Female

90.35 Lakhs

Literacy Rate

66.46 %

Literacy Rate Male

74.95 %

Literacy Rate Female

57.92 %

Total Workers

164.53 Lakhs

Items

Quantity

Main Workers

138.06 Lakhs

Marginal Workers

26.47 Lakhs

Members of Parliament (MPs)

17

Members of Legislative Assembly (MLAs)

119

Zilla Parishad Territorial Constituency Members (ZPTCs)

443

Mandal Parishad Territorial Constituency Members (MPTCs)

6497

TELANGANA HISTORY:
Telangana, as a geographical and political entity was born on June 2, 2014 as the 29th and the
youngest state in Union of India. However, as an economic, social, cultural and historical entity
it has a glorious history of at least two thousand five hundred years or more. Megalithic stone
structures like cairns, cists, dolmens and menhirs found in several districts of Telangana show
that there were human habitations in this part of the country thousands of years ago.
Remnants of iron ore smelting found at many places demonstrate the hoary roots of
artisanship and tool making in Telangana for at least two thousand years. The reference to
Asmaka Janapada, part of present Telangana, as one of the 16 Janapadas in ancient India
proves that there existed an advanced stage of society.
One of the first five disciples of the Buddha, Kondanna is a typical name from Telangana and
though there is no exact information about his native place, the earliest known Buddhist
township of Kondapur in Medak district is believed to be after him. The Buddha himself
famously acknowledged that it was Kondanna who understood him properly. The Buddhist
sources say that Bavari, a Brahmin from Badanakurti in Karimnagar sent his disciples to all the
way to north India to learn Buddhism and spread the message in this region. Megasthenes,
who visited India in the 4th century BCE, wrote that there were 30 fortified towns of Andhras
and a majority of them were in Telangana. In the historical age, Telangana had given rise to
mighty empires and kingdoms like the Satavahanas, Vakatakas, Ikshvakus, Vishnukundins,
Chalukyas, Kakatiyas, Qutb Shahis and Asif Jahis.
The emergence and flourishing of these powerful political formations is in itself a proof of
existence of a sturdy economic, social and cultural structure. Thus Telangana has been a
vibrant social entity by the time of the Buddha and continued to be so for the next two and a
half millennia. Endowed with such rich cultural heritage, despite the attempts by historians and
scholars from Andhra region to obfuscate and erase its history, Telangana always retained and
fought for its self respect and self rule. Due to the official efforts to ignore, erase, belittle and
look down Telangana history and turn it into an appendage or a footnote, particularly during
1956-2014, much of Telangana history is either not properly researched or not recorded even if
it was studied. Telangana rose again and secured its political identity now and is in the process

of resurrecting its own glorious past. Here is an attempt to reconstruct the history of Telangana,
the wonderful musical instrument with a thousand strings.

Pre-history (Up to 1000 BCE)


Even though extensive exploration has not been done, particularly subjected to neglect after
1956, the archaeological department under the Nizams government had done tremendous
work in discovering the traces of pre-historical human habitations in Telangana. These studies
found that human habitations in parts of Telangana can be seen from the Paleolithic age
consistently. Either the same locations or extended locations showed people continued to live
and develop through the later stages of Mesolithic, Neolithic and Metal ages. Excavations
discovered stone tools, microliths, cists, dolmens, cairns and menhirs. All the ten districts of
Telangana showed these traces even when a proper, scientific and official research and
excavations have not been done and thanks to the efforts of either the first generation
researchers before 1950s or individual amateur explorations.

Pre-Satavahanas (1000 BCE 300 BCE)


In the historical age beginning from 1000 BCE there are some references of Telangana as a
geographical entity as well as Telugu as a linguistic entity, in the contemporary Buddhist and
mythological texts. However, it needs a detailed research to discover finer aspects and establish
the stage of development of pre-Satavahana society. Thought the official research into this
aspect was stalled for about six decades, some enthusiasts like Thakur Rajaram Singh, B N
Sastry and Dr D Raja Reddy did their own painstaking explorations and showed that there was a
flourishing society before the emergence of the Satavahanas. Particularly Dr Raja Reddy proved
with numismatic evidence that there were rulers before the Satavahanas with Kotalingala as
capital and issued their own coins. In these excavations the coins of Gobada, Naarana,
Kamvaaya and Samagopa were discovered and at least two other rulers names came to light.
Thus Telangana happens to be the first region in the subcontinent to have issued punchmarked coins with even insignia. The Buddhist texts as well as accounts of foreigners like
Magesthenes and Arrian talked about this region as having thirty forts, many of which have to
be explored.

Satavahanas (250 BCE 200 CE)


After the fall of the Mauryan Empire, around the third century BC there arose the first
significant kingdom under the Satavahanas from this region. The earliest capital of the
Satavahanas was Kotalingala and then moved to the other popular capitals like Paithan and
Amaravati (Dharanikota) only after two centuries of their rule. However, the first capital was
either ignored or brushed aside to give prominence to the later place in coastal Andhra. The
coins issued by the Satavahana kings Simuka (BC 231-208), Siri Satavahana, Satakani I, Satasiri,
Satakani II, Vasittiputta Pulumayi, Vasittiputta Satakani and their governors were discovered in
Kotalingala. Numismatic and epigraphic evidence showed that the Satavahanas ruled a larger
area of the peninsula, with oceans as borders on three sides. Literature like Gathasaptashati,
painting like Ajanta flourished during the Satavahana rule.

Post-Satavahana (200 CE 950 CE)


After the fall of Satavahanas in the third century AD, Telugu-speaking areas were divided under
various small rulers and till the emergence of the Kakatiyas, for about six or seven centuries
this fragmentation continued. Even as the mainstream Andhra historians maintained that it was
a dark period in Telangana history without any political formation, the current research found
that Telangana was ruled by various kingdoms like the Ikshvakus, Vakatakas, Vishnukundins,
Badami Chalukyas, Rashtrakutas, Vemulavada Chalukyas, Kalyani Chalukyas, Mudigonda
Chalukyas, Kanduri Chodas and Polvasa dynasty. A detailed research into this period is yet to
take place.

Kakatiyas (950 CE 1323 CE)


The sub-feudatories of the Rashtrakutas emerged themselves as independent kings and
founded the Kakatiya dynasty around 950 AD and this kingdom became strong and united
whole of Telugu-speaking lands and lasted for more than three centuries and a half. The
kingdom saw powerful kings like Ganapatideva, Rudradeva and Prataparudra as well as the first
ever woman ruler in the subcontinent Rudramadevi. The Kakatiyas ruled from Hanumakonda in
the beginning and shifted their capital to Warangal later.
The Kakatiyas are known for their irrigation public works, sculpture and fire arts. Thanks to the
well-planned irrigation facilities and a perfect system of chain tanks to suit the undulating
nature of the terrain, the Kakatiya kingdom flourished economically leading to cultural progress
also. Envy of this affluence, several neighbouring kingdoms as well as Delhi Sultanate tried to
wage war on Warangal many times and failed. Finally in 1323, Delhi army could lay seize on
Warangal fort and capture Prataparudra, who, according to the legend, killed himself on the
banks of the Narmada unwilling to surrender when he was being taken as prisoner of war to
Delhi.

Post-Kakatiya Interregnum (1323 1496)


After Prataparudra was defeated by Malik Kafur in 1323, the Kakatiya kingdom was again
fragmented with local governors declaring independence and for about 150 years Telangana
was again under different rulers like Musunuri Nayakas, Padmanayakas, Kalinga Gangas,
Gajapatis, and Bahmanis.

Qutbshahis (1496 - 1687)


Sultan Quli Qutb Shah, subedar for Telangana under the Bahamanis, with Golconda as his
capital, declared his independence in 1496 and seven sultans of this dynasty ruled not only
Telangana but the entire Telugu-speaking land including parts of present day Maharashtra and
Karnataka. The Moghul empire waged war and defeated Golconda in 1687 and for about three
decades Telangana was again witnessed chaos and fragmented rulers.

Asaf Jahis (1724-1948)

In 1712, Emperor Farrukhsiyar appointed Qamar-ud-din Khan as the viceroy of Deccan and
gave him the title Nizam-ul-Mulk . He was later recalled to Delhi, with Mubariz Khan appointed
as the viceroy. In 1724, Qamar-ud-din Khan defeated Mubariz Khan and reclaimed the Deccan
suba. It was established as an autonomous province of the Mughal empire. He took the name
Asif Jah, starting what came to be known as the Asif Jahi dynasty. He named the area
Hyderabad Deccan. Subsequent rulers retained the title Nizam ul-Mulk and were called Asaf
Jahi Nizams or Nizams of Hyderabad. The Medak and Warangal divisions of Telangana were
part of their realm.
When Asaf Jah I died in 1748, there was political unrest due to contention for the throne among
his sons, who were aided by opportunistic neighbouring states and colonial foreign forces. In
1769, Hyderabad city became the formal capital of the Nizams.
Nasir-ud-dawlah, Asaf Jah IV signed the Subsidiary Alliance with the British in 1799 and lost its
control over the state's defense and foreign affairs. Hyderabad State became a princely state
among the presidencies and provinces of British India.
A total of seven Nizam's ruled Hyderabad. (there was a period of 13 years after the rule of Asaf
Jah I, when three of his sons (Nasir Jung, Muzaffar Jung and Salabath Jung) ruled. They were not
officially recognised as the rulers:

Nizam-ul-Mulk, Asaf Jah I (Mir Qamar-ud-din Khan)

Nasir Jung (Mir Ahmed Ali Khan)

Muzaffar Jung (Mir Hidayat Muhi-ud-din Sa'adullah Khan)

Salabat Jung (Mir Sa'id Muhammad Khan)

Nizam-ul-Mulk, Asaf Jah II (Mir Nizam Ali Khan)

Sikander Jah, Asaf Jah III (Mir Akbar Ali Khan)

Nasir-ud-Daula, Asaf Jah IV (Mir Farqunda Ali Khan)

Afzal-ud-Daula, Asaf Jah V (Mir Tahniyath Ali Khan)

Asaf Jah VI (Mir Mahbub Ali Khan)

Asaf Jah VII (Mir Osman Ali Khan)

Post-independence
When India became independent from the British Empire in 1947, Hyderabad remained an
independent princely state for a period of 13 months.

The peasants of Telangana waged an armed struggle to liberate the region. Scores of people
lost their lives in the armed struggle. The private militia named Razakars, under the leadership
of Qasim Razwi unleashed terror in the state by resorting to looting and murder.
On 17 September 1948, the Indian government conducted a military operation called Operation
Polo to bring Hyderabad state into the Indian Union. It appointed a civil servant, M. K. Vellodi, as
first chief minister of Hyderabad State on 26 January 1950.
In 1952, Dr. Burgula Ramakrishna Rao was elected chief minister of the Hyderabad State in its
first democratic election. During this time, there was an agitation by locals in the state to ensure
proper representation was given to locals ( mulkis ) of Hyderabad.

First Telangana Movement


In early 1950s, people of Telangana region in Hyderabad state, started organizing themselves
with a demand for separate state. In 1953 the Indian government appointed the States
Reorganization Commission (SRC) to look into various statehood demands in the country. The
Commission was headed by Fazal Ali, Kavalam Madhava Panikkar and H.N. Kunzru
The SRC toured the whole country to seek representations from various sections of the society.
People of Telangana region submitted several memorandums to the SRC and expressed their
wish to constitute Telangana as a separate state. Telangana intellectuals such as late Prof
Jayashankar and political leaders such as Sri HC Heda, Sri Konda Venkat Ranga Reddy gave
memorandums containing historic, political, economic, social and cultural justifications for
creating the Telangana state. The Commission submitted its report on 30 September 1955, and
recommended formation of Telangana state.
During the period between 1955 September and 1956 November, the people of Telangana
launched a series of protests demanding statehood by implementing the SRC
recommendations. But intense lobbying by leaders from Andhra state in New Delhi resulted in
the merger of Telangana region in Andhra state to form the Andhra Pradesh state.
Telangana leaders insisted on a Gentlemens Agreement before the merger could take place.
The agreement was signed by Andhra and Telangana leaders and provided safeguards with the
purpose of preventing discrimination against Telangana by the Andhra leaders.However, the
agreement was violated from day one by the Andhra leaders.

1969 Telangana Agitation


Non-implementation of Gentlemens Agreement and continued discrimination to Telangana
region in government jobs, education and public spending resulted in the 1969 statehood
agitation.
In January 1969, students intensified the protests for a separate state. On 19 January, all party
accord was reached to ensure the proper implementation of Telangana safeguards. Accord's
main points were 1) All non-Telangana employees holding posts reserved for Telangana locals
will be transferred immediately. 2) Telangana surpluses will be used for Telangana
development. 3) Appeal to Telangana students to call off agitation.

But the protests further intensified, as more and more students and employees joined the
statehood movement. Police firing on protesters led to the death of about 369 youngsters
during this phase of the agitation. Then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi called for a high-level
meeting to discuss the statehood issue. After several days of talks with leaders of both regions,
on 12 April 1969, the Prime Minister developed an Eight Point Plan. Sri M. Chenna Reddy,
founded the Telangana Praja Samithi (TPS) political party in 1969 to spearhead the statehood
movement.
Mrs. Indira Gandhi had called snap parliamentary elections in March 1971. In these
parliamentary elections, Telangana Praja Samithi won 10 out the 14 Parliament seats in
Telangana. However, Indira Gandhis Congress (R) Party scored a landslide victory on a platform
of progressive policies such as poverty elimination (Garibi Hatao). She was reluctant to accept
the Telangana statehood demand at that juncture. Sri M Chenna Reddy then merged TPS in
Congress (R) party, after formulating a Six-Point Formula to safeguard Telanganas interests.
The statehood movement continued until 1973, but subsided later.

Final Telangana Movement


Since mid 1990s, the people of Telangana started organizing themselves under various
organizations with a demand for separate state of Telangana.
In 1997, the state unit of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) passed a resolution seeking a separate
Telangana. Though the party created the states of Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, and Uttarakhand in
2000, it did not create a separate Telangana state citing resistance of its coalition partner,
Telugu Desam Party.
Sri Kalvakuntla Chandrashekar Rao (KCR), who was then the Deputy Speaker of AP State
assembly, had started background work on Telangana issue in early 2000. And after detailed
discussions and deliberations with a plethora of Telangana intellectuals, KCR announced the
launch of Telangana Rashtra Samithi on May 17th 2001.
KCR had resigned to the post of Deputy Speaker and MLA before launching the Telangana
Rashtra Samithi party. Prof Jayashankar, the ideologue of statehood movement extended his
support to KCR.
In 2004, TRS entered into a poll alliance with Congress party. The party won 26 MLAs and 5 MPs
and entered into both the AP state and Indian government. Telangana issue found a place in
UPA-1 Common Minimum Program. Statehood issue was also mentioned by President Abdul
Kalam and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in their speeches.
TRS president KCR, was initially allotted the Shipping portfolio. But another UPA ally DMK
demanded Shipping portfolio and threatened to walk out of the coalition, if its demand was not
met, KCR voluntarily relinquished the Shipping portfolio to save the fledgling UPA-1
government. KCR remained as a Union Minister without portfolio, before being given the L
abour and Employment portfolio. As the UPA government continued to dilly-dally on the
decades old demand for Telangana state, KCR resigned to his ministry in 2006.

When a Congress leader made a belittling statement on the statehood movement in September
2006, KCR resigned to the Karimnagar Lok Sabha seat and won it with a thumping majority. The
massive majority achieved by KCR in that election proved the strong statehood aspirations in
the region.
In April 2008, TRS party MLAs resigned also walked out of the state government in protest
against the delay in Telangana formation. But, TRS could retain only 7 MLA and 2 Lok Sabha
seats in this by-election.
In 2009 elections, TRS allied with TDP, CPI and CPM parties. The grand alliance did not yield the
desired result, as the Pro-Telangana vote got split between TRS, Congress, PRP and BJP. In the
end, TRS could win only 10 MLA seats and 2 MP seats.

Intensifying the movement


On Nov 29th, 2009 , KCR had announced an indefinite hunger strike demanding statehood to
Telangana. But en route, the state police had arrested him and sent to Khammam sub-jail. The
movement spread like wildfire with students, employees, peoples organizations plunging into
it. In the next 10 days, the whole of Telangana region came to a standstill.
The state government, headed by Sri K Rosaiah had called for an all-party meeting on 7th
December. Leaders of TDP and PRP parties promised that they would support a Telangana
statehood resolution if it was tabled in the state Assembly. As KCRs health was deteriorating
very fast, on Dec 9th 2009, the UPA government announced that the process of statehood for
Telangana would be initiated.
But within 2 weeks, resistance from Seemandhra leadership resulted in UPA backtracking on
this issue. KCR then brought all political forces in Telangana region together to form the
Telangana JAC an umbrella body of several organizations and parties, with Prof Kodandaram
as its Chairman. TRS cadre and leaders actively participated in several agitations and protests
launched by TJAC.

State Formation
After 4 years of peaceful and impactful protests, the UPA government started the statehood
process in July 2013 and concluded the process by passing the statehood bill in both houses of
Parliament in Feb 2014.
In the General Elections held in April 2014, Telangana Rashtra Samithi emerged victorious by
winning 63 of the 119 seats and formed the government. Sri K Chandrashekar Rao was sworn
in as the First Chief Minister of Telangana. The Telangana state was inaugurated formally on
June 2nd 2014.

Culture
'South of North and North of South, Telangana State has long been a meeting place for diverse
languages and cultures. It is easily the best example for Indias composite culture, pluralism and

inclusiveness. Located on the uplands of Deccan plateau, Telangana is the link between the
North and South of India. It is thus no surprise that the region on the whole came to be known
for its Ganga-Jamuna Tehzeeb and the capital Hyderabad as a miniature India!.

Geography, Polity and Economy of the region determined the culture of Telangana.
Satavahanas, the earliest known rulers of the region sowed the seeds of independent and selfsufficient village economy, the relics of which can be felt even today. In the medieval times, the
Kakatiya dynasty's rule, between the 11th and 14th centuries with Warangal as their capital, and
subsequently the Qutub Shahis and Asafjahis, who ruled the Hyderabad state defined the
culture of the region.

Art forms
Some classical art forms received the royal patronage and attained finesse. However, the art
forms of the innumerable communities spread across the length and breadth of the State give
Telangana its distinct identity.

While the Kakatiya rule led to evolution of dance forms such as Perini Sivatandavam, also
known as dance of warriors, the commoners, faced with the challenges of daily life developed
traditions of story-telling coupled with solutions to tide over them through Golla Suddulu, Oggu
Kathalu
and
Gotralu
etc.
Several art forms like above mingled and new forms emerged. The ubiquitous Dhoom Dham is
one such evolved and composite art form. They generally were about the struggle and
exploitation. People adopted the old sensibilities of theatre and art changing the content as per
the
case
and
place.
A variant of Yakshagana, Chindu Bhagavatham is performed widely across Telangana. It is a
theater art form that combines dance, music, dialogue, costume, make-up, and stage
techniques with a unique style and form. The word Chindu in Telugu means jump. As their
presentation is interspersed with leaps and jumps, it gained the name of Chindu Bhagavatam.
Most of the stories narrated are from Bhagavatam.
Qawali, Ghazals and Mushairas evolved under the patronage of Qutub Shahi and the Asafjahi
rulers in and around the capital city of Hyderabad.

Festivals

The Hindu festivals like Ugadi, Srirama Navami, Bonalu, Vinayaka Chaturthi, Dasara, Deepavali,
Sankranti, Holi, Mahashivaratri are celebrated with pomp, gaiety and devotion. Dasara is the
main
festival
with
the
epithet
pedda
panduga.
Bathukamma, a part of Dasara festivities, is unique to Telangana. This colourful festival has
historic, ecological, societal and religious significance. Women clad in glittering costumes and
jewellery carry beautifully stacked Bathukammas with flowers like Tangedu, Gunugu, Chamanti
and
others
to
the
village
or
streets
meeting
point.
Making circles around the assembled Bathukammas, womenfolk recite songs in a group. The
songs have their roots in Puranas, History and even in the recent political and social
developments of the particular region. The fete culminates in Saddula Bathukamma where the

villagers

immerse

the

flower

stacks

in

the

nearby

tanks

and

lakes.

Bonalu is a Hindu Festival, celebrated during the Telugu month of Ashadam (translates to June/
July of Gregorian calendar) wherein Goddess Mahakali is worshiped. The festival is also
considered a thanksgiving to the Goddess for fulfilling the desires of devotees.
As part of the festival, Bojanam or Meal is offered to the presiding Mother Goddess. Women
prepare rice cooked with Milk, Jaggery in a Brass or Earthen Pot adorned with Neem Leaves,
Turmeric, Vermilion putting a Lighted Diya on top of the Ghatam.
An important part of the festival is Rangam (prophecy). Women standing atop of an earthen pot
invokes goddess Mahankali onto her and turns an Oracle.
Next is Ghattam. A copper pot is decorated in the form of Mother Goddess. The Ghattam is
carried by a priest and is taken in procession accompanied by Pothurajus and musical
instruments like trumpets and drums for the immersion. Pothurajus are considered the brother
of Mother Goddess and are represented by well-built, bare-bodied men, wearing a small tightly
draped red dhoti and bells on ankles with turmeric on bodies and vermilion on the foreheads.
While Ramzan is the main festival of Muslims, Moharram too is celebrated on a large scale in
Telangana. It is known famously as peerla panduga. Pir means Master. Many Hindus take part
in the festival.
Chirstians, mainly in and around Hyderabad celebrate Christmas and Good Friday with great
fervor and religiosity.

Arts and Crafts


Telangana is a great place for arts and crafts with many astounding handicrafts.
Bidri Craft
The unique art of silver engraved on metal. Black, gold and silver coatings are applied on this. It
involves various several stages like casting, engraving, inlaying and oxidizing. The name of this
art form is derived from a town called Bidar (currently part of Karnataka) of the erstwhile
Hyderabad state.

Banjara Needle Crafts


Banjara Needle Crafts are the traditional handmade fabrics made by Banjaras (the tribal
Gypsies) in Telangana. It is a form of embroidery and mirror work on fabrics employing the
needlecraft.
Dokra Metal Crafts
Dhokra or Dokra is also known as bell metal craft and is widely seen in Jainoor Mandal,
Ushegaon and Chittalbori in Adilabad district. The tribal craft produces objects like figurines,
tribal gods, etc. The work consists of folk motifs, peacocks, elephants, horses, measuring bowl,
lamp caskets and other simple art forms and traditional designs.
Nirmal Arts
The renowned Nirmal oil paintings use natural dyes for depicting themes from the epics such
as Ramayana and Mahabharata. Also, the wood paintings and other wooden articles, has great
aesthetic expression. The origin of the Nirmal craft is traced back to the Kakatiya era. The
motifs used for Nirmal craft are floral designs and frescoes from the regions of Ajanta and
Ellora and Mughal miniatures.
Bronze Castings
Telangana is famous world-wide for its amazing Bronze castings. While using solid casting of
icons, the mould is created using several coatings of different clays on a finished wax model.
This process then imparts fine curves to the cast image.

The Telangana government has announced the following four


icons for the new State:

The State Bird - Palapitta (Indian Roller or Blue Jay).

The State Animal - Jinka (Deer).

The State Tree - Jammi Chettu (Prosopis Cineraria).

The State Flower - Tangedu (Tanners Cassia).

These icons reflect the culture and tradition of Telangana state and three of them - Tangedu
flowers, Blue Jay and Jammi Chettu - are associated with the popular festivals of Batukamma

and Dasara. While Tangedu flowers are used in stacking of Batukammas, spotting the Blue Jay
on Dasara is considered a good omen and people worship Jammi Chettu on that day.

Palapitta

Lord Rama spotted the Palapitta before invading Lanka and vanquished Ravana. Palapitta has
been chosen to put Telangana on the path of victory

Jinka

Deer is deeply associated with Indian history and a reference to this graceful animal was there
in the great epic Ramayana. It can survive in the smallest forests also. It reflects the mindset of
the people of Telangana as it is very sensitive and innocent.

Jammi Chettu

Pandavas had vanquished a large army of Kauravas only after performing worshipping the
Jammi Chettu. They had hidden their weapons on a Jammi Chettu when they had been forced
into exile in the forests. Now, Telangana requires the blessings of the Jammi Chettu.

Tangedu Flower

Tangedu flower which is used during the Batukamma festival by women folk is the most
appropriate choice as the state flower.

Best Infrastructure Award

Telangana was chosen for the State with Best Infrastructure Award at the India Today Conclave
on 31 October, 2014. Telangana IT Minister K T Rama Rao received the Award representing the
State.

The Skoch Renaissance Award 2014 in ICT Category

State wins the Skoch Renaissance Award 2014 in ICT category. Ramesh Akula, Director
Communications, Telangana IT Department received it on 21 November, 2014 in New Delhi
from Sri Venkaiah Naidu, Union Minister of Urban Development and Housing.
Adilabad derives its name from the erstwhile ruler of Bijapur, Mohammed Adil Shah. The
district is world famous for its Nirmal toy making & Dhokra casting. The district was situated
between 77 47' and 80 E, of the eastern longitudes and 18.40' and 19.56 N', of northern
latitudes.
The district is bounded on north by Yeotmal and Chanda district of Maharashtra, on the east by
Chanda district, on the south by Karimnagar and Nizamabad districts and on the west by
Nanded district of Maharashtra State.
The district has population of 27,41,239 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 7.79% of the
total population of the State with 10.18% decadal growth.

Historical Background
The district derives its name from Adilabad, its headquarters town which was named after the
ruler of Bijapur, Ali Adil Shah. The district was for long not a homogeneous unit and its
component parts were ruled at different periods by nasties namely, the Mauryas, Staavahanas,
Vakatakas, Chaludyasof Badami, Rashtrakututs, Chalukyas of Kalyani, Mughals,Bhosle Rajes of
Nagpur and Asaf Jahis, besides the Gond Rajas of Sirpur and Chanda.

Agriculture
The southern part of the district consisting of Nirmal, Luxettipet, Khanapur and surrounding
mandals is fairly developed agriculturally, owing to the availability of irrigation facilities there.
The total cropped area of the district is 5.93 lakh hectares which constitute 37% of the total
geographical area. The principal crops of the district are Jowar, paddy, Cotton, Wheat, Maize,
Chillies, Sugarcane and Soy.

Tourism

There is a
highest waterfall situated at Kuntala (V) of Neradigonda mandal, Potchera Waterfall at Pochara
(V) of Boath mandal, the only one holy pilgrimage of Saraswathi temple at Basar where the
thousands of pilgrimages are visiting every day.
The Kaddam Project is an existing major project across river Kaddam, a tributary of Godavari
near Peddur (V), Kaddam (M), Adilabad District. The project is envisaged to irrigate an ayacut of
68,000 Ac. Khariff.
The Kaddam Project has been integrated with Sriramasagar Project. The reservoir being
supplemented through Sriramasagar Project, Saraswathi Canal to stabilize the localized ayacut.

Temples

B
asara Temple is situated 150 Kms from Adilabad, Adilabad District, Sri Gyana Saraswathi temple
at Basara on the banks of river Godavari is the only temple in South India dedicated to the
Goddess of learning. The legend has it that after the Mahabharata war, sage Vyas embarked on
a pilgrimage in search of peace. He reached the serene kumaranchala hills on the banks of river
Godavari and meditated and propitiated the Goddess who eventually appeared before him and
granted her presence in the form of the divine trinity. The Goddess ordered the sage to place
three handful of sand at three places everyday.
Miraculously these sand dunes transformed into the idols of the divine trinity i.e., Saraswathi,
Lakshmi, & Kali. These are the presiding deities of Basar today. Despite the presence of the
trinity, the temple is dedicated to Goddess Saraswathi.

Hills & Rivers

The most
important river that drains the district is the river Godavari. The Pengange, the Wardha, and the
Pranahita com next importance. The Kadam and the Peddavagu are tributaries of the Godavari.
Besides these, there are also rivulets like the Satnala, the Swarna vagu, and the Suddavagu
which drain the district.
The Godavari which is the largest river in peninsular India raises in the western Ghats at Tri
mbakeshwar near Nasik in Maharastra state and enters this district near Basara in Mudhole
Taluk.
This mighty river forms the boundary of the district separating the district from Nizamabad and
Karimnagar districts and skirts the southern borders of Chennur, Luxettipet, Khanaapur, Nirmal
and Mudhole east - while taluks. The Penganga forms part of the northern boundary of the
district in Adilabad.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

16.1

Population

In Persons

27,41,239

Male

In Persons

13,69,597

Female

In Persons

13,71,642

Urban

In Persons

7,60,259

Rural

In Persons

19,80,980

Population Growth (decadal)

10.18

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

170

Literacy

61.01

Male

70.81

Female

51.31

Urbanisation

27.734138

Workers as % of total population

49.17

Workers % of main Workers

37.77

Household industries

4.3

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

6,60,641

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

1,18,75,286

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

7231.89

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

16.84

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

102.69291

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

18.823605

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

7.5513299

Population per bank

In Thousands

13.5

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

18532.496

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

16988.668

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

28.429426

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

11.796399

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

36.090144

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Total cotton

370363

723297

Statistical Year Boo

Rice

70749

187267

Statistical Year Boo

Soyabeen

58771

84630

Statistical Year Boo

Redgram

40631

26817

Statistical Year Boo

Jowar

28792

35462

Statistical Year Boo

Maize

22020

68773

Statistical Year Boo

Bengalgram

17204

25341

Statistical Year Boo

Greengram

8076

5240

Statistical Year Boo

Adilabad Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Coal

1,18,75,286

1,58,65,382

Statistical Year Book

Limestone

42,16,268

5,60,974

Statistical Year Book

The district was situated between 77 40' and 78 37'E , of the eastern longitudes and 18 05'
and 19 N, of northern latitudes. The geographical area of this district is only 7956 sq. km
constituting 14.02 percent of the state.
It is also known as Indur. Nizamabad is the current and official name of the district. Nizam +
Abad = Nizamabad, Abad means mass of people (Town). The district is bounded on the North

by Adilabad district, East by Karimnagar district. South by Medak district, West by Nanded
district of Maharashtra & Bidar district of Karnataka.
The district has population of 25, 51,335 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 7.25% of
the total population of the State with 8.77 decadal growth.

Nizam Sagar Dam


Nizam Sagar Dam is an Indian dam. It is a reservoir constructed across the Manjira River, a
tributary of the Godavari River, between Champed (Nizamabad) and Banjapalle villages of the
Nizamabad district in Telangana, India. It is located at about 144 km north-west of Hyderabad.

The masonry dam sprawling across the river for 3 km with a fourteen feet wide motorable road
over it. There are excellent boarding and lodging facilities nearby, for tourists.
Before Nizam Sagar was built, the Manjira River was not properly harnessed and little water
was being used by diverting water at Ghanpur Anicut for Irrigating about 5,000 acres and an
open Channel called Mahaboob Nagar (Right Canal) in Medak District.
The Ghanpur Anicut was the first scheme constructed across Manjira river in 1904 at a cost of
Rs.18.00 Lakhs. Some years later, Nawab Ali Nawaj Jung Bahadur as Superintending Engineer
added Fatch Nahar (Left canal) to increase the utility of the river later. The ayacut of 17,308
acres was being irrigated under this Ghanpur Anicut which subsequently increased to 30,000

acres as per actuals. Nizam sagar Project is the second irrigation scheme on Manjira river and
the largest in the then Hyderabad state taken up during the year 1923 and completed by the
year 1931. This Project was originally contemplated for utilization of 58.00 TMC of water to
irrigate 2,75,000 acres in Banswada, Bodhan, Nizamabad and Armoor Taluks of Nizamabad
District.

Dichpally Ramalayam

Dichpally Ramalayam or Khilla Ramalayam is one of the oldest temples in Nizamabad,


Telangana. According to historical sources, it was built in the 14th century by the Kakatiya kings.
It is also called Indhoor Khajuraho or Nizamabad Khajuraho.
This temple has 105 steps and a pedestrian subway connecting it to Raghunadha Temple in the
Nizamabad urban center. The temple is visited by thousands of devotees on Sri Rama Navami
day (the ninth day of the month of Chaitra). It is located 10 KM away from Nizamabad district,
Telangana.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

Population

In Persons

25,51,335

Male

In Persons

12,50,641

Female

In Persons

13,00,694

Urban

In Persons

5,88,372

Rural

In Persons

19,62,963

Population Growth (decadal)

8.77

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

321

Literacy

61.25

Male

71.47

Female

51.54

Urbanisation

23.061338

Workers as % of total population

54.26

Workers % of main Workers

43.5

Household industries

8.99

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

5,33,119

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

79338

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

1812.00

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

64.04

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

65.760033

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

18.852875

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

9.5636206

Population per bank

In Thousands

10.63

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

18542.057

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

19775.921

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

53.62747

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

25.664371

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

15.914727

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Rice

192960

736189

Statistical Year Boo

Maize

94834

505743

Statistical Year Boo

Soyabeen

83432

174456

Statistical Year Boo

Bengalgram

29699

47340

Statistical Year Boo

Total cotton

20498

45940

Statistical Year Boo

Greengram

11986

10573

Statistical Year Boo

Turmeric

11557

65505

Statistical Year Boo

Black gram

11475

10909

Statistical Year Boo

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Laterite

79,338

4,905

Statistical Year Book-

Feldspar

22,009

5,601

Statistical Year Book-

Hyderabad, the capital city of Telangana consists of the twin cities of Hyderabad and
Secunderabad and is a bustling 400-year-old metropolis with an urban population of 6 million
people approximately. Hyderabad is famous as the former seat of the fabulously wealthy
Nizams of Hyderabad.

Built on the banks of the river Musi, and surrounded by huge prehistoric rock formations like
petrified, gray elephants. The district was situated between 77 30' and 79 30'E, of the eastern
longitudes and 16 30' and 18 20'N, of northern latitudes. The boundaries of Hyderabad
district are Nalgonda district, Mahaboobnagar district, Karnataka state and Medak district in the
East, South, West and North directions respectively. The district has population of 39,43,323 as
per the 2011 census which accounts for 11.20% of the total population of the State with 2.97%
decadal growth.

Golconda Fort

Golconda is one of
the most famous forts of India. The name comes from the Telugu words "Golla Konda" meaning
"Shepherd's Hill". Golconda was originally a mud fort, which was rebuilt by the first three Qutub
Shahi kings over a period of 62 years.

The fort is well known for its ingenious water supply system and acoustics among other
attractions like the palaces and the famous Fateh Rahben gun. The exclusive Sound & Light
Show takes you right back in time.

Birla Mandir

Birla Mandir is a Hindu temple, built on a 280 feet (85 m) high hillock called Naubath Pahad on
a 13 acres (53,000 m2) plot. The construction took 10 years and was constructed in 1976 by
Swami Ranganathananda of Ramakrishna Mission. The temple was constructed by Birla
Foundation, which has also constructed several similar temples across India, all of which are
known as Birla Mandir.
This completely white marble temple of Lord is built on the hillock, the Kala Pahad. The temple
has exquisite sculptured and carved ceiling. The temple looks down on Hussain Sagar Lake and
is illuminated at night.

Charminar

The Charminar, built in 1591 CE, is a monument and mosque located in Hyderabad, Telangana,
India.The landmark has become a global icon of Hyderabad, listed among the most recognized
structures of India.The Charminar is situated on the east bank of Musi river. To the west lies the
Laad Bazaar, and to the southwest lies the richly ornamented granite Makkah Masjid. The
English name is a translation and combination of the Urdu words Chr and Minar, translating to
"Four Towers" the eponymous towers are ornate minarets attached and supported by four
grand arches
Charminar lies in all its splendour in the middle of Lad-Bazaar - Hyderabad's famous bangle
destination. The monument is illuminated in the evenings.

Qutb Shahi Tombs

Th
e tombs of the legendary Qutb Shahi kings are at a distance of a kilometre from Banjara
Darwaza of the Golconda Fort. These tombs are said to be the oldest historical monuments in
Hyderabad.
The uniqueness of the tombs lies in the fact that they are the only tombs in the world where
the entire dynasty has been buried at one place.

Mecca Masjid

Makkah Masjid, is one of the


oldest mosques in Hyderabad, Telangana in India, And it is one of the largest Mosques in India.
Makkah Masjid is a listed heritage building in the old city of Hyderabad, close to the historic
landmarks of Chowmahalla Palace, Laad Bazaar, and Charminar.
Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah, the fifth ruler of the Qutb Shahi dynasty, commissioned bricks to
be made from the soil brought from Mecca, the holiest site of Islam, and used them in the
construction of the central arch of the mosque, thus giving the mosque its name. It formed the
centrepiece around which the city was planned by Muhammad Quli Qutub Shah.

Salar Jung Museum

This museum is one of the largest


collection of antiques by one man - Mir Yousuf Ali Khan, Salar Jung III.

The display includes Persian carpets, Moghul miniatures, Chinese porcelain, Japanese
lacquerware, famous statues like the Veiled Rebecca and Marguerite and Mephistopheles, a
superb collection of jade, daggers belonging to Queen Noor Jahan and the Emperors Jahangir
and Shah Jahan, Aurangzeb's sword and many other fabulous items.

Hitec City

The IT community
of tomorrow. The Hyderabad Information Technology Engineering Consultancy City (HITEC City)
built, marketed and maintained by L&T Info city Ltd. (joint venture of Larsen & Toubro Limited
and the Andhra Pradesh Industrial Infrastructure Corporation Limited) is a state-of-the-art self
sufficient IT township.
HITEC City is a self-reliant business park leveraging on Hyderabad's advantages of being the IT
training and manpower destination in India.

Hussainsagar Lake

Hyderab
ad's most popular boating and water sports location - from speed boats to motor boats, 48
seater launches with starlit dinner on board etc.
In the middle of the lake is placed one of the world's tallest monolithic statues of Lord Buddha
on the 'Rock of Gibraltar'.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

0.2

Population

In Persons

39,43,323

Male

In Persons

20,18,575

Female

In Persons

19,24,748

Urban

In Persons

39,43,323

Rural

In Persons

Population Growth (decadal)

2.97

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

18172

Literacy

83.25

Male

86.99

Female

79.35

Urbanisation

100

Workers as % of total population

39.49

Workers % of main Workers

31.03

Household industries

2.59

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in Hectares

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

2.12113

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

3.8799764

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

25.029651

Population per bank

In Thousands

4.02

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

432274.51

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

532514.84

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

166.25634

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

1886.883

The city was named after Syed Karimuddin, who is thought to be its founder. The district lies on
the northern part of Andhra Pradesh approximately between the latitudes 17 50' and 19 05'N
and longitudes 78 29' and 80 22'E.
Karimnagar district is bounded by Madhya Pradesh State in the east, Nizamabad district in the
West, Warangal and Medak districts in the South and Adilabad district in the North directions.
The district has population of 37,76,269 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 10.73% of
the total population of the State with 8.15% decadal growth. Many large scale companies like
NTPC, Kesoram Cements, Ramagundam-singareni collieries etc. are located in and around
Karimnagar.

Vemulawada

Vemulawada is a Mandal head quarters on the western part in Karimnagar district. It is located
on the banks of Mulavagu Rivulet. The distance between Karimnagar town and Vemulawada is
35 Kilometers. Vemulawada was a capital city of Vemulawada Chalukyas dynasty between A.D
750-973.
The remnants of the temples and statues show that Chalukyas were great architects. The
greatness of Vemulawada can be inferred from ten inscriptions from the various temples41.

In those inscriptions it is named as Lemulavatika, Lembulavade, Lembulavada. After the


changes it is transformed into Lemulavada, Yemulada, Vemulavada. The oldest temples are
located in Vemulawada in Karimnagar district.

Jagityala

Jagityala is 50 kms away from


Karimnagar. The town is a revenue division and Mandal. It is the biggest of all the towns which
are governed by Municipal councils. It was the biggest Taluk among the Talukas of Telangana.
Polasa village which is very near to Jagityala has thousand years of history.
There are no historical evidences in Jagityala except a Fort. Elgandal Sarkar was very vast and
include Chennuru, Lakshetpeta, Nirmal in its Sarkar. Mubarijul Mulk Japhruddaula Mirja Ibrahim
Khan Dhamsa who was the ruler of Elgandula, built a strong fortress with the help of the
technology of French Engineers in A.D 1747208. The frosts which are Nirmal hills were also built
by Thamsa Farqu Mirja Ehetesham Jung, Son of Dhamsa, succeeded his father. He was a wicked
ruler.
He did not give any respect to the notices of Asafja Nizam Khan II. Then the Nizam sent his
army. Ehetsham was defeated in 1791 and fled from Jagityala. He took refuge in Nirmal
fortress. At this time, the Nizam army attacked Jagityala fort in A.D 1791. The Khiledar of
Jagityala fought against them and was defeated and fined the Jagityala Durgam to the Nizams
army after the Nizams army directed their way to attack Nirmal.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

11.8

Population

In Persons

37,76,269

Male

In Persons

18,80,800

Female

In Persons

18,95,469

Urban

In Persons

9,51,225

Rural

In Persons

28,25,044

Population Growth (decadal)

8.15

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

319

Literacy

64.15

Male

73.65

Female

54.79

Urbanisation

25.189546

Workers as % of total population

51.94

Workers % of main Workers

42.02

Household industries

4.01

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

7,56,959

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

1,76,24,611

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

2544.83

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

70.15

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

103.64179

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

19.649024

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

8.2886044

Population per bank

In Thousands

12.26

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

22965.525

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

16542.783

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

39.107521

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

19.509712

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

12.305577

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Rice

289428

1026877

Statistical Year

Total cotton

251375

588595

Statistical Year

Maize

108706

568675

Statistical Year

Mangoes

13217

98136

Statistical Year

Turmeric

15515

101344

Statistical Year

Greengram

9474

5582

Statistical Year

Groundnut

9340

14104

Statistical Year

Soyabeen

7856

14282

Statistical Year

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Coal

1,76,24,611

2,35,46,481

Statistical Yea

Moulding Sand

27,83,388

1,27,618

Statistical Yea

The present name of Khammam is derived its name after a local hill, which was called as
'Stambhadri'. The town was called with different names starting with Stambhadri, Kambhadri,
Kambham mettu, Khammam mettu and then finally as Khammam.
Khammam town which was the seat of Taluk Administration was part of the larger Warangal
District, till 1st October, 1953. Five taluks of the Warangal district viz., Khammam, Madhira,

Yellandu, Burgampadu and Paloncha (Now Kothagudem) were carved out and a new district
KHAMMAM with Khammam as District Headquarters.
The district was situated between 79 47' and 80 47'E, of the eastern longitudes and 16 45'
and 18 35'N, of northern latitudes.
The Boundaries of Khammam district are East Godavari district in the East, Warangal and
Nalgonda districts in the West, Krishna district in the South and Madhya Pradesh State borders
in the North directions. The district has population of 27,97,370 as per the 2011 census which
accounts for 7.95% of the total population of the State with 8.47% decadal growth.

Temple

The
temple at Bhadrachalam has the Archa Murthys of Rama, Sita and Lakshmana and are
considered to be Swayambhu (self-manifested ones) .
Lord Sri Rama appeared in a dream to a woman called Pokala Dammakka and informed her
about the existence of vigrahas on Bhadragiri hills. To her surprise she found the "Vigraha's"
and put up a modest structure. Dhammakka, cleared jungle and offered puja to the deities.
On 17 Nov 1959 the Bhadrachalam Revenue Division, consisting of Bhadrachalam and Nuguru
Venkatapuram Taluks of East Godavari district were merged into the Khammam district
through GO No 553. for geographical contiguity and administrative viability.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Area
Population
Male
Female
Urban
Rural
Population Growth (decadal)
Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)
Literacy
Male
Female
Urbanisation
Workers as % of total population
Workers % of main Workers
Household industries
Area under Food & Non-Food crops
Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)
Forest Area under the control of Forest Department
Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area
Road Length per 100 sq.km.
Post offices per 100,000 persons
Bank branches per 100,000 persons
Population per bank
Per capita bank deposits

Item

Per capita bank credit


Per capita bank credit to agriculture
Per ha. bank credit to agriculture
Per capita bank credit to Industries

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Total cotton

184770

505400

Rice

153835

473080

Maize

32057

172456

Chillies

30494

137245

Mangoes

25931

116404

Greengram

13055

8843

Groundnut

6508

10447

Blackgram

6280

6073

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Coal

1,96,31,668

2,62,27,909

Dolomite

6,72,803

1,58,432

Mahabubnagar is the largest district in Telangana in terms of area (18432.00 sq. km) covered. It
is also known as Palamoor. The name was changed to Mahabubnagar in honour of Mir Mahbub
Ali Khan Asaf Jah VI, the Nizam of Hyderabad (1869-1911 AD). The district was situated between
77 15' and 79 15'E, of the eastern longitudes and 15 55' and 17 20'N, of northern latitudes.

Mahabubnagar is southern district of Hyderabad state under Nizam and bordered with River
Krishna in the south and surrounded by the Guntur District of AP to the east, Kurnool district of
AP to the south, Nalgonda and Ranga Reddy Districts to the north and Gulbarga and Raichur
Districts of the state of Karnataka to the West.
The district has population of 40,53,028 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 11.52% of
the total population of the State with 15.34% decadal growth.

Pillalamrri

The most
interesting place to see in Mahabubnagar is the famous banyan tree called Pillalamrri, which is
about 4 km from the town. There is a tomb of a Muslim saint under the tree.
The tree presents the appearance of a small hillock with green foliage from a distance but on
reaching closer, it looks like a large green umbrella under which about thousand people can
easily take shelter.
It is 700 year old banyan tree and its branches extend over an area of 3 acres. In Telugu,
"Pillalu" means children & "marri" means a banyan tree. There is also an aquarium, a small zoo
and an archaeological museum here.

Umamaheswaram
Umamaheswaram is located at a distance of 150 KM from Hyderabad and close by Achampet in
Mahabubnagar District. Umamaheswaram temple is situated on very tall hills of Nallamala
forests and dates back to 2nd century A.D. To reach the temple, one has to ride on very steep
and dangerous curves of 5 mile length from the bottom of the hill.

It is well known as
North Entrance to Srisailam (Jyotirlingam) . Umamaheswaram temple is in deep Nallamalai
forests and located in vast range of Scenic mountains.
Srirangapur is situated at a distance of 12 km from Wanaparthy, which is 100 km from
Mahabubnagar. Here you find a Sri Ranganayakaswamy temple built during the 18th century
A.D.
his town is situated 120 km from Mahabubnagar and 10 km from the Kollapuri Someswara
Swamy temple.
There are 15 temples, all housing Shivalingas where Shivarathri & Karthika Pournami are
celebrated with much fervour.The Madhava Swamy temple at Kollapur was originally built by
the 16th century A.D., on the left bank of river Krishna, at Manchalakatta. The architecture of
the temple is exceedingly beautiful. All around the temple walls , the beautifully carved
sculptures depict the 24 aspects of Vishnu and Dasavathars of Vishnu. Various pillars
supporting the mandapa, the Garudalaya.

Koilsagar

In
Koilsagar
Irrigation Project constructed to irrigate an ayacut of 12000Acres, in Mahaboobnagar district,
ayacut has not fully developed.
It is now proposed to lift water from fore shore of Jurala Project in two stages to a total lift of
120m with 4 Nos. of Pumps of 10,000 HPreach and to fill up the Koilsagar Project to stabilize the
ayacut of 12000 Acres including a gap ayacut of 7500 Acres and to irrigate an additional 38250
Acres bringing the total to 50,250 Acres under the project at a quoted value of Rs.360.20 crores.
The Joorala Project (also called the Jurala or Priyadarshini Jurala Project) is situated about 10 km
from Kuravapur, Mahabubnagar. It is constructed on the Krishna river.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

18.4

Population

In Persons

40,53,028

Male

In Persons

20,50,386

Female

In Persons

20,02,642

Urban

In Persons

6,07,692

Item

Units

Figure

Rural

In Persons

34,45,336

Population Growth (decadal)

15.34

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

220

Literacy

55.04

Male

65.21

Female

44.72

Urbanisation

14.9935

Workers as % of total population

53.92

Workers % of main Workers

46.23

Household industries

1.67

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

9,49,123

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

3,74,943

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

3032.51

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

31.73

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

138.811

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

20.8486

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

6.85907

Population per bank

In Thousands

15

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

14163.2

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

13345.1

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

40.648

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

17.3579

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

8.91058

Districts Major Crops


Districts Major Mineral Production
Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Feldspar

3,74,943

95,423

Statistical Year Boo

Quartz

2,36,932

37,435

Statistical Year Boo

Medak was formerly popular as Siddapur Medak, the prefix however, lost its importance in the
popular usage. It is located in Telangana State. Sangareddy is the district headquarters of
Medak.
The district was situated between 77 28' and 79 10'E, of the eastern longitudes and 17 23'
and 18 19'N, of northern latitudes. The district is bounded by Nizamabad District to the north,
Hyderabad District to the east and south, Warangal and Nalgonda Districts to the east, and
Karnataka state to the west.
The district has population 30,33,288 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 8.62% of the
total population of the State with 13.6% decadal growth.

Medak Church
The church was built under the stewardship of the Methodist Christian, the Reverend Charles
Walker Posnett, who was driven by the motto My best for my Lord. Charles Posnett had arrived
in Secunderabad in 1895, and after first ministering among British soldiers at Trimullghery, had
launched into the villages and had reached Medak village in 1896. In those days there was no
railway to Medak (the journey of 60 miles (97 km) from Hyderabad had to be done on
horseback - and Posnett could do it in a day) and in the whole Medak area there were hardly
two hundred Christians, who were using a small tiled house as their place of worship.
As the number of Christians increased, Charles Posnett raised a moderate structure in the
Mission Compound in the shape of a church, but thought it unworthy, and early in 1914 laid the
foundations of the present cathedral church, on 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of land in Ghusnabad
area. When the people of Medak district were suffering from famine between 1919 and 1921,
Charles Posnett helped them by employing them in the construction of the church instead of
running a free kitchen. Construction went on for 10 years. Charles Posnett consecrated the
church in 1924, thanking God for mitigating the sufferings of the people.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

9.7

Population

In Persons

30,33,288

Male

In Persons

15,23,030

Female

In Persons

15,10,258

Urban

In Persons

7,27,871

Rural

In Persons

23,05,417

Population Growth (decadal)

13.6

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

313

Literacy

61.42

Male

71.43

Female

51.37

Urbanisation

23.996106

Workers as % of total population

51.52

Workers % of main Workers

41.01

Household industries

1.7

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

6,20,854

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

56069

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

905.94

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

35.42

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

84.55404

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

19.384905

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

8.7693618

Population per bank

In Thousands

11.7

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

22490.116

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

23830.906

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

44.71493

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

21.846241

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

20.706227

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Maize

142205

643031

Statistical Year

Total cotton

128865

446479

Statistical Year

Rice

110355

372597

Statistical Year

Bengalgram

30020

44039

Statistical Year

Redgram

29195

19736

Statistical Year

Greengram

27485

27041

Statistical Year

Jowar

25035

27860

Statistical Year

Blackgram

15327

13840

Statistical Year

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Quartz

56,069

8,859

Statistical Year B

Feldspar

38,705

9,850

Statistical Year B

The district was situated between 78 40' and 80 05'E, of the eastern longitudes and 16 25'
and 17 60'N, of northern latitudes.
The Boundaries of Nalgonda district are Krishna and Khammam districts in the East,
Mahaboobnagar and Hyderabad districts in the West, Mahaboobnagar and Guntur districts in
the South and Medak and Warangal districts in the North directions.

The district has population of 34,88,809 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 9.91% of the
total population of the State with 7.41% decadal growth.

Nagarjuna Sagar Dam

Nag
arjuna Sagar Dam is the world's largest masonry dam. It was built on the Krishna River at
Nagarjuna Sagar in between Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh state and Nalgonda district of

Telangana state, India. The construction duration of the dam was between the years of 1955
and 1967.
The dam created a water reservoir whose capacity is 11,472,000,000 cubic meters (4.0511011
cu ft) . The dam is 490 feet (150 m) tall and 0.99 miles (1.6 km) long with 26 gates which are 42
feet (13 m) wide and 45 feet (14 m) tall.
Nagarjuna Sagar was the earliest in the series of large infrastructure projects initiated for the
Green Revolution in India; it also is one of the earliest multi-purpose irrigation and hydroelectric projects in India. The dam provides irrigation water to the Nalgonda Khammam districts
of Telangana, Prakasam, Krishna and Guntur districts of Andhra Pradesh along with electric
power to the national grid. It holds second largest reservoir in India after Indira Sagar in
Madhya Pradesh followed by Bhakra dam. It is the largest dam in India in terms of Length,1,550
meters.

Buddhist

Nagarjuna Sagar in an important Buddhist site located 150


kms from Hyderabad. The historic location takes its name from the Buddhist saint and scholar
Acharya Nagarjuna who is said to have set up a centre of learning here. Today, Nagarjuna Sagar
is home to Nagarjuna Sagar Dam - the world's tallest masonry dam that irrigates over 10 lakh
acres of land.
It was during the building of the dam that the ruins of an ancient Buddhist civilization were
excavated here. Some of the relics unearthed have been carefully preserved on a picturesque
island called Nagarjuna Konda, located in the centre of a man-made lake.

Yadagirigutta Temple
Yadagirigutta Temple The area acquired its name and fame from a sage called Yadarishi, son of
the great sage Rishyasrunga who did penance inside a cave with the blessings of Anjaneya on
this hill between Bhongir and Raigiri in Nalgonda district. Pleased with his deep devotion, Lord
Narasimha (an incarnation of Lord Vishnu) appeared before him in five different forms as Jwala,
Yogananda, Gandabherunda, Ugra and Lakshminarasimha.

They later manifested themselves into finely sculpted forms that later came to be worshipped
as Panchanarasimha Kshetram. As the legend goes, the Lord appeared first as Jwala Narasimha
(Lord as a flame) , when Yadarishi was unable to face the intensity of this apparition, he
appeared in a peaceful form as Yoganarasimha (Lord in a Yogic Padmasana posture with open
palms on the knees) . Not satisfied with the Lord appearing alone, Yadarishi sought to see him
with this consort, so he is said to have appeared with Lakshmi on his lap, known as Lakshmi
Narasimha Swamy and as being worshipped by Alwars, his ardent devotees.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

14.2

Population

In Persons

34,88,809

Male

In Persons

17,59,772

Female

In Persons

17,28,037

Urban

In Persons

6,62,507

Rural

In Persons

28,26,302

Population Growth (decadal)

7.41

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

245

Literacy

64.2

Male

74.1

Female

54.19

Urbanisation

18.989489

Workers as % of total population

51.75

Workers % of main Workers

43.56

Household industries

0.69

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

6,83,662

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

1,39,70,510

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

836.93

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

42.36

Item

Units

Figure

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

132.34248

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

21.038698

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

7.9110092

Population per bank

In Thousands

12.82

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

12795.484

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

19378.533

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

44.636098

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

22.778335

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

18.443082

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Total cotton

297824

602656

Statistical Year Boo

Rice

208524

683868

Statistical Year Boo

Greengram

36071

27876

Statistical Year Boo

Redgram

28636

13831

Statistical Year Boo

Groundnut

22411

33979

Statistical Year Boo

Mangoes

8267

65185

Statistical Year Boo

Castor

6837

2154

Statistical Year Boo

Chillies

6358

15364

Statistical Year Boo

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Limestone

1,39,70,510

18,58,776

Statistical Year Book

Feldspar

15,500

3,945

Statistical Year Book

The district was situated between 77 30' and 79 30'E, of the eastern longitudes and 16 30'
and 18 20'N, of northern latitudes. The boundaries of Rangareddy district are Nalgonda
district, Mahabubnagar district, Karnataka state and Medak district in the East, South, West and
North directions respectively.
The district has population of 52,96,741 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 15.05% of
the total population of the State with 48.16% decadal growth and 70.21% is urban as per the
2011 census. The district encircles the city and district of Hyderabad, and the city of Hyderabad
also serves as the administrative centre of the district.

Ananthagiri Hills

Ananthagiri Hills is located 10 km from Vikarabad, Ranga Reddy district, Telangana, India. The
hills are the main water source for Osmansagar and Himayathsagar. It is considered as one of
the dense forests in Telangana region. Ananthagiri has a famous temple located in this forested
region, which is also the birthplace of Musi River. It is situated at a distance of about 90 km
from Hyderabad City and a popular destination for trekking and for those who love adventure.
It is also considered one of the earliest human habitat areas in South India. Ancient caves,
medieval fort like structures and ancient temple shows the history of the area.
It is a much sought after place, which is covered, by red soil and ideal for some adventure
sports. Visitors rate it as one of most beautiful places for a weekend get away from Hyderabad.

The road is in good condition, which takes you into the dense forests with beautiful trees and
streams all along the way.

Gandipet

Osmansagar, also called Gandipet, is an excellent picnic spot located on outskirts of Hyderabad.
Osmansagar is among the two lakes located on the citys periphery region supplying drinking
water to the city. Osmansagar is a beautiful lake located 20 km. west of Hyderabad.
The lake is a man made reservoir created by constructing a dam across the Isa, a tributary of
Musi River. The lake has an abutting bund with lush gardens, which provide an ideal ambience
for an outing. The lake also houses a heritage building, Sagar Mahal, which was built as a resort
by the Hyderabad Nizam and has been transformed into a lake resort by the department of
Tourism.

The Mrugavani National Park

The Mrugavani National Park in the state capital is an example of a beautiful national park
turned major tourist attraction. What is most exciting is that in a land layered with exotic and
immense natural resources like in India, it sure is a great achievement. The Mrugavani National
Park, located at Chilkuru in Moinabad, is at a distance of about 25 kms from Hyderabad.
The National Park is spread over 3.5 sq kms of pure, untamed land. The Indian government
announced it a wildlife sanctuary in the year 1994 and since then, the park has been home to
some 600 species of plants and animals. Like in the case of most national parks, even the
Mrugavani national park has had least human intervention and interaction in order to make
sure that all the precious creatures remain undisturbed in their cozy natural habitat.

Himayat Sagar

The construction of reservoir on Esi a tributary of Musi River was completed in 1927, for
providing drinking water source for Hyderabad and saving the city from floods, which
Hyderabad suffered in 1908. It was built during the reign of the last Nizam of Hyderabad, Nizam
VII and so it is named after his youngest son Himayat Ali Khan.
The Himayat Sagar and Osman Sagar reservoirs provided continuous water supply to the twin
cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad until recently. Due to population growth it was not
sufficient for water supply to Hyderabad city. The engineer at the time of construction was late
Khaja Mohinuddin S/O Mohammed Hussein, Madri.

The Mahavir Harina Vanasthali National Park

The Mahavir Harina Vanasthali National Park located in Hyderabad is one such great attraction.
The wildlife park, named after the holy saint of the Jains, Lord Mahavir, is located in
Vanasthalipuram, which is a residential suburb about 15 kms from the main city. It is
particularly known for being a home for endangered animal species, Black Buck deer. The deer,
which is also known as Krishna Jinka in the local language, is also the most hunted animal in all
of India in the 18th and 19th centuries. The other animals found here are cheetahs, wild board,
porcupines, monitor lizards, and several varieties of snakes.
Visitors can see the animals through sheds and viewing towers. The government has also
introduced van safaris to take the visitors on a ride within the park to watch the animals
closely.

Chilkur Balaji Temple

Chilkur Balaji Temple popularly known as Visa Balaji Temple or Visa God is an ancient Hindu
temple of Lord Balaji on the banks of Osman Sagar Lake near Hyderabad, India. It is 17 km from
Mehedipatnam. It is one of the oldest temples in Hyderabad built during the time of Madanna
and Akkanna, the uncles of Bhakta Ramadas.
The shrine is instrumental for the temples popularity as Visa God. This temple does not accept
any money, does not have a hundi, from the devotees, no green channel or privileges for VVIPs.

Durgam Cheruvu

Durgam Cheruvu is another significant lake of the Rangareddy District. This lake is the most
unspoilt and the quietest one in the region.
Its surroundings include unique rock mounds, whose presence here marks the boundaries of
the plateau of this lake

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

7.5

Population

In Persons

52,96,741

Male

In Persons

27,01,008

Female

In Persons

25,95,733

Urban

In Persons

37,19,172

Rural

In Persons

15,77,569

Population Growth (decadal)

48.16

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

707

Literacy

75.87

Male

82.11

Female

69.4

Urbanisation

70.216233

Workers as % of total population

45.5

Workers % of main Workers

37.2

Household industries

1.78

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

2,82,768

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

45,98,000

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

730.72

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

32.92

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

64.25256

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

7.570693

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

12.403854

Population per bank

In Thousands

8.72

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

70390.453

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

32670.089

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

28.770684

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

53.892541

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

59.345462

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Total cotton

60233

144914

Statistical Year Bo

Maize

42971

166701

Statistical Year Bo

Rice

40912

98397

Statistical Year Bo

Redgram

39504

16117

Statistical Year Bo

Jowar

16174

15082

Statistical Year Bo

Groundnut

8995

15141

Statistical Year Bo

Greengram

6420

4096

Statistical Year Bo

Bengalgram

5347

6427

Statistical Year Bo

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Limestone

45,98,000

6,11,764

Statistical Year Boo

Laterite

10,57,095

63,350

Statistical Year Boo

The old name of this district is Orugallu. Oru means one and Kallu means stone. The district
was situated between 78 49' and 80 43'E, of the eastern longitudes and 17 19' and 18 36'N,
of northern latitudes.
The district is bounded by Karimnagar District to the north, Khammam District to the east and
southeast, Nalgonda District to the southwest, and Medak District to the west.
The district has population of 35,12,576 as per the 2011 census which accounts for 9.98% of the
total population of the State with 8.21% decadal growth.

Warangal Fort
Warangal, once the capital of the Kakatiya Kingdom, Warangal is

with beautiful lakes, fine

temples, rich fauna & flora have contributed to its importance as a Tourist Centre.
The ancient name of Warangal was known to be Oruguallu or Omtikonda on account of huge
boulder like hillock situated near the swayambhu Siva Temple and is also called
"EKASILANAGARAM". In course of time, it was called as "Orugallu", and finally known as
Warangal.
Warangal the ancient Kakatiya Kingdom has everything to satisfy the thirst of tourist all over the
world. It has beautiful Lakes, Forts, Architectural Monuments, Wild Life Sanctuary, Musical
Garden, Rock Garden, Vana Vigyana Kendra, Regional Science Centre, a fine blend of new and
old.

Districts Geographical Profile


Item

Units

Figure

Area

In '000 Sq. Km

12.9

Population

In Persons

35,12,576

Male

In Persons

17,59,281

Female

In Persons

17,53,295

Urban

In Persons

9,92,333

Rural

In Persons

25,20,243

Population Growth (decadal)

8.21

Population Density (Person/Sq.Km)

Ratio

273

Literacy

65.11

Male

74.58

Female

55.69

Urbanisation

28.250862

Workers as % of total population

49.58

Workers % of main Workers

39.97

Household industries

0.79

Area under Food & Non-Food crops

Area in Hectares

6,93,004

Mining & Quarrying (Coal - Top)

Qty in tonnes

16,69,195

Forest Area under the control of Forest Department

Area in SQ.Kms

3710.14

Gross irrigated area as % of gross cropped area

65.78

Road Length per 100 sq.km.

In Sq.km

106.29628

Post offices per 100,000 persons

Ratio

21.693481

Bank branches per 100,000 persons

Ratio

8.1421726

Population per bank

In Thousands

12.48

Per capita bank deposits

Rs. In Crores

21500.46

Per capita bank credit

In Rs.

21538.039

Item

Units

Figure

Per capita bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

62.55061

Per ha. bank credit to agriculture

In Rs.

31.704546

Per capita bank credit to Industries

In Rs.

25.758079

Districts Major Crops


Crop

Area in hectares

Out-turn in tonnes

Source

Total cotton

276412

588595

Statistical Year B

Rice

209714

689019

Statistical Year B

Maize

80092

387607

Statistical Year B

Groundnut

30413

60508

Statistical Year B

Chillies

25801

97219

Statistical Year B

Greengram

22575

15088

Statistical Year B

Mangoes

7835

43312

Statistical Year B

Turmeric

9449

47075

Statistical Year B

Districts Major Mineral Production


Mineral

Quantity (Tonnes)

Value ('000 Rs.)

Source

Coal

16,69,195

22,30,045

Statistical Year Bo

Laterite

7,24,599

44,795

Statistical Year Bo

Mission Kakatiya

Mission Kakatiya

ission Kakatiya is a major and noble program contemplated by the Government of

Telangana to revive the neglected water bodies, and to put them to optimum use to bring back
the cultural and agricultural prosperity of the once resplendent Telangana.

Tanks and ponds that once dotted every village in Telangana and contributed to the prosperity
of the region, have now disappeared. There is no trace at many a place that a tank existed. The
current pathetic state of shattered hopes and smashed tanks stands as epitaphs of the past
glory and grandeur of Telangana and how it was subjugated by the decades of misrule of
erstwhile rulers. Tanks and ponds stood as statements of prosperity, affluence and culture of
Telangana. They weren't mere water bodies catering to the irrigation and other needs of
people. They were epitomes of Telangana culture and history.

About the project:


The Government with an iron will and steel resolve

wanted to ensure the implementation of the "Mana Ooru - Mana Cheruvu" program as part of
the Mission Kakatiya thereby proving a point that it's an administration of deeds, and not
words. Growth of agriculture, allied economic activity and financial self-reliance of villages was
the vision of Kakatiya rulers who had taken the initiative for creating very large tanks. The
Qutub Shahis and Asaf Jahis who ruled the place eventually too continued the great work of
Kakatiyas on the irrigation front. Precisely with a view to restoring the faded grandeur, the Chief
Minister Mr K Chandrashekar Rao christened the project as Mission Kakatiya.

Mana Vooru Mana Pranalika

ana Ooru Mana Pranalika is the brainchild of Chief Minister Sri K Chandrashekar Rao.

This unique program intends to give a new dimension to development planning. Instead of
planning about various development activities and making budgetary allocations at the highest
level of government, this novel program attempts to get inputs from the village level. The
program intends to democratize development planning and increase transparency in
government spending. This program also aims to strengthen grassroots democracy by
empowering gram panchayats. Data was collected from each gram panchayat in Telangana,
their needs were assessed and included in the budgetary allocations for this year. Honble CM
has launched this program from Nalgonda district.

Water Grid

ater is life! International community has declared clean drinking water as a human right

long back. Yet, lack of drinking water is a common sight in our state and country.
Even though two perennial rivers flow across the state, the tragedy is, most of Telangana state
does not have access to clean drinking water.
To change this situation, the Telangana government, under the able leadership of CM Sri K
Chandrashekar Rao, has designed the Telangana Water Grid - a mammoth project intended to
provide a sustainable and permanent solution to the drinking water woes.
The objective of Telangana Water Grid is to provide 100 liters of clean drinking water per
person in rural households and 150 liters per person in urban households. This project aims to
provide water to about 25000 rural habitations and 67 urban habitations.

elangana has a variety of tourist attractions including historical places, monuments, forts,

water falls, forests and temples. Hyderabad, the state capital ranked second best place in the
world that one should see in 2015 which is published in the annual guide of 'Traveler' magazine
of National Geographic. Hyderabad and Warangal are the largest cities with many tourist
places.

Charminar
The Charminar, built in 1591 CE, is a monument and mosque located in Hyderabad, Telangana,
India.The landmark has become a global icon of Hyderabad, listed among the most recognized
structures of India.The Charminar is situated on the east bank of Musi river.To the west lies the
Laad Bazaar, and to the southwest lies the richly ornamented granite Makkah Masjid.
The English name is a translation and combination of the Urdu words Chr and Minar,
translating to "Four Towers"; the eponymous towers are ornate minarets attached and
supported by four grand arches.
Charminar lies in all its splendour in the middle of Lad-Bazaar - Hyderabad's famous bangle
destination. The monument is illuminated in the evenings.
Charminar is a monument and a mosque, which is synonymous with the history of Hyderabad, India. The
majestic structure was completed in 1591 CE and is not only a landmark building of Hyderabad but also a
famous monument of India. It is believed that Mohammed Quli Qutb Shahi, the fifth sultan of the Qutub Shahi
dynasty had built the monument to commemorate the end of a deadly plague menace that had gripped the city
then. It is located near the bank of the river Musi. Charminar is derived from two distinct words Char and
Minar, which means four towers. Mir Momin Astarabadi of Qutb Shah dynasty played an important role and
he ordered extensive preparations for the design and layout. Historians believe that this structure is an example
for Indo-Islamic architecture combined with few Persian elements. The monument is located in the heart of old
city and it is believed that Hyderabad was measured in four directions from Charminar for administrative
purposes.
A visit to Hyderabad is incomplete without visiting this grand and majestic centerpiece. It is also considered
the Arc de Triomphe of the East. Some of the historians say that it was built it in honor of his wife,
Bhagyamathi. There is also legend that tells about the existence of a secret tunnel underneath the monument
connecting the fort at Golconda that was created as a means of escape to royal family in an emergency. Each of
the sides measure 20 meters while the minarets are located at a height of 48.7 meters from the ground level.
Each side of Charminar opens into a plaza like stricture where the giant arches overlook the major
thoroughfares. It is a clear square structure that measures 31.95 mts. on each side while imposing arches span a
distance of 11mts. The four minarets rise to a height of 56 mts. The ornamental arches on the minarets enhance
the aesthetic value. There are 149 circular steps inside each minaret and one of them is open for tourists to
climb and enjoy a breathtaking view of the city. It also houses the oldest mosque in Hyderabad with prayer
spaces for the devout to worship.

Islamic architecture of those times is marked by arches, minarets, and domes. The structure is famous for its
profuse stucco decorations and arrangement of impressive balustrades and balconies. The floral design is
executed delicately and stands as a masterpiece to the combination of Mughal and Hindu architecture crafted
by the local artisans. The four clocks in four cardinal directions were added in the year 1889. The base of
Charminar has a water cistern located at center which consists of a small fountain for ablutions, before the
faithful offer prayers in the mosque. Charminar has become synonymous with the culture of old city of
Hyderabad and the area is also a popular destination for lip smacking Muslim dishes, colorful bangles, pearls,
jewellry and other items. The place is a symbol of Hyderabadi culture and stands tall and proud as a reminder
of the glorious era.

Golconda Fort
The Golconda fort was first built by Kakatiya as part of their western defenses. It was built in
945 CE-970 CE on the lines of the Kondapalli fort. The city and fortress are built on a granite hill
that is 120 meters (400 ft) high and is surrounded by massive crenelated ramparts. The fort was
rebuilt and strengthened by Pratapa Rudra of Kakatiya dynasty. The fort was further
strengthened by Musunuri Nayaks who overthrew the Tughlak army occupying Warangal. The
fort was ceded by the Musunuri chief, Kapaya Nayaka to the Bahmanis as part of the treaty in
1364 AD. The fort became the capital of a major province in the Sultanate and after its collapse
the capital of the Qutb Shahi kings. The fort finally fell into ruins after a siege and its fall to
Mughal emperor Aurangazeb in 1687 AD. After the collapse of the Bahmani Sultanat, Golkonda
rose to prominence as the seat of the Qutb Shahi dynasty around 1507. Over a period of 62
years the mud fort was expanded by the first three Qutb Shahi kings into a massive fort of
granite, extending around 5 km in circumference.
Golconda Fort is located in the western part of Hyderabad city and is about 9 km from the Hussain Sagar Lake.
The outer fort occupies an area of three square kilometers, which is 4.8 kilometers in length.
It was originally known as Mankal, and built on a hilltop in the year 1143. It was originally a mud fort under
the reign of Rajah of Warangal. Later it was fortified between 14th and 17th centuries by the Bahmani Sultans
and then the ruling Qutub Shahi dynasty. Golconda was the principal capital of the Qutub Shahi kings. The
inner fort contains ruins of palaces, mosques and a hill top pavilion, which rises about 130 meters high and
gives a birds eye view of other buildings.
Golconda fort is undoubtedly one of most magnificent fortress complexes in India. The history of Golconda
Fort goes back to early 13th century, when it was ruled by the Kakatiyas followed by Qutub Shahi kings, who
ruled the region in 16th and 17th century. The fortress rests on a granite hill 120 meters high while huge
crenellated ramparts surround this structure.

It was initially called Shepherds Hill, meaning Golla Konda in Telugu while according to legend, on this
rocky hill a shepherd boy had come across an idol and the information was conveyed to the ruling Kakatiya
king at that time. The king constructed a mud fort around this holy spot and after 200 years, Bahamani rulers
took possession of the place. Later the Qutub Shahi kings converted this into massive granite fort extending
5km in circumference. The fort is considered a mute witness to historic events. The Qutub Shahis reign at
Golconda ended in 1687 when it was run over by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb, who intentionally left it in
ruins.
Golconda still boasts of mounted cannons, four drawbridges, eight gateways, and majestic halls, magazines,
stables etc. The outermost enclosure is called Fateh Darwaza meaning Victory gate, after Aurangzebs army
marched successfully through this gate. At Fateh Darwaza one can witness fantastic acoustical effects, which is
one among the many famous engineering marvels at Golconda. Clapping your hand at a certain point near the
dome entrance reverberates which is heard clearly at the hill top pavilion, almost one kilometer away. This
served as a warning note to the inhabitants of the fort of any impending danger, Ofcourse it now amuses
visitors. The fort gains an impressive place among the architectural marvels and heritage structures of India
and is a testimony to Hyderabads glorious past.

Medak Church
The church was built under the stewardship of the Methodist Christian, the Reverend Charles
Walker Posnett, who was driven by the motto My best for my Lord. Charles Posnett had arrived
in Secunderabad in 1895, and after first ministering among British soldiers at Trimullghery, had
launched into the villages and had reached Medak village in 1896. In those days there was no
railway to Medak (the journey of 60 miles (97 km) from Hyderabad had to be done on
horseback - and Posnett could do it in a day) and in the whole Medak area there were hardly
two hundred Christians, who were using a small tiled house as their place of worship. As the
number of Christians increased, Charles Posnett raised a moderate structure in the Mission
Compound in the shape of a church, but thought it unworthy, and early in 1914 laid the
foundations of the present cathedral church, on 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of land in Ghusnabad
area. When the people of Medak district were suffering from famine between 1919 and 1921,
Charles Posnett helped them by employing them in the construction of the church instead of
running a free kitchen. Construction went on for 10 years. Charles Posnett consecrated the
church in 1924, thanking God for mitigating the sufferings of the people.

Chowmahalla Palace
Chowmahalla Palace or Chowmahallat (4 Palaces), is a palace of the Nizams of Hyderabad state.
It was the seat of the Asaf Jahi dynasty and was the official residence of the Nizams of
Hyderabad while they ruled their state. The palace remains the property of Barkat Ali Khan
Mukarram Jah, heir of the Nizams. All ceremonial functions including the accession of the
Nizams and receptions for the Governor-General were held at this palace. The prestigious

UNESCO Asia Pacific Merit award for cultural heritage conservation was presented to
Chowmahalla Palace on March 15, 2010. UNESCO representative Takahiko Makino formally
handed over the plaque and certificate to Princess Esra, former wife and GPA holder of Prince
Mukarram Jah Bahadu
The history of Hyderabad is so enticing that it feels like reading a wonderful love story and its glorious past is
no less than a fairy tale. And the most interesting part of this novel forms the rule of the Nizams, which fills
pages of history with legendary contributions of art, architecture and science.
A testimony to this aspect is seen in the form of the many exquisite monuments scattered all over the city. One
such monument that in its striking sumptuousness still shows off the power of time immemorial is the
engrossing Chowmohalla Palace. The name Chowmohalla refers to four palaces. The construction of the
palace was initiated in the year 1750 by Nizam Salabhat Jung but it was Nizam Afzar-ud-Dawla Bahadur who
saw that the palace was completed between the years 1857 and 1869. Originally, the palace covered 45 acres
from Laad Bazaar on the north to Aspan Chowk Road which is on the south. The Chowmohalla complex is a
replica of Shahs Palace in Teheran, Iran. Presently the palace consists of two courtyards with graceful palaces,
the grand Durbar Hall or the Khilwat. Gardens and fountains add to the elegance.
Southern Courtyard is the oldest part of the complex. It comprises of four graceful palaces Tahniyat Mahal,
Mahtab Mahal, Afzal Mahal, and Aftab Mahal. Northern Courtyard has been restored and is open to the public.
The main attraction of this area is the Bara Imam, which is a long corridor. It has rooms on the east wing,
which once served as the administrative wing. Another stunning construction is the Clock Tower. It houses the
Khilwat Clock which still works perfectly.

Warangal Fort
Warangal Fort, in the present-day Indian state of Telangana, appears to have existed since at
least the 13th century CE. Although precise dating of its construction and subsequent
enhancements are uncertain, historians and archaeologists generally accept that an earlier
brick-walled structure was replaced with stone by Ganapatideva, who died in 1262, and that his
successors Rudramadevi and Prataparudra added to its height and added gateways, square
bastions and additional circular earthern walls prior to the latter's death in 1323. This places the
construction towards the end of the Kakatiya period. There were later modifications between
the 15th and 17th centuries, comprising principally the addition of barbicans to the four gates
in the stone wall and the creation of gates in the outer earthern wall. Remnants of the structure
can be seen today near to the town of Warangal, which was the Kakatiya capital. The
Archaeological Survey of India has listed the remains as a Monument of National Importance.
Warangal is recognized as one of the best heritage cities of India. It is 145 km away from the state capital
Hyderabad. It is also the second largest city in the state of Telangana. The citys name is derived from the
Telugu word Orugallu Oru which means one and the word gallu meaning stone. The city is also known as

Ekasila Nagaram. The city is currently an industrial and cultural centre in the state of AP. The city was the
capital of the great Kakatiya rulers who reigned between 12th and 14th centuries.
According to the history of Warangal, the Prola Raja of great Kakatiya dynasty built the beautiful city in 12th
century. The Kakatiyas, who ruled the place for more than 200 years, have left the succeeding generations,
many grand monuments and architectural wonders like the famous Warangal fort, Swayambhu Temple and
many other amazing ancient structures. The Warangal Fort, which is the main attraction of the city is spread
over a radius of 19 kilometers between Warangal and Hanamkonda. The fort was constructed in the 13th
century in the reign of the Kakateya King Ganapati Deva. The Warangal fort is most famous for its graceful
and finitely carved arches and pillars. This fort has four large stone gateways.

Laknavaram Lake
Laknavaram Lake is around 80 km from Warangal; 11 km from Govindaraopet and 8 km from
Chalvai and 10 km from Machapur. Tourists coming from Warangal direction has to take the NH
202 road towards Mulugu. After crossing mulugu, drive 15 km you willget Machapur and before
chalvai please take right direction or hire a tata magic for easy access into the thick forest to
reach this place. The green hills of Govindaraopet agency mandal lie side by side to form a
massive bowl like structure which holds the spacious, beautiful and pristine lake popular known
as Laknavaram Cheruvu. The lake was the discovery of ancient Kakatiya rulers. They spotted
this excellent place amidst trees and green hills lined up around to hold the rainwater. The King
Ganapathi devudu only built a small sluice gate turning the place into a spacious lake which
now feeds thousands of acres of agricultural land every year. A sweet-water lake spread over
10,000 acres in the midst of green lush hills surrounded by thick forests

Taramati Baradari
The Baradari was constructed on the banks of the Musi river. Today, the region comes under
the city limits of Hyderabad, India. The tourism department attributes the name to the reign of
the Seventh Sultan of Golconda, Abdullah Qutb Shah who as an ode to his favorite courtesan,
Taramati, is said to have named the sarai Taramati Baradari. Taramati Baradari pavilion has 12
doorways and was constructed to allow cross ventilation and is one of the most indigenous
techniques to have been used at that time. The open pavilion includes other facilities like an aircooled theatre with capacity of 500 people, open-air auditorium with capacity of 1600 people,
Banquet Hall with capacity of 250, and multi-cuisine restaurant

Nagarjuna Sagar Dam


Nagarjuna Sagar Dam is the world's largest masonry dam. It was built on the Krishna River at
Nagarjuna Sagar in between Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh state and Nalgonda district of
Telangana state, India. The construction duration of the dam was between the years of 1955
and 1967. The dam created a water reservoir whose capacity is 11,472,000,000 cubic meters
(4.0511011 cu ft). The dam is 490 feet (150 m) tall and 0.99 miles (1.6 km) long with 26 gates
which are 42 feet (13 m) wide and 45 feet (14 m) tall. Nagarjuna Sagar was the earliest in the
series of large infrastructure projects initiated for the Green Revolution in India; it also is one of
the earliest multi-purpose irrigation and hydro-electric projects in India. The dam provides
irrigation water to the Nalgonda Khammam districts of Telangana, Prakasam, Krishna and
Guntur districts of Andhra Pradesh along with electric power to the national grid. It holds
second largest reservoir in India after Indira Sagar in Madhya Pradesh followed by Bhakra dam.
It is the largest dam in India in terms of Length,1,550 meters.

Falaknuma Palace
Falaknuma Palace is one of the finest palaces in Hyderabad, Telangana, India. It belonged to
Paigah Hyderabad State, and it was later owned by the Nizams.[1] It is on a 32-acre (13 ha) area
in Falaknuma, 5 km from Charminar. It was built by Nawab Vikar-ul-Umra, prime minister of
Hyderabad and the uncle and brother-in-law of the Nizam VI, Nawab Mir Mahboob Ali Khan
Bahadur. Falak-numa means "Like the Sky" or "Mirror of the Sky" in Urdu.
A visit to the Falaknuma Palace is like retracing the paths of Nizams, walking in step with the European
royalty, feeling the presence of the flamboyant Begums, walking arm-in-arm with distinguished Heads of the
State and walk the Kings way, slicing your path through the choicest architecture. It is like walking into the
heavens as the palace stands high about 2000 feet above the city. The Falaknuma Palaces exquisite beauty
allows you to enjoy a journey into the blue skies, into the glided ages of time immemorial, where grandeur and
lavishness is all you see.
Those who have basked in its opulence have rejoiced in its brilliantly designed Venetian chandeliers, uniquely
made furniture, an awe inspiring marble staircases and sloshing fountains, enchanting statues, and objects
dart. The Mughal, Rajasthani and the Japanese gardens that were personally conceived by the Nizam adore the
palace. The Falaknuma Palace has a very rich Library, that is every collectors envy. This replica of the one
library at Windsor Castle homes the rarest of manuscripts. It is also graced with one of the most applauded
collections of the Holy Quran in India.

Bhadrachalam
The temple at Bhadrachalam has the Archa Murthys of Rama, Sita and Lakshmana and are
considered to be Swayambhu (self-manifested ones). Lord Sri Rama appeared in a dream to a

woman called Pokala Dammakka and informed her about the existence of vigrahas on
Bhadragiri hills. To her surprise she found the "Vigraha's" and put up a modest structure.
Dhammakka, cleared jungle and offered puja to the deities. On 17 Nov 1959 the Bhadrachalam
Revenue Division, consisting of Bhadrachalam and Nuguru Venkatapuram Taluks of East
Godavari district were merged into the Khammam district through GO No 553. for geographical
contiguity and administrative viability
Parnasala is a small village located at a distance of 32 kilometers from the holy town Bhadrachalam in the state
of Telangana, India. A little glitch in reaching the village is its remote location because of which makes it a
little difficult to access. One can reach Parnasala only by road or boats as the means of transportation.
According to the legend, the most disciplined Lord Shri Ram spent some of his fourteen years of exile at this
place. The little stream stands as a testimony to the belief that Sita, wife of Lord Shri Ram, took her bath in the
stream, the place is called Sita Vaagu. Every belief is justified one such proof is the imprints in Radhagutta
in Parnasala. Another story accounting to the history of this historical village is that Maricha Rakshas was
killed by Lord Shri Ram in the same place when he came in disguise as a golden deer to deceive Goddess Sita.
Parnasala, which became a much visited picnic spot in Bhadrachalam is said to be the place where the evilminded king Ravan abducted Goddess Sita. This place unfolds this part of the epic Ramayana by exhibiting the
primary events with beautifully canvassed sculptures of Shri Ram, Sita, Laxman, and Ravan.