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Descendancy Narrative of William Landrum (2864)

I. William1 LANDRUM (2864)1 (Edicts of Aberdeen. Hereinafter cited as Edicts of Executry.) was New Tag Here is an interesting message worth saving
for further research:I'm really sorry about how much trouble it has taken to send such a relatively simple email. Quite simply, the original 'thank you' was
about thanking you for getting back to me so quickly. While I pride myself on how quickly I can go through the originals of 17th and 18th century Virginia
documents, I really struggle with the Scottish documents of the same years. I had only gotten halfway through verifying the data that I had on those early
Lendrums, when your email came in with the suggestion that the Margarets were mixed up. By the way, I agree with that conclusion. The papers that I
had from the Scottish archives were, among others, the settlement papers of Patrick Lendrum's estate. One of the main points of that exercise was to
name all of the then existing heirs.
That is not to suggest that what Heather has to say is not interesting. In the first place, I had never heard of any Lendrum's as far north as Kirkwall
before. And her usage of primary evidence, such as the register of deaths, leaves it in very good stead, as far as the reliability of evidence goes. I was
also particularly interested in her naming William as the father of Peter. One of the nuggets that Diane Baptie, the Scottish researcher I hired to get me
the copies of Peters estate settlement, was an abstract of the will of a William Lendrum of Logie Buchan. Diane sent it to me because one of William's
heirs was a Peter Lendrum. As I recall, William's will was 1726 -- this would suggest that it is possible that the Peter named in William's will could be
Peter, the father of Thomas Lendrum of Port Royal. However, it was no more than that -- there was no more that the coincidence of name and age -- no
real proof of kinship. If Heather has better evidence, I would be interested in seeing it.
I was also interested in her identification of Donald as the father of Helen Farquharson. I had seen in the OPR in IGI where Peter Lendrum and Helen
Farquahrson were married 12 Nov 1719 in Foveran. I checked my 1696 Aberdeenshire poll books for Foveran and found a Donald Farquahrson -- who I
guessed was Helen's father. Do you know if Heather has any primary evidence that Donald is Helen's father?
Also in the errant email was thanks for asking after my book. It is written, and in the can. However, I want to hire a professional editor, who is familiar
with the period, and that part of Virginia, to edit it. Aside from wanting to put out a work of quality, it is really necessary. I spend a good portion of my
book pointing out the shoddy and misleading research of others. I need to be on very firm ground, myself, especially if I am going to take others to task
for their misleading publications. So when I save the funds necessary for the effort, it will go forward.
George LandrumGC@aol.com (George Lendrum, "Essex County Lendrum," in Lendrum. (No place: no publisher, future), Hereinafter cited as "Essex
Co., Va."). He died in 1726 at Parish - Logie Buchan, Watridgemuir, Scotland, The information from the edicts was supplied by Diane Baptie
<diane@dbaptie.freeserve.co.uk> a Scottish Researcher hired by George Landrum in 1999. He LANDRUM TIMELINE BASED ON COMPILED
INFORMATION
This document is a compilation of Margot Woodroughs Lendrum narrative with the time line on Landrum developed by Linda P. Landrum
12907 Jadestone Dr. Sun City West, AZ 85375-3241. Her notes are in italics.
1726 Notes from Diane Baptie, a Scottish researcher, state: William Lendrum of Watridgemuir, parish of Logie Buchan died and his executors were his
children, Peter, Robert, Jean and Janet. (This could be the father of Peter/Patrick
Thomas Lendrum Sr. is called both a lawyer ( Note from Linda P. Landrum dated August, 1998 states: Reverand Thomas got his college degree in
Scotland and it was eight years between that and the time he appears in Virginia. Since his father was a burgess in Scotland makes one think that
Thomas was born in Scotland. ( Linda Landrum descends from James the emigrant discussed at length in Joel Shedds book, but Linda feels that
Parson Thomas was NOT a descendent of James, but could have been a nephew or more likely a cousin) (Original Scots Colonists in Early America,
by David Dobson states: Thomas Lendrum settled in Port Royal, VA, child was Thomas Keity Landrum) in Joel P. Shedds book, the Lendrum Family
of Fayette Co., Ga., p. 32. Thomas Sr. was either an immigrant or a native born Virginian, and there is evidence for both cases. If he was an
immigrant, he well could have been the Thomas Lendrum mentioned in the Order Book for Caroline Co., Va., dated Feb. 8, 1750, wherein he secured
fifty acres of land according to Royal institutions, by which each newly arrived settler was entitled to such a grant from the Crown. On the other hand, if
he was a native born Virginian, as indicated in the family tradition which says that the Lendrums came from Scotland in 1680, then who is the father?
Joel Shedds book casts no light on this problem.
(1-21-82 note - correlate this with Thomas Sr.s will.)
1 Apr 1741 Thomas Lendrum, Master of Arts, of the parish of Slayns, source:
Officers & Graduates of Kings College, Aberdeen, 1495-1860, by Peter J.
Anderson
15 Jul 1749 On motion of Thomas Landrum, who is desirous to practice the law,
this court being satisfied of his probity, honesty and good demeanor, do order
the same to be certified (Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 164)
15 Aug 1749 Thomas Landrum Gent produced a license to practice as Attorney
and
took the usual oaths to the government and the oath of an attorney
according to law. (Essex County Orders 15, p 373)
8 Sep 1749 Thomas Landrum, Gent, produced a license from Peyton Randolph
Esq,
etc, to plead at the County Courts, took the oaths and subscribed the Test.
(Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 171)
18 Dec 1750 Harry Turner of King George County, Gent; John Miller of Caroline,
Planter, and John Lee of Essex, Gent; concerning 5 Oct 1748 mortgage between
John Miller and Harry Turner for 273 pounds 2 shillings 5 pence paid by Harry
1

His name is a guess given that his children are mentioned and one of the children is Peter. however, this could be a different Peter. Connection needs
to be proved.

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Turner to John Miller, Miller sold to Turner 200 acres m Essex adjoining
John Corbin Esq, purchased by Miller from Thomas Ship, plus 11 slaves; for 5
shillings Turner sells his rights in the mortgage to John Lee; Wits: for
Harry Turner; John Smelt, Win. Parker, John Lee, Jr; by Miller: E. Pendleton,
Obad. Marriot, Thomas Lendrum, Henry Lee.
8 Feb 1750/1 Thos. Turner, Thos. Landrum, Jno. Shores, Geor. Frazear, Edward
Dixon, Patrick Couts, Jas. Donald, John Gray, Win. Gray and Robert Scott made
oath that they came immediately from Great Britain into this colony to dwell
and that this is the first time of their having proved the same in order to
entitle them to 50 acres of land each, and severally assigned their rights to
Jas. Maddison, Gent. (Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 247)
6 Apr 1753 Thomas Landrum attended meetings of Masons at Fredricksburg
Lodge #
4, and a dozen times in the next few years.
8 Nov 1753 Thomas Buckners mortgage to James & Robert Berries, merchants in
Glasgow, was proved by Thomas Landrum, John Gray and William Scott,
witnesses
thereto. (Caroline County Order book 1746-54, p 433)
12 Jan 1754 Thomas Landrum, became a member (probably made Entered
Apprentice) at Fredricksburg Lodge # 4.
12 Apr 1754 Thomas Landrum, at a meeting of Free & Accepted Masons, listed as
visiting brethren, at meeting of Port Royal Kilwinning Crosse Lodge # 2;
signed first by-laws.
14 Dec 1755 Thomas Landrum, affiliated as Fellow Craft Mason, Kilwinning
Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia
12 Jan 1756 Thomas Landrum, among first to earn Master Mason Degree,
Kilwinning Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia
Thomas Landrum was one of two visiting members and 10 Port Royal citizens
who met to form what was then an unchartered lodge of masons on 12 Apr 1754 . He was among the first to earn the Master Mason Degree in the
Lodge on 12 Jan 1756, and also served two terms as Grand Master of the Lodge (1761-1762).
A copy of Thomas Landrum's signature appears on the by-laws of the Kilwinning Port Royal Crosse Lodge.
26 Jul 1760 Mr. William Wren payment to Mr. Landrum for taking Wm Ailsops
deposition - 7/6 (folio 226); Thomas Lendrum same date, receives 7/6 for
taking witness deposition (folio 118), Edward Dixons Business Papers,
Container 17, reel 6 (1759-60)
10 Dec 1760 Thomas Landrum elected Master of the Lodge, Kilwinning Crosse
Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, served as Master of the
Lodge apparently until 1763.
20 Aug 1761 Thomas Lendrum, revenue from Wm Marshall; (folio 41), Edward
Dixons Business Papers, Container 18, reel 6 (1760-61)
1761 Thomas Lendrum, revenue from Elizabeth Buckner, Richard Tankersley
Dr. John Sutherland;
1762 Ann Marshall, 7/6
by Dr. Bankhead for Gibsons suit; (folio 18), Edward Dixons Business
Papers, Container 197, reel 6 (176 1-62)
6 May 1762 Thomas Landrum Gent Guardian Divers of Turner Dixon and Harry
Dixon
under the will of Thomas Turner the elder deceased, Thomas Turner by Thomas
Jett, Mary Turner and Sarah Turner by Anthony Thornton Gent their guardian,
defendants; vs Edward Dixon Gent only acting executor of the will of Thomas
Turner the elder; Suit concerns promise of Thomas Turner the elder to pay
Edward Dixon 2,000 pounds current money of Virginia on Dixons marriage to
Turners daughter Sarah. (King George County Orders #3, pp 994-1012)
1763 Mr. Thomas Lendrum; previous account folio 67, next account folio 56;
Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 20 reel 7, (1762-63)

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1764 Mr. Thomas Lendrum; cash received for account Robt. Million(folio 56);
Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 21 reel 8, (1763-64)
28 Jul 1764 Thomas Lendrum, Letter of recommendation, candidate for holy
orders, practiced as a lawyer, has a title from the vestry of a parish in the
county of King George; letter from Francis Faquier in Williamsburg to the Lord
Bishop of London
31 Jul 1764 Thomas Lendrum, letter of recommendation, candidate for holy
orders, has been intimately acquainted with the gentleman since his youth,
studied together for 4 years in the same University, where he took the degree
of Master of Arts. Since his residence in this colony, he spent part of his
time with my family, and the rest of it a small distance from me. letter from
Robert Innes, rector of Drysdale Parish
9 Aug 1764 Thomas Landrum, letter of recommendation, candidate for holy
orders, resided near my parish for upwards of 15 years; letter from John
Smelt, rector of St. Annes
10 Aug 1764 Thomas Landrum, letter of recommendation, candidate for holy
orders, letter of recommendation from Alexr Cruden, rector or South Farnham
Parish
3 Apr 1765 Thomas Lendrum on list of ministers ordained for Virginia
17 Aug 1765 Thomas Lendrum, at Port Royal, writes a letter of recommendation
for holy orders for Christopher McRae, who studied at Marishali College, from
which he says he has a diploma. Rev. Mr. Henry has given him a title to his
curate(?)
25 Feb 1765 Thomas Lendrum, Hanover Parish, Virginia, writes a letter of
recommedation for holy orders for Mr. George Goldie.
3 April 1765 Thomas Lendrum on list of ministers ordained for Virginia
3 Apr 1765 Thomas Lendrum, Bond given to Richard, Lord Bishop of London, for
40 pounds, Terms: Lendrum licensed by Richard, Lord Bishop of London to
perform the office of Priest in Province of Virginia, given His Majesties
bounty of 20 pounds, that sd Lendrum will sail to province of Virginia to
perform sd office within 3 months of date of bond. Wits: Benj Chamberlain,
Wm Dickers, Not Pub
4 Apr 1765 Thomas Lendrum, Virginia - Money Book 49-306 (A List of Emigrant
Ministers to America 1690-1811, Gerald Fothergil, GPC 1965)
1769 Revd. Mr. Thomas Lendrum; revenues from Wm Boon; Edward Dixon s
Business
Papers, Container 23 reel 8, (1762-63)
1765-1771 Thomas Landrum, minister of Hanover Parish (A List of the Colonial
Church in Virginia from 1607-1785)
1771 Thomas Lendrum, Admitted as an Attorney in King George County Court in
1758. Went to England for ordination 1764. Licensed for Va April 3, 1765.
Became minister of Hanover Parish, King George County and remained its
minister probably until his death in 1771. Appointed Justice of the Peace for
King George County, 1767. Will probated in King George County, 1771 (A List
of Emigrant Ministers to America 1690-1811, Gerald Fothergil, GPC 1965)
The author of the Lodge history said that Thomas was probably made an
entered apprentice at Fredricksburg Lodge # 4 in Fredricksburg, Va. The Port
Royal Lodge met on 5 Sep 1770 to conduct Thomas' funeral service . Thomas
Landrum is shown on a list of members of the Fredricksburg Lodge between 1752
and 1771.
5 Sep 1770 Called meeting of Masons of Kilwinning Crosse Lodge 2-23 7, Port
Royal, Caroline County, Virginia for funeral of Thomas Landrum. The corpse
appeared to have been at the home of Robert Gilchrist, & from there procession went to the cemetery.
The best hunch, until more evidence appears, is that Thomas Sr. was newly arrived from England, and that he was one and the same as the
Lendrum mentioned in Dictionary of Scottish Immigrants to the U.S.A. by Whyle, p. 200. The book states that Lendrum arrived in Port Royal, Va.

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before 1784, and that he was the son of Thomas Keith. (S.H. #2778) the SH means Service of Heirs) If this fact is true, it would help to explain the
family tradition which includes the name Keith in that of Thomas Lendrum, even when there is no documentary proof for this name. Possibly, the same
Thomas that arrived in Port Royal was the same as the Thomas who, on February 8, 1750, along with others, made oath that they came immediately
from Great Britain into this colony to dwell, and that this ye first time of their having proved the same in order to entitle them to 50 acres of land according
to Royal institutions, and that the said persons severly assign their rights to James Madison, Gent. as shown in the Order Book of Caroline Co., Va. It
would then, also, be likely that the recent immigrant, Thomas I, was the lawyer and parson who was admitted to the practice of law at Port Royal in
1749. This latter Thomas, being the same man who wrote a will in 1764, probated in King George County, Va. in 1771. The will named his son,
Thomas II.
In a codicil that stuck me (George Landrum) as odd, he implores the guardians/executors to spend their own funds to educate Thomas' children, in the
event that their
shares of the estate are inadequate.
Why does Thomas feel free to implore his guardians/executors to spend
their own funds on his children's education? We find what might be part of
an answer in one of the letters of recommendation for ordination as a
minister written to the Bishop of London. In a letter dated 31 Jul 1764,
Rev. Robert Innes, the Rector of Drysdale parish, said that he had been
intimately acquainted with Thomas since his youth, as they studied together
for 4 years at the same University. Thomas took the degree of Master of
Arts. Innes further said that when Thomas spent a part of his time in the
Colony 'in my Family', and the rest of it a small distance from him .
I found that Rev. Robert Innes had obtained an MA from Aberdeen
University . Andersons' list shows Thomas Lendrum, of the parish of Slains,
to have received his M.A. 1 Apr 1741. I could not find a Robert Innes, Moray
province, parish of Alva, with an M.A. until 1745. I wrote and asked the
University of Aberdeen how it might be possible that these two men might have
studied together for the 4 years mentioned in the letter of recommendation.
They replied that Robert Innes began studying in 1737, but only graduated in
1745.
4 Apr 1771 Thomas Landrum Will, written Sunday, 5 Aug 1764, I intend., in a
few days to sail for Great Britain; gives executors to sell all estate, real
& personal, to pay debts; lots in Port Royal; reversion in land purchased
from Thomas Sullinger after the death of his mother; rest of estate to wife in
lieu of dower, requesting her to bestow as much as she can spare to educate
son Thomas Keith, & child she is now with if a son to qualify them for Parsons
or Doctors (for I will by no means intail on them the Drudgery of the Law);
the charge of their education I particularly recommend the Reverend Robert
Innes and Alexander Rose, who I am confident will take care that they shall
have a Virtuous & Religious Education tho perhaps their share of my Estate may
not affort them a Learned one; after the death of my wife.. my estate may be
divided among my surviving children, but in case my son Thomas Keith, when he
comes to the years of discretion, should desire to live in Port Royall, he may
take a fee simple estate in all my land and houses that may remain unsold (if
he dies, to unborn child if son; if wife survives all she shall have the
disposal of 100 pounds; 1/3 of the balance thereof I leave to Robert Innes,
son of the above named Robert Innes; the other 2/3s I desire may be converted
to money and remitted to my Father or Mother, if alive, if not to my sisters
and brothers equally. Wife, Robert Gilchrist, James Miller, John Gray,
Alexander Rose & John Skinker, Gentlemen, executors, & said Robert Inness
guardian of my children.
Codicil: As the profit of my son or sons shares of my estate may not be
sufficient for his or their education, I would by no means confine my
executors, or their guardians to our laws in that regard, but impower and even
desire them to expend every penney of their fortunes on it, if my wife can be
prevailed on to part with them which I trust she will. Will & codicil written
5 Aug 1764.
At court held 4 Apr 1771, will of Thomas Landrum CLK deceased was presented by Nelly Landrum. On oaths of Thos Jett, Thoms Hodge,
William Barnard andAlexander Rose admitted to record. Nelly Landrum, Executrix
Thomas Lendrum Jr. was the Physician of Port Royal, Va. and was probably born sometime between 1750 and 1758. During the war of Revolution,
he served with the Virginia State Navy. Evidence of this is contained in the rather lengthy half-pay file which rests in the National Archives. The
evidence that this particular Thomas Lendrum is the direct ancestor of Lillie Hudson Lendrum is contained in this file and proved by several letters which
were found in the attic of Beechwood, in So. Ft. Mitchell, Ky. (It is interesting to note that there were at least two Thomas Lendrums, and possibly
there were even three. The several D.A.R. papers filed claiming descent from the revolutionary soldiers are as a rule incorrect. Even those of Lillie
Hudson Lendrum was entirely erroneous! Since she claimed descent from a man, Warren T. Lendrum who was actually her uncle. It is easy to see how
she could have made this error, since, evidently, her grandfather, Thomas Lendrum II, ( the surgeon), was middle aged when her father, John B.
Lendrum was born. Thomas Lendrum II served as surgeons mate on board the ship Tempest during the Revolutionary War. There are several proofs
of this service:

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1.

December 30, 1779 he was allowed 18 of brown sugar.


September 9, 1779 he received coffee and sugar.
December 10, 1779 he received sugar coffee and tea.
2. During his time of service he was acquainted with several men who in later

years made affidavits to this fact:

Jul 1779 Murdock, William et al vs John Edward Henry Turner Dixon and John and Alice Pratt; Nelly Landrum listed in the Account of the
Estate of Capt. JosephMurdock decd, for 1778 in King George County Court
24 Oct 1780 Nelly Landrum, widow, administratrix of the last will of Rev.
Thomas Landrum, decd, sells one slave to Dr. John Tennant of Port Royal. Caroline County Chancery Suits
3 Jan 1784 Thomas Lendrum sett. Port Royal Va, ch Thomas-Keith pre 1784 SRO
SH
3244 (Original Scots Colonists of Early America 16 12-1783, David Dobson, GPC
1989)
1784 Thomas Keith Lendrum inderits the share left to his father, Peter/Patrick.Peter was described of once of Colliestown, lately Burgess of Old
Aberdeen. The land that thomas Keith inderits is called Symons Croft, lying in the Seton parish of Old Machar and sherriffdom of Old Aberdeen. Data
goes on to mention the rest of family.
3 Jan 1784 Thomas Keith Lendrum, to his father Thomas Lendrum in Port Royal,
Virginia (Dictionary of Scottish Settlers in North America 1625-1825)
3 Jan 1794 Thomas Lendrum, burgess of Aberdeen, sh. 1765, sett Port Royal, VA,
fa of Thomas, d pre 1784 (Scots on the Chesapeake, 1607-1830, David Dobson,
GPC, 1992)
a. In 1834 John Cannady of Fauquier Co., Va. states that Thomas Landrum was a surgeons mate who stayed with the Tempest until it was
abandoned by the crew when the enemy took command of the River (James) and finally the vessel. Thomas had been on board at least two years and
ten months prior to the capture of the Tempest.
b. In 1834 Charles Hayden of King George Co., Va. stated that he knew Thomas Landrum and also the fact that he died in Westmoreland County,
Va., and was the son of Parson Landrum of King George Co. Both Thomas Landrum and Higdon (wonder if this should be Hayden. If so its an error
made by MVW when her original notes typed in the 1970s) grew up in the same area. Thomas Landrum married after the war and lived in Leedstown in
Westmoreland Co., Va.
c. William Stoke Jett (note that Thomas Lendrums wife was named Margaret Stoake.) likewise made an affidavit in which he states that he was
acquainted with Thomas Landrum, the son of Parson Lendrum of King Geo. Co., Va. He too says that after his marriage Thomas resided in Port Royal,
Caroline Co. and practiced medicine. Later he moved to Westmoreland Co. where Jett was living. William Jett recalls the anecdote wherein Landrum
was called upon to perform an amputation, his first, while in service on board the Tempest.
Following the Revolutionary War, Thomas married Margaret Stoake. It would be reasonable to assume that the wedding took place sometime
between 1788 and 1790. If this date, and his presumed birthday are correct, then Thomas was probably in his mid thirties when he married. (Family
stories indicate that Thomas Lendrums wife was named Buckner but his will clearly calls her Margaret Stoake.) In fact, the name Buckner has persisted
in the family up until the early 1900s, but to date no record is found of a connection with the Buckners. Perhaps the name belonged to either Margaret
or Thomas mother.
Rodham Kenner, et al vs Sarah Tennant
No date Jury finds that Thomas Landrum died on 5 Aug 1764 (sic) and his will
was admitted to record in King George Co on 4 Apr 1771. Nelly Landrum, widow
of Thomas Landrum qualified as executrix. Thomas Landrum at his death left
children, viz, Thomas Keith Landrum, Hellen Kenner, wife of Rodham Kenner,
Marianna Stone wife of Samuel Stone and Peter Landrum. On 24 Oct 1780 Nelly
Landrum sold a slave to John Tennant (now dead) and his wife Sarah Tennent.
Nelly Landrum died in Dec 1803.
11 Sep 1804 Mary Parker is judged to be too old and infirm to be able to
testify in court.
Box 8 MO-MU Folder

Box 12 St-Sw
Samuel Stone vs Thomas Lendrum, administrator of Nelly Lendrum
1808 Samuel Stone states that he married a daughter of Nelly Landrum and is
entitled to a part of her estate and has purchased Peter Landrums share of
the estate from him
29 Sep 1805 Peter Lendrum appoints Samuel Stone his attorney to receive from
Dr. Thomas Lendrum of Westmoreland Co his full share of Nelly Landrums

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estate.
16 Sep 1806 Peter Lendrum signs a note stating that he has received my
proportion of my deceased mothers estate Mrs. Nelly Lendrum.
3 Dec 1809 Thomas Lendrum states that Samuel Stone is entitled to 1/4th of
Nelly Lendrums estate in right of his wife plus 1/4th interest bought from
Peter Lendrum
13 Mar 1812 Thomas Lendrum died intestate in Westmoreland Co
Caroline County Court Records, Box 2 1742, 1762-90, Folder 5
4 Apr 1771 Thomas Landrum will (abstracted above)
Caroline County Court Papers
Box 7, Folder 4 Ended papers J & L 1805
11 Apr 1805 Mary Parker states that Mrs Nelly Landrum, now deceased, sold a
slave to Dr. John Tennent, now deceased and that Mrs. Landrum and her family
were in want of bread and meat. Nelly Landrum was the widow of Thomas
Landrum.
30 Jan 1804 Peter Landrum states that Rodham Kenner and Samuel Stone are
married to his sisters and that the will of his father was dated 1 Aug 1764.
Apr 1805 Thomas Landrum, Rodham Kenner & Helen Kenner his wife and Samuel
Stone and Marianne Stone his wife sue Sarah Tennent
8 Dec 1809 Maryanna Stone in the house of Samuel Stone on 8 Dec 1809 states
that a few days before the sale of her deceased mothers estate, she gave her
sister, the wife of Rodham Kenner, feathers to make her a good bed.
11 Dec 1809 Thomas Landrum of Westmoreland county states that Rodham
Kenner
married a daughter of Nelly Landrum and is entitled to a part of her estate.
8 Dec 1809 Robert Kay states that on 8 Dec 1809 he was at the sale of Nelly
Landrums estate and that Thomas Landrum demanded bonds from Samuel Stone
and Rodham Kenner for their purchases.
About 1800 Caroline County Chancery Suits:
Box 7, K-Ma
Rodham Kenner vs Thomas Landrum
No Date Rodham Kenner against Thomas Landrum, administrator of Nelly
Landrum.
Thomas Landrum has died intestate & Christopher T. Collins is his
administrator
In January of 1811, Thomas Lendrum (note that the spelling has now changed to Lendrum - the way it has persisted until the present.) wrote a will
leaving to Margaret Stoke Lendrum, his property for the maintenance of his children. His youngest child, John B. (presumed Buckner) Lendrum was
seven years old, at the time. His oldest daughter, Elizabeth Washington Lendrum, however, was married to Dr. Christopher Collins. Dr. Collins was
named executor of the will. Thomas wife, Mary (Margaret or Mary ?), was to be the administrator. Evidently Margaret relinquished the right to
administrator to Christopher Collins. When Collins died, his wife Elizabeth was granted letters of Administration by the Court, even though Margaret
Lendrum was still alive. (Thomas Lendrum died July 12, 1811)
Starting about 1834, Elizabeth Lendrum Collins, as a representative for the heirs, her brothers and sisters (presumably her mother now dead), started
proceedings to secure the pension due as a result of the Act of Congress of July 5, 1832, granting pension rights to veterans or survivors or their heirs.
Elizabeth had quite a job ahead of her and evidently it became necessary for her to enlist the aid of her congressman, J. Taliaferro, in an attempt to
collect Thomas Lendrums pension. Apparently there was some dispute as to when Thomas Lendrum actually terminated service, the Va. State Navy
having been reduced in number prior to the close of the war. It was initially presumed that Thomas was relieved of duty at this time ________.
However, it soon became apparent that two ships were retained in service past the date of reduction, these being the Tempest and the Tattler. There
are three affidavits in Thomas Lendrums half-pay file which state that he was on board the Tempest as Surgeons Mate. That being the case, J.

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Taliaferro was able to use the following facts from a similar case to cause the pension office to grant a pension, which allowed for Lendrums service
from the date of the ships capture.
Leighs Reports - Vol. 1, p 517:
The Captain of the Tempest was named Markham and he was made prisoner when his ship was captured in Hampton Rhodes. His heirs filed suit in the
Virginia Court of Appeals for half-pay and won. Taliaferro requested that the war department grant the same right to Thomas Lendrum, since it was
proved that he, too, served on the vessel until its capture and so should be entitled to the same rights as the captain.
In May of 1835, Lucy E. Lendrum, the daughter of Thomas, and sister of Elizabeth, acted as attorney-in-fact for Harriet E. Lendrum, Thomas W.
Lendrum, John B. Lendrum and Lucy E. Lendrum in granting power of attorney to the estate administrator, Mrs. Elizabeth W. Collins. In fact the estate
did succeed and on May 9, 1838, received a total of $2529.74 for 27 years and 264 days half-pay pension based on the rate of $91.25 per year.
Presumably, the heirs used their hard earned pension to support themselves, and evidently it was a greatly needed pension for their support, for Mr.
Taliaferro, in an effort to speed up the proceedings, refers to the needy, unmarried heirs. One wonders what part John B. Lendrum, who was at this
time, far away in Kentucky, received. It is possible that he and his brother, Warren T. Lendrum, forfeited their rights to the pension in favor to their
widowed and unmarried sisters.
Having won the initial battle for the half-pay pension, and presumably having exhausted the funds received, Elizabeth Collins again became active
in the pension case in 1845. She reopened the issue by requesting that half-pay be allowed from Nov. 30, 1781, the date on which Thomas Lendrum
terminated service (?) until April 22, 1783, the date on which the original pension had commenced. She was successful, as shown by a letter dated
Sept. 17, 1845, from the Pension Office in Washington which allowed the heirs an additional 91.25 per year for the extra 18 months, a total of $127.00.
The matter was still of interest to someone in 1854, for one Thomas C. Peek, of Hampton, Elizabeth County, Va. whose relationship is yet unknown,
wrote to the Pension Office in Washington asking how much half-pay had been allowed for Thomas Lendrum, when and to whom it had been allowed.
All of these proceedings had a two-fold effect. Initially, they granted a living to a widow and her two maiden sisters. (Harriet B. Lendrum was listed
as head of the household in 1850 in Va. census and family letters indicate that she lived with Elizabeth, her sister.) The long range effect was to bring to
the present the vital information necessary to establish which of the two, and possibly three, Thomas Lendrums of Virginia was the real ancestor of Lillie
Hudson Lendrum. Lillie had filed D.A.R. papers on _________, stating that her descent from one Thomas Lendrum of Virginia. The papers contained
only that grain of truth. Lillie was in error in most other respects, and it took the combination of the Virginia State Navy half-pay file and some personal
letters found in the attic at Beechwood to establish the true identity of Thomas Lendrum, Surgeons Mate.
The available evidence concerning the immediate heirs of Thomas Lendrum indicate that the three girls, Elizabeth L. Collins, Harriet, and Lucy E.
Lendrum all remained in Virginia. Walter T. Lendrum attended West Point, married, raised a family, and served in the Mexican War. Possibly, he lived
for a time in New York. Here are the texts of two letters which came from the attic at Beechwood, the home of Lilly Hudson Lendrum Blakelys son,
Stephens Laurie, which is located in Kenton County, Ky.
The first letter is from Harriet Lendrum addressed to her brother, John B. Lendrum. It is only a fragment and so the date and entire contents and the
order of the pages is not known. Each page will be shown as a separate paragraph:
her mother and only eleven years old and very pretty and so is Joesia. I wrote to your father a short time since and informed him of Mr. Jetts death.
You said nothing about your friend Georgie Phelps. Where is she now? I really was surprised to hear old Mr. and Mrs. Benton were still living. I
suppose the old man is nearly and idiot. He seemed to have so little sense when I saw him. I was sorry to hear of Laura child being afflicted. I hope
Kate married well. She is a very sweet person. Is old Mr. Preston still living? Do you know anything of Mrs. Fairchild? I really like to....
..before but I had a rising on my finger so that I could not write without a good deal of pain. I am now writing on Sunday when they are all at church
because it is the only quiet time I have and I cant write in a bustle. I was very glad to get a letter from you and to hear you all were well. This has been
one of the coldest winters so early in the season I have known for a good many years. The ground is covered with a deep snow and very cold. Do you
expect to spend a Merry Christmas? I expect to spend a very sad one. It will be the only Christmas I have spent without some of the boys kin, their
mothers death and.....
scarcely ever go out even to Church. We have a fine preacher, Bishop Payne. He is very popular and is calculated to do some good. He is a
devoted Christian. I have not heard a Methodist minister more than two or three times since I left Covington and I miss it very much for although I like to
hear Bishop Payne I like my own church best. I hear very often from Fred. He says his little boy is a very fine child and the great comfort to him. Says
he is the greatest chatter box he ever heard. Warren scarcely ever writes but we hear from him through Doct. Marye. The other boys are well. John is
in Memphis and.......
I am very glad to hear Thom is doing so well. I hope he will try and lay up his money. Is Mrs. Porter still in the office? What has become of our
cousin Mrs. Whips? Give my love to her if she is in Covington. I must now close this uninteresting letter for I have nothing to write about for there never
was a duller place than this. Remember me affectionately to your father, mother, and Harry and any one that asks for me also Thomas when you see
him. I should like so much to see you all once more but never expect to have that pleasure. Yours, Aunt H. E. Lendrum
1856 letter addressed to John B. Lendrum from his niece, Marie Lendrum
Marie, daughter of Warren T. Lendrum
Dear Uncle;
Once again I have retained my pen for the purpose of devoting a few moments to you. I have to confine myself to a few moments as I am seated by the
sick bed side of Sallie. and am liable to be called off at any time to administer to her wants. She has been confined to her bed for the past two weeks
with a Nervous Fever and it is impossible to say when she will be able to leave it. She is of course completely prostrated not being able to take any
nourishment in her weak state. The doctor has been attending her constantly but does not think there is anything very serious the matter with her, but of
course it will take her some weeks to recover her accustomed health. It was extremely negligent of me dear Uncle not to have acknowledged your letter
sent by Mr. Taylor and the daguerreotypes but I hope it is not quite too late to do so now and say how much I appreciated both. Lillie must have grown
amazingly since I saw her judging from her picture but it does not flatter her in the least. It is not nearly as pretty as she is. The same can be said of the
boys but you know that is characteristic of all daguerreotypes. We are looking forward every day for Johns arrival. He has not written lately and as that
is the case I think intends taking us by surprise as he usually does. I think that we will give up on anticipated visits to Virginia for the present as we
received a letter from Cousin Maria a day or two since, written of course in great depression of spirits stating that poor Tom Wheelwright was with them
and in dying condition. I suppose you know that he was in decline, did you not? I am afraid that the next accounts will be that he is dead indeed. I
sincerely sympathize with his afflicted family. His mother is so completely wrapped up in him. Even if this were not the case I do not suppose that Mary
(Johns wife) would feel in the spirits for visiting, being afflicted herself having lost her brother a month ago. We heard some charming news a few
weeks since, the removal of the troops from Arkansas to Old points. If that is the case, of course, John will be sent probably for two or three years
indeed, I really hope it is something more than idle reports, as he never had an agreeable station since he has been in the army. I suppose you have
heard of Colonel Taylors removal from Texas. He left here about two weeks ago with his family for the purpose of spending the length of time with Mrs.
Taylor in Cincinnati. He is probably now on his way. You cannot imagine how much we miss Sallie and Mary. We have always been so intimate.

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Upton is now at Cedar Park. He was here for a few days but could not resist the temptation of returning. He now talks of going back to Sante Fe but
whether he will carry his intentions out or not I cannot say. He is not very communicative. I suppose your city as well as ours has been politically
agitated for the past few weeks, has it not? Indeed that has been the topic of the day here. Even the ladies seemed to take as much interest as the
opposite sex. I formed an exception however for since we are not permitted to vote I think it is a decided waste of time and breath to espouse either
party. Dont you think so? It is getting late dear Uncle and I will have to close. Do pardon the penmanship of this letter as I am writing with an old stick
(it cannot be called a pen) Give my kindest love to Aunt E. and the children in which Sallie joins me
Yours most affectionately,
Maria
Family stories say that John B. Lendrum, the son of Dr. Thomas Lendrum, went to Kentucky, Campbell County, around 1829-1830, and that he was
born Aug. 19, 1804 at Oak Grove in Westmoreland Co., Va. However, the 1850 census for Kenton County, Ky. shows John B. Lendrum as age 39,
which would place his birth at 1811. In either case, he married and started a family rather late. (As also did his father Thomas Lendrum Jr., which
explains what at first seemed a gap in generations.) By 1850 John appears in the 3rd Ward of Covington, Kenton Co., Ky. His occupation is City Clerk
and he resides with his wife, Elizabeth (Rudd) who is age 29 and is a native Kentuckian. They have two sons, Thomas W. age 3, and evidently named
for his Uncle, and the infant Harry Stokes, age 1. The family is wealthy enough to include a maid named Mary Roe, age 17, who came from Germany.
Since John B. Lendrum did not marry his wife until 1846, at which time he was either 42 or 35, both of which are a bit old for the day, he must have quite
a past waiting to be discovered. INSERT J.B. LENDRUM PICTURE HERE.
By the year 1861 John Lendrum was living on Garrard Street, between Third and Fourth, in Covington, Ky. and is called, in the Cincinnati City
Directory, a general agent e.s.( dont know what es means need to look up) His daughter, Lillie Hudson, who was born Sept. 13, 1852, was by this
time, nine years old. Her future husband, Laurie J. Blakely, has just arrived in town at this time ( Not so sure about this date for Laurie need to double
check)(1861) for he is listed, also, in the same City Directory as -------------.
The court records for August 28, 1862 show (order book 1, p. 316) that John B. Lendrum produced his commission as justice of the peace for the 1st
District of City of Covington. In 1871 when the Directory was published, the Lendrums were living at the N.W. corner of Greenup and Fifth Street and
John B. Lendrum was employed as a store keeper at Wessels and Schultz. By now, son Harry S. was serving as a clerk at the Post Office, at 86 E.
Fifth Street in Covington. Harry was later to marry Sarah Morrison, move to Brooklyn, N.Y. and produce six children: Ralph Hemmingway, Harry Stokes
Jr., Paul Grant, Earl Randolph, Victor Stephen and Lillian Hudson. The other son, Thomas W. disappeared and is reported through family tales to have
gone to prison for embezzlement, a great source of embarrassment to an otherwise outstanding family who practically pioneered Covington, Ky.
The daughter, Lillie Hudson Lendrum married at the age of 25, on June 28, 1877 to Laurie John Blakely of Covington, Ky. The wedding was held at
the brides home, 619 Scott Street in Covington. The groom was a Catholic, from a very Catholic family, but since the bride was Baptist, the wedding
could not be held in the church. The following is a description of the wedding:
ORANGE BLOSSOMS No sweeter lady was ever wedded to a worthier or genial gentleman than when Miss Lillie Lendrum was wedded to Mr. L. J.
Blakely. The marriage was celebrated in simple, pretty style at the home of the Brides parents, #619 Scott Street, yesterday afternoon at 3 oclock.
Father Ton Major, of Cynthiana, officiating. The bride looked indisputably lovely in her pure white attire, ornamented with natural flowers; and the groom
was as handsome as handsome can be. The parlors were clothed in white, decked off with flowers and pretty illuminations, and the whole presented a
most charming tableau. Only a few of the nearest relatives and intimates were there. And the wedding pair took passage on the Fleetwood at 4 oclock
destined for Greenbrier, White Springs, where they will abide for a few days, and then return to their home. Among the wedding gifts were: ornamental
work from her own workmanship, Miss Carrie Gedge; bracelets, Mr. Harry Lendrum; pickle jar, silver stand and spoons, Warren T. Lendrum; silver fruit
spoons in case, Mrs. W. H. Mackey; a case of silver knives, Mrs. J. B. Lendrum; silver jewell casket, Mrs. Boyd; silver napkin rings, Cousin Mollie;
pitcher and goblet, Mrs. Mary B. Ryan; silver basket, Mrs. A. J. Whipps; bouquet of elegant ---, Mrs. N. B. Stephens (This is Mrs. Napoleon Stephens
_who knows the B. could be Bonapart) [The various Stephens in the family were named for Napoleon B. Stephens the best friend of Laurie Blakely.
Thankfully the last name of Stephens was used not the first of Napoleon whew a near miss!]; another of same from Dodo Ryan.
It was hardly a year past the wedding date when on May 25, 1878, at the age of about 70, John B. Lendrum died. His death was recorded thus: (It
seems that the extract came from a newspaper clipping, although there is no notation of the date or issue. Taken from a typed copy found in the attic at
Beechwood.) Esquire J. B. Lendrum died at his home, 619 Scott Street, yesterday morning in the 74th year of his age. The funeral takes place
tomorrow at 2 oclock. John Buckner Lendrum was born on the 19th day of August, 1804 at Oak Grove, Va. He was the son of Dr. Thomas Keith
Lendrum, and his mothers maiden name was Margaret Buckner. His father was a regimental surgeon in a Virginia command in the Revolutionary War.
The deceased came to Covington in 1830 and has resided here ever since. He served 12 years as City Clerk and several years besides as Magistrate;
also as Mayor pro tempore in the administration of Mayor Cyrus Preston and S. W. Foley. In 1836 he was initiated in Washington Lodge, I.00F in this
city. He was also, at his death, a member of the Simon Kenton Pioneer Association. Both these Societies will attend his funeral, having already called a
meeting for this purpose. Esquire Lendrum has been failing fast, from mere old age for several months. He leaves a widow and three children, and very
many of this community, who have learned to respect him as a good and venerable citizen, will unite with them in mourning his death.
Two years following her husbands death, on Monday March 13, 1880, Elizabeth Rudd Lendrum died and her funeral was held at the First Baptist
Church on 4th Street in Covington. Her obituary read as follows: Mrs. J. B. Lendrum, my estimable lady and old citizen died at midnight of day before
yesterday, after a long and painful illness. Mrs. Elizabeth Lendrum, widow of the late John B. Lendrum, and one of Covingtons oldest residents,
esteemed by all for her many admirable qualities of mind and heart, died yesterday at the residence of her son in law, L. J. Blakely, Esq.
It must have been a trying few years for the newly married Lillie Lendrum and Laurie J. Blakely because their first son, Stephens L. Blakely was born
on April 23, 1878, only one month prior to his grandfathers death, and their second son, Paul Lendrum Blakely was born Feb. 27, 1880, only a month
prior to his grandmothers death from what was described as a long and painful illness, and during which time she seemed to have been living with the
newlyweds.
In July, 1977 the Court and Probate records of Kenton County were examined to find a will or administration of the estate of John B. Lendrum, or his
wife Elizabeth Rudd Lendrum, but none were found.
In the year 1896, the son of John B. Lendrum, Harry S., died. Here follows his obituary: The news of the death of Harry Stokes Lendrum, which
occurred last Sunday at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., will be heard with sincere regrets. He was in his 46th year at the time of his death. He was
born in Covington, Ky. and was the son of the late John b. and Elizabeth H. Lendrum, pioneer residents of this city. The deceased, early in his life, was
appointed to a position in the City of Covington Post Office, served under the late Jesse R. Grant and Shadford Easton. During the second
administration of General Grant, Mr. Lendrum was the Presidents personal request, transferred to the New York Post office where he subsequently
became chief of Division of the Registry Dept. In his many years of service in the department, both here and in New York, he possessed and merited
the full and hearty confidence of his superiors in office. He was a good son, a devoted husband and father. In Covington he enjoyed the friendship and

Page 8

esteem of a wide circle of acquaintances and friends. He leaves a surviving widow and four children, a girl 14 years of age and three boys, and his
sister, Mrs. Laurie J. Blakely. The burial was in Brooklyn.
This brings to a close the Lendrum line. The story continues with the family of Laurie J. Blakely and Lillie Hudson Lendrum Blakely.
Note that the notes below as well as others incorporated into the text in the same type were supplied by George Lendrum who is descended
from James (not this Thomas) and is writing a book on the Landrums of Essex. An exerpt from his book, beautifully footnoted is in the file of
MVW 8-99
The post town of the parish of Slains is Ellon. Ellon is one of the
sites reported by Shedd and others as being one of the early centers of
concentration of Landrum's in Scotland.
I found the close association of Robert Innes and Thomas Lendrum
interesting. Robert Rose was the minister of St. Anne parish, Essex County,
from 1725-1748 . Parson Robert Rose's youngest brother, Alexander Rose,
settled at Grantswood, in King George County, Virginia, and served as an
attorney in the surrounding county courts . The Old Parochial Register of
the parish of Alves shows an entry on page 64 (1720) shows an entry that
states: "Robert Rose Student of Philosophy at Alves" as being one of the
witnesses to the baptism of Robert Innes, the son of William Innes and
Margaret McKay in Wester Alves, Scotland .
After ordination, Thomas Lendrum replaced the Rev. Johathan Boucher as
the minister of Hanover Parish, King George County, Virginia in 1765 . The
Thomas Lendrum mentioned above was Boucher's immediate successor in Hanover
Parrish in King George County, Virginia. Curiously enough, another Thomas
Landrum was to succeed Boucher in St. Anne's Parish (Annapolis, Maryland).
In Maryland, Boucher left St. Annes in 1771 , and the other Thomas Landrum
did not succeed Boucher until 16 Jan 1775 . Boucher is best known for being
a Loyalist who was tutor to George Washington's step son, Jackie Custis from
1768-1773. The largest and most complete collection of Washington's
surviving pre-revolutionary correspondence is with Boucher during this period
. Oddly enough, the Thomas Landrum who succeeded Boucher at St. Anne's was
also a Loyalist, deserted his parish and sailed for England in 1778 .
Boucher will appear again in later chapters, as will the Thomas Landrum of
Hanover Parish.
Thomas Landrum provides a number of genealogical clues, as of 1764 when
he wrote his will. We can surmise that as far as he is aware, both of his
parents are living. He also has both brothers and sisters. He names one
son, Thomas Keith. Squabbles among heirs provide us with the names of the
remainder of his children. One squabble will suffice to provide us with
their names. In Rodham Kenner, et al v Sarah Tennent we find Thomas, at his
death, had children Thomas Keith Landrum, Hellen Kenner, wife of Rodham
Kenner, Marianna Stone, wife of Samuel Stone and Peter Landrum. The suit
concerned a slave sold to John Tennent (then deceased) and his wife Sarah
Tennent. It is also mentioned that Thomas' wife Nelly died in Dec 1803.
There is no date on the papers, but the suit is clearly after 1803."
I see that the signature exemplar did not come through. Also, none of
the footnotes came in the above copy. If you want, I can do the above as a
separate document and attach it -- that way the signature example & footnotes
should come through.
Bye for now,
George in 2006.
A. Peter2 LANDRUM (679)2 (Ibid., LandrumGC@aol.com is George Landrum. He lives in Germany in 1999 and has done a thorough research on
early Landrum family. His book is a work 50% complete.) (Edicts of Executry.) married Helen FARQUHARSON (2847) at Scotland (George
Lendrum, "Essex Co., Va."). He was also known as Patrick (679). Peter is described of once of Colliestown, lately Burgess of Old Aberdeen (Ibid.).
1. Parson Thomas3 LANDRUM (134) (Ibid.). This document is a compilation of Margot Woodroughs Lendrum narrative with the time line
on Landrum developed by Linda P. Landrum 12907 Jadestone Dr. Sun City West, AZ 85375-3241. Her notes are in italics.

1726 Notes from Diane Baptie, a Scottish researcher, state: William Lendrum of Watridgemuir, parish of Logie Buchan died and his executors
were his children, Peter, Robert, Jean and Janet. (This could be the father of Peter/Patrick
Thomas Lendrum Sr. is called both a lawyer ( Note from Linda P. Landrum dated August, 1998 states: Reverand Thomas got his college degree
in Scotland and it was eight years between that and the time he appears in Virginia. Since his father was a burgess in Scotland makes one think
that Thomas was born in Scotland. ( Linda Landrum descends from James the emigrant discussed at length in Joel Shedds book, but Linda feels
that Parson Thomas was NOT a descendent of James, but could have been a nephew or more likely a cousin) (Original Scots Colonists in Early
America, by David Dobson states: Thomas Lendrum settled in Port Royal, VA, child was Thomas Keity Landrum) in Joel P. Shedds book, the
2

One researcher thought name was Thomas, but subsequent research found name of Peter/Patrick.

Page 9

Lendrum Family of Fayette Co., Ga., p. 32. Thomas Sr. was either an immigrant or a native born Virginian, and there is evidence for both
cases. If he was an immigrant, he well could have been the Thomas Lendrum mentioned in the Order Book for Caroline Co., Va., dated Feb. 8,
1750, wherein he secured fifty acres of land according to Royal institutions, by which each newly arrived settler was entitled to such a grant from
the Crown. On the other hand, if he was a native born Virginian, as indicated in the family tradition which says that the Lendrums came from
Scotland in 1680, then who is the father? Joel Shedds book casts no light on this problem.
(1-21-82 note - correlate this with Thomas Sr.s will.)
1 Apr 1741 Thomas Lendrum, Master of Arts, of the parish of Slayns, source:
Officers & Graduates of Kings College, Aberdeen, 1495-1860, by Peter J.
Anderson
15 Jul 1749 On motion of Thomas Landrum, who is desirous to practice the law,
this court being satisfied of his probity, honesty and good demeanor, do order
the same to be certified (Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 164)
15 Aug 1749 Thomas Landrum Gent produced a license to practice as Attorney
and
took the usual oaths to the government and the oath of an attorney
according to law. (Essex County Orders 15, p 373)
8 Sep 1749 Thomas Landrum, Gent, produced a license from Peyton Randolph
Esq,
etc, to plead at the County Courts, took the oaths and subscribed the Test.
(Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 171)
18 Dec 1750 Harry Turner of King George County, Gent; John Miller of Caroline,
Planter, and John Lee of Essex, Gent; concerning 5 Oct 1748 mortgage between
John Miller and Harry Turner for 273 pounds 2 shillings 5 pence paid by Harry
Turner to John Miller, Miller sold to Turner 200 acres m Essex adjoining
John Corbin Esq, purchased by Miller from Thomas Ship, plus 11 slaves; for 5
shillings Turner sells his rights in the mortgage to John Lee; Wits: for
Harry Turner; John Smelt, Win. Parker, John Lee, Jr; by Miller: E. Pendleton,
Obad. Marriot, Thomas Lendrum, Henry Lee.
8 Feb 1750/1 Thos. Turner, Thos. Landrum, Jno. Shores, Geor. Frazear, Edward
Dixon, Patrick Couts, Jas. Donald, John Gray, Win. Gray and Robert Scott made
oath that they came immediately from Great Britain into this colony to dwell
and that this is the first time of their having proved the same in order to
entitle them to 50 acres of land each, and severally assigned their rights to
Jas. Maddison, Gent. (Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 247)
6 Apr 1753 Thomas Landrum attended meetings of Masons at Fredricksburg
Lodge #
4, and a dozen times in the next few years.
8 Nov 1753 Thomas Buckners mortgage to James & Robert Berries, merchants in
Glasgow, was proved by Thomas Landrum, John Gray and William Scott,
witnesses
thereto. (Caroline County Order book 1746-54, p 433)
12 Jan 1754 Thomas Landrum, became a member (probably made Entered
Apprentice) at Fredricksburg Lodge # 4.
12 Apr 1754 Thomas Landrum, at a meeting of Free & Accepted Masons, listed as
visiting brethren, at meeting of Port Royal Kilwinning Crosse Lodge # 2;
signed first by-laws.
14 Dec 1755 Thomas Landrum, affiliated as Fellow Craft Mason, Kilwinning
Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia
12 Jan 1756 Thomas Landrum, among first to earn Master Mason Degree,
Kilwinning Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia
Thomas Landrum was one of two visiting members and 10 Port Royal citizens
who met to form what was then an unchartered lodge of masons on 12 Apr 1754 . He was among the first to earn the Master Mason Degree in
the Lodge on 12 Jan 1756, and also served two terms as Grand Master of the Lodge (1761-1762).
A copy of Thomas Landrum's signature appears on the by-laws of the Kilwinning Port Royal Crosse Lodge.
26 Jul 1760 Mr. William Wren payment to Mr. Landrum for taking Wm Ailsops
deposition - 7/6 (folio 226); Thomas Lendrum same date, receives 7/6 for

Page 10

taking witness deposition (folio 118), Edward Dixons Business Papers,


Container 17, reel 6 (1759-60)
10 Dec 1760 Thomas Landrum elected Master of the Lodge, Kilwinning Crosse
Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, served as Master of the
Lodge apparently until 1763.
20 Aug 1761 Thomas Lendrum, revenue from Wm Marshall; (folio 41), Edward
Dixons Business Papers, Container 18, reel 6 (1760-61)
1761 Thomas Lendrum, revenue from Elizabeth Buckner, Richard Tankersley
Dr. John Sutherland;
1762 Ann Marshall, 7/6
by Dr. Bankhead for Gibsons suit; (folio 18), Edward Dixons Business
Papers, Container 197, reel 6 (176 1-62). He Children Helen, Marianne and Peter from Linda P. Landrum. He married Nelly (--?--) (135).
The Landrums came from Scotland and settled in Westmoreland Co., VA in 1680.
In 1750 320 headrights were purchased by John Madison, Thomas Landrum (lawyer), Dr. John Shores, Robert Scott.
He was obvioulsy a man who valued education as he wrote a codicill to his will instructing that "As the profits of my son or sons shares of my
estate may not be sufficient for his or their education, I would by no means confine my executors or their guardians to our laws in that regard, but
impower and even desire them to expend every Penny of their fortunes on it if my wife can be prevailed on to part with them which I trust she will.
Thomas Lendrum Sr. is called both a lawyer and a parson in Joel P. Shedd's book, the "Lendrum Family of Fayette Co., Ga.", p. 32. Thomas
Sr. was either an immigrant or a native born Virginian, and there is evidence for both cases. If he was an immigrant, he well could have been the
Thomas Lendrum mentioned in the Order Book for Caroline Co., Va., dated Feb. 8, 1750, wherein he secured fifty acres of land according to
Royal institutions, by which each newly arrived settler was entitled to such a grant from the Crown. On the other hand, if he was a native born
Virginian, as indicated in the family tradition which says that the Lendrums came from Scotland in 1680, then who is the father? Joel Shedd's
book casts no light on this problem.
(1-21-82 note - correlate this with Thomas Sr.'s will.)
The best hunch, until more evidence appears, is that Thomas Sr. was newly arrived from England, and that he was one and the same as the
Lendrum mentioned in "Dictionary of Scottish Immigrants to the U.S.A." by Whyle, p. 200. The book states that Lendrum arrived in Port Royal,
Va. before 1784, and that he was the son of Thomas Keith. (S.H. #2778) the SH means Service of Heirs) If this fact is true, it would help to
explain the family tradition which includes the name Keith in that of Thomas Lendrum, even when there is no documentary proof for this name.
Possibly, the same Thomas that arrived in Port Royal was the same as the Thomas who, on February 8, 1750, along with others, "made oath that
they came immediately from Great Britain into this colony to dwell, and that this ye first time of their having proved the same in order to entitle
them to 50 acres of land according to Royal institutions, and that the said persons severly assign their rights to James Madison, Gent." as shown
in the Order Book of Caroline Co., Va. It would then, also, be likely that the recent immigrant, Thomas I, was the lawyer and parson who was
admitted to the practice of law at Port Royal in 1749. This latter Thomas, being the same man who wrote a will in 1764, probated in King George
County, Va. in 1771. The will named his son, Thomas II.
The following are notes from a geneologist (name unknown) found on the internet. They are included here because they support as well as
illuminate what was already known of Thomas Landrum.
Thomas Lendrum
1 Apr 1741 Thomas Lendrum, Master of Arts, of the parish of Slayns, source: Officers & Graduates of Kings College, Aberdeen, 14951860, by Peter J. Anderson
15 Jul 1749 On motion of Thomas Landrum, who is desirous to practice the law, this court being satisfied of his probity, honesty and good
demeanor, do order the same to be certified (Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 164)
15 Aug 1749 Thomas Landrum Gent produced a license to practice as Attorney and took the usual oaths to the government and the oath of
an attorney according to law. (Essex County Orders 15, p 373)
8 Sep 1749 Thomas Landrum, Gent, produced a license from Peyton Randolph Esq, etc, to plead at the County Courts, took the oaths and
subscribed the Test.
(Caroline County Order Book 1746-54, p 171)
18 Dec 1750 Harry Turner of King George County, Gent; John Miller of Caroline, Planter, and John Lee of Essex, Gent; concerning 5 Oct
1748 mortgage between John Miller and Harry Turner for 273 pounds 2 shillings 5 pence paid by Harry Turner to John Miller, Miller sold to Turner
200 acres m Essex adjoining John Corbin Esq, purchased by Miller from Thomas Ship, plus 11 slaves; for 5 shillings Turner sells his rights in the
mortgage to John Lee; Wits: for Harry Turner; John Smelt, Win. Parker, John Lee, Jr; by Miller: E. Pendleton,
Obad. Marriot, Thomas Lendrum, Henry Lee.
8 Feb 1750/1 Thos. Turner, Thos. Landrum, Jno. Shores, Geor. Frazear, Edward Dixon, Patrick Couts, Jas. Donald, John Gray, Win. Gray
and Robert Scott made oath that they came immediately from Great Britain into this colony to dwell and that this is the first time of their having
proved the same in order to entitle them to 50 acres of land each, and severally assigned their rights to Jas. Maddison, Gent. (Caroline County
Order Book 1746-54, p 247)
6 Apr 1753 Thomas Landrum attended meetings of Masons at Fredricksburg Lodge # 4, and a dozen times in the next few years.

Page 11

8 Nov 1753 Thomas Buckners mortgage to James & Robert Berries, merchants in Glasgow, was proved by Thomas Landrum, John Gray
and William Scott,
witnesses thereto. (Caroline County Order book 1746-54, p 433)
12 Jan 1754 Thomas Landrum, became a member (probably made Entered Apprentice) at Fredricksburg Lodge # 4.
12 Apr 1754 Thomas Landrum, at a meeting of Free & Accepted Masons, listed as visiting brethren, at meeting of Port Royal Kilwinning
Crosse Lodge # 2; signed first by-laws.
14 Dec 1755 Thomas Landrum, affiliated as Fellow Craft Mason, Kilwinning
Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia
12 Jan 1756 Thomas Landrum, among first to earn Master Mason Degree, Kilwinning Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County,
Virginia
26 Jul 1760 Mr. William Wren payment to Mr. Landrum for taking Wm Ailsops deposition - 7/6 (folio 226); Thomas Lendrum same date,
receives 7/6 for taking witness deposition (folio 118), Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 17, reel 6 (1759-60)
10 Dec 1760 Thomas Landrum elected Master of the Lodge, Kilwinning Crosse Lodge 2-237, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, served
as Master of the Lodge apparently until 1763.
20 Aug 1761 Thomas Lendrum, revenue from Wm Marshall; (folio 41), Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 18, reel 6 (1760-61)
1761 Thomas Lendrum, revenue from Elizabeth Buckner, Richard Tankersley Dr. John Sutherland;
1762 Ann Marshall, 7/6
by Dr. Bankhead for Gibsons suit; (folio 18), Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 197, reel 6 (176 1-62)
6 May 1762 Thomas Landrum Gent Guardian Divers of Turner Dixon and Harry Dixon under the will of Thomas Turner the elder deceased,
Thomas Turner by Thomas Jett, Mary Turner and Sarah Turner by Anthony Thornton Gent their guardian, defendants; vs Edward Dixon Gent
only acting executor of the will of Thomas Turner the elder; Suit concerns promise of Thomas Turner the elder to pay Edward Dixon 2,000
pounds current money of Virginia on Dixons marriage to Turners daughter Sarah. (King George County Orders #3, pp 994-1012)
1763 Mr. Thomas Lendrum; previous account folio 67, next account folio 56;
Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 20 reel 7, (1762-63)
1764 Mr. Thomas Lendrum; cash received for account Robt. Million(folio 56);
Edward Dixons Business Papers, Container 21 reel 8, (1763-64)
28 Jul 1764 Thomas Lendrum, Letter of recommendation, candidate for holy orders, practiced as a lawyer, has a title from the vestry of a
parish in the county of King George; letter from Francis Faquier in Williamsburg to the Lord Bishop of London
31 Jul 1764 Thomas Lendrum, letter of recommendation, candidate for holy orders, has been intimately acquainted with the gentleman
since his youth, studied together for 4 years in the same University, where he took the degree of Master of Arts. Since his residence in this
colony, he spent part of his time with my family, and the rest of it a small distance from me. letter from Robert Innes, rector of Drysdale Parish
9 Aug 1764 Thomas Landrum, letter of recommendation, candidate for holy orders, resided near my parish for upwards of 15 years; letter
from John Smelt, rector of St. Annes
10 Aug 1764 Thomas Landrum, letter of recommendation, candidate for holy orders, letter of recommendation from Alexr Cruden, rector or
South Farnham Parish
3 Apr 1765 Thomas Lendrum on list of ministers ordained for Virginia
17 Aug 1765 Thomas Lendrum, at Port Royal, writes a letter of recommendation for holy orders for Christopher McRae, who studied at
Marishali College, from which he says he has a diploma. Rev. Mr. Henry has given him a title to his curate(?)
25 Feb 1765 Thomas Lendrum, Hanover Parish, Virginia, writes a letter of recommedation for holy orders for Mr. George Goldie.
3 Apr 1765 Thomas Lendrum, Bond given to Richard, Lord Bishop of London, for 40 pounds, Terms: Lendrum licensed by Richard, Lord
Bishop of London to perform the office of Priest in Province of Virginia, given His Majesties bounty of 20 pounds, that sd Lendrum will sail to
province of Virginia to perform sd office within 3 months of date of bond. Wits: Benj Chamberlain, Wm Dickers, Not Pub
4 Apr 1765 Thomas Lendrum, Virginia - Money Book 49-306 (A List of Emigrant Ministers to America 1690-1811, Gerald Fothergil, GPC
1965)
1769 Revd. Mr. Thomas Lendrum; revenues from Wm Boon; Edward Dixon s Business Papers, Container 23 reel 8, (1762-63)
1765-1771 Thomas Landrum, minister of Hanover Parish (A List of the Colonial Church in Virginia from 1607-1785)

Page 12

1771 Thomas Lendrum, Admitted as an Attorney in King George County Court in 758. Went to England for ordination 1764. Licensed for
Va April 3, 1765.
Became minister of Hanover Parish, King George County and remained its minister probably until his death in 1771. Appointed Justice of
the Peace for King George County, 1767. Will probated in King George County, 1771 (A List of Emigrant Ministers to America 1690-1811, Gerald
Fothergil, GPC 1965)
5 Sep 1770 Called meeting of Masons of Kilwinning Crosse Lodge 2-23 7, Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia for funeral of Thomas
Landrum. The corpse appeared to have been at the home of Robert Gilchrist, & from there procession went to the cemetery.
4 Apr 1771 Thomas Landrum Will, written Sunday, 5 Aug 1764, I intend., in a few days to sail for Great Britain; gives executors to sell all
estate, real & personal, to pay debts; lots in Port Royal; reversion in land purchased from Thomas Sullinger after the death of his mother; rest of
estate to wife in lieu of dower, requesting her to bestow as much as she can spare to educate son Thomas Keith, & child she is now with if a son
to qualify them for Parsons or Doctors (for I will by no means intail on them the Drudgery of the Law); the charge of their education I particularly
recommend the Reverend Robert Innes and Alexander Rose, who I am confident will take care that they shall have a Virtuous & Religious
Education tho perhaps their share of my Estate may not affort them a Learned one; after the death of my wife.. my estate may be divided among
my surviving children, but in case my son Thomas Keith, when he comes to the years of discretion, should desire to live in Port Royall, he may
take a fee simple estate in all my land and houses that may remain unsold (if he dies, to unborn child if son; if wife survives all she shall have the
disposal of 100 pounds; 1/3 of the balance thereof I leave to Robert Innes, son of the above named Robert Innes; the other 2/3s I desire may be
converted to money and remitted to my Father or Mother, if alive, if not to my sisters and brothers equally. Wife, Robert Gilchrist, James Miller,
John Gray,
Alexander Rose & John Skinker, Gentlemen, executors, & said Robert Inness guardian of my children.
Codicil: As the profit of my son or sons shares of my estate may not be sufficient for his or their education, I would by no means confine my
executors, or their guardians to our laws in that regard, but impower and even desire them to expend every penney of their fortunes on it, if
my wife can be prevailed on to part with them which I trust she will. Will & codicil written
5 Aug 1764.
At court held 4 Apr 1771, will of Thomas Landrum CLK deceased was presented by
Nelly Landrum. On oaths of Thos Jett, Thoms Hodge, William Barnard and
Alexander Rose admitted to record. Nelly Landrum, Executrix
Caroline County Chancery Suits:
Box 7, K-Ma
Rodham Kenner vs Thomas Landrum
No Date Rodham Kenner against Thomas Landrum, administrator of Nelly Landrum.
Thomas Landrum has died intestate & Christopher T. Collins is his administrator
24 Oct 1780 Nelly Landrum, widow, administratrix of the last will of Rev.Thomas Landrum, decd, sells one slave to Dr. John Tennant of Port
Royal.
8 Dec 1809 Maryanna Stone in the house of Samuel Stone on 8 Dec 1809 states that a few days before the sale of her deceased mothers
estate, she gave her sister, the wife of Rodham Kenner, feathers to make her a good bed.
11 Dec 1809 Thomas Landrum of Westmoreland county states that Rodham Kenner married a daughter of Nelly Landrum and is entitled to
a part of her estate.
8 Dec 1809 Robert Kay states that on 8 Dec 1809 he was at the sale of Nelly Landrums estate and that Thomas Landrum demanded
bonds from Samuel Stone and Rodham Kenner for their purchases.
Rodham Kenner, et al vs Sarah Tennant
No date Jury finds that Thomas Landrum died on 5 Aug 1764 (sic) and his will was admitted to record in King George Co on 4 Apr 1771.
Nelly Landrum, widow of Thomas Landrum qualified as executrix. Thomas Landrum at his death left children, viz, Thomas Keith Landrum, Hellen
Kenner, wife of Rodham Kenner,
Marianna Stone wife of Samuel Stone and Peter Landrum. On 24 Oct 1780 Nelly Landrum sold a slave to John Tennant (now dead) and his
wife Sarah Tennent.
Nelly Landrum died in Dec 1803.
11 Sep 1804 Mary Parker is judged to be too old and infirm to be able to
testify in court.
Box 8 MO-MU Folder
Jul 1779 Murdock, William et al vs John Edward Henry Turner Dixon and John
and Alice Pratt; Nelly Landrum listed in the Account of the Estate of Capt. Joseph
Murdock decd, for 1778 in King George County Court
Box 12 St-Sw
Samuel Stone vs Thomas Lendrum, administrator of Nelly Lendrum

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1808 Samuel Stone states that he married a daughter of Nelly Landrum and is
entitled to a part of her estate and has purchased Peter Landrums share of
the estate from him
29 Sep 1805 Peter Lendrum appoints Samuel Stone his attorney to receive from
Dr. Thomas Lendrum of Westmoreland Co his full share of Nelly Landrums
estate.
16 Sep 1806 Peter Lendrum signs a note stating that he has received my
proportion of my deceased mothers estate Mrs. Nelly Lendrum.
3 Dec 1809 Thomas Lendrum states that Samuel Stone is entitled to 1/4th of
Nelly Lendrums estate in right of his wife plus 1/4th interest bought from
Peter Lendrum
13 Mar 1812 Thomas Lendrum died intestate in Westmoreland Co
Caroline County Court Records, Box 2 1742, 1762-90, Folder 5
4 Apr 1771 Thomas Landrum will (abstracted above)
Caroline County Court Papers
Box 7, Folder 4 Ended papers J & L 1805
11 Apr 1805 Mary Parker states that Mrs Nelly Landrum, now deceased, sold a
slave to Dr. John Tennent, now deceased and that Mrs. Landrum and her family
were in want of bread and meat. Nelly Landrum was the widow of Thomas
Landrum.
30 Jan 1804 Peter Landrum states that Rodham Kenner and Samuel Stone are
married to his sisters and that the will of his father was dated 1 Aug 1764.
Apr 1805 Thomas Landrum, Rodham Kenner & Helen Kenner his wife and Samuel
Stone and Marianne Stone his wife sue Sarah Tennent
3 Jan 1784 Thomas Lendrum sett. Port Royal Va, ch Thomas-Keith pre 1784 SRO
SH
3244 (Original Scots Colonists of Early America 16 12-1783, David Dobson, GPC
1989)
3 Jan 1784 Thomas Keith Lendrum, to his father Thomas Lendrum in Port Royal,
Virginia (Dictionary of Scottish Settlers in North America 1625-1825)
3 Jan 1794 Thomas Lendrum, burgess of Aberdeen, sh. 1765,
sett Port Royal, VA,
fa of Thomas, d pre 1784 (Scots on the Chesapeake, 1607-1830, David Dobson,
GPC, 1992)v. He was graduated on 1 Apr 1741 at Master of Arts; Parish of Slayns.3 He was employed by He was a lawyer listed among
the lawyers qualified to practice in Caroline Co., VA
A John Buckner was listed as a lawyer in 1757 in same County
Aug 15 1749 Court approves motion of Thomas Landrum, certified to be attorney Essex County Orders 15 p. 373; Caroline County Order Book
1746-54 pg. 164 on 15 Jul 1749 at Lawyer, Caroline, VA. He left a will on 5 Aug 1764 at King George, VA, He made this will in anticipation of a
voyage back to England. Evidently he was rather young as his wife was pregnant at the time will was made. He specified that he wanted his
sons educated as parsons or doctors "for I will by no means intail on them the drudgery of the Law'.
Will of Thomas Landrum August 5, 1764
In the name of God Amen. Wereas I intend God Willing in a few days to sail for Great Britain from whence perhaps I may never return, I think it
proper to make my Last Will and Testament which I do in the following manner In the first place I subject all my real as well as personal Estate to
the Payment of my Debts; and for that purpose I devise my Lots in Port Royall, and the Reversion in the Land I lately bought of Thomas Sullinger
after the Death of his mother to my Exucutors and the Survivors of them with full Power and authority to them to sell and convey the same or
either of them. as they shall Judge to be most to the Interest of my Family.
After my Debts are paid as I have Great Confidence in the discretion and Motherly affection of my wife, I devise to her all the Residue of my
Estate for the Support of Her and my Children. During her life in Lieu of her Dower requesting her to use as much of it as She can possibly spare
on the Education of my Son Thomas Keith, and the Child Shee is now with if a Son to Qualify them for Parsons or Doctors (for I will by no means
intail on them the Drudgery of the Law.) and the charge of their Education I particularly Recommend to the Reverend Robert Innes and Alexander
Ross who I am confident will take care that they shall have a~virtuous and Religious Education tho perhaps their share of my Estate may not
afford them ~ learned one.

Source: Officers and Graduates of Kings College, Aberdeen 1495-1860 - Peter J. Anderson (Scotland).

Page 14

After the death of my wife I desire all my Estate Real and Personal may be equally Divided among my surviving Children and representatives of
; But in Case my son Thomas Keith when he comes to the years of Discretion, should desire to Live in Port Royall, or my Executors Should think
it a fisable for him so to do so then he may take a fee simple Estate in all my Lands and Houses that may then remain unsold; but with the
Burden of paying his other Brothers and Sisters and their Representatives as aforesaid, aproportionable part of the value of what he shall take by
this Devise. And in Case of his Death before he shall make his choice as Aforesaid, or the said Houses and Lands be alloted him by my
Executors, I give the same Benefit of Election to and leave the Same Discretionary Power in my Executors in Regard to the Child my Wife is now
with, if a Son, who make take the Said Estate on the Same Terms. If my Wife Should out Live all my Children and there Issues then shee Shall
have the Disposal of One Hundred Pounds of my Estate by Deed or Will as Shee Shall think proper One third part of the Ballance thereof I Leave
to Robert Innis Son of the above named Robert Innis. The other two thirds I desire may be converted into Money,and remited to my Father or
Mother if alive, if not to my Sisters and Brothers Equally their Children of Such of whom as may be Dead at the time for and of this my Last Will
I appoint my Wife, Robert Gilcrist, James Miller, John Gray, Alexander Ross and John Skinker Gentlemen Executors and my Said and the said
Robert Innis guardians of my Children In Witness Whereof this my Last Will and Testament wrote with my own hand I have signed and sealed on
Sunday the fifth day of August In the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and Sixty four Thos. Landram
As the profits of my Son or Sons Shares of my Estate may not be sufficient for his or their Education I would by no means confine my Executors
or their Guardians to our Laws in that regard, but impower and even desire them to expend every Penny of their fortunes on it if my wife can be
prevailed on to part with them which I trust she will This Codicill made the same Day Thos. Landrum
(At a Court held for King George County the 4th Day of April 1774) The Last Will and Testament of Thomas Landram deceased was presemted
into Court by Nelley Landrum Executrix therein named who made oath there to and the said Will being proved to be the hand writing of the said
Thomas by the Oath of Tho Jett, ( Thomas Jett was born in King George County Va. and lived at Walnut Hill once owned by William Ball. He was
father of William Storke Jett a soldier in the Revolution) Thomas Hodge,Willian Barnard and Alexander Ross and admited to Record and on the
motion of the Said executrix She performed what the Law in such cases require Certificate is granted her for obtaining a Probate thereof in due
form (David Dobson, Original Scots Colonists of Early America unknown detail.). He was a member of church on 3 Apr 1765 at Hanover Parish
A letter of recommendation for Thomas Landrum's candidacy for holy orders was written Jul 28, 1764. The next spring on April 3, 1765 he
appeared on a list of ministers ordained for Virginia. and on February 25, 1765 he was listed as a minister of Hanover Parish in Virginia. His
estate was probated on 4 Apr 1774 at King George, VA, (At a Court held for King George County the 4th Day of April 1774) The Last Will and
Testament of Thomas Landram deceased was presented into Court by Nelley Landrum Executrix therein named who made oath there to and the
said Will being proved to be the hand writing of the said Thomas by the Oath of Tho Jett, Thomas Hodge, Willian Barnard and Alexander Ross
and admited to Record and on the motion of the Said executrix She performed what the Law in such cases require Certificate is granted her for
obtaining a Probate thereof in due form. He emigrated say 1784 from Port Royal, Scotland. Inheirtance was. 4
a) Helen4 LANDRUM (680) (Rev. Thomas Landrum.) married Rodham KENNER (681) (Ibid.). Her married name was KENNER (680).
b) Marianne4 LANDRUM (682) (Ibid.) married Samuel STONE (683). Her married name was STONE (682).
c) Thomas Keith4 LENDRUM II (132). He served as a Surgeon's Mate on board the "Tempest" in Virginia State Navy. "History of Caroline
Co., VA" p. 451 says he was a young Port Royal physician at the outbreak of the Revolution. He joined the Continental Navy and was
Surgeon's Mate on both the "Tartar" and the "Tempest" two continental privateers. He practiced in Port Royal until 1812.
Thomas Lendrum Jr. was the Physician of Port Royal, Va. and was probably born sometime between 1750 and 1758. During the war of
Revolution, he served with the Virginia State Navy. Evidence of this is contained in the rather lengthy "half-pay" file which rests in the
National Archives. The evidence that this particular Thomas Lendrum is the direct ancestor of Lillie Hudson Lendrum is contained in this file
and proved by several letters which were found in the attic of "Beechwood", in So. Ft. Mitchell, Ky. (It is interesting to note that there were at
least two Thomas Lendrums, and possibly there were even three. The several D.A.R. papers filed claiming descent from the revolutionary
soldiers are as a rule incorrect. Even those of Lillie Hudson Lendrum was entirely erroneous! Since she claimed descent from a man,
Warren T. Lendrum who was actually her uncle. It is easy to see how she could have made this error, since, evidently, her grandfather,
Thomas Lendrum, the surgeon's name was middle aged when her father, John B. Lendrum was born. Thomas Lendrum II served as
surgeon's mate on board the ship "Tempest" during the Revolutionary War. There are several proofs of this service:
1.

December 30, 1779 he was allowed 18" of brown sugar.


September 9, 1779 he received coffee and sugar.
December 10, 1779 he received sugar coffee and tea.
2. During his time of service he was acquainted with several men who in later
years made affidavits to this fact:
a. In 1834 John Cannady of Fauquier Co., Va. states that Thomas Landrum was a surgeon's mate who stayed with the "Tempest" until it
was abandoned by the crew when the enemy took command of the River (James) and finally the vessel. Thomas had been on board at least
two years and ten months prior to the capture of the "Tempest".
b. In 1834 Charles Hayden of King George Co., Va. stated that he knew Thomas Landrum and also the fact that he died in Westmoreland
County, Va., and was the son of Parson Landrum of King George Co. Both Thomas Landrum and Higdon grew up in the same area.
Thomas Landrum married after the war and lived in Leedstown in Westmoreland Co., Va.
c. William Stoke Jett (note that Thomas Lendrum's wife was named Margaret Stoake.) likewise made an affidavit in which he states that
he was acquainted with Thomas Landrum, the son of Parson Lendrum of King Geo. Co., Va. He too says that after his marriage Thomas

1714, Symon's Croft, Seton


Parish, Old Machar, Old
Aberdeen, , Aberdeen, Scotland
The land Parson Thomas inheirited from his father was called Symon's Croft, lying in the Seton Parish of Old Machar and sherriffdom of Old Aberdeen.
(Could this have been his birthplace?).

Page 15

resided in Port Royal, Caroline Co. and practiced medicine. Later he moved to Westmoreland Co. where Jett was living. William Jett recalls
the anecdote wherein Landrum was called upon to perform an amputation, his first, while in service on board the "Tempest".
Following the Revolutionary War, Thomas married Margaret Stoake. It would be reasonable to assume that the wedding took place
sometime between 1788 and 1790. If this date, and his presumed birthday are correct, then Thomas was probably in his mid thirties when he
married. (Family stories indicate that Thomas Lendrum's wife was named Buckner but his will clearly calls her Margaret Stoake.) In fact, this
name has persisted in the family up until the early 1900's, but to date no record is found of a connection with the Buckners. Perhaps the
name belonged to either Margaret or Thomas' mother.
In January of 1811, Thomas Lendrum (note that the spelling has now changed to Lendrum - the way it has persisted until the present.)
wrote a will leaving to Margaret Stoke Lendrum, his property for the maintenance of his children. His youngest child, John B. (presumed
Buckner) Lendrum was seven years old, at the time. His oldest daughter, Elizabeth Washington Lendrum, however, was married to Dr.
Christopher Collins. Dr. Collins was named executor of the will. Thomas' wife, Mary, was to be the administrator. Evidently Margaret
relinquished the right to administrator to Christopher Collins. When Collins died, his wife Elizabeth was granted letters of Administration by
the Court, even though Margaret Lendrum was still alive. (Thomas Lendrum died July 12, 1811)
Starting about 1834, Elizabeth Lendrum Collins, as a representative for the heirs, her brothers and sisters (presumably her mother now
dead), started proceedings to secure the pension due as a result of the Act of Congress of July 5, 1832, granting pension rights to veterans or
survivors or their heirs.
Elizabeth had quite a job ahead of her and evidently it became necessary for her to enlist the aid of her congressman, J. Taliaferro, in an
attempt to collect Thomas Lendrum's pension. Apparently there was some dispute as to when Thomas Lendrum actually terminated service,
the Va. State Navy having been reduced in number prior to the close of the war. It was initially presumed that Thomas was relieved of duty at
this time ________. However, it soon became apparent that two ships were retained in service past the date of reduction, these being the
"Tempest" and the "Tattler". There are three affidavits in Thomas Lendrum's "half-pay" file which state that he was on board the "Tempest" as
Surgeon's Mate. That being the case, J. Taliaferro was able to use the following facts from a similar case to cause the pension office to grant
a pension, which allowed for Lendrum's service from the date of the ship's capture.
Leigh's Reports - Vol. 1, p 517:
The Captain of the Tempest was named Markham and he was made prisoner when his ship was captured in Hampton Rhodes. His heirs
filed suit in the Virginia Court of Appeals for half-pay and won. Taliaferro requested that the war department grant the same right to Thomas
Lendrum, since it was proved that he, too, served on the vessel until it's capture and so should be entitled to the same rights as the captain.
In May of 1835, Lucy E. Lendrum, the daughter of Thomas, and sister of Elizabeth, acted as attorney-in-fact for Harriet E. Lendrum,
Thomas W. Lendrum, John B. Lendrum and Lucy E. Lendrum in granting power of attorney to the estate administrator, Mrs. Elizabeth W.
Collins. In fact the estate did succeed and on May 9, 1838, received a total of $2529.74 for 27 years and 264 days half-pay pension based on
the rate of $91.25 per year.
Presumably, the heirs used their hard earned pension to support themselves, and evidently it was a greatly needed pension for their
support, for Mr. Taliaferro, in an effort to speed up the proceedings, refers to the needy, unmarried heirs. One wonders what part John B.
Lendrum, who was at this time, far away in Kentucky, received. It is possible that he and his brother, Warren T. Lendrum, forfeited their rights
to the pension in favor to their widowed and unmarried sisters.
Having won the initial battle for the "half-pay" pension, and presumably having exhausted the funds received, Elizabeth Collins again
became active in the pension care in 1845. She reopened the issue by requesting that half-pay be allowed from Nov. 30, 1781, the date on
which Thomas Lendrum terminated service (?) until April 22, 1783, the date on which the original pension had commenced. She was
successful, as shown by a letter dated Sept. 17, 1845, from the Pension Office in Washington which allowed the heirs an additional 91.25 per
year for the extra 18 months, a total of $127.00.
The matter was still of interest to someone in 1854, for one Thomas C. Peek, of Hampton, Elizabeth County, Va. whose relationship is yet
unknown, wrote to the Pension Office in Washington asking how much half-pay had been allowed for Thomas Lendrum, when and to whom it
had been allowed.
All of these proceedings had a two-fold effect. Initially, they granted a living to a widow and her two maiden sisters. (Harriet B. Lendrum
was listed as head of the household in 1850 in Va. census and family letters indicate that she lived with Elizabeth, her sister.) The long range
effect was to bring to the present the vital information necessary to establish which of the two, and possibly three, Thomas Lendrums of
Virginia was the real ancestor of Lillie Hudson Lendrum. Lillie had filed D.A.R. papers on _________, stating that her descent from one
Thomas Lendrum of Virginia. The papers contained only that grain of truth. Lillie was in error in most other respects, and it took the
combination of the Virginia State Navy half-pay file and some personal letters found in the attic at "Beechwood" to establish the true identity of
Thomas Lendrum, Surgeon's Mate. He married Margaret Stoake BUCKNER (133), daughter of John BUCKNER (3128) and Elizabeth
WASHINGTON (3127). He was born in 1760 at Port Royal, Caroline Co., VA, Scotland. He was apprentriced in 1770 at Caroline, VA.5 He
left a will on 10 Jan 1811 at Westmoreland County, VA, I Thomas Lendrum of Westmoreland County being very sickly and infirm, and not
knowing when my desolution may take place, make and ordain this my last will and testament viz. after my just debts are paid I give to my
beloved wife Margaret Stoake Lendrum, the whole of my property real and personal during her natural life for the better support of herself and
for the maintenance and education and support of our children. At her death it is my will that the whole of the personal Estate may be equally
divided between the surviving children and the Land to be sold for two annual payments and to be divided as aforesaid between the surviving
children viz. the money arising from the sale of the land, I hereby give and confirm to Dr. Collins, Barbary and her increase forever. I
constitute and appoint Dr. Christopher Collins executor and my wife Margaret Stoake (another spelling of this is Storke) Lendrum executrix of
this my last will and testament as witness my hand this 10th day of January 1811. He died on 13 Mar 1812 at Westmoreland County, VA,
One record, Caroline County Chanery Suits says: He died in testate.
However, this may be another Thomas as there is a will for the Surgeon's Mate in the "Half Pay File."
(1) Harriet5 LENDRUM (138). Harriet was living in King George Co. in 1870 and had previously lived in Westmoreland Co., VA. It does
not appear that she married.
A letter dated 1943 from SLB to Victor S. Lendrum states that in 1907 a Fred B. Wheelwright wrote to SLB stating that in 1866 he
(Wheelwright) traveled to Covington with his Aunt Harriet Lendrum to visit "our grandfather" (John B. Lendrum). She appeared on the
CENSUS on 1 Jun 1850 at Harriet Lendram; p325, Westmoreland County, VA (U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census,
5

P. 440 of "Colonial Caroline" states 1770 "Thomas Landrum - a child who appears to be in the care of nobody is ordered bound" since we know father
had died by now its possible that mother was also dead.

Page 16

Seventh Census of the U.S., 1850: Population, Free Schedule, Micro-publication M432, National Archives, Washington, DC; (Washington,
D.C.: National Archives, 1850). Hereinafter cited as 1850 Census.). She lived in 1870 at King George, VA. She died after 1870 at King
George, VA.
(2) Warren Thomas5 LENDRUM (136). He was a graduate of West Point with rank as Major. He began military service at Army Major He
is said to have graduated from West Point and to have served in the Mexican War.
(a) John6 LENDRUM (597) began military service at Army; Captain Died fighting Indians in New Mexico. He married Mary (--?--)
(598).
i) Upton7 LENDRUM (599)
ii) Sallie7 LENDRUM (600) She never married.
iii) Maria7 LENDRUM (601) She never married. She lived in 1857 at Baltimore, MD.
(3) Margaret B.5 LENDRUM (137). It is likely she was living in Westmoreland Co., VA at the time of her death, and there is no evidence
that she married. She died in 1832 at Westmoreland County, VA (Justin Glenn, "Lendrum notes from Justin Glenn," e-mail message from
to Margaret Woodrough, Feb 12, 2001. Hereinafter cited as "Justin Glenn notes.").
(4) Lucy E.5 LENDRUM (139). From the record it look as though she did not marry. She died at Westmoreland County, VA.
(5) Elizabeth Washington5 LENDRUM (140)6 was born circa 1787 (Ibid.). She married Christopher J. COLLINS (141) on 21 Apr 1806 at
Westmoreland County, VA, Marriage date from "Westmoreland Co., VA" by Crozier. Note says" Thomas lendrum, her father gives
consent." As of 21 Apr 1806, her married name was COLLINS (140).
(6) John Buckner5 LENDRUM
(64).

She lived in Westmoreland Co., Virginia, the home county of George Washington. There is a connection to the Washington family. 09-01.

Page 17

Page 18

Page 19

The available evidence concerning the immediate heirs of Thomas Lendrum indicate that the three girls, Elizabeth L. Collins, Harriet, and
Lucy E. Lendrum all remained in Virginia. Walter T. Lendrum attended West Point, married, raised a family, and served in the Mexican
War. Possibly, he lived for a time in New York. Here are the texts of two letters which came from the attic at "Beechwood", the home of
Lilly Hudson Lendrum Blakelys' son, Stephens Laurie, which is located in Kenton County, Ky.
The first letter is from Harriet Lendrum addressed to her brother, John B. Lendrum. It is only a fragment and so the date and entire
contents and the order of the pages is not known. Each page will be shown as a separate paragraph:
"her mother and only eleven years old and very pretty and so is Joesia. I wrote to your father a short time since and informed him of
Mr. Jetts death. You said nothing about your friend Georgie Phelps. Where is she now? I really was surprised to hear old Mr. and Mrs.
Benton were still living. I suppose the old man is nearly and idiot. He seemed to have so little sense when I saw him. I was sorry to hear
of Laura child being afflicted. I hope Kate married well. She is a very sweet person. Is old Mr. Preston still living? Do you know anything
of Mrs. Fairchild? I really like to...."
"..before but I had a rising on my finger so that I could not write without a good deal of pain. I am now writing on Sunday when they are
all at church because it is the only quiet time I have and I can't write in a bustle. I was very glad to get a letter from you and to hear you all
were well. This has been one of the coldest winters so early in the season I have known for a good many years. The ground is covered
with a deep snow and very cold. Do you expect to spend a Merry Christmas? I expect to spend a very sad one. It will be the only
Christmas I have spent without some of the boys kin, their mother's death and....."
"scarcely ever go out even to Church. We have a fine preacher, Bishop Payne. He is very popular and is calculated to do some good.
He is a devoted Christian. I have not heard a Methodist minister more than two or three times since I left Covington and I miss it very
much for although I like to hear Bishop Payne I like my own church best. I hear very often from Fred. He says his little boy is a very fine
child and the great comfort to him. Says he is the greatest chatter box he ever heard. Warren scarcely ever writes but we hear from him
through Doct. Marye. The other boys are well. John is in Memphis and......."
"I am very glad to hear Thom is doing so well. I hope he will try and lay up his money. Is Mrs. Porter still in the office? What has
become of our cousin Mrs. Whips? Give my love to her if she is in Covington. I must now close this uninteresting letter for I have nothing
to write about for there never was a duller place than this. Remember me affectionately to your father, mother, and Harry and any one
that asks for me also Thomas when you see him. I should like so much to see you all once more but never expect to have that pleasure.
Yours, Aunt H. E. Lendrum"
1856 letter addressed to John B. Lendrum from his niece, Marie Lendrum
Marie, daughter of Warren T. Lendrum
Dear Uncle;
Once again I have retained my pen for the purpose of devoting a few moments to you. I have to confine myself to a few moments as I am
seated by the sick bed side of Sallie. and am liable to be called off at any time to administer to her wants. She has been confined to her
bed for the past two weeks with a "Nervous Fever" and it is impossible to say when she will be able to leave it. She is of course
completely prostrated not being able to take any nourishment in her weak state. The doctor has been attending her constantly but does
not think there is anything very serious the matter with her, but of course it will take her some weeks to recover her accustomed health. It
was extremely negligent of me dear Uncle not to have acknowledged your letter sent by Mr. Taylor and the daguerreotypes but I hope it is
not quite too late to do so now and say how much I appreciated both. Lillie must have grown amazingly since I saw her judging from her
picture but it does not flatter her in the least. It is not nearly as pretty as she is. The same can be said of the boys but you know that is
characteristic of all daguerreotypes. We are looking forward every day for John's arrival. He has not written lately and as that is the case
I think intends taking us by surprise as he usually does. I think that we will give up on anticipated visits to Virginia for the present as we
received a letter from Cousin Maria a day or two since, written of course in great depression of spirits stating that poor Tom Wheelwright
was with them and in dying condition. I suppose you know that he was in decline, did you not? I am afraid that the next accounts will be
that he is dead indeed. I sincerely sympathize with his afflicted family. His mother is so completely wrapped up in him. Even if this were
not the case I do not suppose that Mary (John's wife) would feel in the spirits for visiting, being afflicted herself having lost her brother a
month ago. We heard some charming news a few weeks since, the removal of the troops from Arkansas to Old points. If that is the case,
of course, John will be sent probably for two or three years indeed, I really hope it is something more than idle reports, as he never had an
agreeable station since he has been in the army. I suppose you have heard of Colonel Taylor's removal from Texas. He left here about
two weeks ago with his family for the purpose of spending the length of time with Mrs. Taylor in Cincinnati. He is probably now on his
way. You cannot imagine how much we miss Sallie and Mary. We have always been so intimate. Upton is now at Cedar Park. He was
here for a few days but could not resist the temptation of returning. He now talks of going back to Sante Fe but whether he will carry his
intentions out or not I cannot say. He is not very communicative. I suppose your city as well as ours has been "politically agitated" for the
past few weeks, has it not? Indeed that has been the topic of the day here. Even the ladies seemed to take as much interest as the
opposite sex. I formed an exception however for since we are not permitted to vote I think it is a decided waste of time and breath to
espouse either party. Don't you think so? It is getting late dear Uncle and I will have to close. Do pardon the penmanship of this letter as
I am writing with an old stick (it cannot be called a pen) Give my kindest love to Aunt E. and the children in which Sallie joins me
Yours most affectionately,
Maria
Family stories say that John B. Lendrum, the son of Dr. Thomas Lendrum, went to Kentucky, Campbell County, around 1829-1830,
and that he was born Aug. 19, 1804 at Oak Grove in Westmoreland Co., Va. However, the 1850 census for Kenton County, Ky. shows
John B. Lendrum as age 39, which would place his birth at 1811. In either case, he married and started a family rather late. (As also did
his father Thomas Lendrum Jr., which explains what at first seemed a gap in generations.) By 1850 John appears in the 3rd Ward of
Covington, Kenton Co., Ky. His occupation is City Clerk and he resides with his wife, Elizabeth (Rudd) who is age 29 and is a native
Kentuckian. They have two sons, Thomas W. age 3, and evidently names for his Uncle, and the infant Harry Stokes, age 1. The family is
wealthy enough to include a maid named Mary Roe, age 17, who came from Germany. Since John B. Lendrum did not marry his wife
until 1846, at which time he was either 42 or 35, both of which are a bit old for the day, he must have quite a past waiting to be
discovered.

Page 20

By the year 1861 John Lendrum was living on Garrard Street, between Third and Fourth, in Covington, Ky. and is called, in the Cincinnati
City Directory, a general agent e.s. His daughter, Lillie Hudson Lendrum, who was born Sept. 13, 1852, was by this time, nine years old.
Her future husband, Laurie J. Blakely, has just arrived in town (1861) for he is listed, also, in the same City Directory as -------------.
The court records for August 28, 1862 show (order book 1, p. 316) that John B. Lendrum produced his commission as justice of the peace
for the 1st District of City of Covington. In 1871 when the Directory was published, the Lendrums were living at the N.W. corner of
Greenup and Fifth Street and John B. Lendrum was employed as a store keeper at Wessel's and Schultz. By now, son Harry S. was
serving as a clerk at the Post Office, at 86 E. Fifth Street in Covington. Harry was later to marry Sarah Morrison, move to Brooklyn, N.Y.
and have six children: Ralph Hemmingway, Harry Stokes Jr., Paul Grant, Earl Randolph, Victor Stephen and Lillian Hudson. The other
son, Thomas W. disappeared and is reported through family tales to have gone to prison for embezzlement, a great source of
embarrassment to an otherwise outstanding family who practically pioneered Covington, Ky. He was born on 19 Aug 1804 at Oak Grove,
Westmoreland County, VA (SLB's family date book.) (Reminiscences.) (Covington, Ky (1878).) (1850 Census.). He lived in 1829 at
Covington, Kenton County, KY. He was a member in 1835 at I.O.O.F, Covington, Kenton County, KY. He married Elizabeth Hudson
RUDD (65), daughter of John H RUDD (257) and Harriet ANDERSON (602), on 4 May 1846 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, Marriages
of Campbell, Boone and Kenton Counties, Kentucky, 1795-1850
LENDRUM, John B. & Elizabeth H. RUDD, 6 May 1846, m by F, Kenton Co., KY
(SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.).He appeared on the CENSUS on 1 Jun 1850 at John B. Lendrum, 39/male; dwelling
664, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1850 Census;, Third ward p. 256, line 664.). He was employed on 1 Jun 1850 at City Clerk,
Covington, Kenton County, KY (1850 Census.). He appeared on the census in 1860 at Covington, Kenton County, KY.7 He lived in 1861
at Garrard between 3rd and 4th St., Covington, Kenton County, KY ("SLB Remembrances.").8 He was licensed on 28 Aug 1862 at Justice
of the Peace First Dist., Covington, Kenton County, KY.9 He appeared on the census in 1870 at Covington, Kenton County, KY. He was
employed in 1871 at Rev. store keeper; Wessels and Shultz, Covington, Kenton County, KY. He lived in 1871 at 86 E. 5th St., Covington,
Kenton County, KY.10 Obnituary of he was John Buckner Lendrums grandson, Stephens Laurie Blakely, kept extensive scrapbooks of
newspaper clippings. In many cases he had the clippings made into typed transcriptions. There is no original of this obituary, but it was
among family papers taken from Stephens home Beechwood when the estate was liquidated.
John Buckner Lendrums death was recorded thus: (It seems that the extract came from a newspaper clipping, although there is no
notation of the date or issue. Taken from a typed copy found in the attic at "Beechwood".) "Esquire J. B. Lendrum died at his home, 619
Scott Street, yesterday morning in the 74th year of his age. The funeral takes place tomorrow at 2 o'clock. John Buckner Lendrum was
born on the 19th day of August, 1804 at Oak Grove, Va. He was the son of Dr.Thomas Keith Lendrum, and his mother's maiden name
was Margaret Buckner. His father was a regimental surgeon in a Virginia command in the Revolutionary War. The deceased came to
Covington in 1830 and has resided here ever since. He served 12 years as City Clerk and several years besides as Magistrate; also as
Mayor pro tempore in the administration of Mayor Cyrus Preston and S. W. Foley. In 1836 he was initiated in Washington Lodge, I.00F in
this city. He was also, at his death, a member of the Simon Kenton Pioneer Association. Both these Societies will attend his funeral,
having already called a meeting for this purpose. Esquire Lendrum has been failing fast, from mere old age for several months. He
leaves a widow and three children, and very many of this community, who have learned to respect him as a good and venerable citizen,
will unite with them in mourning his death." in 1878. He died on 20 May 1878 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, aged 73 His death was
recorded thus: (It seems that the extract came from a newspaper clipping, although there is no notation of the date or issue. Taken from
a typed copy found in the attic at "Beechwood".) "Esquire J. B. Lendrum died at his home, 619 Scott Street, yesterday morning in the 74th
year of his age. The funeral takes place tomorrow at 2 o'clock. John Buckner Lendrum was born on the 19th day of August, 1804 at Oak
Grove, Va. He was the son of Dr.Thomas Keith Lendrum, and his mother's maiden name was Margaret Buckner. His father was a
regimental surgeon in a Virginia command in the Revolutionary War. The deceased came to Covington in 1830 and has resided here
ever since. He served 12 years as City Clerk and several years besides as Magistrate; also as Mayor pro tempore in the administration of
Mayor Cyrus Preston and S. W. Foley. In 1836 he was initiated in Washington Lodge, I.00F in this city. He was also, at his death, a
member of the Simon Kenton Pioneer Association. Both these Societies will attend his funeral, having already called a meeting for this
purpose. Esquire Lendrum has been failing fast, from mere old age for several months. He leaves a widow and three children, and very
many of this community, who have learned to respect him as a good and venerable citizen, will unite with them in mourning his death"
(SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). He was buried on 21 Jun 1878 at Highland Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County,
KY (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) ("Lendrum Booklet."). He was a member in 1878 at Simon Kenton Pioneer
Assoc., Covington, Kenton County, KY, A newspaper clipping (date unknown) states:
The Fourth and The Pioneers
A goodly gathering of good citizens of various ages, sexes and conditions in life greeted the Pioneer Association at its meeting yesterday
to celebrate the Nation's Natal day and to elect Society officers for another year. The old board of officers was re-chosen: president H.H
Martin, Vice President John Mackoy, Secretary Napoleon B. Stephens, Treasurer John T. Lewis. According to programme, the
Declaration of Independence was read by Mr. Stephens; a minute of the life and a tribute to the worth of character of the late John B.
Lendrum was read by Mr. Mackoy; and the oration of the day was gracefully delivered by Col. Robert Richardson. It was a delightful halfhour's discourse,devoted mainly to the utility of anniversaries in preserving public memories worth to be preserved. The eloquent speaker
well said that when a people lost the memory of its Natal Day, the glory and genius of what people was from that time declined.
(a) Thomas Warren6 LENDRUM (260). An old hand written chart from "Beechwood" gives this person's middle name as Keith. He
was born on 13 May 1847 (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). He witnessed CENSUS 1850 - FREE on 1 Jun 1850 at

They must have been running a boarding house because there is a motley crew living in their home.
From SLB "Reminiscences"

John Buckner Lendrum was born in Westmoreland Co., Virginia on August 19, 1804. He was the son of Thomas Keith Lendrum, a Revolutionary Wr
Soldier. John Lendrum came to covington in 1829 and Married Elizabeth Rudd. His people came from Scotland and had settled in Westmoreland Co.,
Virginia in 1680.
9
The order book 1 p. 316 appoints him as justice of the peace. On p. 336 of the same book he is given the right to marry people.
10
The city Directory for 1872 gives home address as 333 Garrard St.

Page 21

John B. Lendrum, 39/male; dwelling 664, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1850 Census;, Third ward p. 256, line 664.). He died say
1895.
(b) Harry Stokes6 LENDRUM (261). An old handwritten chart from "Beechwood's" attic give middle initial as L. He A Thomas
Landrum of Virgina who served in the Revolutionary War was married to a woman name who had been "Stoake". Possibly this is the
origin of name. See DAR Lineage books to check. He married Sarah A. MORRISON (492) at NY (Lillian Hudson Lendrum, "unknown
title," e-mail message from unknown author e-mail (unknown address) to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.). He was born on 18
May 1849 at Covington, Kenton County, KY (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). He witnessed CENSUS 1850 FREE on 1 Jun 1850 at John B. Lendrum, 39/male; dwelling 664, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1850 Census;, Third ward p. 256,
line 664.). He lived in 1871 at 85 E. 5th St., Covington, Kenton County, KY. He was employed in 1871 at Postal Clerk, Covington,
Kenton County, KY. He appeared on the Census in 1880 at New York, NY (U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Tenth
Census of the U.S., 1880: Population Schedule, Micro-publication T9, National Archives, Washington, DC; (Washington, D.C.:
National Archives, 1880). Hereinafter cited as 1880 Census.). He was buried in 1895 at Brooklyn. He died in 1895 at Brooklyn In the
year 1896, the son of John B. Lendrum, Harry S., died. Here follows his obituary: "The news of the death of Harry Stokes Lendrum,
which occurred last Sunday at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., will be heard with sincere regrets. He was in his 46th year at the time
of his death. He was born in Covington, Ky. and was the son of the late John B. and Elizabeth H. Lendrum, pioneer residents of this
city. The deceased, early in his life, was appointed to a position in the City of Covington Post Office, served under the late Jesse R.
Grant and Shadford Easton. During the second administration of General Grant, Mr. Lendrum was the President's personal request,
transferred to the New York Post office where he subsequently became chief of Division of the Registry Dept. In his many years of
service in the department, both here and in New York, he possessed and merited the full and hearty confidence of his superiors in
office. He was a good son, a devoted husband and father. In Covington he enjoyed the friendship and esteem of a wide circle of
acquaintances and friends. He leaves a surviving widow and four children, a girl 14 years of age and three boys, and his sister, Mrs.
Laurie J. Blakely. The burial was in Brooklyn."
i) Ralph Hemingway7 LENDRUM (493) ("Lendrum Booklet.") Never married. He was born in 1878. He appeared on the Census
in 1880 (1880 Census.). He died on 25 Jan 1943 at Brooklyn Never married. Died of gas asphyxiation (Lendrum, "unknown short
title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.).
ii) Lillian Hudson7 LENDRUM (498) married James Fred CRESSER (499). She lived at Lillian Hudson Lendrum, 615 6th Ave.,
Brooklyn ("Lendrum Booklet."). Her married name was CRESSER (498). She was born in 1879 at New York, NY (1880 Census.).
(a) William L.8 CRESSER (500) died on 13 Jan 1887 at Brooklyn Found record that states he died 1-13-1887 at age 4. I
suspect this is incorrect. Need more checking ("Lendrum Booklet.").
(b) Beatrice L.8 CRESSER (501)
iii) Harry Stokes7 LENDRUM Jr. (494) (Ibid.) was born in Oct 1880 at New York, NY, Lillian gave his birthdate, but he does not
appear on the 1880 census so census must have been taken before he was born ("Personal information from Lillian Blauvelt 620
Green Briar Ct. Westfield, NJ 07090", February 2002, Lillian Blauvelt (620 Green Briar Ct. Westfield, NJ 07090), to MVW (Florida).
Hereinafter cited as "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."). He married Ada Maude THOMPSON (502) on 28 Jun 1902 at Brooklyn, NY
(Ibid.). He lived in 1943. He was buried in 1954 at Brooklyn, NY (Ibid.). He died on 17 Oct 1954 Broke his neck falling from a
ladder (Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.) (Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."). He
was New Tag She is his grandaughter. I sent her printout of Lendrum in February of 2001.
Mrs. Lillian Blauvelt, 620 Green Briar Ct., Westfield, New Jersey,07090. she responded with additionl family information. in 2001.
He A note from his grandaughter, Lillian Blauvelt says, " Sarah disowned my grandfather because he married "beneath him". in
2002 (Ibid.).
(a) Harry Stokes8 LENDRUM III (503) (Direct information taken from first person family knowledge. Not heresay or legend.)
(b) Lillian Maude8 LENDRUM (504) was born on 3 May 1903 (Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."). She married John Dwight
BALDWIN (505), son of John Theddius BALDWIN (507) and Fanny (--?--) (508), on 18 Mar 1924 (Ibid.). As of 18 Mar 1924,
her married name was BALDWIN (504) (Ibid.).
i) Lillian Maude9 BALDWIN (506). Record gives age as 14, but record (SLB) has no date. Evidence suggests record made
after 1943. She married an unknown person (Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12
2001.). She was born on 26 Aug 1929 (Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."). She married Henry Donald BLAUVELT
(3123) on 3 Sep 1948 (Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.) (Blauvelt, "Note from
Lillian Blauvelt."). As of 3 Sep 1948, her married name was BLAUVELT (506) (Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to
Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.) (Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt."). She was living in 2001 at Westfield, NJ
(Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.).
(a) John Douglas10 BLAUVELT (3370) (Blauvelt, "Note from Lillian Blauvelt.") (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(b) Henry Robert10 BLAUVELT (3371) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(c) Lynn Marie10 BLAUVELT (3372) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(d) Lisa Margaret10 BLAUVELT (3373) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) was born on 29 Feb 1960 (Ibid.). She died on 12 Nov 1986
aged 26 (Ibid.).

Page 22

iv) Paul Grant7 LENDRUM (495) was born in 1883. He died on 14 Nov 1887 ("Lendrum Booklet.").
v) Earl Randolph7 LENDRUM (496) was born in 1886. He died on 6 Nov 1887 He died of Diphtheria (Ibid.).
vi) Victor Stephen7 LENDRUM (497). Some information on this family taken from SLB notes. He wrote the notes and gave ages,
but there is no way to date the notes except they were done after 1943. In notes he says that at that time parents were still living.
SLB died in 1959. He was born on 25 Dec 1888 at New York, NY (Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough,
March 12 2001.). He married Irene Estelle CROOKE (509) on 16 Dec 1915 (Ibid.). He was employed by Letter in File. He
searched deeds etc. for Williamsburg Savings in 1943 at 1 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, NY (Ibid.). He lived before 1965 at Brooklyn,
NY.11 He died on 8 Sep 1965 at Brooklyn aged 76 Heart Attack
(Ibid.).
(a) Victor Stephen8 LENDRUM Jr (510). Age given as 24 but no date on record. He is unmarried. He was born on 12 Sep
1918 (Ibid.). He served in the military circa 1944 According to his sister he was at Guadalcanal, was smart and kept finances
for the army (Ibid.). He married Gertrude SCHWARZ (3170) on 8 Dec 1945. He died on 28 Apr 1979 at Chicago, IL, aged 60
Died of colon cancer (Ibid.).
i) Donald M.9 LENDRUM (3171) is still living.
(b) Marion Estelle8 LENDRUM (511) ("Lendrum Booklet.") was born on 4 Feb 1920 (Lendrum, "unknown short title," e-mail to
Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.). She married John James FORD (515) on 23 May 1942 SLB notes say no children but
don't know what date notes made (Ibid.). As of 23 May 1942, her married name was FORD (511). She died on 19 Jun 1981 at
AZ aged 61 Died of colon cancer (Ibid.).
(c) Ruth Florence8 LENDRUM (512) (Ibid.). Age given as 21 in SLB notes. She married Walter COURNEY (3124) (Ibid.). Her
married name was COURNEY (512) (Ibid.). She was born on 31 Aug 1921 (Ibid.). She married an unknown person on 26 Oct
1947 (Ibid.). She was living in 2001 (Ibid.).12
(d) Irene E.8 LENDRUM (513). Age given as 20. Her married name was PURELIS (513) (Ibid.). She married Walter
PURELIS (3125) (Ibid.). She was born on 16 Feb 1923 (Ibid.). She married an unknown person on 13 Jun 1952 (Ibid.).
(e) Lillian Hudson8 LENDRUM (514) ("Lendrum Booklet."). Her married name was JARMAN (514) (Lendrum, "unknown short
title," e-mail to Margot Woodrough, March 12 2001.). She married John J. JARMAN (3126) (Ibid.). She was born on 22 Aug
1932 (Ibid.). She lived in Aug 1968 at Phoenix, AZ (Ibid.).13 She was living in 2001.14 She was New Tag
hudson03@yahoo.com in 2001. Here is the text of her e-mail message to me.
Hi, How r u feeling, better I hope. I've been down and off computer for abt. 2 mths. Will know more, I hope, from dr, tomorrow.
Thanks for update,but there need to be several corrections. My dad Victor Stephen and brother to Harry Stokes and Ralph ,
was born in N.Y. Dec.25,1888 and died in Brooklyn, N.Y and buried with my mother in cemetery on Long Island, N.Y. can't
think of name now. Mother Irene Estelle Crooke, not Croake,
they were married in Brooklyn on Dec.16,1915 . Daddy died Sept. 8th, 1965 in Brooklyn and mother died Dec, 12..1966 also
in Brooklyn. Dad didn't live at 1 Hanson Place, Bklyn, that's where he worked searching deeds etc. for the Williamsburg
Savings. They lived many years at 1551 E. 8th St, and 1526 E. 8th St. I was born at 1551 on Aug 22, 1932. My dad had
angina and mother died 15 mths later from heartbreak and cerebral hemmorage in hospital after 8 days in a coma. When
married and living in Bklyn, John J, Jarman and I and 2 daughters lived in Unionville, Mo. for 2 yrs, then moved back to Bklyn
and bought a house .at 815 East 46th Street, then moved to Phoenix ,Az. in Aug. 1968, living o at 4109 W. Purdue, 514 E.
Angela Drive, and now at 12414 Westgate Drive, SunCity West, AZ. Our girls are Nancy Lea Jarman Schroeder born Nov. 12.
1958 and married to William H. Schroeder on June 7,1986 and daughter Jill! ian Lea Schroeder born March 20, 1987, 2nd
daughter, Cathy Irene Jarman Daniels born April 14, 1962 in Centerville, Iowa, and married to David Todd Daniels on April 25,
1987- no children- My brother Victor Jr. born Sept.12, 1918 was in WWII Guadalcanal, he was smart, kept finances for the
army and married Gertrude Schwarz on Dec. 8,1945 and one son DonaldMwho was born Jan 1947 married to Karen 3 sons
living in Bartlett, Ill.,Vic (Buddy) died April 28th 1979.
Marion Estelle Lendrum Ford married John J on May 23,1942 and died June 19, 1981 in Sun City West also of cancer of colon
and lungs. She smoked and had no children. Love, Lillian
Hi, How r u feeling, better I hope. I've been down and off computer for abt. 2 mths. Will know more, I hope, from dr, tomorrow.
Thanks for update,but there need to be several corrections. My dad Victor Stephen and brother to Harry Stokes and Ralph ,
was born in N>Y> Dec.25,1888 and died in Brooklyn, N>Y and buried with my mother in cemetery on Long Island, N>Y> can't
think of name now. Mother Irene Estelle Crooke, not Croake,
They were married in Brooklyn on Dec.16,1915 . Daddy died Sept. 8th, 1965 in Brooklyn and mother died Dec, 12..1966 also
in Brooklyn. Dad didn't live at 1 Hanson Place, Bklyn, that's where he worked searching deeds etc. for the Williamsburg
Savings. They lived many years at 1551 E. 8th St, and 1526 E. 8th St. I was born at 1551 on Aug 22, 1932. My dad had
angina and mother died 15 mths later from heartbreak and cerebral hemmorage in hospital after 8 days in a coma. When
married and living in Bklyn, John J, Jarman and I and 2 daughters lived in Unionville, Mo. for 2 yrs, then moved back to Bklyn
and bought a house .at 815 East 46th Street, then moved to Phoenix ,Az. in Aug. 1968, living o at 4109 W. Purdue, 514 E.
11

Lived at 1551 E. 8th St., and 1526 E. 8th St.


Still living.
13
The lived at 4109 W. Purdue, 514 E. Angela Drive and in 2001 at 12412 Westgate Dr. SunCity West, AZ.
14
This is the person who sent the e-mail message that is cited at hudson arizona in this database.
12

Page 23

Angela Drive, and now at 12414 Westgate Drive, SunCity West, AZ. Our girls are Nancy Lea Jarman Schroeder born Nov. 12.
1958 and married to William H. Schroeder on June 7,1986 and daughter Jill! ian Lea Schroeder born March 20, 1987, 2nd
daughter, Cathy Irene Jarman Daniels born April 14, 1962 in Centerville, Iowa, and married to David Todd Daniels on April 25,
1987- no children- My brother Victor Jr. born Sept.12, 1918 was in WWII Guadalcanal, he was smart, kept finances for the
army and married Gertrude Schwarz on Dec. 8,1945 and one son DonaldMwho was born Jan 1947 married to Karen 3 sons
living in Bartlett, Ill.,Vic (Buddy) died April 28th 1979.
Marion Estelle Lendrum Ford married John J on May 23,1942 and died June 19, 1981 in Sun City West also of cancer of colon
and lungs. She smoked and had no children. Love, Lillian
Hi again- short and sweet. MY dad is down as 4th generation that seems correct, but then u have Victor Jr. Marion Estelle it
shud be and me also with the 4th generation. We should be mention as the 5th, I believe with more info like 1st email just sent.
That was another Lillian married to Cressner, I've seen that name before, but not my husband born in Unionville,Mo. John J.
Jarman.
Funny meeting. We met Aug 7th or 8th A Sat. nite in 1954, met thru blind date met at uso dance at Chanute AFB, Ill,
corresponded and visited, and Sept. 30th,1955 he discharged from AF and moved to Brooklyn, N.Y. and were married Dec
26, 1955 at St. Brendans Catholic Church, Bklyn. N.Y. A real good sweetheart, I was very fortunate. I asked St. Ann to send
me a good man and she did. Ha. How do we get the emails or whatever, of our living relatives? Thanks for all ur trouble and
feel good. Love, Lillian (Ibid.).
i) Nancy Lea9 JARMAN (3165) is still living.
(a) Jillian Lea10 SCHROEDER (3167) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
ii) Cathy Irene9 JARMAN (3168) is still living.

(c) Lily Hudson6 LENDRUM (44).15


Obnituary of she was (Newspaper obituary,
Cincinnati Enquirer dated April 3, 1922, pg 6) provided by Kay Ryan
MRS. LILY L. BLAKELY DIES
Mother of Former Covington Official Stricken in Chicago
Mrs. Lily L. Blakely, mother of Attorney Stephens L. Blakely, former Commonwealth Attorney of Kenton County died in Chicago,
ILL, yesterday, when visiting her daughter, Mrs. L. C. Baldwin. Mrs. Blakely was born in Covington September 13, 1850. She was the
widow of Laurie J. Blakely, widely known Cincinnati Editorial writer.
Besides Attorney Blakely and Mrs. Baldwin she is survived by two sons. Rev Paul L. Blakely, editor of a religious magazine,
America, New York City, and L. J. Blakely, Jr., advertising manager of a gas and electric appliance company, Covington; and two
daughters, Sisters Mary Agatha and Jane Frances Blakely, Georgetown, KY.
The body of Mrs. Blakely will be forwarded to the residence of her son, Attorney Stephens L. Blakely, Beechwood Road Ft. Mitchell,
this morning. Funeral services will be held from his residence tomorrow morning. Requiem mass will be solemnized at St. Mary's
Cathedral by Rev. Paul L. Blakely, son of the decesaed. Burial will be in St. Mary's Cemetery. She was DAR # Her DAR # is 16151
She is on page 38 but do not know which book.
EVERYTHING in the DAR record is wrong for her. Her application is in MVW file and apparently she didn't even know her
grandfather's name.
All of the information here is correct and verified. at #16151 (DAR, compiler, Daughters of American Revolution Lineage Books (No
place: no publisher). Hereinafter cited as DAR.). (From Aunt Aileen J. Ryan's notes) provided by Kay Ryan
Aunt Lillie was the gentlest of women, with a vein of iron. Our Mother loved her and she loved "Mae". Her husband and children
addred her. She always dressed in white with a tiny black ribbon around her neck. The family lived first in Covington and then in Ft.
15

She was in the Elizabeth Kenton Chapter of the DAR in Covington, KY.

Page 24

Mitchell where the only living grandchildren still live. She was born on 13 Sep 1852 at Covington, Kenton County, KY (SLB Date diary,
Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) ("SLB Remembrances."). She married Laurie John BLAKELY (43), son of James B. BLAKELY (50)
and Susananna SMYTH (51), on 28 Jun 1877 at Marriage; Covington, Ky, Covington, Kenton County, KY, The Court House records of
the marriage give the following information. Lilly H. Landrum was married June 28, 1877 in Covington and was 21 when she married.
(This would put her date of birth as 1856. Other records give her birthdate as 1852) It was her first marriage and she said her father
was born in Virginia and her mother was born in Kentucky. Her father was present when the court house record was made.
The court house record refers to Laurie J. Blakely as Laurene J. Blakely residing in Covington. He stated that he was 30 years old, but
actually he was 33. His occupation was listed as Lawyer and he says he was born in Virginia. He stated that his father was born in
Virginia and his mother was born in Pennsylvania. This does not square with census data from several years that show his father born
in England and if Laurie Blakely was born in Virginia, it was the part that later became West Virginia. (Perhaps he wanted to establish
Virginia ancestors as no doubt he was aware that his wife was from a long line of "old Virginians". --MVW 2001
Lillie Hudson Lendrum married at the age of 25, on June 28, 1877 to Laurie John Blakely of Covington, Ky. The wedding was held at
the bride's home, 619 Scott Street in Covington. The groom was a Catholic, from a very Catholic family, but since the bride was
Baptist, the wedding could not be held in the church. The following is a description of the wedding:
"ORANGE BLOSSOMS"
No sweeter lady was ever wedded to a worthier or genial gentleman than when Miss Lillie Lendrum was wedded to Mr. L. J. Blakely.
The marriage was celebrated in simple, pretty style at the home of the Bride's parents, #619 Scott Street, yesterday afternoon at 3
o'clock. Father Tom Major, of Cynthiana, officiating. The bride looked indisputably lovely in her pure white attire, ornamented with
natural flowers; and the groom was as handsome as handsome can be. The parlors were clothed in white, decked off with flowers and
pretty illuminations, and the whole presented a most charming tableau. Only a few of the nearest relatives and intimates were there.
And the wedding pair took passage on the Fleetwood at 4 o'clock destined for Greenbrier, White Springs, where they will abide for a
few days, and then return to their home. Among the wedding gifts were: ornamental work from her own workmanship, Miss Carrie
Gedge; bracelets, Mr. Harry Lendrum; pickle jar, silver stand and spoons, Warren T. Lendrum; silver fruit spoons in case, Mrs. W. H.
Mackey; a case of silver knives, Mrs. J. B. Lendrum; silver jewell casket, Mrs. Boyd; silver napkin rings, "Cousin Mollie"; pitcher and
goblet, Mrs. Mary B. Ryan; silver basket, Mrs. A. J. Whipps; bouquet of elegant ---, Mrs. N. B. Stephens (Napoleon B. Stephens - all
the Stephens in the Blakely family bear this name in honor of his friend. Thank goodness, it could have been Napoleon instead of
Stephens!" ; another of same from "Dodo" Ryan."
It was hardly a year past the wedding date when on May 25, 1878, at the age of about 70, John B. Lendrum died.
As a newly wed couple, the first few years must have been trying because their first son, Stephens L. Blakely was born on April 23,
1878, only one month prior to his grandfathers death, and their second son, Paul Lendrum Blakely was born Feb. 27, 1880, only a
month prior to his grandmother's death from what was described as a long and painful illness, and during which time she seemed to
have been living with the newlyweds.
The couple was married at 619 Scott St. Covington, KY. In Stephens L. Blakely's wedding scrapbook there is a picture of "Georgia
Row" at White Sulfer Springs with the note that this is where "Mr. and Mrs. B., Sr. spent their honeymoon in 1877. Looks like Jane and
Stephens Woodrough selected the same spot and took the picture.
Marriage by Rev. Thomas Major (priest) in the presence of Rev. W.H Felix (Baptist Minister) and Mrs. E. Woodall and others, kinfolks
and friends according to LJB's entry in bible (Lilly H. Landrum, Marriage Book 2: 11, Kenton Co. Ct. House.) (SLB Date diary, Date
diary, about 1950 MVW file.) (Lendrum-Blakely, Laura Glass, Belleair Florida (1998).) ("Lendrum Booklet."). As of 28 Jun 1877, her
married name was BLAKELY (44) (SLB Diary.) (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) (Lendrum Blakely.) ("Lendrum
Booklet."). He witnessed CENSUS 1880 on 1 Jun 1880 at Laurie J. Blakely, 36/male; dwelling 207, family 243, Covington, Kenton
County, KY (1880 Census;, Enumeration date June 10, 1880 p. 26 line 34
T9-0425 P.228B.). She lived with Laurie John BLAKELY (43) and Stephens Laurie BLAKELY (35) in 1880 at 621 Garrard St.,
Covington, Kenton County, KY. He witnessed CENSUS 1900 on 1 Jun 1900 at Laurie J. Blakely, 57/male, Covington, Kenton County,
KY (U.S. Dept of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Twelfth Census of the U.S., 1900: Population Schedule, Micro-publication T623,
National Archives, Washington, DC; (Washington, D.C.: National Archives, 1900). Hereinafter cited as 1900 Census.). She witnessed
the marriage of Stephens Laurie BLAKELY (35) and Jane DeValcourt Stamps PIATT (36) on 28 Jun 1906 at St. Mary's Church,
Covington, Kenton County, KY (unknown subject, unknown repository, unknown repository address.) (SLB Date diary, Date diary,
about 1950 MVW file.) (Lendrum Blakely.). She appeared on the census in 1920 at Covington, Kenton County, KY.16 She died on 2
Apr 1922 at Chicago, IL, aged 69 She died at the home of her daughter, Mary Louis Blakely Bladwin. According to a family story told
by Jane Blakely Woodrough - "I remember Aunt Weese telling the story of when Lily was on her death bed and they sent for a priest.
The doorbell rang and Weese, expecting the priest, answered the door carrying a lit candle (as was the custom when expecting a
priest carrying the eucharist), then dropped to her knees. When she looked up, she was startled to see the laundry man, staring down
at her with wondering eyes!" (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) ("Lendrum Booklet."). She was buried on 4 Apr 1922
(SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.).
i) Stephens Laurie7 BLAKELY
(35)

16

She was shown as a widow living with her son Laurie who was single and listed as a Traveling Salesman.

Page 25

Page 26

Page 27

Page 28

Family stories tell that the Blakely family is related to Ashton, Houghton, Lendrum, Rudds, Ruffner, Weakland, Smythe and
Buckners. Some of these connections have been found and others (Ashton, Houghton and Weakland) are still missing although
there was an old note and picture in SLB's attic that indicates the pictures are of Haughton ancestors. He was baptized in 1878 at
Covington, Kenton County, KY, Baptized by Rt. Rev. Bishop of Covington (Lendrum Blakely.). As of 1878, he was also known as
Laurie John Stephens BLAKELY (35) This information from a bible record. He was born on 23 Apr 1878 at Stephens Laurie
Blakely, 609 Scott St., Covington, Kenton County, KY, The following is from SLB's "Reminiscences"
I was walking down Scott Street one hot summer afternoon and met Richard and we stopped and talked on the southwest corner
of Pike and Scott Streets. Pike Street between Madison Ave and Scott Street used to be called Cooper Street after the Cooper
family. Herndon Cooper's children are scattered over the country so that the name has disappeared in Covington, even Cooper
Street.
Well, Richard is a most respectable colored man, a pensioner of the Shinkle family. He told me that I had been born in the third
house south of Pike Street. I had always thought that I was born in the house on the corner, but he said that on this date, April 23,
1878, he was fifteen years old and was a boy in Spanglers Livery Stable and Mule Yard just across the street. He said he used to
saddle my father's horse and bring him across the street so that my father could ride to his office which was only a few blocks
away, for which he was frequently rewarded with Canadian dimes, nickles and sometimes quarters. He even had some of them in
his pocket at the time. (Likely time 1940's)
My father Laurie J. Blakley entered the army of the Confederate States and after the surrender went to Canada where he remained
for several years. He never talked much about his adventures, but I heard him mention this fact once or twice.
Richard's Canadian money was interesting because it was such a casual reminder of something that had happened eighty years
before.
Note from MVW: this is a strange story. Why would a man give out tips in Canadian coins at least five years after he supposedly
went to Canada. Funny he should be carrying them around that long. Story is particularly peculiar since there has been no
evidence located that supports the story. July 2001
Bible entry reads: Laurie John Stephens Blakely first child and son of Laurie J. Blakely and Lilly his wife (and called 'Stephens" in
honor of an old and dear friend N.B. Stephens) was born in Covington, Ky (Ibid.). He appeared on the Census on 1 Jun 1880 at
Laurie J. Blakely, 36/male; dwelling 207, family 243, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1880 Census;, Enumeration date June 10,
1880 p. 26 line 34
T9-0425 P.228B.).17 He and Laurie John BLAKELY (43) lived in 1880 at 621 Garrard St., Covington, Kenton County, KY.18 He
was graduated on 29 Jun 1898 at St. Xavier College, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950
MVW file.). He appeared on the census in 1900.19 He witnessed CENSUS 1900 on 1 Jun 1900 at Laurie J. Blakely, 57/male,
Covington, Kenton County, KY (1900 Census.). He witnessed CENSUS 1900 in 1900 at Covington, Kenton County, KY. He was
employed in 1901 at Attorney, Covington, Kenton County, KY (Family information.). He was engaged in Nov 1905 at Covington,
Kenton County, KY.20 He spent Honeymoon in Jun 1906 at Greenbriar Hotel.21 He was graduated on 26 Jun 1906 at McDonald
Law School, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH.22 He married Jane DeValcourt Stamps PIATT (36), daughter of Edward Courtney
PIATT (62) and Sallie Scott RICHARDSON (63), on 28 Jun 1906 at St. Mary's Church, Covington, Kenton County, KY, The
wedding invitation came only from mother and was reported in newspapers of the time. "The wedding nuptials of Miss Jane
Stamps Piatt, the only daughter of Mrs. Sallie Richardson Piatt and Stephens L. Blakely, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Laurie
Blakely were solemnized Thursday morning at St. Mary's Cathedral. The bride was very beautiful in a robe of white Paris mull,
with Valenincenes lace trimmings. She carried a bouquet of bride roses and asparagus vine and wore a tulle veil caught to her
hair by a spray of orange blossoms. At her throat was a pendant of pearls and rubies, a bridal gift. After the ceremony the bridal
party and immediate relatives repaired to the home of the bride's mother, where a handsome breakfast was served. The drawing
room was decorated with carnations and ferns."
A guest list was given: Mr. and Mrs. DeVal Court Carroll, Theodore Kirk, Arthur Hubbard, John Menzies, Laurie Blakely, Sallie
Piatt, Shelly Rouse, John Simrall, John Picton, Henry Walker, Benjamin McCutcheon, George McRoberts, Graddy Kennedy, J. M.
Kennedy, Ida Foster, Misses Annabel Prague, Eisle Laidley, Edith Brennen, Edith Noonan, Helen and Mary Bum, Harriet and
Grace Collins, Virginia Gooch, Anna Holmes, Emily Woodall, Marie Louise Blakely, Elizabeth and Susie Blakely, McVeighs, Jean
Walker, Jane Martin, Virginia Martin, Emma Gallati, Mary Coombs, Fan Simrall, Messrs Brent Woodall, Stewart Walker, John
Warner, Hugh Warner, and Sam Adams (unknown subject unknown repository.) (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW
file.) (Lendrum Blakely.). He was shown on a deed in 1908 at Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, A newspaper clipping taken from
17

Occupation shown as lawyer and birthplace shown as Virginia. This is the first time since 1850 that Laurie Blakely gives his birthplace as Virginia. All
previous census show him born in Pennsylvania. Also, in this census his mother is shown as having been born in Maryland. This is clearly wrong and
leads one to think that perhaps his wife, Lillie, gave the information and simply got it wrong or perhaps this was what she was told. Lillie did in fact come
from a Virginia family that traced its roots back to George Washington.
18
According to the 1880 census. They lived at house #207 and are shown on page 26 line 34. They had two servants Phoebe Coleman and Kate
Garrett.
19
Shown as: BLAKELEY........ Steven L. BLAKELEY.
20
ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
The engagement of Miss Jane Stamps Piatt and Stephens L. Blakely which has just been announced by the bride-elect's mother, Mrs. E. Courtney Piatt
of Garrard St. is of interest not only in this city but also in Central Kentucky, owing to the prominence of both families. Miss Piatt is one of Covington's
most beautiful and cultured young girls. Both are popular in Covington society and also in Lexington where Miss Piatt resided for a short time. The
wedding will be a pretty, but quiet event early in June at St. Mary's Cathedral. - taken from a newspaper clipping.
21
Jane and Stephens went to Greenbriar Hotel and spent two weeks on honeymoon.
22
Law certificate in MVW file.

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SLB's scrapbook states the following about the purchase of home and land where Beechwood would be built: "Annie M and Mary
P. Thorburg to Jane Piatt Blakely 4.14 acres of land on the Pleasant Run Creek $2,400." He was shown on a deed in 1908 at sale;
4 acres Kenton county, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, This is at least part of the land on which Beechwood would be built. He
bought the land from Annie and Mary Thorburn. There was an old house on the property that burned (pictures in MVW file). Later
Beechwood was built on the property. RESCUES SICK WIFE IN A FIRE
Attorney Stephens L. Blakely, prominent in Covington politics, was seriously burned in the destruction of his home by fire on
Beechwood Ave Ft. Mitchell, Wednesday morning. He received his burns after saving his wife and three children under unusual
circumstances. He was awaken at 3:30 in the morning by the smell of smoke, and found the room choked. He rushed across the
hall to his wife's room where she was with their 11 day old child (John Buckner Blakely). He carried her downstairs, but could not
get outdoors, because the porch was all aflame. He finally got her to safety by lowering her from the parlor window. He then
saved Stephens, 4 Courtney 3 and Jane 18 months in the same manner. With this family safe, Blakely rushed back into the house
in an attempt to put out the flames. He was severely burned about the hands and feet. Nearly overcome, he was carried to the
home of neighbors. Mrs. Blakely was taken to the home of friends with her children but, it is feared the shock may be serious. The
fire, it is believed was caused by a defective flue. The house was destroyed, resulting in a $3,000 loss. Blakely will be appointed
city solicitor under Mayor-elect "Pat" Philipps. - Account taken from newspaper article. He was employed by City Solicitor
Covington, KY on 2 Jan 1912 at Covington, Kenton County, KY (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). Here is an
exccerpt from a piece written in 2007 by the Covington Historical Society. It sheds light on a little know side of Stephens L.
Blakely. SLB was awarded a flag pole with a bronze inscription plaque in thanks for his activities. Evidentally the flag pole fell and
the plaque was stored in the attic of Beechwood.
Covington also had a group like the American Patriot League. However the citys group was one that achieved national press and
became a powerful force during this time. This organization was called the Citizens Patriot League. Formed in 1917 with twentyfive members, by 1919 it claimed more than one thousand members.ii Stamm, German-American Population, 10. It was the most
visible and probably the most powerful local patriotic organization. The League held mass meetings attended by prominent
members of the community. The organization raised support for its anti-German acts with emotional rhetoric to generate publicity
so that its members could pressure public officials to pass laws that the group supported.iii Ibidi The goals of the CPL were to
eliminate German in schools as well as other foreign languages; no German language in media; and sought the deportation of any
American of foreign birth, who did not support the United States in the war. iiii Ibid ii They campaigned against German newspapers,
against individuals, and pushed their agenda on what they believed a pro-German person was.iiv Ibid, 11v
The first meeting of the CPL was held in October of 1917.vv The Kentucky Post, October 18, 1917. Many influential people, such
as the Mayor of Covington, [name?] the Commonwealths attorney for Kenton County, Stephens Blakely and many more, attended
this meeting.vvi Ibidi Stephens Blakely would become a major player in the anti-German movements that evolved in Covington.
In order to accomplish its goals, the CPL did several things. The group wrote resolutions that contained the opinions of the
League; signed by members and mailed to officials or groups.vvii Stamm, German-American Population, 11.ii The CPL sent out 200 members to
homes and saloons across the city to hang posters warning of punishments to be inflicted upon pro-Germans.vviii Ibid, 12iii One of the
first places the group focused were the saloons owned and operated by Germans. The most famous case was Joe Janson.
Janson was a saloon owner whose license was revoked. iix Ibid x Stephens Blakely, a known member of the CPL and the
Commonwealths Attorney led the case against him.xx Ibid Eventually Janson recovered his license but he had lost money, and was
painted as pro-German by the CPL.
Another concern for the CPL was to inform the public of the German war crimes that were committed. The group, led by Stephens
Blakely, wrote a proposal and urged the government to make all German War Crimes public.xxi Ibid,13i It wanted the government to
photograph victims in France and Belgium and then send them to every home in America.xxii Ibidii At one meeting Blakely claimed
that German soldiers gas their enemies in the trenches, gouge out their eyes, and cut off arms and legsxxiii Ibidiii The CPL
meetings included descriptions of German war atrocities. Eventually the government would respond to the Leagues suggestion
that those living in the rural parts of the state may not be informed enough about what was going on over seas. The Bureau of
Public Information in Washington agreed to send literature to all fourth class postmasters to be placed in every rural mailbox
throughout the state.xxiv Ibidiv
Besides the resolutions that the group passed, it was also involved in violent acts. Mobs, usually members of the CPL, attacked
those who they felt were pro-German. Stephens Blakely, Harvey Myers and John ONeal led many of these mobs.xxv Frederick W. Schmitz,
An Open Reply to John Richmond, President Blakely Club Concerning Patriotic Activities World War I file at Kenton County Public Library, (July 1921) 5,9,14 v
Paul W. Flynn, a farmer and
lifelong resident of Kenton County was surrounded by a howling mob, stripped naked and horsewhipped until he signed a paper for
a War Savings stamp worth $11,000.xxvi Ibid, 5vi He was attacked because he had not bought any stamps prior to the incident and
this was considered as not supporting the war. John Schneider Jr. was beaten and horsewhipped by the CPL because it was said
he insulted the Red Cross.xxvii Ibid, 8vii Father Goebel, a Catholic Priest was visited by the CPL one night at his home. He was
insulted, slapped and kicked by a mob led by Blakely and a placard nailed to his church door because it was rumored he was
preaching kaiserism.xxviii Ibid, 10viii On the other hand, when the CPL visited Father Henry Tappert, German-born pastor of
Covingtons Mother of God Church [Mutter Gottes Kirche] warning him to cease preaching in German, he simply told them,
Gentlemen, ve send our boys to the trenches in France, und ve vill continue to preach in German, good day! Father Tappert
exuded such a charismatic aura that the visitors simple melted away and never bothered the parish again! The clergy continued to
preach auf Deutch until the new pastor, Rev. Edward Klosterman arrived in 1930 when it was apparent most parishioners no
longer understood the tongue.xxix Parish records & personal interview of Edward Strubel (1991)ix But the situation for Mother of God Parish was certainly
the exception.
Schoberg Case
Members of the CPL also took it upon themselves to investigate individuals. Information that they collected about individuals was
turned over to officials and then used to prosecute these individuals.xxx Stamm, German-American Population, 14x One such case was what

Page 30

became known as the Schoberg Case. This case actually involved seven people. However, only three were convicted: Charles
Bernard Schoberg, J. Henry Kruse and Henry Feltman. The men were arrested for seditious acts while having private
conversations at Schobergs shoe shop in Latonia (Covington), Kentucky.xxxi Merriman, An Intensive School of Disloyalty,183xi
The men came under suspicion of the CPL when other citizens heard Schobergs supposedly pro-German statements.xxxii Ibid, 186xii
Once they came under suspicion, the CPL paid the W. H. Detective Bureau of Cincinnati to install a dictograph in Schobergs
grandfather clock.xxxiii Ibidxiii It was in place in March of 1918 and from March to July they listened to whispered conversations from
the basement of a bank next door to Schobergs shop. The listeners took notes of only disloyal or pro-German conversations over
the ticking and tolling of the grandfather clock. The primitive technology made the conversations hardly audible. xxxiv Ibidxiv By July 14,
1918, the CPL felt enough evidence had been collected and Kruse, Schoberg, Feltman and four others were arrested for
seditious acts. The notes taken by the detectives were used as a base for a federal grand jury on August 6, 1918. xxxv Ibid, 187xv The
indictments alleged that: 1) the defendants tried to favor the cause of Germany and Austria-Hungary, 2) they opposed the United
States, 3) intended to bring the armed forces of the United States into contempt, scorn, and disrespect, 4) cause and incite
insubordination, disloyalty, mutiny and refusal of duty in the armed forces of the U.S.xxxvi Ibidxvi The vague generalities of the
amended Espionage Act of May 1918 could be applied with ease!
All of the defendants pleaded not guilty. Each man testified as to never saying anything pro-German, each attesting to their efforts
to support the war by buying war bonds and donating to the Red Cross.xxxvii Ibid188-192xvii The detectives who installed the dictograph
and listened to their conversations testified as to what the defendants had said.xxxviii Ibid, 187xviii All three were convicted and sent to
prison at Moundville. When they appealed to Federal Pardon Attorney J.A. Finch, the American Legion and the CPL, led by
Stephens Blakely, gathered around ten thousand signatures opposing the release.xxxix Ibid, 201xix [An appeal to President Wilson for a
pardon was ignored editor].
The men had to wait until 1921, when their sentences were commuted by President Warren G. Harding. xxxx Ibid, 203xx All the evidence
used to convict these men was paid for by the Citizens Patriot League. The dictograph cost the CPL around $1,000 to $1,500, and
even though these were private conversations that were barely audible on the tapes, the evidence was still allowed into court and
used by the prosecutor. xxxxi Ibid, 186xxi
After the War
From all of this activity, Covington gained a certain amount of notoriety as a result of the actions of the Citizens Patriot League. Its
actions were known nationwide. A national magazine called Manufacturing Record featured Covington for having set an example
which it would be well for every community throughout the nation to follow.xxxxii Stamm, German-American Population, 14xxii It went on to laud
Covington for its mass meetings and resolutions, reprinting the resolutions in full and encouraging other communities to imitate
Covington.xxxxiii Ibidxxiii
By the end of the war the CPL boasted at having over one thousand members.xxxxiv Ibid, 10xxiv They had successfully repressed
German newspapers so that the Volksblatt could only be delivered by mail in Covington; the German language was dropped from
the school system, and even from the streets for fear of retaliation for speaking German. The CPL had been successful.
Although it was the strongest and most successful, the CPL was not the only anti-German group in Northern Kentucky at this time.
There were groups such as the Kenton County Council of Defense, Central Covington Patriotic League, and Campbell County
Bibliography Cincinnati German Street Names Project: Document. Edited by Franziska C. Ott
Public Affairs Committee. German
Council of Defense.xxxxv Ibid, 14
American Citizens League of Greater

Cincinnati, 1995

Coppa, Frank J., and Thomas J. Curran. The Immigrant Experience in America. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1976Covington City

Commissioners Meeting Minutes. 1914 to 1918, Kenton County LibraryFrom the Land of Freedom: German Immigrants Write Home. Edited by
University Press, 1988
1970

Harlon, Alvin F. The Serene Cincinnatians. New York: E P Dutton & Company, 1950

Higham, John. Strangers in the Land: Patterns of American Nativism 1860-1925.

the First World

War. Harvard: Harvard University Press, 1979

New York: Atheneum, 1965

Keller, Phyllis. States of Belonging: German-American Intellectuals and

Merriman, Scott A. An Intensive School of Disloyalty: The C.B. Schoberg Case under

Kentucky during World War I, Registrar of Kentucky Historical Society, vol. 98, no. 2. Spring 2000
and the Federal

Walter D. Kamphoefner. Ithaca: Cornell

Hawgood, John Arkas. The Tragedy of German America. New York: Arno Press,

governments Policy Under the Espionage Acts During WWI it Court of Appeals District. Ph.D. diss., University of Kentucky, 2003Schmitz, Frederick W. An Open Reply

to John Richmond, President of Blakely Club Concerning Patriotic Activities World War I file at Kenton County Public Library, July 1921
Edited by Don Heinrich Tolzmann.

Cincinnati German American Studies Program, University of Cincinnati, 2003

The Cincinnati Germans Scrapbook of Articles.

The Germans In America 1607-1970. Edited by Howard B. Furer.

York: Oceana Publications Inc, 1973 The Kentucky PostTolzmann, Don Heinrich. Cincinnatis German Heritage. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1998
German Heritage. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1998
2003

The Espionage and Sedition Acts in

Merriman, Scott A. Ordinary People in Extraordinary Times? Defendants, Attorneys,

Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. German Heritage Guide to The Greater Cincinnati Area.

Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. The Cincinnati Germans After the Great War. New York: P. Lang, 1987 xxv

New

Tolzmann, Don Heinrich. Covingtons

Milford: Little Miami Publishing Co.,

All of these groups actions paralleled the actions of the

CPL.
When World War I ended, life did not automatically go back to what it was like before. Those accused of being pro-German were
still held in suspicion. The Citizens Patriotic League did not disappear until the 1920s and there were still people serving sentences
for sedition. Perhaps it was the Great Depression that helped erase the hatred of everything German. The population was too busy
surviving to worry about who spoke German. During World War II, the German population was not persecuted to the same extent.
Whatever the cause for the disappearance of the hatred of everything German, it is gone. Covington celebrates its German
heritage through Oktoberfest in Cincinnati and in Covingtons Main Strasse area. Today the community has re-discovered its
German heritage, even though the bi-lingual nature of Greater Cincinnati German-American culture has never been recaptured
(Karl Lietzenmayer, "unknown title," e-mail message from Karl J Lietzenmayer [nkyheritage.kchs@juno.com] (unknown
address) to mvw, Sept 2007.). He married Margaret Howard JAMES (209), daughter of Howard K. JAMES (223) and Margaret
HAMILTON (224), on 1 Jun 1929 at NY
This is the second marriage for both parties. Their former spouses had died. Former spouses had each been brother and sister.
Stephens Laurie Blakely and Jacob W. Piatt, II had been best friends (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). He was
employed by City Solicitor Covington, KY; Covington, KY in 1934 at Covington, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.). He was buried in Feb

Page 31

1959 at St. Mary's, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY. He died on 24 Feb 1959 at Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, aged 80 The
following was written about SLB at his death:
The master of "Beechwod" has gone to rest
The law books are closed at last
And a gentleman of distinguished mien
Has become a part of the past
Yet he lives in the hearts of his many friends
In the home which his presence knew
In the great white columns, the flickering fires
And the road where the beeches grew
One can circle the drive or mount the stairs
Or wander from room to room
And feel the strength of the legal giant
Beyond and above the tomb
Yes, the master of "Beechwood" has gone away
But remains an essential part
Of the history of a commonwealth
Which lived in his own great heart.
Written by Alice Kennelly Roberts for the Cincinatti Enquirer. Obnituary of he was The Editor's Desk Stephens L. Blakely
by John R. Blakely
Stephens L. Blakely, a member and Third Vice-President of the Kentucky Historical Society, died at Covington, Kentucky, on
Tuesday, February 24, 1959. He was eighty years old.Mr. Blakely was of English descent and was born in Covington, a son of
Laurie John Blakely and Lillie Lendrum Blakely, on April 23, 1878. He was baptized in the Catholic faith. His forebears came to
this country in the year 1632, settling in Westmoreland County, Virginia, and subsequently migrating to Kentucky, following the old
Buffalo Trace along the Ohio River to the place of his birth.
Mr. Blakely received his early education at LaSallette Academy in Covington. Later he attended St. Xavier High School in
Cincinnati, where he studied history, the sciences, Latin, Greek, and the philosophers, subjects considered fundamental to normal
education in that period. In 1894 he began his course of prelegal studies at St. Xavier College, later Xavier University, in
Cincinnati. It was here that his regard for constitutional law first asserted itself. He coupled his interest with a talent for clear
expression of thought. By the time he was only twenty years old, he had written several articles on the Constitution and
recognized it as an instrument of freedom. The ideals formed in these early years were soundly grounded and never changed. He
loved liberty of the individual, of thought, and of expression, and the independence granted to man by the natural law.
Following his graduation from college in 1898 he attached himself as a law clerk to one of the older lawyers then practicing in
Covington. A formal legal education was not at that time a prerequisite to admission to practice in Kentucky. Realizing, however,
that there is no short way to a thorough training of the mind in its chosen field, he enrolled at the old McDonald Institute, later the
Chase School of Law, in Cincinnati, and after graduation was admitted to the bar of Kentucky in 1903.
His early years of practice testify to a wealth of ambition and enterprise. Clients do not come easily to a young lawyer who has just
hung out his shingle. But he was fortunate in soon being accepted as a junior associate in one of the larger Covington firms at a
salary of $6.00 per week, with all expenses paid! If work was not available, he sought it out. He was commissioned by his firm to
abstract and codify a record of all deeds and encumbrances relating to real property located in Kenton County. The job was
completed shortly prior to the year 1910 and is now a permanent part of the records at the Kenton County Clerk's office in
Covington. It is consulted frequently as source material for real estate title examinations.
In 1907 he married Jane Stamps Piatt, the daughter of Edward Courtney Piatt and Sallie R. Piatt of Covington. A short time after
their marriage they moved to Beechwood Road, now a part of South Fort Mitchell, a suburb located about five miles south of
Covington. There they occupied a home which was destroyed by fire in 1911. The present homestead, called "Beechwood", was
completed in 1912. It is located on an eminence overlooking, (as shown by its deed) "the meanders of Pleasant Run Creek."
During the War Between the States, the territory surrounding the home was the scene of skirmishes involving the attacking
Confederates under General Heath, and the Union army under General Wallace, defending Fort Mitchell.
The depth of his mind and the force of his personality combined with is quick wit and a refreshing modesty to produce a young man
destined for many years of success in the law. In 1910 he was appointed solicitor for the City of Covington. He retired from that
position in 1914 upon his election as Commonwealth's attorney for the Sixteenth Judicial District of Kentucky. Except for a leave of
absence granted in 1918 to serve with the United States Army, he held this office until 1920, when he was defeated for re-election.
For many years following his retirement to private practice, Mr. Blakely devoted much of his time to the practice of criminal,
municipal, and constitutional law in the state and federal courts. He was recognized as one of the outstanding trial lawyers of the
Kentucky Bar. In a sketch of him, The Cincinnati Enquirer had this to say:
"Tall, well built, and with a shock of grey hair, Blakely has a booming voice and an imposing courtroom manner and is at his best
before a jury."
In 1928 his wife died after a short illness. About a year thereafter, he married Margaret James Piatt of Tiffin, Ohio, the daughter of
Howard K. James and Margaret H. James, formerly of Covington. Together they raised six children through the difficult period
caused by the great depression.
In 1934 he was again appointed solicitor for the City of Covington. He served in that capacity until 1937, when he retired to accept
the position of legal counsel for the Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Transportation Company. He became director and secretary
of the organization, serving as such until the time of his death.
The later years of his life were devoted almost exclusively to the service of corporate clients attracted to him by his wisdom and
logic and the soundness of his advice. In 1948 he founded the law firm of Blakely, Moore & Blakely, with which he was associated
for the remainder of his lifetime. He belonged to the American and Kentucky Bar Associations and was a member and former
president of the Kenton County Bar Association.

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Mr. Blakely was a staunch advocate of states' right and as such took an active part in the national election campaigns in 1948 and
1956. He was firm in his belief that the individual states ought to be free to control their own destiny without unwarranted
interference from centralized authority.
Always keenly interested in history, local and of the Commonwealth, Mr. Blakely was a founder, in 1949, of the Christopher Gist
Historical Society of Covington, and was its first president. He was an active member of the Literary Club of Cincinnati and
delivered frequent addresses before that group. He was a prolific writer on legal, constitutional, historical, and related subjects.
Among his published articles were "In the Palace Grounds", "Lawyers", "Charles Dickens", "Bonnie Prince Charlie", "A Kentucky
Mystery", "Thorne Hill", and "Belle Boyd, a Fantasy Based on Logic".
He was an active member of Blessed Sacrament Parish in South Fort Mitchell. He belonged to the Fort Mitchell Country Club and
was one of its founders in the year 1904. He was a charter member and past commander of the Norman-Barnes Post of the
American Legion in Covington. He participated in the affairs of many church, social, and historical organizations of local and
national character. A scholarship was established in his honor at Xavier University on Christmas of 1958.
He is survived by his widow; five children, Jacob Wykoff Piatt, Mrs. Earl L. Carran, Mrs. Clay E. Delauney, Mrs. John R.
Woodrough, and John R. Blakely; two sisters, Mrs. Lewis Baldwin and Mother Jane Frances; one brother, Laurie J. Blakely; and
eight grandchildren.
In his lifetime Stephens L. Blakely rejected the concept of "something for nothing" just as he rejected the evils inherent in the so
called "welfare state". He was convinced the hope of gaining something without giving up anything in return is at the root of every
human failure. His principles were right and his direction true. He knew that investment comes before return and that we must
give before we receive. The qualities most characteristic of this great and lovable person were his patience, understanding,
integrity, and compassion, and his deep respect for the dignity of man. His practice of these virtues engendered in him the
boundless faith he had in himself, in his fellow man, and in his God.
From Kay Ryan:(Kentucky Times Star Newspaper dated Oct 22, 1919, pg. 28)
BLAKELY GETS INVITATIONS TO MEET KING
Letter received from G. A. Aerts, Belgian Consul
Commonwealth Attorney Stephens L. Blakely of Covington Wednesday
received a special invitation from G. A. Aerts, Belgian consul in Cincinnati, to meet their majesties; the King and Queen of Belgium.
Blakely expressed pleasure over the receipt of the following letter from Mr. Aerts:
My Dear Mr. Blakely:
I take great pleasure in handing you herewith six cards, which will enable you to pass through the
guard, in order to be presented to their majesties, the King and Queen of Belgium, on Wednesday at 4 o'clock at Music hall.
When introducing you and your friends, I want to tell the King what you have done for the cause of Belgium.
Believe me,
Yours Sincerely, (signed) G. A. Aerts
(part of a Newspaper article from the Kentucky Post Final Edition)There's a date written 2-24-1959 - I don't know if that's the
papers date or the death date.
STEPHENS L. BLAKELY DIES AT AGE 80 Veteran Lawyer Had Been Ill Since February 6
The 55-year-old legal career of Stephens L. Blakely, 80, Covington attorney, was ended by death Tuesday at St. Elizabeth
Hospital.
Mr. Blakely, who twice served as Covington city solicitor and once as Kenton county commonwealth attorney, was the senior
partner in the law firm of Blakely, Moore, Blakely & O'Hara at 106 E. third street, Covington. His home was at 116 Beechwood
road, South Ft. Mitchell.
In recent years, Mr. Blakely served as legal counsel for the Green Line and the Union Light, Heat & Power Co.
He served as city solicitor from 1910 to 1914 and from 1932 to 1935. He was commonwealth attorney from 1914 to 1920.
Although a Democrat, Mr. Blakely was a staunch believer in States Rights.
Mr. Blakely, who had been ill about 3 weeks, was admitted to the hospital Feb. (Con't on page 3, col 1---don't have that page)
(Newspaper obituary, Cincinnati Enquirer, dated Feb. 25, 1959, pg 8A)
LONG CAREER ENDED FOR STEPHENS BLAKELY
Stephens L. Blakely, Covington lawyer and historian, died at 5 a.m. yesterday at St. Elizabeth Hospital, following a three-week
illness. He was 80 years old.
Mr. Blakely, a lawyer for 53 years, lived at 116 Beechwwod Rd., South Ft. Mitchell. He was senior partner in the firm of Blakely,
Moore, Blakely & O'Hara, Covington. He served as Covington city solicitor from 1910 to 1914, Commonwealth's Attorney from
1914 to 1920 and solicitor again from 1932 to 1935.
In recent years, Mr. Blakely served as legal counsel for the Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Transportation Co. and Union
Light, Heat & Power Co. He was appointed a member of the Civil War Centennial Committee by Governor Chandler. A Democrat,
he was a firm believer in states' rights.
Mr. Blakely was one of six veteran lawyers honored last December at an annual meeting of the Kenton county Bar Association.
All had served more than 50 years in the profession.
He was a member of Blessed Sacrament Church, South Ft. Mitchell, Holy Name Society, Ft. Mitchell County Club, Literary Club
of Cincinnati, Christopher Gist Historical Society, Ohio Historical and Philosophical Society, Kenton Historical Society, Caledonian
Society, the Medievalists, Kentucky Civil War Roundtable and American and Kentucky Bar Associations. He was a graduate of St.
Xavier High School and Xavier University, Cincinnati.
He leaves his wife, Mrs. Margaret J. Blakely; three daughters, Mrs. Jane B. Woodrought, South Ft. Mitchell, Mrs. Page Carran,
Ft. Mitchell and Mrs. Clay E. Delauney, Charlottsville, N.C.; two sons John R. Blakely a member of the law firm and J. Kykoff Piatt,
Middletown, Ohio; a brother, Laurie J. Blakely, Lexington; two sisters Mother Jane Frances Blakely, Cardome Academy,
Georgetown and Mrs. Louis Baldwin, Chicago, and eight grandchildren.
John R. Blakely and his sister, Mrs. Woodrough, have announced establishment of the Stephens L. and Margaret J. Blakely
Annual Scholarship at Xavier University for prelaw students from Kenton county.

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Solemn Requiem High Mass will be sung at 9 a.m. tommorrow at Blessed Sacrament Church. Prayers will be same at 8:30
a.m. at the residence where friends may call from 4 to 9 p.m. today. Burial will be in St. Mary Cemetery. in Apr 1959 at Fort
Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Family information.). He lived in 1959 at 116 Beechwood Road, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.23
There are many photographs in the possession of MVW showing Stephens L. Blakely from the time he was a student through until
retirement. In addition, he left numerous diaries of travel and several early diaries written as a young man. All of these are in
MVW file in 1999. Laura Woodrough Glass has copies of the diaries. When "Beechwood" was cleaned out for the final time
following the death of John Ruffner Blakely in 1999, numerous interesting items were salvaged from the attic among which were
the bankruptcy papers of his grandfather, James Blakely. (bankruptcy papers donated to Ohio Historical Society) All are in the care
of MVW. He was The following is a wonderful recipe for a Mint Julep that deserves to be preserved.
THE MINT JULEP CEREMONY
The preparation of the quintessence of gentlemanly beverages can be described only in like terms. A mint julep is not the product
of a formula. It is a ceremony and must be performed by a gentleman possessing a true sense of the artistic, a deep reverence for
the ingredients and a proper appreciation of the occasion.
It is a rite that must not be entrusted to a novice, a statistician, or a Yankee. It is a heritage of the Old South, an emblem of
hospitality, and a vehicle in which noble minds can travel together upon flower-strewn paths of a happy and congenial thought.
Go to a spring where cool, crystal-clear water bubbles from under a bank of dew-washed ferns. In a consecrated vessel, dip up a
little water at the source. Follow the stream through its banks of green moss and wildflowers until it broadens and trickles through
beds of mint growing in aromatic profusion and waving softly in the summer breeze. Gather the sweetest and tenderest shoots
and gently carry them home. Go to the sideboard and select a decanter of Kentucky Bourbon, distilled by a master hand,
mellowed with age yet still vigorous and inspiring. An ancestral sugar bowl, a row of silver goblets, some spoons and some ice
and you are ready to start.
Into a canvas bag, pound twice as much ice as you think you will need. Make it fine as snow, keep it dry, and do not allow it to
degenerate into slush.
Into each goblet, put a slightly heaping teaspoonful of granulated sugar, barely cover this with spring water and slightly bruise one
mint leaf into this, leaving the spoon in the goblet. Then pour elixir from the decanter until the goblets are about one-fourth full. Fill
the goblets with snowy ice, sprinkling in a small amount of sugar as you fill. Wipe the outside of the goblets dry and embellish
copiously with mint.
Then comes the important and delicate operation of frosting. By proper manipulation of the spoon, the ingredients are circulated
and blended until Nature, wishing to take a further hand and add another of its beautiful phenomena, encrusts the whole in a
glistening coat of white frost. Thus harmoniously blended by the deft touches of a skilled hand, you have a beverage eminently
appropriate for honorable men and beautiful women.
When all is ready, assemble your guests on the porch or in the garden, where the aroma of the juleps will rise heavenwards and
make the birds sing. Propose a worthy toast, raise the goblet to your lips, bury your nose in the mint, inhale a deep breath of its
fragrance, and sip the nectar of the gods.
Being overcome by thirst, I can write no further.

Lt. Gen Simon Bolivar Buckner - 1937 in 2002.

(a) Stephens Buckner Cuthbert8 BLAKELY (38) was employed at Attorney. From Kay Ryan: A book - "As We Rememeber
Him" - was written about Steve after his untimely death. When he was young, he would refer to himself as "Stephens Buckner
Cuthbert Albert Nuttybutt Blakely". (Albert was his confirmation name) Steve was killed in an explosion at the Ashland Oil
Refinery in Latonia, KY. He had been married just 27 days. He was awarded Attorney-at-Law posthumously. He was born on
14 Jul 1907 at Covington, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.) (Lendrum Blakely.). He was baptized on 28 Jul 1907 at Roman Catholic;
St. Mary's Cathedral. He witnessed the baptism of Stephens Blakely WOODROUGH (1) on 14 Sep 1937 at Blessed
Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY. He married Marjorie CARSON (206) on 31 Aug 1938 at Blessed
Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.). He died on 26 Sep 1938 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, aged
31 He died of an industrial accident just days before he was to be admitted to the Kentucky Bar. His death left a gigantic hole
in the family, and was memorialized by his Uncle Rev. Paul Lendrum Blakely in a privately published book "As We Remember
23

Blakely family lived in the home called "Beechwood" for many years. Property was first purchased from two maiden ladies named Thorburn. The
original house on the site burned Nov. 14, 1911.
Here is a newspaper account of the fire dated November 15, 1911:
"Attorney Stephens L. Blakely, prominent in Covington politics, was seriously burned in the destruction of his home by fire on Beechwood Avenue, Ft.
Mitchell, Wednesday morning. He received his burns after saving his wife and three children under unusual circumstances. He was awakened at 3:30
in the morning by the smell of smoke and found the room choked. He rushed across the hall to his wife's room where she was with their 11 day old
child. He carried her downstairs, but could not get outdoors, because the porch was all aflame. He finally got her to safety by lowering her from the
parlor window. He then saved Stephens, 4, Courtney 3 and Jane 1.5 in the same manner.
With his family safe, Blakely rush back into the house in an attempt to put out the flames. He was active on the second floor when severely burned
about the hands and feet. Nearly overcome, he was carried to the home of neighbors. Mrs. Blakely was taken to the home of friends with her children,
but it is feared the shock may be serious. The fire, it is believed , was caused by a defective flue. The house was destroyed, resulting in a $3,000 loss.
Blakely will be appointed city solicitor under Mayor-elect "Pat" Philipps.
The home was replaced with a brick structure. According to SLB's date diary the family spent the first night in their new house on July 19, 1913.
However, a later entry in same diary states" Began my new house on Sept 13, 1913" since the diary is a typed one I suspect that an error was made in
transcription. (Their are other "errors" in the diary).

Page 34

Him". Copies of the book have been distributed to family members. He was buried on 28 Sep 1938 at St. Marys Cemetery, Ft.
Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.).
(b) Edward Courtney Piatt8 BLAKELY (39) was born on 11 Oct 1908 at Beechwood, Covington, Kenton County, KY, Born at
4:30 in the morning (Ibid.) (Lendrum Blakely.). He was baptized on 1 Nov 1908 (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW
file.). He died on 7 Apr 1918 at Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, aged 9 "Sunday, April 7th, 1918 - Little Courtney died this
morning at ten minutes to one after an illness of about 4 weeks. The little fellow awoke one Saturday morning March 9th with a
headache. I jokingly told him it was no use to be sick on a holiday, but he was really sick and rapidly developed pneumonia.
Everything was done for him and a few days before his death he apparently had begun to recover. He received the Last
Sacraments on the 28th of March. During the little fellows' suffering he told me "Father, I love you the best of all" and I believe
that he did. At least all during his little life he showed most affection for me and his greatest pleasure was that he looked like
me. It is so hard for his mother and me not to despair but we are comforted much by the thought that he is happy in heaven
now and is intercessing for us and that as long as we live, and when we are old and our children married and gone from us, we
will always have a little boy.
Tuesday, April 9th, 1918 - Courtney buried today at St. Mary's. High Mass at the Cathedral. John Menzies, Claude
Johnson, John Read, Joe Kerr, Stanley Ashbrook and Logan Cambron pall bearers. Found Courtney's lessons prepared for
his last day of school. One of them is marked "for father and mother to see". Another little poem is as follows, as I remember
it:
All things bright and beautiful
All things great and small
All things good and wonderful
The Lord God made them all." He was buried on 9 Apr 1918 at St. Mary, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.).
(c) Jane Ashton8 BLAKELY

(6).

Stories from Mother


by
Laura Woodrough Glass
The Zoo Opera
When mother was dating, she had a beaux that liked to take her to the Zoo Opera, over the river in Cincinnati. She recalls
there was a balcony, where they served dinner, overlooking the stage and grandstands. A full opera, conducted orchestra and
all, would be performed in the open shell. She referred to it as probably the first dinner-theater.
During the performance, you could hear the roar of the big cats and the calls of the birds, especially the peacocks, and other
inhabitants of the zoo.
My Sister, Susie

Page 35

Back in the days of which I speak, the theaters had ushers who would show the late comers to a seat in the darkened
theater, using a low-light flashlight to indicate a particular row of seats for them to use. These same ushers would escort out
anyone who made a disturbance, too.
On the occasion of one of Susies first dates, she was escorted to the movie. With the usher leading the way, then
indicating two seats to them, Susie preceded her date, genuflected, made the sign of the cross, and entered the row of plush
seats and sat down.
For Entertainment
There was a small creek that ran through the property, known as Beechwood, where mother grew up.
In the warm summer months the woods behind the house, and the creek, known as Pleasant Run, were their playground.
She and her brothers would spend hours damming up the creek to make a swimming hole, but they never succeeded in
building a dam high enough to make the water much more than a foot deep.
***
We would climb up on the shed roof, with our heads just at the peak, and lying down on our stomachs, we would spit on the
tin roof. Whosoever spit would run off the end of the roof first was the winner. Makes my mouth dry just to think about it!
Family Cars
Father had a 1920 Ford Runabout. Father would drive; mother sat in the middle, with John on her lap; I sat next to the
door. We would leave the door open, and Steve would sit on the floor, with his feet on the running board. And thats how we
drove to church!
***
When father got rich, he bought a Haines Touring car. It had a front seat, a back seat and two fold-out seats, that would
fold down from the back of the front seat.
It was an orphan immediately. (which means you couldnt get replacement parts, so very few were made.) The transmission
went out. Just made it to the Dixie Highway in low, shifted into second to the top of the hill, then coasted all the way downtown,
getting as far as Pike Street. Then he shifted into low again to get to Pike and Main Streets, where the children would get out
and walk the rest of the way to school, at 7th and Greenup, because they could walk, or run, faster than the car could get
there.
***
We all carried notes from our father which read Please excuse Johns (Janes, Steves) tardiness. Nothing more, no
reason given! We should have had them mimeographed because we carried them almost daily!
***
Father was not reliable when it came to getting someplace on time. He would get up, bathe, shave and dress; come
downstairs, eat a leisurely breakfast and read the morning paper while we were all champing at the bit to leave.
***
Father fancied himself a gentleman farmer. He built a three room house on the back of the farm (Beechwood) and a man,
wife and 4 children moved into it. He was supposed to put in the garden. He was paid $50. a month, besides.
I remember the crop of potatoes, stored in the basement - was a dirt floor then - and each night before dinner one of us
would be sent downstairs to select potatoes for the evening meal. By the end of the winter it was hard to find potatoes that
hadnt grown leaves or rotted.
***
We all had chores to do. We had a cow that we had to milk twice a day; morning and night, and it was always dark. It was
my job to hold her tail, John held the lantern and Steve milked the cow.
The boys had to mow the grass and I had inside chores; dusting down the front and back stairs and under all the beds. We
didnt have carpeting upstairs then, just wood floors.
***
Father was a great story teller. He had a big, wing chair that was on rockers; and instead of a dog at his feet, he had
children. He would sit in his chair, after dinner, and he would make up stories to tell us........like the one about the little people
that lived under the house who would come up through a trap door in the dining room at night.
***
My First Dog
I was downtown, on Scott Street, one day when I met a schoolmate who had a puppy she wanted to get rid of. The puppy
was about 5 months old, had a collar and leash. So I dragged that puppy all the way to the car stop, carried it onto the street

Page 36

car, and dragged it all the way down the street, home - and told father it followed me home. Father said Well have no female
dogs. and I said Its not female. Its name is Jack. Sure enough Jack was female. She had 6 puppies the first litter and 11
the second. At one time we had 18 dogs running around that place. But an outbreak of distemper hit the area and they all
died.
***
My Uncle Laurie
Uncle Laurie was an inventor, you know. He had stuff all over the house that he had invented. One of his inventions was a
gadget hooked up to the alarm clock in his bedroom. At the preset hour, the alarm bell, which sounded like a fire alarm, would
go off, the covers would be pulled down and the window would shut. That way, hed be sure to get up!
One night his sister has some friends over to spend the night, and they slept in that room. In the morning, at the preset
hour, the alarm goes off, the covers go flying, the window shut, and the girls scattered in all directions, screaming and hollering.
He never had his invention patented.
***
After Laurie and Frances had moved into Lexington, I used to go down and stay with them.
One time I got up early in the morning and discovered one of his inventions. He had rigged up a mat under the rug that set
off bells as loud as fire alarms, and flashing lights and I had unknowingly set off his own private burglar alarm!
***
When the old farm house caught on fire, people came from all over the town; from as far away as Ft. Mitchell. Theyd get in
their cars, and drive over, just to see if they could help. There were no fire departments in those days, so the house couldnt be
saved; but they saved what furniture and belongings they could. John was just 5 days old. Mother put him in a laundry basket
and set him in the middle of Beechwood road.
Beechwood
The original house burned down, when John was just 5 days old, and we lived in a tar-paper shack until the new house was
built. Beechwood was rebuilt in about 1912, an imposing Colonial structure of orange-red brick, with four huge, round,
wooden white columns, and green painted shutters. Originally, the front porch was wooden and later replaced by the concrete
porch thats there today. Across the front porch there were large, wooden rockers, with woven backs and seats, and painted
white. The house sits back from the road, up on a small hill. A winding driveway from the street ending in a circle by the side
of the porch. Along the front of the property is a white board fence, extending from the driveway, along the road, to the creek.
There are three floors in the house. The third floor, as it was always called, consists of two rooms. The larger one
overlooked the woods through two small, quarter-circle windows, and the smaller one, with a window overlooking the driveway.
There were two little closets, just at the top of the stairs, that were used for storage, as well as cubby-holes under the eves, in
the larger room. But there was no plumbing. This is where the boys slept; Steve and Courtney in the larger room, John in the
small one. If they got up during the night, they had to go all the way down to the bathroom on the first floor, under the front
stairs. They werent allowed to use the bathroom next to the master bedroom, which was just at the foot of the third floor
stairs!
On the second floor are four rooms. The master bedroom, with a coal burning fireplace, a large walk-in closet and two huge
windows, one looking out over the front porch and lawn, the other on the side, looking out over the woods and creek. The one
bathroom, at that time, adjoined the master bedroom with entrance doors from both the hall and the bedroom. It wasnt until
much later that the second shower room was added. The small room next the master bedroom was originally a bedroom.
When I was recovering from influenza, I slept in there; and mother could hear me coughing all night, mother recalls. This
room was later converted into a book room and study, and through small French doors was a balcony, with a black iron railing
and gray wooden floor. In the middle of the hall, at the top of the stairs, is a large linen closet, with double wooden doors. The
other two bedrooms, one larger than the other, take up the other side of the second floor. The front room, with two more large
windows, over looking the front porch and lawn and the driveway on the side, was used as a guest bedroom or an infirmary, if
one of the children were sick. I slept in the back bedroom; in a big double bed with Gran. When I got sick, I moved into the
front bedroom and a nurse stayed with me. After I got well again, I got to stay in the front bedroom, and Gran stayed in the
smaller room. When mother died, Gran moved to Nicholasville to live with her brother. And when father married again, I had to
give up my room to Page and Margaret, and I took the back bedroom. Wyk went upstairs with the boys.
The first floor of Beechwood has a formal entry hall; a lavatory located under the front stairs, and the back stairs off to the
right. A formal dining room, with silver chandelier; and two light, airy windows. A swinging door leads back to the kitchen, and a
gray wooden porch is just outside the kitchen door. The ceilings are high, at least 15 feet, in every room. The formal front
parlor, with three tall, double sash windows; an enormous wood burning fireplace, with a broad white mantelpiece the focal
point of the room. A cut crystal chandelier hangs from the ceiling, with tiny silk shades on the electric candlesticks. The French
doors lead out onto a porch on the back of the house. In the 50s, I think it was, the back porch was torn off, as was the
wooden porch outside the kitchen door, and the back parlor, a small study, and the sun porch were added to the back of the
house. So now the French doors lead into the back parlor; the end of the front hall goes into the study; and a door on the right

Page 37

goes out onto the sun porch. There is another fireplace, with white marble mantle; and three tall windows looking out on the
back lawn and down into the woods.
The coal burning furnace has long since been replaced, but the coal room and coal chute are still there. And the stone
room is now the storage area for garden and power tools.
She was born on 20 Dec 1909 at 8:02 pm; Beechwood, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.) (Lendrum Blakely.). She was
baptized on 6 Feb 1910 at Roman Catholic; St. Mary's Cathedral, Covington, Kenton County, KY, Sponsors were Frank and
Margaret Tracy. (Her baptism certificate says sponsor is John Tracy.) (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). She
lived in 1935 at 239 Stewart Ave, Waukegan, Lake, IL. She married John Randolph WOODROUGH (5), son of James (Jay)
Richards WOODROUGH (9) and Laura Alma HOLLMEYER (10), on 23 Nov 1935 at Rectory Blessed Sacrament Church, Fort
Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, Here is the description of her wedding:"The bride, who inherited the beauty for which the women
of her mother's family - the Richardsons were noted, was never lovlier than in her wedding gown, which was worn by the
groom's aunt, Mrs. W.F. Cochran, on her wedding day in 1898. It was deep ivory satin brocade fashioned with lace on tiny
ruffles that outlined the bottom of the skirt and train. A tight separate bodice with long shirred sleeves and draped about the
neck and shoulders with an exquisite Brussels lace bertha. She carried a bouquet of cream gardenias and valley lillies. It took
place at Blessed Sacrament Rectory (unknown subject, unknown repository, unknown repository address.). As of May 1966,
her married name was WOODROUGH (6). She and John Randolph WOODROUGH (5) were divorced in May 1966 at
Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH.24 She was employed by Chase Brass and CopperInventory control Manager - Chase Metals
- division of BP America in 1970 at Chase Brass and Copper, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, OH (Family information.). She was
retired in 1971 (Ibid.). She lived in 1995 at 116 Beechwood Rd., Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY.25 She lived in 1998 at 1750
Belleair Forest Dr. A-3, Belleair, Pinellas County, FL (Ibid.).26 She lived with Laura Jane WOODROUGH (7) in 1998 at
Steneck/Woodrough, 1750 Belleair Forest Rd. A-3; 727-, Belleair, Pinellas County, FL. She died on 29 Sep 2004 at Pinellas
County, FL, aged 94. Obnituary of she was Jane Blakely Woodrough, 94, of Largo, Fla., formerly of Fort Mitchell, died
Wednesday at Sabal Palms Health Care Center in Largo.
She was a retired office manager with Chase Metals, and a member of Blessed Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, and St.
Cecelia and St. Catherine churches in Largo.
Survivors include a son, Stephens B. Woodrough of St. Petersburg, Fla.; daughters, Laura W. Steneck of Belleair, Fla., and
Susan W. Purdy of Oakland Township, Mich.; nine grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren.
Services will be at the convenience of the family.
Hubbell Funeral Home, Belleair Bluffs, Fla., is handling arrangements. in Oct 2004. She was buried on 28 Mar 2005 at St.
Mary Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, Her family decided to wait until Spring to return her ashes to Kentucky. At
that time they assembled the entire family for a wonderful weekend reunion. Jane would have been very pleased.
i) Stephens Blakely9 WOODROUGH
(1)
is still living.
(a) Stephens Blakely10 WOODROUGH Jr.
(3)

24

Copy of divorce filed in Kenton Circuit Court as well. At the time John lived at 1724 Madison Road in Cincinati.
"Beechwood" was the only place she called home until she moved to Florida in 1997.
26
She lived there with her daughter Laura W. Glass.
25

Page 38

Page 39

Page 40

Page 41

is still living.
i) Mary Elizabeth11 WOODROUGH
(3122)27

27

She took her first airplane ride at age three months when she visited both of her great grandmothers in Florida.

Page 42

Page 43

Page 44

is still living.
ii) Katherine Grace11 WOODROUGH
(3838)

Page 45

Page 46

Page 47

is still living.
iii) Stephens Blakely11 WOODROUGH III (4235) is still living.
iv) Cecilia Ann11 WOODROUGH (5086) is still living.
(b) Page Annette10 WOODROUGH
(4)

Page 48

Page 49

Page 50

Page 51

Page 52

Page 53

is still living.
i) Shannon Evelyn11 MCDERMOTT
(3446)28

28

Bo.

Page 54

Page 55

is still living.

Page 56

ii) Brigid Anne11 MCDERMOTT


(3865)

Page 57

Page 58

Page 59

is still living.
iii) Molly Jane11 MCDERMOTT (4213) is still living.
iv) Anna Margaret11 MCDERMOTT (5303) is still living.
v) Daniel Blakely11 MCDERMOTT (5302) is still living.
vi) Kelly Joan11 MCDERMOTT (5332) is still living.
ii) Laura Jane9 WOODROUGH

(7)

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was born on 14 Jun 1939 at


Waukegan, Lake, IL. She received First Holy Communion circa 1946 at 'Cardome', Georgetown, KY. She married Charles
Craig GLASS (24), son of Charles Howard GLASS (176) and Helen Marie WEBB (177), on 30 Aug 1958 at Blesed
Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, Wedding took place at 5:30 pm (Ibid.) (Lendrum Blakely.). As of 30
Aug 1958, her married name was GLASS (7) (Family information.) (Lendrum Blakely.). She lived on 23 Apr 1990 at
Madisonville, KY. She lived in 1998 at Steneck/Woodrough, 1750 Belleair Forest Rd. A-3; 727-, Belleair, Pinellas County,
FL. She married Ronald Nash STENECK (3231) on 9 Sep 2000 (Laura Glass, "Laura Woodrough Glass correspondence",
2000 This is taken from information assembled by LWG. Individual sources will be mentioned in each item.
My source for the THOMAS SHORE information was Marshall SHORE, who has done
extensive research on the SHORE ancestors; also, received information from
Tommy Wiggins, a descendant, on Jane Shore Morin and William STAMPS, and Sue Moore, another descendant of Jane
Shore & James MORIN.
But Marshall Shore was the main source of info.
LWG.). As of 9 Sep 2000, her married name was STENECK (7). She died on 15 May 2007 at Clearwater, Pinellas County,
FL, aged 67 Dear ones, Laurie died at 5:08 this morning. Susie came in at 1:00 am and she and Dad and Ron were with
Laurie. She had been sleeping since 10:00 AM on Sunday and was not able to communicate during the last 24 hours. She
is finally at rest after a long ordeal. All of her children were in this past weekend to see her.
Susie is staying a week or so and she and I will try to help Ron sort things out. Its very sad, but I think all of us were able to
say what we wanted to her and she was able to finish the work she set for herself. She did a wonderful job of transcribing
the Wimmer diaries, and also the diaries of her grandfather as well as the Woodrough Story, but her greatest
accomplishment was the transcription of the Shoebox letters and the integration of them with the love letters. Seldom does
a family have a window into the thoughts of their ancestors. We do and I think these letters will be even greater treasures
for the kidlets as they mature.
I'll keep you posted on plans as they develop. Love to all and be grateful for a life well-lived by Laurie. Margot. Obnituary of
she was Laura Woodrough Steneck, 67, of Belleair, died Tuesday May 15, 2007 at home under the care of hospice.
She was born in Waukegan, Illinois and came here in 1996 from Madisonville, Kentucky. She was a homemaker as
well as an accomplished genealogist who published seven family histories. She was a member of Saint Cecilia
Catholic Church. Survivors include her husband, Ronald and three sons, Stephens, Fort Mill, S. C.; Courtney,
Florence, KY; Michael, Crittenden, KY and daughter, Sara, Madisonville, KY. and four step-children, Donald, Roblyn
and Elizabeth all of St. Petersburg, Fl and Shawn of Pinellas Park, FL. She leaves fourteen grandchildren and four
great grandchildren as well as a brother, Stephens and a sister Susan.
A funeral Mass will be celebrated on Saturday, June 2nd at 11:00 in the morning at St. Cecilia Church Belleair, FL.
on 16 May 2007.
(a) John Charles10 GLASS (143) was born on 24 Nov 1963 at Covington, Kenton County, KY. He died on 8 Dec 1963
at Covington, Kenton County, KY.

(b) Stephens Craig10 GLASS (25)

is still living.

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i) Ashley Marie11 GLASS (162)

is still living.

ii) Jamie Lynn11 GLASS (163)

is still living.

iii) Christopher Andrew11 GLASS (164)

is still living.

(c) Courtney Howard10 GLASS (27)

is still living.

i) Jonathan David11 GLASS (142)

is still living.

ii) Cambron Charles Scott11 GLASS (144)

(d) Michael Edward10 GLASS (26)

is still living.

is still living.

i) Brandon Craig11 GLASS (182)

is still living.

ii) Brittany Renee11 GLASS (3232)


brain tumor.

was born on 21 Aug 2000. She died on 6 Oct 2007 aged 7 She died of a

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(e) Sara Frances10 GLASS (28)

i) ShyeAnne11 BAUER (175)

is still living.

is still living.

ii) Aaron Gage11 BAUER (2959) (Family information.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.)

is still living.

iii) Susan Elizabeth9 WOODROUGH (8)


living.

(a) John Siro10 VAZQUEZ (30)

is still

is still living.

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i) Claire Ashton11 VASQUEZ (74)

ii) Jameson Sean11 VAZQUEZ (2960) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.)

(b) James Eric10 POWNER (76)

is still living.

is still living.

is still living.

11

i) Jackson Evans POWNER (4488) is still living.


ii) Caden James11 POWNER (5265) is still living.

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(c) Elizabeth Ashton10 POWNER (424)

is still living.

(d) John Ruffner8 BLAKELY (40) was born on 4 Nov 1911 at Beechwood, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, When John was
eleven days old the house burned according to SLB diary (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) (Lendrum
Blakely.). He was baptized on 3 Dec 1911 at Roman Catholic; St. Marys Cathedral, Covington, Kenton County, KY, SLB Date
diary gives baptisim date as Dec. 3, 1911 with sponsors as Lilly Hudson Lendrum and Laurie J. Blakely. He was confirmed on
9 May 1926.29 He was employed on 9 Mar 1937 at Attorney; Admitted to Kentucky Bar (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about
1950 MVW file.). He witnessed the marriage of Susan Elizabeth WOODROUGH (8) and James Siro VAZQUEZ (29) on 18 Jun
1966 at Blesed Sacrament Church, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Family information.). He married Jane GRANT (219) on
14 Aug 1966 at Ft. Mitchell, Kenton County, KY. He was employed in 1985 at Attorney, Covington, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.).
He lived on 24 Apr 1990 at 116 Beechwood Rd., Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY. He September 1, 1998 We may have seen
John Ruffner Blakely for the last time and what an experience! I am writing this as we fly east to Pittsburgh Pennsylvania a
trip of forty minutes. My intention is to visit East Liverpool Ohio tomorrow to seek the truth to all those stories of Blakely millions
lost when the cemetery land was abandoned by the city, but that is another story. What a beginning it is to the Pittsburgh
odessy to stop off in Covington, KY to visit John Ruffner Blakely at his retirement home.
Its hard to believe that the Blakely life that has been spread on the floor in front of me in St Petersburg Florida for the past six
years has distilled down to this present scene. Beechwoods attic was cleaned out when John entered the nursing home
early this year and pictures from almost one hundred years of living found their way to my home in Florida. The pictures tell a
story of a young mans (Stephens L. Blakely) rise from serious student through the years of establishing his profession, family
and particularly his home at Beechwood. John Ruffner Blakely is the only surviving son and years ago he came into
possession of Beechwood after a trying fuss with the other heirs.
John has left Beechwood forever and moved into a retirement home. The family worked so hard in support of the home and
now what remains barely fills the two tiny rooms that are Johns life in the nursing home.
As the plane crosses the Ohio River at dusk I reflect on the old family pictures and the story they tell. John was a distinctive
looking child his face was always easy to pick out in any picture. One picture in particular shows him as a dapper young
soldier standing next to papa on the porch of Beechwood.
His life at the nursing home is like the skinny dehydrated geranium I notice on the window of his apartment. The poor plant sits
by the window desperately clinging to life with two blossoms pitifully adjoining one another; one dead and the other clinging to
the least remnant of a blossom. The plant gazes longingly out the window toward the small spot of summer color in the bed of
droopy-necked sunflowers and sunny yellow marigolds. This potted plant is a last garden patch for a gardener who wont give
up - yet.
For years John slept in his fathers bed with the high headboard. Among the few items that followed him to the nursing home
were the bed and a chest of drawers. The bed once looked so grand at Beechwood. Yet, in its present home it reminds me
of the graves at Stoke Poges in England with their markers shaped like the head and footboards of beds.
(We are coming close to Pittsburgh now. Below me I see the Monagahelia with a large island) this is where the Blakely family
got its start when they arrived from England in the early part of the 19th century.
The wall of Johns apartment holds remembrances - a distillation of the family. There is the Ruffner relic, a picture said to have
been brought from Germany by the first Ruffner settler. Another wall holds the DeValcourt coat of arms; a proclamation from
the town of Covington naming a day in June 1997 as John Blakely Day for his work with the Christopher Gist Society. The
room is full of other objects. In the corner stand two very large oxygen tanks; there is a sofa from Beechwood with a cover that
is full of soil from the multitude of coal fires burned in the fireplace.
SBW and I had only an hour to visit with John from 4:30 to 5:30. We had Pages wedding album and showed it to John. (John
touched each picture). John shared his scrapbooks with us then suddenly announced he needed to go eat. How like John!
29

Sponsor at Confirmation listed as "Laurie". Presumably this is Laurie Blakely.

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We drop in out of the sky for a one hour visit and John who doesnt eat much anyway and could eat anytime decides to
interrupt the visit to go eat!
Johns sister Jane Ashton B. Woodrough is on her way later this week to visit him. For some reason she feels the need to
come in spite of the way he enticed her to give up her home without reimbursement and move in with him and then evicted
her when it suited him. He has always been self-centered and egotistical without much thought to the feelings of others.
Beechwood is going to his adopted son Mark who is the beneficiary of Janes abandonment of her life estate in her home on
the Beechwood property. She wont be around to interfere with his life and yet no one seems to realize that there should be
some sort of monetary consideration given to her. This is so typical of the family.
John smoked all his life and now pays the price by being burdened by emphysema. Most of the time he is connected to the
huge oxygen tank in the corner by a very long plastic tube that lies snarled on the floor. In a manner so typical of John, he tried
to give SBW directions to go see someone down the hall. He got up from the very soiled red sofa and walked across the curled
up pile of oxygen hose without taking time to untangle it. Mercifully he didnt trip, but instead walked out the door dragging the
snarl, lets the door slam, gets yanked back sharply and curses as he yanks the tube from his nose and throws it on the hall
floor. Such typical John behavior. During our conversation he tells us the place costs 5cents a minute again only John would
have this figured out.
As we leave John remarks that we look as good as we did the day we married. He is right we do. We escaped by the skin of
out teeth and made a life away from Beechwood, Covington and the old family ways. Steve mutters Dont ever let me get like
that
Now as we land in Pittsburgh I reflect that it all started here (or at least the part we know). As I gaze at the plane cabin with
interior lights and gently floating cabin attendants I think of the scene in 2001 space odessy. Our life which seems so common
to us would look just as surreal as the Kubrick movie to James Blakely and Susan Smythe those Pittsburgh pioneers who were
so prominent here, lost everything and returned to the country life of Elk Co., Pennsylvania in the town of St. Marys. (Special
note - during our trip to Pittsburgh we were able to visit East Liverpool and see the actual places so important in James
Blakely's life. We finally unravelled the Great Land story "Blakely Loses Millions" and it is recounted in full under James
Blakely's story.
Note: while John was at dinner I took two pieces of paper and quickly wrote notes to aid me in the narrative. Here are the
notes:Dirty red sofa; Note from his wife Jane on dresser; 1998 Blakely calendar (business);
Notes on door Bath Wed. and Sat.; Pappys bed (after John's death it would be given to Stephens B. Woodroug,
Jr.);Stonewall Jackson picture;Ruffner picture (it went to Laura Steneck and will eventually go to Stephens B. Woodrough,
Jr.);Beechwood picture with Strom Thurmon; And the piece de resistance on the counter in the kitchen a gallon of Kentucky
Bourbon (John doesnt drink any more.)
September 2, 1999
As I print this it seems a good time for a footnote. John did die on Good Friday of 1999. Steve, Laurie, Jane Ashton and Susie
attended the funeral. Several weeks following his death Stephens B. Woodrough Jr., and Elena made the trip to Beechwood to
bring Pappys bed (SLB) which had actually originally belonged to Laurie J. Blakely to their new home in Atlanta. It is
magnificent and was well worth the trip for them. In the same room they have the portrait of Laurie J. Blakely hanging and call
it the Laurie Room. How fun! Laura Glass brought the Ruffner picture to Florida and had it reframed. And we did indeed visit
East Liverpool and make many discoveries. In addition I had a Eureeka moment at the Pittsburg Library when I found Historic
Pittsburgh and Her People with new information about the Blakely family. on 1 Sep 1998. Obnituary of he was (Newspaper
obituary from the Cincinnati Enquirer, dated April 10, 1999, pg B8)
BLAKELY
John R., beloved husband of the late Jane Grant Blakely, father of Marc J. Reardon, Marde R. O'Meara, Mary
R. Langenbrunner and Patricia J. Reardon, grandfather of Marc Reardon, Mathew Reardon, Brooke L. Reardon, Amy O'Meara,
Cary O'Meara, Adam Langenbrunner and Baird Langenbrunner, brother of Jane B. Woodrough. Resident of Ft. Mitchell, KY
April 2, 1999, age 87 years. Mass of Christian Burial, Tuesday, April 13th, Blessed Sacrament Church 2415 Dixie Hwy., Ft.
Mitchell, KY at 1P.M. Interment St. Mary Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell, KY Friends may call from 11 A.M. until 12:45P.M. Tuesday at
the church. Memorial may be made to the Christopher Gist Historical Society, Attn: Mrs. Alice Kennelly Roberts, 443 Farrell
Dr., Ft. Wright, KY 41011. Allison & Rose Funeral Home, Inc., Robbins St. and Madison Ave., Covington serving the family. in
1999. He died on 2 Apr 1999 at Emphysima, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY, aged 87 John died on "Good Friday" if one
didn't know better it would be realistic to think he chose this particular day. How like him. He funeral was on 13 Apr 1999 at
Blessed Sacrament, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY. He was buried on 13 Apr 1999 at St. Marys Cemetery, Fort Mitchell,
Kenton County, KY, John R. Blakely - As We Remember Him
"To Live in the Hearts of Those We Have Loved and Leave Behind is Not to Die"
And so it is with John Blakely - a man I always knew and loved simply as: Unca John.
On behalf of John's sister (my mother), Jane Woodrough, and her other children (my sisters), Laura Glass and Susan
Powner, and an behalf of my own children and those of my sisters, I would like to spend a few moments to share our feelings of
both sadness and joy to all those who mourn his loss with us today, and to briefly search back into our memories for a few
more glimpses into some of the times and places where our lives were touched (and maybe even changed) by John.
Love is a timeless subject pondered by great authors and poets. It's a feeling which is not easy to put into mere words. The
same is true for the related emotions of loyalty, trust, compassion, courage, resolve, and joy itself - to name only a few of the
human passions which mirrored both the spiritual and personal character of John Blakely. Unca John was all of these to me,
and I'm sure - to all of us at one time or another. John loved life, and he lived it as completely and as fully as his being
permitted. As many of here today have seen and experienced first-hand, John was never satisfied with mediocrity or doing
anything in a half-hearted manner. If anything was worth doing, he did it to the hilt, and he did it with an unfailing passion.
He was intensely loyal to his friends and to anyone who put their name on the line for him; he was kind-hearted and
compassionate; and he was profoundly committed to the principles of absolute integrity and trustworthiness. The same is true
regarding his strength of character and personal bravado. Indeed, there were frequent occasions when John would truly "push
the envelope" to demonstrate the intensity of his personal grit and resolve.

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Sometimes his determination and commitment was so pronounced (but either unfocused or focused on the wrong
objective) that it bordered on the comical. And yet, you dared not snicker or even crack a smile lest he think you thought he
was being a silly - which, of course, was the case, but you still couldn't say anything because, as he was always so careful to
make very clear: he was dead serious about it! I have a vivid recollection of one such occasion.
John loved the outdoors and camping. One of his favorite expressions was to ask everyone as a group - frequently at a
precise moment in time when events were not going exactly as planned - "Mr. Scoutmaster, are we all having fun yet?" My
guess is that it probably reminded him of his boyhood camping escapades. In any event, I was lucky enough to go on one of
his great outdoor adventures with a couple of his friends. I was about 15 at the time, and as I recall we had been camped
overnight in sleeping bags somewhere on the banks of the Kentucky River on a fishing trip. It was very early in the morning before sunrise. John had gotten up first and was in the process of making a fire when I first woke up. I remember that
everything was very wet and muddy, and there was even a light mist in the air. But John was not deterred. He got the fire
going - barely - and proudly announced that he was going to cook breakfast for all of his fellow camp-mates, of which there
were 4 of us, including John.
The next hour or so was classic John Blakely. First there was the smoldering fire, which never did give off much heat, but
produced enough smoke to choke everyone within 50 yards. There was smoke everywhere, and every time John moved out of
the way, it followed him. He began by first making intermittent strange noises under his breath, then he started muttering
various unrepeatable words and phrases, and finally he shook his stick at the fire - warning it that he would "kill it" if it didn't
cooperate. Somewhat petrified, I asked if there was anything I could do. Get more wood - preferably dry wood was his reply.
When I returned to the scene, I found that John had put a whole package of bacon strips into a large black iron skillet on the
fire. It was mesmerizing theater. The smoke continued to roar in his face while he continued his circular dance around the fire,
and the big skillet slowly filled up with grease.
Then the "grand idea" struck John like a truck: "Why don't we use some of this excess grease to get the fire going?"
Hearing no objection from anyone who valued their well-being, John proceeded to pour some of the grease into the fire. It
worked all- right! The flames leapt up around the skillet and John's arm and most of his right side, producing a great flash of
light and a whooshing sound, and throwing a light sprinkling of ash all over John and the bacon in the skillet. After making sure
his hair wasn't on fire, John calmly reassured everyone that wood ash is "nature's pepper" and would make everything taste
better.
The bacon finally got to the point where it was declared safe to eat. It was somewhere between almost deep-fried and
burned. Some pieces were crispy brown on one end and kind of slimy grey on the other. Never mind. It was time to fry the
eggs. John boldly took orders. "How do you want them cooked, sunny side up, over easy or hard, or just plain scrambled?"
Just at about the time the first order went into the pan, a light rain began to fall. I won't belabor the story much further, except
to say that it was at that point that John made a command decision: "Men," he said, "I hope everyone likes scrambled eggs,
because we just ran out of all the others."
In less than a minute, John added another half dozen eggs to those already in the skillet, and began to stir the contents as
though he were mixing cement. By this time, it is raining in earnest. But John was not to be denied. He stayed out there fixing
those eggs while the rest of us retreated to whatever shelter we could find. For the next 10 minutes - it seemed like hours at
the time - John stayed with his mission doing his determined best holding a raincoat over his head while trying to cook eggs
over a dying fire in a rainstorm! As I said, it was classic John Blakely when he finally (an proudly) served soggy breakfast with
his familiar refrain: "Mr. Scoutmaster, are we all having fun yet?"
John was many different things to all of us. He was my mother's big brother and a surrogate father to my sisters and me
after our father left and pursued a different role in life. That was in 1952, and I will be indebted to John forever for his caring,
for his generosity, for his willingness to listen to my problems, for his wisdom, and for his inspiration to name only a few of the
gifts he bestowed upon me. This is not to say that John was easy-going or any type of pushover. Anyone who knew John also
knew he was a tough disciplinarian. John had (and followed) certain rules. Some of them reflected 19th century social
standards, but that didn't make them wrong. For the most part, John had it right, and I'm very grateful for the positive influence
he had on my life.
As I prepared for this occasion today, I tried to think of what I would call the most defining and memorable moment in my
relationship with John. It was not an easy task, but it really didn't take long for me to recall that moment. It happened when I
was finishing my first year of law school at UK in Lexington. My performance in the classroom was satisfactory, but (as usual) I
wasn't setting any records. Actually, of course, I was doing more playing than studying. I even tried working part-time at
Keeneland. I thought everything was OK. While I was home for Easter and the spring- break, John was visiting and asked me
to go with him on an errand for my mother. When we got to the store, he parked and I started to get out. "Stay in here for a
second, I want to talk to you." I could tell instantly from the tone of his voice that he was deadly serious. I was absolutely
stunned and totally blind-sided. For the next 5 minutes, John proceeded to tell me how important my schooling was; how
poorly I was applying myself; how disappointed he and my mother were that I took a job at Keeneland (I never learned how he
found out); et cetera, et cetera. He said and did all the right things. His voice was calm but firm; he reinforced my confidence
by praising my abilities, and he focused on the long term goals of self-fulfillment and my desire to pursue a career as a trial
lawyer. And then he ended the monologue as abruptly as it started by looking me squarely in the eye and promising that he
would personally beat me to a pulp if I didn't get my act together. It made an indelible impression and taught me the most
important lesson of my life.
Some of the coincidences in John's life made some of us think he might have a special connection with his Maker. For
example, John waited for almost 55 years before marrying his first true love, Janie - God rest her soul. I don't know how many
times I heard various members of his family chide him over the years for getting such a late start on raising his own family. It
almost became a family tradition at each wedding: "Well, John, when are you going to have a party." Finally, that day arrived in
August of 1966. Everyone was so excited. John Blakely was really going to do it; he was going to get married. Everything
was proceeding smoothly as planned until disaster struck toward the end of an otherwise beautiful and unmarred ceremony.
Just as the priest opened the tabernacle to distribute Holy Communion, the church's theft alarm went off. It was the loudest,
longest, and most persistent ringing alarm I had ever heard. It must have taken 10 full minutes for the nuns to scurry from their
convent quarters down the long aisle of St. Agnes church to turn it off! We can only guess what must have been running
through John's and Janie's minds as they stood there patiently at the altar as the alarm continued to sound its incessant

Page 67

ringing. But some of us even thought (privately, of course) that John might have arranged it to mark the occasion with another
memorable moment.
My bet is that John probably also had something to do with the last memorable coincidence of his life. I'm not being
disrespectful here, because John took his relationship with God very seriously. He loved God with his whole heart, mind and
soul, and he lived his full life accordingly. But I still think it was a little presumptuous of John to ask Him to take him on the
same day His Son died on the cross. Good Friday, therefore, will always be an extra special day for me.
I know as certain as I'm standing here today that as John looks into the eyes of his Scoutmaster, he doesn't have to ask if
he having a good time. He is finally there, and he is very alive for the rest of time.
(e) Paul Lendrum8 BLAKELY (41) was buried in 1918 at St. Marys Cemetery, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.). He was
born on 1 Aug 1918 at Beechwood, Covington, Kenton County, KY, SLB Dated diary gives August 1, 1918 as date of baptisim
and burial (Lendrum Blakely.). He died on 1 Aug 1918 at Beechwood, Fort Mitchell, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.).

ii) Paul Lendrum7 BLAKELY (45).


(Notes from Laura Glass) Paul was a Jesuit Priest, Florissant, Missouri.
(notes from the Blakely Bible as transcribed from Laura Glass-Paul was a Priest of the Society of Jesus)
(Newspaper article March 13, 1943) Father Paul L. Blakely, S. J. - Veteran Catholic Jounalist by John LaFarge
PAUL
LENDRUM BLAKELY, S.J., PRIEST, PATRIOT AND SCHOLAR
On what would have been his birthday in a leap year, the last day of February, the Rev. Paul L. Blakely, S.J., was buried at the
Jesuit Novitiate of Saint-Andrew-on-Hudson, Poughkeepsie, NY. If he had lived until February 29, 1944, he would have celebrated
his sixteenth birthday and his sixty-fourth year. Or rather, others would have celebrated it for him, since Father Blakely had a
constitutional inability to direct attention to himself. He considered himself fortunate that even the semblance of a birthday was
something that came about only once in every four years.
Having lived and worked with Father Blakely on the Staff of AMERICA for more that sixteen years of his twenty-nine in this
occupation, I can say that that which impressed me when I first made his acquaintance is the same that causes me a little
marveling now that he is gone. How was it that the valiant man and the genial, tenderhearted priest who was second to none in his
influence upon the thought and -in many ways-upon the actual destiny of the Catholic church in America, was so comparatively
little known except in name to the outer world?
Over 1,100 signed articles appeared in AMERICA over Father Blakely's name. His unsigned editorials passed the 2,000 mark
several years ago and were between 2,500 and 3,000 when, on Thursday morning, February 25, he sent down to the printer the
proofs on the last material (in the March 6 issue) that his indefatigable Underwood had typed off-always with the same ease,
clarity, precision of thought, length, style, language. But with all this incredible wealth of authorship, Paul Blakely never had the
mind to collect even the humblest dividends of an author's fame, nor to excite any curiosity about himself. That some souls were
puzzled by his using the very transparent disguise of "John Wiltbye" was a source to him of mild amusement. He was particularly
delighted by the kind old lady who wrote in, after one of the many John Wiltbye articles, solicitously expressing the idea that quite
possibly John Wiltbye was not such a worldly reprobate and might have a priestly vocation.
Perhaps the key to this paradox lay in the very fiction of "John Wiltbye" itself. The name, by the way, was a genuine family
name in Pual Blakely's ancestry. "Cricket Wainscott," a second pseudonym, used when Wiltbye and Blakely both occupied the
field, once adorned an elderly colored man in Father Blakely's native Kentucky. When Blakely wrote for the sake of writing (more
or less), combining business with relaxation, he wrote in the style and under the name of John Wiltbye. But when Blakely wrote
under his own name or without signature, he wrote invariably because in his mind there was something which desperately needed
saying. His craft was finished; it was an exceedingly polished, skilled, flexible technique, the very acme of logical exposition, adroit
polemic, editorial rapier-thrusts. But it was a mere instrument with which to convey to the reader what he felt the reader should
know, and the quicker and more clearly the reader knew it the better.
It was Father Blakely's absorption in the causes which he argued that made him indifferent to his own reputation. But that same
absorption weighted with intense feeling the winged arrows of his countless written words, and sent them piercing through to
spheres of influence that some church historian, one of these days, will enjoy analyzing.
The focus and source of these interests, for the greater part, was his profound, exact and painstaking study of the American
Constitution, in the light of the nation's history, and of the other basic documents that are related to it. This study was reinforced by
an extensive and valuable library of books on the Consitituion, Lincoln and American history which he collected through the years.
Father Blakely's thought upon the importance of this subject might be summed up in three simple propositions, as I have
obtained from him in many conversations.

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First, the Founding Fathers, and the political inheritance they bequeathed to us, were guided by an uncommon degree of
practical wisdom, one notable part of which was their respect for religion, the law of God and for religious education. The
Constitution, as they left it to us, is a powerful safeguard for morality, freedom and social peace.
Secondly, it is quite possible that the exigencies of government in the present-day world will require alterations in the
Constitution. Father Blakely never undertook to deify either the plan or the origins of the United States. But if or when such
changes should be made, they should themselves be made constitutionally, not by violence, subterfuge or usurpation of power.
And the Supreme Court of the United States was called to be our chief protection against such a calamity.
It was therefore-in the third place-our duty as citizens and upon our conscience as Catholics to be on our guard against such
tendencies, most of which, from Father Blakely's point of view, manifested themselves through the attempt to place upon the
central government the functions which should rightfully be performed by the individual States. The defense, intellectual and
editorial, that he constructed against such tendencies, was maintained consistently through all the adminstrations he lived under
while on the Staff of AMERICA; through Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover and the present Adminstration as well. The Blakely
position was a non-partisan position, based upon an interpretation of the Constitution. Whether his critics agree with him or not,
they should at least recognize its unchanging consistency.
Father Blakely was literally a born journalist, for his father, Laurie John Blakely, "every inch a Catholic," was appointed Dean, in
1912, of the newly founded School of Journalism of St. Xavier College, Cincinnati died January 25, 1917, in Coving, KY., where
Paul was born. The words applied to Blakely, Senior, by the Rector of St. Xavier at that time, the Rev. F. Heiermann, S. J., apply
in telling fashion to Blakely, Junior; only lifted to a higher and still more consecrated plane (AMERICA, June 2, 1917):
He
looked on journalishm as a great and noble profession, burdened with high responsibilities, but a power in the realm of truth,
making for clear thinking and clean living. In this high ideal, he himself set the example. No one who had come in contact with
him, could ever forget him. His character had something of the courteous, gentle but independent and uncompromising chivalry of
old. He was a knight without fear and without reproach. His success may not always have appeared before the world, but his life
was a blessing and inspiration to all who knew him.
Father Blakely's middle name, which he rarely used (Lendrum), came from his mother, Lily Hudson Lendrum Blakely. His
father, who was a Confederate colonel as well as a member of the Kentucky Bar and constant contributor to Louisville, Covington
and Cincinnati papers, was the son of an English-born Virginian who was a convert (through its marriage) to the Catholic Faith.
The name was originally Blakeleigh and came from Lancashire.
Paul himself attended St. Xavier College in Cincinnati and on July 30, 1897, entered the Society of Jesus at St. Stanislaus
Novitiate, Florissant, Mo. He completed his studies at St. Louis University and was ordained to the priesthood in 1912. He taught
Latin, Greek and English at Detroit College, 1900-02, and was professor of Literature at St. Louis University, 1906-09. In July,
1914 he became an Associate Editor of AMERICA.
Most men who have very intense convictions operate within a rather limited range. Father Blakely's dominant interests,
however, covered so wide a field that their mere recital would fill a good part of a volume. Moreover, like his own father, and as a
"born journalist," he was averse to systematization, and wrote - save for his purely religious productions-with an eye upon the issue
or controversy of the moment. If I were to single out a few matters about which his convictions and expression polarized, as it
were, I should nominate as favorites the individual's liberty, under the American Constitution, to fulfil his duties to God and country;
the liberty of the Church, here and everywhere in the world; the integrity and the freedom of Catholic education, in all its degrees
and phases; the separation of religion and politics; the danger of political or governmental centralization; the impossibllity of
legislating people into virtue; the sanctity of the family as the unit of society, and of the marriage bond as its protection.
Some day, when the history of the Church in this country is finally written, I believe that Paul Blakely will be adequately
recognized as the man who saved Catholic education, at a critical moment, from one of the most insidious threats to its existence:
absorption through a Federal Department of Education. Father Blakely's long, lone compaign of opposition to the establishment of
such a Department was no quixotic crusade. It succeeded in clarifying not only Catholic, but a large and influential sector of nonCatholic opinion on an issue which touched upon the nature of our government, the basic interests of religion, the history of
education in the United States.
He will likewise be remembered for the part he played in the memorable investigaton of Catholic charitable institutions under
John Purroy Mitchel, Mayor of New York. By his vigorous stand in this affair and the influence he wielded he succeeded, as
asserted by many of his contemporaries, in saving from destruction the private charities of the Catholic church in New York Cityand by inference, in many another city of the nation. The cause of private charity, incidentally, was one particularly dear to the
heart of Father Blakely, and especially of personal, as opposed to merely institutionalized charity. This was expressed in his keen
solicitude for the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul. He was eminently a lover of God's poor, of every race, color and creed.
The rights of the workingman to organize and the duty of the employer to secure for him a living wage, were defended by Father
Blakely, interpreting for Americans the teachings of Pope Leo's Rerum Novarum, at a time when these teachings were denounced
as "Socialistic" by pious Catholic laymen and as yet seldom, if ever, referred to in the pulpits.
Consideration for the rights of the Negro, not as a Negro but as an ordinary human being, to equal protection before the law, led
Father Blakely to go directly counter to his professed distrust of Federal measures and openly advocate the enactment of the
Federal anti-lynching bill.
Perhaps the most controversial of all issues in which Father Blakely engages was the famous Mooney case. His position of
sharp and unqualified condemnation of the procedure followed by the court in that instance certainly grieved, one may say
scandalized, many a soul who was ready to follow him in other lines. But he was as ardent an advocate of justice for the criminal
as he was of warfare against crime.
Yet his controversies, striking as they were, played but a minor part in the total of Father Blakely's careful teaching on a
positive and rounded ideal, totally alien to Puritanism and narrowminded sadness: an ideal of religion and of a full and many sided
human living. The ardor of his defense grew from a deep valuing of the truly good things of life: in art, education, culture, friendly
companionship, all of which he saw in a true Ignatian spirit, as gifts of the Creator leading men back to Him. The last of all his
signed articles (March 6, 1943) is almost a mirror of Blakely's true and genial self.
A man of strong convictons and wide sympathies forms friends among the dead as among the living. Charles Dickens, George
Washington, Robert E. Lee, and particularly Abraham Lincoln were among Blakely's greatest intimates, and with the latter there
were singular bonds of regional association, temperament, cast of mind. But in the world of God's chosen ones, none was dearer
to him than Bernadette of Lourdes.

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As for his friends among the living, none were more remarkable than the unnumbered and unnamed host of men and women to
whom, not as a scholar or a writer, but as an ifinitely self-sacrificing priest and ever-patient counselor he brought enlightenment,
courage, spiritual direction and consolation through the hidden side of his life, a busy priestly ministry for which he found time out
of his hours of much-needed sleep and leisure. In his early years, he lectured widely on history and sociology, and visited in the
slum areas and night courts for first-hand information.
For more than twenty-six years, almost to the day of his death, Father Blakely, year in and year out, devoted a Sunday a month,
with Mass and instructions, to a Retreat group at the Cenacle Convent on Riverside Drive. For a dozen years or more he
celebrated two Masses on all the remaining Sundays and preached to the poor at St. John's Church on East Seventy-second
Street. With equal constancy he labored for the best part of a lifetime for the spiritual benefit of those admirable Religious women,
the Helpers of the Holy Souls. Where he could not work personally, he followed with burning interest and passionate regret that
personal service was not possible, the home missions, whose neglect, especially in the rural regions, he bitterly deplored. Visiting
the sick, instructing the ignorant, counseling the doubtful, relieving those in want and suffering, were all in the day's work for Paul L.
Blakely. Just a glow from that inner light penetrated to AMERICA'S readers through his weekly homily on the Gospel of the day.
Just a glow: the full radiance of that hidden and supernatural life might be, dear reader, too much for your and my eye to endure in
our present condition. Some day, too that revelation will be made, not by historians, but by the Judge of the living and the dead.
In the meanwhile, as we pray for the soul of Paul L. Blakely who, with all his learning and worldly wisdom, was as obedient and
simple a Religious as any novice, we may pray that we who are left may be given the grace to carry on, however, imperfectly, the
great work that he brought to high stature in the years God granted him.
(piece taken from Newspaper article in America April 21, 1979)
. . . But why blur the key significance of men who worked under several successive editors-in-chief? Future historians of
AMERICA should dwell on the roles played by Paul Blakely, Robert Graham, Benjamin Masse, Harold Gardiner and Vincent
Kearney, not forgetting many others with shorter terms of service. . . .
. . .The board room walls have several photos of the gentle but redoubtable Paul Blakely, a white haired Kentuckian who spent
29 years as an associate editor. Blakely was a prodigious writer throughout years that span the middle period of the magazine.
He alone, we are told, wrote practically every editorial during the 1920's and 1930's. With night turned into day, he worked the
oddest hours conceivable. Often, at one in the morning, he would be pounding the beat with a police officer on upper Broadway,
or he would be downtown at sessions of the night court. His interests and reading were universal, and he kept the editor's box
filled with his signed articles, his editorials and features written under two assumed names. . . .
(From notes of Aunt Aileen Ryan)
Paul L. Blakely, S.J., another son of Laurie and Lillie Lendrum Blakely, was on the staff of the Jesuit magazine AMERICA.
During the 1920's and 1930's he wrote most of the editorials for that publication. He authored over 2,500 articles on social justice.
He was buried February 29, 1944, his sixteenth birthday, age 64 at the Jesuit Novitiate of Saint Andrew on Hudson, Poughkeepsie,
NY. He was one of the "Greats" in the jesuit order. (See Article AMERICA of March 13, 1943 by his friend, John LaFarge, S.J.
another Jesuit "great". See also 70th Anniversary Edition of AMERICA April 21, 1979 article by Thurston Davis, S. J.) Unalterable
opposed to the political philosophy of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, he was instructed by Roosevelt to cease and desist. Paul
Blakely, who was on his deathbed, advised His Excellency that another article would appear in the next issue of AMERICA. He
was buried at Poughkeepsie, N.Y, Jesuit Novitiate of Saint Andrew on Hudson, Poughkeepsie, NY (SLB Date diary, Date diary,
about 1950 MVW file.). He was born on 29 Feb 1880 at Paul Lendrum Blakely, Greenup St., Covington, Kenton County, KY
(Lendrum Blakely.). He was baptized in Apr 1880 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, Sponsors H. Hallan and Sallie Cambron
Hallam. He witnessed CENSUS 1880 on 1 Jun 1880 at Laurie J. Blakely, 36/male; dwelling 207, family 243, Covington, Kenton
County, KY (1880 Census;, Enumeration date June 10, 1880 p. 26 line 34
T9-0425 P.228B.). He lived with Laurie John BLAKELY (43) and Stephens Laurie BLAKELY (35) in 1880 at 621 Garrard St.,
Covington, Kenton County, KY. He witnessed CENSUS 1900 in 1900 at Covington, Kenton County, KY. He witnessed the
baptism of Stephens Buckner Cuthbert BLAKELY (38) on 28 Jul 1907 at Roman Catholic; St. Mary's Cathedral. He was employed
by He was the editor of "America" magazine for many years. Wrote regularly for it under different pen names.; First Mass College
Church, St. Louis, MO. Remembrance card in file. on 27 Jun 1912 at Jesuit Priest; Society of Jesus, St. Louis, MO (Family
information.). He died on 26 Feb 1943 at New York, NY, aged 62
Taken from America magazine dated Aug 13, 1943.
"Father Blakely's middle name, which he rarely used (Lendrum) came from his mother, Lily Lendrum. His father, who was a
Confederate Colonel as well as a member of the Kentucky Bar and constant contributor to Louisville, Covington and Cincinnati
papers, was the son of an English-born Virginian originally Blakeleigh and came from Lancashire."
Note from MVW 9-98. I doubt the Colonel part, and have not yet found evidence of the Confederate part or the Blakeleigh part.
iii) Elizabeth Ashton7 BLAKELY (46) was Catholic. (Per Aunt Aileen J. Ryan's notes) Elizabeth Blakely was known as Mother
Agatha of the Order of the Visitation) Elizabeth, after several years of the social life, followed her sister Susan Houghton Blakely
(also known as Mother Jane Frances Blakely) into the convent, entering at Wheeling, West Virginia, and eventually coming to
Cardome "on Loan" as a teacher of history. She as Mother Agatha also served for a time as Mother Superior. She has
predeceased Susie by many years. In 1922 she lived in Georgetown, KY - per her mother's obituary notice. She was born on 28
Jun 1883 at 64 Robbins St., Covington, Kenton County, KY, Bible entry : Born on June 28th 1883 that day the sixth anniversary of
the happy marriage of baby's parents. Baptism Sponsors: Bernard & Elizabeth Becker
(SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) (Lendrum Blakely.).She appeared on the census on 1 Jun 1900 at Laurie J.
Blakely, 57/male, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1900 Census.). He witnessed CENSUS 1900 in 1900 at Covington, Kenton
County, KY. She witnessed the baptism of Stephens Buckner Cuthbert BLAKELY (38) on 28 Jul 1907 at Roman Catholic; St.
Mary's Cathedral. She was Her religious name was Sister Mary Agatha. She was known to family as "Aunt Beth" circa 1910 at

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"Cardome" Convent of the Visitation, Georgetown, KY. She died on 29 May 1948 at 'Cardome', Georgetown, KY, aged 64 SLB
Date Diary says she died May 9, 1948.

iv) Susan Haughton7 BLAKELY (207).


From SLB's "Reminiscenses"Tom Piatt of Fayette
County named one of his horses "Sister Jane Frances", and we all thought it quite a compliment to both of them.
She was very well educated particularly in the classics. She had a particular love of Shakespeare and commented that every
human emotion was contained in his works. She served several turns as mother superior of her convent, but was always a modest
unassuming person. During her lifetime she was made a "Kentucky Colonel" by the governor.
(Per Aunt Aileen J. Ryan's notes)
Susan Houghton Blakely, another daughter of Laurie & Lillie Blakely, entered the Visitation Order in Georgetown, Kentucky
(Cardome) in 1912. As Mother Jane Frances Blakely, she served eight consectuive 3-year terms as superioress of the Convent.
She was relieved only last year, at (1979) at her own insistence, at age 94. She is now the stalwart assistant to the present Mother
Superior. A woman of outstanding charm, she has engaged the affections of several generations of young ladies and their
mothers who were educated at THE place for young ladies of the Blue Grass - CARDOME. Governor Chandler appointed her an
honorary Kentucky Colonel. Her influence on the life of central Kentucky has been widespread and profound (See clippings) Her
sister, Elizabeth, after several years of social life, followed her into the convent, entering at Wheeling, West Virginia, and eventually
coming to Cardome "on Loan" as a teacher of history. She as Mother Agatha also served for a time as Mother Superior. She has
predeceased Susie by many years.
(Newspaper article in the Lexington Herald (Kentucky) LIFESTYLE August 5, 1976)
A CONTINUATION - MOTHER JANE FRANCES BLAKELY KEEPS AN EYE ON MONASTERY
As an admiring world watched, young women of tiny physical stature set records at the Montreal World Olympics. At Visitation
Monastery, Cardome, just outside Georgetown, another tiny lady is quietly setting records.
Those who have admired Cardome's Mother Janes Frances Blakely for many years are amazed by the stamina and alacrity
with which she has begun her unprecendented eighth three-year term as mother superior of the monastery.
Her gentle spirit, kindness, energy, sharpness and wit remain as strong as ever.
Small in stature but a giant in mind, Mother Janes Frances has for 65 years seen her beloved Cardome through many triumphs
and a share of crises.
As a young nun, she enjoyed tremendously the role of a teacher of Shakespeare, the classics, as well as Latin and French.
Later, the nun held the position of principal of the once flourishing Visitation Academy where as many as 130 girls once were
enrolled.
She patiently endured the years of the demise of the academy, and prayed and worked hard as the nuns changed their work
from academy to residence for older ladies and Montessori school.
Today, with the residence having finally achieved a good measure of success, and with parents seeking extension of the
Montessori program into the elementary school level, the veteran superior is marveling once again as more of her prayers come
true and as potential nuns seek out the cloister of Cardome.
Twenty-five years ago Mother Janes Frances' peers would have retired to enjoy the fruits of their labors. But sacrifice of that
luxury is one of the demands of religious vocation, and the tiny nun admits that there have been more challenges during the past
few years than there were in the earlier ones.
Cardome's chaplain Father James R. O'Rourke likes to introduce the superior to gatherings by recalling that she bacame a
Vistation nun in 1912, "the same year that the Titanic was sunk." He also liked to recall the words of another former chaplain who
maintained that he knew at least three times when Mother Jane Frances Blakely "literally saved Cardome."
As a schoolgirl Susan Houghton Blakely, daughter of Northern Kentucky journalist and St. Xavier journalism school dean, came
to know Cardome. A graduate of 1904, she knew the founders of the Visitation in Scott County.
She saw the present massive monastery when it was under construction, and was deeply impressed by the fact that the chapel
was built and completed first.
After six years of college courses, Susan Blakely made her move to become a nun.
Her years in the academy saw the school emerge as outstanding, and in the peak years of the 1940's, grow to house 130
students.
However, the days of the academy of necessity came to an end. Boarding schools all over the country went "out of style" in the
1950's and 1960's. Cardome Visitation Academy graduated its last class in 1969.

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The sisters then turned to the opening of a Montessori pre-school program for local youngsters and the operation of a home for
ladies.
The home grew slowly, but last year achieved near capacity. The Montessori program was so successful it may be enlarged.
Cardom's time of trial and testing may or may not be over. But with Mother Jane Frances Blakely's guiding presence, Cardom's
friends are certain that the new era for visitation Monastery in Scott county will be more productive than ever.
(Newspaper article by Si Cornell)
A SUPERIOR KENTUCKY COLONEL
Becoming a Kentucky Colonel isn't much news, except-well, read on.
Cardome Visitation Monastery, about 75 miles down I-75, is a beautiful place atop a hill near Gerogetown, KY.
The headquarters building once was the mansion of James Robinson, chosen as the confederate governor of Kentucky during
the Civil War. It was a rather empty title, Kentucky never seceeding from the Union, and therefore a Confederate governor had few
official duties. Still, Kentucky was the only state sporting both Yankee and Rebel governments.
Nearly 80 years now, Cardome has been operated by nuns of the Visitation Order. Most of that time it was a "finishing school"
(high school) for young ladies of fine family. Cardome had students from 15 states and several foreign countries.
In Recent years, Cardome was converted into a Montessori School for talented younger children. Also, it is a residence for
elderly women.
Boss of all this activity is an unusual woman, Mother Superior Jane Frances. She graduated from Cardome in 1904, and
except for the training of her order, never really left.
I am privileged to know Mother Jane. She is a tiny woman, not much over 80 pounds unless she has a heavy rosary. She
never has been known to raise her voice in anger or rebuke, but she has the sort of eyeballs which can glow or freeze.
Usually, she is both most gentle and most practical. But she does not wish me to tell her age, although that 1904 graduation
date might give you a rough idea. For 31 years she was directress and disciplinarian for Cardome's girls, and her eyes and that
quiet voice with an edge on it could stop a motorcycle gangfight.
For 44 years, she has been mother superior. Her order grants only three-year terms at that job, with a limit of two terms in
succession. So Mother Jane has served six years at least seven times, meaning there also have been 21 years when she did
some other job. That's a lot of work.
Mother Jane was born Susan Haughton Blakely, a distinguished local name.
Her father, Laurie J. Blakely, was a journalist, lawyer, and poet. He was editor of the old Cincinnati Commerical Tribune. He
founded the School of Journalism at Xavier University and served as its dean.
Laurie Blakely's labors undoubtedly touched and perhaps transformed many lives. His daughter's have, too.
Think of all the high school girls down the years changed from gigggles into ladies. Think of the present little children just
beginning to examine this world. Think of a lifetime of probelms solved, especially when the problems belonged to others, not
Mother Jane.
Visitation Order now is beginning its 100th year in Kentucky and somebody decided Mother Jane should be a Kentucky
Colonel. After all, people so honored are supposed to have done something for the Commonwealth, and Mother Jane certainly
qualifies, even if she doesn't bet horses and swizzle juleps.
A few days back, no less than ex-Gov. A. B. (Happy) Chandler appeard at Cardome to do the honors.
"Fifty-two years ago, I had a girl friend in school here," said Happy. "The girl insisted I come to Cardome and meet Mother Jane
Frances. I did and I have been in live with her ever since."
Congressman John Breckinridge also sent these words: "Your complete dedication, your personal leadership, and your ideals
in the field of education have greatly enriched the state of Kentucky, and have more than earned the tribute paid."
Mother Jane's niece, Mrs. Jane Blakely Woodrough, of Ft. Mitchell, was present when all these nice things were being said and
I asked her what Mother Jane's reply had been.
"You know how she is," said Mrs. Woodrough. "Whatever it was, it only was a few words and so quiet nobody could hear it."
Okay, Mother Jane hasn't changed any, but I think the Kentucky Colonels, from this time forward, best mind their manners.
(Newspaper article in TODAY'S FAMILY, Lexington, KY., Tuesday, August 2, 1977)
FRIENDS HELPING SISTER'S DREAMS COME TRUE by Ann Blevins
A lion's share of the thoughts of a Sister of the Visitation belongs to Annecy, a city in southern France where the order of nuns
had its beginnings in 1610, and where the Visitation today has its Motherhouse.
It has been to Annecy that Cardome's Mother Superior Jane Frances Blakely has allowed herself to dream of traveling
someday, and it is to that end that Cardome's Alumnae Day gifts to the superior were directed.
Two special "purses" for the trip to Annecy were presented to the nun of 65 years during Cardome's recent Alumnae Day
festivities. One came in a tiny box affixed to a tiny iron, a symbol of Mother Janes Frances' Iron Jubilee, or 65th year, which she is
celebrating in 1977. Other gifts for the same purpose were received on the day of the Iron Jubilee Mass. Presentations were
made by Mrs. Sinie Stephens Crites of Nicholasville and Mrs. Anna Munday Kingcade of Lexington, the latter representing the
Cardome Academy class of 1921.
Two 60 year graduates were honored at the luncheon. They were Mrs. E. G. Laurie of Lexington and Mrs. Anton Scibilia of
Franklin, Ohio. Golden jubilarians who were recognized, but who were not able to present, included Mrs. Jack Downing, Mrs.
Howard Meiners and Mrs. Vance Benton of Cincinnati; and Mrs. Kelly Lee of Lexington and Mrs. John Geders of Albuquerque.
Twenty-five year graduates present were Mrs. Len Welch of Lima, Ohio; Mrs. B. H. Kloss of Marlette, Michigan; Mrs. C. H.
Stanfield of Winchester; Mrs. George Harvey of Lexington; and Miss Joan Brielmaier of Cincinnati. Ten year graduates were Miss
Jayne Wirtz of Fort Mitchell, and Dr. Adrienne Millett Owen of Lexington.
Residents of the Cardome, Inc. Residence for Ladies were guests at the luncheon, and were made honorary members of the
Cardome Alumnae Association. Among the group was Mrs. Emma Easley, who attended Mount Admirabilis Academy at White
Sulphur, which predates the move to Cardome by the Sisters in 1896.
Mother Jane Frances Blakely, a graduate of 73 years, was recognized at the dinner; as was Mrs. Joe Gaines of Georgetown, a
graduate of 64 years. The oldest graduate of Cardome is Mrs. William Graham Kerr of Lexington, a member of the Class of 1900.

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Membership plaque competition tied, with the classes of 1911, 1916, 1917 and 1957 meriting the joint honor. Tying for the
attendance plaque were the classes of 1916, 1917 and 1952.
Sister Jane de Sales is Cardome's director of alumnae affairs. Mrs. Tim Scully is president of the alumnae association.

(Newspaper article from THE GRAPHIC, Georgetown, KY., January 29, 1981)
CARDOME'S SISTER JANE FRANCES BLAKELY ENDS LONG CAREER OF SERVICE
Cardome Visitation Monastery's Sister Jane Frances Blakely, a 95-year-old figure of masterfulness as comtemplative nun,
teacher, academy directress, convent mother superior, Shakespeare authority, and friend of scores of figures from all walks of life,
was buried Monday in the monastery graveyard during a funeral mass attended by hundreds of devotees.
The diminutive and quietly powerful Visitation sister, born Susan Haughton Blakely to Laurie J. and Lilly Lendrum Blakely of Fort
Mitchell, had been associated with Cardome since 1901 when she enrolled as a student. Graduated in 1904, she completed
college-level studies under the directions of her father, an attorney, political leader, crusading journalist, teacher, and dean of the
School of Journalism of St. Xavier University. She entered the monastery in 1910 and made her religious profession May 8, 1912.
Sister Jane Frances' life bridged two distinct eras both in politics and religious service. Her father was a Confederate soldier
known as "every inch a gentleman, Southerner and Catholic." An opponent of the Goebel faction in Covington politics, he served
in the Kentucky legislature and was eulogized at his death as "an old-fashioned journalist who loved the poor, the oppressed, the
afflicted, caring nothing for personal advantage, fighting their battles without flinching. . ." He looked like Mark Twain, with whom
he corresponded, and once wrote the great author that he shaved while looking at Twain's picture.
The timing of her coming to Cardome coincided with the later years of the nuns who had established the Visitation community in
Scott County in 1875 and who had made the move from White Sulphur to the home of the late Governor James F. Robinson in
1896. She also personally knew all living graduates of Cardome Visitation Academy, a girls' academy which in the mid-twentieth
century became one of the leading boarding schools of the South. By 1930 Cardome was educating young women from 20 states,
and by 1943 enrollment had peaked at 130.
Sister Jane Frances all her life was devoted to Christian education, as was her brother, the Rev. Paul L. Blakely, S.J., an editor
of "America" from 1914 until his death in 1943. His columns of national and international affairs were influential in formulating
catholic public opinion. Her sister, Elizabeth Ashton, became Sister Agatha, who like Sister Jane Frances was authoritative in the
English classics and who in 1937 became Cardome's mistress of novices.
Sister Janes Frances' teaching expertise brought her fame as an instructor in the works of Shakespeare. She was also teacher
of drama.
Her succession of terms of service as convent superior began in 1940. Because she was principal of the academy, she saw
herelf as a "non-candidate" for the superior office. When word came of her election, students pleaded with her not to leave them,
so she took on double duty, doing both jobs so well that time and again she was called on to be mother superior. In 1976 she was
elected to an unprecendented eighth term.
Although Sister Jane Frances' roles in Cardome's active apostolates made her a legend, her work as mother superior and as a
contemplative nun whose main vocation is that of prayer were the real marks of Sister Janes Frances Blakely, She led the convent
through crisis after crisis in a calm, resolute and undaunted manner which brought her the admiration of bishop after bishop.
Her friends were many and varied, representing many religious persuasions. Among them was former Governor A. B. "Happy"
Chandler who once recalled how he met Sister Jane Frances. "I had a girl friend in school here," he said. "She insisted I come to
Cardome and meet Mother Jane Frances. I did and I have been in love with her ever since." Other admirers included the Late
Colonel Harland Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame and Congressman John Breckinridge.
The diversity of her influence was somewhat exemplified by the four-year-old Montessori student who paid Sister a daily visit
and who participated in the offertory at her funeral mass.
Doing the honors at her funeral mass was the bhispop of the Diocese of Covington, the Most Rev. William A. Hughes, chief
celebrant, who was joined by the retired bishop, the Most Rev. Richard H.. Ackerman, who preached the sermon. Others
concelebrating were monsignor Leonard Nienaber, Cardome chaplain; the Rev. James R. O'Rourke, pastor of St. John and St.
Francis parishes of Scott County; and Monsignor Charles Murphy of Cincinnati.
Bishop Ackerman discussed Sister Jane Frances as he had come to know her over the past 20 years. "She was a woman who
loved God very much," he said. "She left no wordly goods, but oh what a legacy she left to us all. She left behind an example of
tremendous worth."
While she was drawn to the Visitation Order because of its strict cloister and the "mountaintop top it offered to her to seek the
hidden life in Christ." She also was drawn to it because of her own intellectuality and her desire to be involved in Christian
education. "She entered the Visitation at a time when it was recognized as one of the great teaching commmunities of the church,"
he noted.
Further, said the bishop, "Sister Jane Frances understood her vocation to become a saint. She fulfilled the statement of St.
Francis de Sales, founder of the Visitiation, that "the measure of love is to love without measure."
"A gentle lady, knowledgable, well disciplined, and genteel," Sister Jane Frances, he said, "will be in the everlasting hills of God
as true a friend and as true a mother as she ever was."
Bearers were John Haggin Cooper, E. Durward Weldon, Edward H. Lynch, R. Hall Wolfe, Walter Harper and Malcolm B.
Saunier.
Friends are planning to establish a memorial endowment fund for Cardome's sisters. Contributons may be sent to Sister Jane
de Sales.

(Newspaper article)
FUND TO HONOR MOTHER JANE FRANCES by Ann Bevins
A memorial has been established in the name of Mother Jane Francis Blakely of the Sisters of the Visitation of Cardome at
Georgetown which will perpetuate her two loves-the religious life, and education.

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The Mother Jane Frances Blakely Fund, which has been instituted by friends of the recently deceased legendary figure who
spent 70 of her 95 years in the Visitation order and 24 of them as mother superior, will be invested and called upon for use in
educating young nuns. "Young," in the words of a benefactor involved in setting up the memorial, "Means anyone the age of or
younger than Mother Jane Frances."
Since her death of January 22 and burial on January 26 following funeral Mass celebrated by Bishop William A. Hughes and
retired Bishop Richard H. Ackerman, persons from all parts of the country have been writing to Cardome in an attempt to verbalize
their feelings about the life and death of Mother Jane Frances.
Most of the expressions of sympathy have echoed Bishop Ackerman's homily comment that "she will be in the everlasting hills
of God as true a friend and as true a mother as she ever was.
Her own community of sisters, in the official obituary letter to other Visitation communities, concluded by saying "There is a
Christian way of life and an American way of life which are inseparable; there is a spiritual life and a cultural life which are united;
there is a private life and a public life which are complementary. All of these inseparable ways formed the composite early life of
Sister Jane Frances, and we believe, even as we pray for the repose of her soul, that they have culminated in a wonderfully
glorious eternal life for her."
Contributions may be made payable to the "Mother Jane Frances Blakely Fund" and sent to the Sisters of the Visitation,
Cardome, Georgetown, Kentucky 40324.
Prayer Card - From death to life through Christ. (Burial Service)
V. J.
In Loving Memory of
Sister Jane Frances Blakely
Born May 23, 1885
Professed May 8, 1912
Died January 22, 1981
Buried January 26, 1981
at Cardome
Please remember her in your prayers. She was baptized She was baptized at Mother of God Church Sponsors Joseph Van
Lenner and wife. She was born on 23 May 1885 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, Born at 53 E. Fourth St., Covington, KY
(Family information.) (SLB Date diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.) (Lendrum Blakely.). He witnessed CENSUS 1900 on 1
Jun 1900 at Laurie J. Blakely, 57/male, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1900 Census.). He witnessed CENSUS 1900 in 1900 at
Covington, Kenton County, KY. She witnessed the baptism of Edward Courtney Piatt BLAKELY (39) on 1 Nov 1908 (SLB Date
diary, Date diary, about 1950 MVW file.). She was employed circa 1910 at Sister of the Visitation, 'Cardome', Georgetown, KY.
She was 'Cardome' on 8 May 1912 at Georgetown, KY. She died on 22 Jan 1981 at 'Cardome', Georgetown, KY, aged 95 The
following was written May 19, 1981 by MVW about the death of "Aunt Sue":
Susan Houghton Blakely left a small worldly legacy. There was an enormous stack of America Magazines all nicely annotated to
point out her brother Paul's writings. No doubt she read each word more than once. Paul's writings seem a bit dated in 1981 as
many of the issues are either long dead or have been resolved. However, they were the fire of the times. One topic discussed in
Paul's "America" writings was the right to die without artificial means of support in the event of a terminal illness. Aunt Sue had
carefully "dog-eared" this article. As always, she was conversant on the current issues of the day. She was not one to dwell in the
past, but rather she stood on the shoulders of the past as she reached for the sky. There were a few pictures, but most were so
dusty that they resembled ghosts. They were ghosts of a far time when women wore long skirts, corsets, large hats and stood
demurely. she appears in the small pictures in scenes with her brother Laurie, her school mates and her cousin. Sue was thing,
shy, but charming and very intelligent. Shortly after the pictures were taken she would put aside the large hats with the feathers
and the swishy skirts. Her life took an alternative path from her friends. How could she know at that far time that she would live
until the week that the space shuttle would be launched and retrieved? Her life spanned one of the most significant centuries in
the history of the world. Her life was equally significant to the events of the century for she affected people as profoundly as any
famous hero. Among the few items she left was a memorial card indicating that she had celebrated her golden jubilee of religious
profession on May 8, 1962. She would live another nineteen years after the jubilee. she lived so long that friends started to think
she was the exception to the rule that all men must die. The universal comment made upon hearing of her death was, "I thought
she would live forever." Also, there were two lovely certificates of a Papal blessing from Pope Paul neatly rolled and put away
rather than displayed for all to see. Such was the nature of the woman. she habitually put an "X" through her picture whenever it
appeared in a newspaper or magazine. Over a long life she was photographed on numerous occasions, but seldom is her face
visible for at the last second she would avert her face just before the shutter snapped. She couldn't understand why anyone
wanted her face. It was her soul that mattered. She left evidence that she continued to study French until the very end and her
only display of pride was the fact that she alone in the community was responsible for the translations from the mother house in
France. She was a regular correspondent with a typewriter with traits just as distinguishable as handwriting. Aunt Sue had
distinctive typewriting full of hanging letters, funny spaces. She never understood why the machine did not bend to her will.
Now her remains are resting in the garden behind the convent close to the grave of her sister, Elizabeth. There is a hole in the
community, the town, the state and indeed even the world. Aunt Sue was dear even to those who knew her by reputation without
ever actually meeting her. she was even more dear to those who knew her company. Her long life is a blessing to a multitude of
people. Her personality and influence stretched broadly. The small legacy of possessions she left could fit into a medium size
box, but her spirit more than filled thousands of hearts (Family information.).
v) Mary Louise Rudd7 BLAKELY (48). The fifth child to bless the household of Laurie John and Lilly [Lendrum] Blakely was
another daughter, Mary Louise Rudd Blakely. Born on August 18, 1886 and named for her Aunt, Mary Louise Ryan. The
inscription in the family bible, made by her father, reads in part:

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".... was born in Covington, Ky. at No. 1509 Madison Avenue, on Wednesday August 18th, 1886 at six o'clock and twenty-five
minutes, a.m. Baptized by Very Rev'd. L. M. Lambert at the Cathedral, Covington, September 5th, 1886. Sponsors, William M.
Piatt and Mary Louise Ryan.
Mary Louise attended the same schools as her sisters, and joined in the lively discussions around the family dinner table. But
unlike her two older sisters, she did not join the convent, but chose to remain at home with her parents.
On May 1, 1918, a year after the death of her father, Mary Louise became the bride of Louis Carroll Baldwin in a quiet ceremony at
St. Mary's Cathedral in Covington. Her brother, Rev. Paul Blakely, traveled from New York to perform the ceremony. Her only
attendant was a sister of the groom, Miss Dixie Baldwin. The brides brother, Laurie, acted as best man.
Louis Baldwin was 34 years old at the time of their wedding, and had been working for Standard Oil for a number of years, where
he began as an office boy.
Lewis and his bride went to Chicago to take up residence.
On February 14, 1919, Louis and Mary Louise became the parents of a son, whom they named Louis Carroll Baldwin, Jr. As an
adult Lou, Jr. would become a published author of many religious and political articles.
Five years later, Louis and Mary Louise added another son to their family. Born on March 1, 1924, they named their second son
John Lendrum Baldwin.
Louis Baldwin continued to work for the Standard Oil Company, and when he retired after 50 years with the company, he was the
Chief Purchasing Agent. He died in September 1962, at the age of 78.
Mary Louise [Blakely] Baldwin survived her husband four years, and died on November 16, 1966.
Regretfully, this is a short biography for a delightful lady, but there is little information in the files. Laura Steneck wrote: I met "Aunt
Weese" several times, when I was very young, and I remember the delightful visits and laughter when she would come to see her
sister, Susan (Sister Jane Frances) at Cardome, when I was a student there. LWS) . She was born on 18 Aug 1886 at Mary
Louise Blakely, 1509 Madison Ave, Covington, Kenton County, KY (Lendrum Blakely.). She was baptized on 5 Sep 1886 at
Roman Catholic; Cathedral, Covington, Kenton County, KY (Ibid.). He witnessed CENSUS 1900 on 1 Jun 1900 at Laurie J.
Blakely, 57/male, Covington, Kenton County, KY (1900 Census.). She appeared on the census in 1900 at Covington, Kenton
County, KY.30 She lived in 1918 at 342 Marquette Road West, Chicago, IL. She married Lewis Carroll BALDWIN Sr (273), son of
Charles Henry BALDWIN (4100), on 1 May 1918 at Covington, Kenton County, KY, The wedding was described as follows: "The
wedding of Miss Mary Louise Blakely and Mr. Lewis Carroll Baldwin was quietly and impressively celebrated Wednesday morning
at St. Mary's Cathedral by Rev. Father Paul Blakely, the bride's brother, from New York City. The bride was exquisitely gowned in
a tan traveling suit and picture hat. She wore a corsage of white sweet peas. The bride's only attendant was Miss Dixie Baldwin,
the bridegroom's sister. She wore a tan eton dress. Mr. Laurie Blakely, brother of the bride, acted as best man. Mr. and Mrs.
Baldwin left immediately for Chicago where they will reside." As of 1 May 1918, her married name was BALDWIN (48). She died
on 16 Nov 1966 at Albuquerque, NM, aged 80 (Lendrum Blakely.).
(a) Lewis Carroll8 BALDWIN Jr (665) married Virginia BRADY (3233). He was born on 14 Feb 1919 at Chicago, IL (Laura
Glass, "Laura Woodrough Glass correspondence", This is taken from information assembled by LWG. Individual sources will
be mentioned in each item.
My source for the THOMAS SHORE information was Marshall SHORE, who has done
extensive research on the SHORE ancestors; also, received information from
Tommy Wiggins, a descendant, on Jane Shore Morin and William STAMPS, and Sue Moore, another descendant of Jane
Shore & James MORIN.
But Marshall Shore was the main source of info.
LWG.). He In 1998 Jane Ashton Blakely Woodrough said a grandaughter of Mary Louise Blakely (daughter of either John or
Louis, Jr.) changed her last name from Baldwin to deValcourt. Sure enough in 2006 MVW was contacted by Kathryne Baldwin
de Valcourt the person who changed her last name to benefit her singing career. Katheryne was most helpful in proving
additional information.
He is still be living in San Diego in 1998 and was contacted by MVW, but seems to know nothing about family hisotry. in 1998.
He died on 21 Apr 2006 at San Diego, CA, aged 87 (Kathryne de Valcourt, "Kathryne de Valcourt - correspondence," e-mail
message from Kathryne de Valcourt [kathrynedv@hotmail.com] to MVW, March 2006. Hereinafter cited as "Kathryne.").
i) Mary Lou9 BALDWIN (4456) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
ii) Betty9 BALDWIN (4457) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
iii) Tom9 BALDWIN (4458) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
iv) Joe9 BALDWIN (4459) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
v) Chuck9 BALDWIN (4460) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(b) John Lendrum8 BALDWIN (664)31 married Barbara Elizabeth PETERSON (666). He was born on 1 Mar 1923 at Chicago,
IL (Ibid.). He lived in 1977 at Lakeland, FL.32 On 10 Dec 1977 John L. Baldwin and his wife communicated with "Aunt Sue"

30

MVW read this census in March of 1978. Interesting because in this Laurie gives his year of birth as 1854 (actually was 1843) and his birthplace as
Pennsylvania (which was probably true) as this is place that was stated in previous census. However, in the 1880 census he gave his birthplace as
Virginia. Perhaps he had "romantic" notion of Virginia since the Centennial celebration was just four years in past. Curious? Census shows: 57 male;
822 Scott St.
31
In 1998 MVW asked John Blakely and his sister Jane Woodrough if they knew the wherabouts of this family or descendants. They had no knowledge.

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(Sister Jane Frances). He sent her the text of an address he gave concerning the Impact on Florida Citrus if trade relations
with Cuba were normalized (Family information.). He died on 16 Feb 1996 at Monterey, CA, aged 72 Death date from his
daughter. Katheryne de Valcourt Baldwin.
Kathryne de Valcourt
13291 Creekside Lane
Poway, California 92064-5776
She had ner name changed legally some years ago as she is a singer and this last name seemd to fit better (Kathryne de
Valcourt, "Kathryne," e-mail to MVW, March 2006.). He Yes, we lived in Winter Haven, Florida from around 1970 to 1976. I
graduated from high school in Lakeland in 1972. My father was a Madison
Avenue Ad Man (advertising executive) and his account was the Florida Citrus
Growers. So he commuted from New York City to Florida and made all the TV
commercials for Florida Orange Juice. One of his more memorable campaigns
featured singer Anita Bryant. "Come to the Florida sunshine tree ..."
Those were the days.
Very astute of you to notice dad's cell phone number being kind of
futuristic. That was dad to a "t", very visionary and way, way ahead of his
time. He had BOTH a mobile telephone and a TV in his car beginning in the
late 1960's. Always the "ad man", keeping up with television commercials.
He was unique and a true visionary.
Thank you again and again for sending me these e-mails. I can't wait to
devour and savour the information. God bless you and your family! Kathryne
in 2006.
i) Susan Elizabeth9 BALDWIN (4446) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
ii) Barbara Ellen9 BALDWIN (4447) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(a) Julie10 MORGAN (4449) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(b) Nicholas10 MORGAN (4451) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
iii) Kathryne9 BALDWIN (4452) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
iv) John Lendrum9 BALDWIN Jr. (4453) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
(a) Alexander John10 BALDWIN (4455) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) is still living.
vi) Laurie Aloysius Ruffner7 BLAKELY (49) was employed at Ins.Broker. As of 1894, he was also known as Laurie Aloysius
Ruffner BLAKELY (49) This is the name shown in Bible record. He was born on 26 Apr 1894 at Harris (Third St.) Newport Ky.,
Newport, Cambell County, KY, Name shown on bible is Laurie Aloysius Ruffner Blakely. Sponsors were Victor M. O'Shaughnessy
and Effie V. Ryan (Lendrum Blakely.). He was baptized on 10 May 1894 b-April 26, 1894; bp-May 10, 1894; s/o Laurie J. Blakely
& Lilly H. Lendaum. He witnessed CENSUS 1900 on 1 Jun 1900 at Laurie J. Blakely, 57/male, Covington, Kenton County, KY
(1900 Census.). He witnessed CENSUS 1900 in 1900 at Covington, Kenton County, KY. He married Frances SHOUSE (274) on
17 Nov 1920 at Lexington, Fayette County, KY. He died on 29 Dec 1971 at Lexington, Fayette County, KY, aged 77.
d) Peter4 LANDRUM (684) was born after 1764 This is the unbord son mentioned in Thomas Landrum's wiill in 1764 (Parson Landrum.).
2. Robert3 LANDRUM (2848) was Mariner (George Lendrum, "Essex Co., Va.").
3. George3 LANDRUM (2849)33 (George Lendrum, "Essex Co., Va.") (Ibid.) (Ibid.) died before 1784 (Ibid.).
a) Margaret4 LANDRUM (2850) (Ibid.) (Ibid.)
b) Helen4 LANDRUM (2851)
4. Anne3 LANDRUM (2852) married Thomas MOIR (2853). Her married name was MOIR (2852).
5. Jean3 LANDRUM (2854) married William MITCHELL (2855). Her married name was MITCHELL (2854). She died before 1784.
a) John4 MITCHELL (2856)
32

Taken from a memo cover sheet - Address Winterset Acres, Winter Haven, FL 33880 Telephone 813-324-5962 Mobile number 294-0116 (this is a
very early date for someone to have a mobile number)
In 1989 MVW wrote to the address, but never received a reply.
33
Will states that George is deceased with only surviving children being Margaret and Helen.

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b) Peter4 MITCHELL (2857)


c) Ann4 MITCHELL (2858) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.)
6. Margaret3 LANDRUM (2859) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) married John CRUICKSHANKK (2860). Her married name was CRUICKSHANKK (2859).
a) Robert4 CRUICKSHANKK (2861) was Merchant (Ibid.).
b) James4 CRUICKSHANKK (2862) (Ibid.) (Ibid.) (Ibid.)
c) Helen4 CRUICKSHANKK (2863)
B. Robert2 LANDRUM (2865) (Edicts of Executry.) (Ibid.)
C. Margaret2 LANDRUM (2870)
D. Jean2 LANDRUM (2866) married James BRUCE (2867) at Elrick, Scotland. Her married name was BRUCE (2866). She was born circa 1700
Birth date is guess based on fact she is married.

LANDRUM (2868) married George BEG (2869) at Meikle Tippertie, Scotland. Her married name was BEG (2868). She
was born circa 1700.
E. Janet2

Printed on: 16 Feb 2015


Prepared by:
Margaret V. Woodrough

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