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A dHI Media Publication serving Van Wert, Delphos & Area Communities

A Joint Product of the Times Bulletin and Delphos Herald Newspapers

Volume 145 | Edition 177 | $1.00

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL SCOREBOARD

wapakoneta 53 @ Van Wert 50


Paulding 51 @ Lincolnview 69
Bluffton 56 @ Crestview 51 / OT
Parkway 41 @ marion Local 79

OPINION

New Bremen 59 @ St. Johns 64


Allen East 57 @ Jefferson 75
wayne Trace 71 @ Antwerp 52

Readers speak their minds about


local topics on the Opinion page.
Turn to pages 6-7 to read letters
to the editor, thumbs up/down,
and columns fro our staff.

6-7

Operation: Street Smart shares warning signs of teen drug use


BY ED GEBERT
DHI Media Editor
egebert@timesbulletin.com
VAN WERT If you hear
a teenager talking about dabs or
mentioning 710, would you understand? Even some of the more basic
information can surprise people.
With this in mind some detectives
from the Franklin County Sheriffs
Office have a program to keep parents, law enforcement officers and
others informed about what to look
for. The program, Operation: Street
Smart, was in Van Wert Friday at
the Vantage Career Center Community Room. The audience was
packed with officials from schools,
law enforcement, and several other
agencies.
They started the program
in 2002, said Detective Brian

Toth. They wanted to educate


the public because we know we
cant just arrest the problem and
keep it locked up. We tried that,
and we havent been that successful. Weve already outlawed it, so
we want to get out front of it and
educate the public, especially the
parents about the signs and what
to look for when their kids are
starting to use.
The Operation Street Smart presentation was given in Van Wert in
the spring of 2011, but information
has advanced since then.
The presentation is updated
every week, Toth stated. Its constantly changing and evolving.
Its incredible how many
changes have kind of evolved in order to address this problem, commented Van Wert Municipal Court
Judge Jill Leatherman. It helps

knowing what theyre dealing with.


Never having been exposed to a lot
of these things and then seeing it,
I would never have known. So if I
dont know it, what can I do about
it?
New information comes in often
as police officers will often use the
Operation: Street Smart team as a
resource to check on new trends
or to give new information on how
innocent looking household items
sometimes are easily turned into
drug paraphernalia from turkey basters to toilet paper rolls to
two-liter pop bottles.
The information at the presentation Friday was clearly designed to
make people aware of the signs and
effects of drug use.
STREET SmART/14

Franklin County Detective Brian Toth gives information about


drug paraphernalia and signs of teen drug abuse to officials
from Van Wert area schools, law enforcement, and other
agencies as part of Operation: Street Smart. This presentation
was offered Friday at Vantage Career Center. (DHI Media/Ed
Gebert)

Lincolnview crowns Thatcher and Tow

Winter manageable so far

Delphos City workers Harry Hodgson and Gary Teman


inspect a salt speader on one of the municipalitys
trucks Friday in preparations for wintry weather
expected this weekend. (DHI Media/Stephanie Groves)
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.
com

Lincolnview crowned Homecoming Queen Julia Thatcher and King Bayley Tow (pictured above)
Friday evening at its homecoming game against Paulding. Rounding out the Homecoming court
were seniors Baylee Neate, Taylor Williams, Tyler Wannemacher, and Tyler Brant; juniors Grace
Gorman and Skyler Whitaker; Sophomores Kelsey Brenneman and Dylan Lee; and freshmen
Lainie Jones and Dylan Neate. (DHI Media/Tina Eley)

Perfect storm creates eating disorders


BY STEPHANIE GROVES
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
In a world where society is so focused on appearances, which also
seems to be a gauge for success, many
teens and young adults who feel unaccepted and have been told they dont
fit the mold struggle with emotional distress and identity issues until they find
the one thing they can control eating.
In the U.S., 30 million people will
be impacted by an eating disorder
with symptoms that include extreme
emotions, attitudes, or behaviors encompassing their weight and food
issues at some point in their lifetime.
These serious eating disorders anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and orthorexia affect men and women of
all ethnic backgrounds, age, sizes, and
sexualities who are susceptible to the
disorders for a myriad or reasons.
River Centre Clinics (RCC) Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Jan
Lockert said there are so many interpersonal components that come together creating the perfect storm: an
eating disorder.
We see many people who believe
they have a healthy perspective on
food and eating, Lockert said. The
dieting gets out of hand, can affect
their psyche, and can become more of
an addiction. We look at helping them
understand and develop a balance.
National Eating Disorders Asso-

ciations (NEDA) Awareness Week


campaign, (NEDA) I Had No
Idea Feb. 22-28 aims to promote
public and media attention to the seriousness of eating disorders and improve education about the biological
underpinnings, environmental triggers, warning signs and how to help
those struggling.
Partnership for Violence Free
Family (PVFF) Executive Director
Donna Dickman said the highest proportion of individuals with eating disorders are between the ages of 18 and
20 years-old and 50 percent of them
have on-set eating disorders before
those ages.
When a teen or young adults attitude about food, weight, or body image is seriously interfering with life,
thats a warning sign, Dickman said.
They develop very rigid patterns and
are very intense. They lie about what
they eat, when they eat, and how much
they eat. If you did not know them,
you might think they were just a very

healthy eater.
NEDA reports eating disorders
are not a teenagers problem or a
young, privileged white womans
disease.
Research shows:
Rates of eating disorders and
body dissatisfaction among older populations are on the rise;
Eating disorders disproportionately impact some segments of the
Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgendered
(LGBT) populations;
Women are more commonly affected by eating disorders;
10 million men and boys will battle a form of the illness at some point
in their lifetime;
No clear distinction for any one
disorder between any racial or ethnic
group; and
Minorities are less likely to receive help for eating issues.
Lockert said the young LGBT population has added stressors and there
are more young people questioning
their orientation. She added, many are
opting to come out, and society is becoming more accepting, but there are
many people who are not accepting of
the lifestyle.
With that age group, being different sets the stage, Lockert said.
Identity is a deep and personal part
of an individual and in general, is a
struggle especially when dealing with
societal norms.
EATING DISORDERS/14

While the region looks


into the eye of another winter weather event his weekend, the Ohio Department of
Transportation has released
its Winter Operations Update for District 1 which includes the counties of Allen,
Defiance, Hancock, Hardin,
Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert
and Wyandot. The report is
issued periodically during the
winter months and as necessary following snow and ice
events. The latest report represents a period beginning in
October to the present.
Throughout the nine-county area, 3,356 total lane miles
were maintained with 37,547
tons of salt and 787,847 gallons of de-icing liquids. These
liquids include salt brine and
Beet Heet, Aqua Salina and
Boost to make the salt brine
more effective and in some
cases, less corrosive. Road
crews drove 785,015 miles
performing snow and ice control for a cost of $5,844,320.
At this same point in the
season last year, 55,282 tons
of salt had been used and
$7.3 million had been spent
on snow and ice control in
the district. Total amount of
salt on hand throughout the
eight-county region of ODOT
District 1 is currently 19,000
tons.
In Allen County, 474 lanes
miles of roads were maintained with 72,719 gallons of
de-icing liquids. Road crews

drove 83,572 miles for snow


removal and ice control at
cost of $768,992 for labor,
equipment and materials.
Putnam County saw 422
lane miles maintained using
4,771 tons of salt and 78,902
gallons of liquids used. Crews
drove 104,9650 miles and the
total cost so far this winter if
$744,233.
Van Wert County came in
the lowest in the tri-county
area at 375 lane miles maintained using 4,209 tons of salt
and 78,902 gallons of liquids.
The cost, to-date, is $649,993
and 87,055 miles were driven.
The worst winter in recent memory in terms of cost
was last winter with $8.7 million expended in District 1 for
snow and ice control, ODOT
Public Information Officer
Rhonda Pees said Friday. Excluding last year, the average
cost per year over the last 10
years for snow and ice control
operations is $4.1 million.
Delphos has reported a
marked decline in weather-related overtime and salt usage
so far this winter even as
crews prepare for this weekends wintry weather forecast.
This winter has been a
lot better than last winter and
our crews have done a great
job at tackling what weve
seen so far, Delphos Safety
Service Director Shane Coleman said Friday afternoon.
We are ready for this weekends weather event, whatever it may be. Our trucks are
stocked and ready and our
guys are on standby.
wINTER/14

Index
Classifieds ........ 12-13
Comics & Puzzles ..11
Real Estate ..............16

Local/State ...........3-4
Obituaries .................2
History ......................5

Bulletin Board

Sports ................. 8-10


Todays World .........15
Weather ....................2

Vol. 145, No. 177

he Van Wert Time


and Temperature
problem is a
number (419) 238chance for you
5050 is temporarily out to do your best.
of service. Service may
-Duke Ellington
be restored on Monday.

Times Bulletin/Delphos Herald

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

OBITUARIES

LOCAL WEATHER

Marilyn
Yates

Velma M.
Altenburger
Aug. 30, 1921-Feb. 19, 2015

July 19, 1940-Feb. 19, 2015

OTTOVILLE Velma
M. Altenburger, 93, of Ottoville, died at 2:46 p.m. Thursday at Lima Memorial Hospital.
She was born Aug. 30,
1921, in Fort Jennings, to
Arnold and Ida (Wieging)
Martin, who preceded her in
death.
On June 5, 1943, she married Jerome Whitey Altenburger, who died April 4,
2010.
She is survived by three
children: Gary (Nuan) Altenburger
of
Thailand,
Bruce (Sylvia) Altenburger of Delphos, and Judy
(Mike) Heitmeyer of Ottoville; 10 grandchildren; 22
great-grandchildren;
two
brothers: Jim (Pat) Martin
of Ottoville and Bob (Dolly)
Martin of Landeck, and two
sisters: Joan Tooter Wessell
and Bernice Rieger, both of
Ottoville.
She was also preceded in
death by a daughter, Brenda
Altenburger; a brother, Leroy
Pep Martin; and two brothers-in-law, George Rieger and
Ron Wessell.
Velma was a cashier for
the Village Market in Ottoville. She was a member
of Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church in Ottoville
and its Rosary Altar Society.
She was a life member of the
Ottoville VFW Auxiliary and
a member of Fort Jennings
American Legion Auxiliary.
She was determined in her
independence, still living at
home at 93 years old. She so
appreciated all the visits and

Velma M. Altenburger
phone calls from family and
friends in her final years. Always the hostess, she would
never let company leave hungry.
She treasured the many
winters spent in St. Petersburg, Florida, with Whitey.
Her love for making crafts,
cooking and baking will not
soon be forgotten. She lent
those talents for many years
to the Ottoville VFW Auxiliary.
A Mass of Christian
Burial will be 10:30 a.m.
Monday
at
Immaculate Conception Catholic
Church, Ottoville. The Rev.
Jerome Schetter will officiate. Burial will follow in St.
Marys Cemetery, Ottoville.
Visitation will be from
2-4 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. on
Sunday at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson
Township, where there will
be a VFW Auxiliary service
at 3 p.m.
Memorials may be made
to a charity of the donors
choice.
Condolences can be expressed at lovefuneralhome.
com.

Virginia Jinny Lee Wood


July 24, 1929 - Feb. 19, 2015

CELINA, Ohio Virginia Jinny Lee Wood, 85, of Celina, formerly of Rockford, Ohio, passed away at 5:05 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015, at the Otterbein St. Marys Senior
Lifestyle Community in St. Marys, Ohio.
She was born on July 24, 1929, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Joseph James and Virginia (Blasing) Meyer.
Survivors include:
Daughters Sheila (Mark Linn) Baltzell of Celina, Holly
P. Wood (Paul) Pabis of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, and Colleen
(Wally) OSteen of Huntsville, Alabama
Preceding her in 1998 was her former husband and friend,
Duane R. Wood, her son-in-law, Larry Baltzell, and her brother James Meyer, and his wife Marcia Meyer.
Services will be held on Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Ketcham-Ripley Funeral Home in Rockford. Burial will follow
at Riverside Cemetery, Rockford.
Friends may call on Monday at the funeral home from
4-8 p.m. and on Tuesday, one hour prior to the service.
Condolences may be expressed at ketchamripley.com.

OTTOVILLE Marilyn
Yates, 74, of Ottoville, passed
away at 6:17 a.m. Thursday at
St. Ritas Medical Center.
She was born July 19, 1940,
at home in Putnam County,
to Edward and Lucille (Ellerbrock) Sanders. They preceded her in death.
Marilyn Yates
Marilyn was united in marriage to Daniel E. Yates on
May 13, 1960, in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He preceded
her in death on Aug. 3, 2002.
She is survived by two
daughters, Kathy Daniels of
Grover Hill and Debra Yates
of Los Angeles; two sons, Jerome (Johanna) Yates of Berea
and Jeff Yates of Valparaiso, Indiana; one brother, Gerald
(Judy) Racine, Wisconsin; five sisters, Sister Anna Maria of
Dayton, Carol Meyer of Fort Jennings, Karen (Jim) King of
Cairo, Ohio, Mary (Mike) Hoverman of Maumee and Barb
Sanders of Columbus; 11 grandchildren, Amber, Dan, Trent,
Todd, Jackie, Josh, Emily, Adrian, Adam, Zane and Christina;
and three great-grandchildren, Abriana, Graydyn, and Lucas.
Marilyn was also preceded in death by a son, Gregory L.
Yates, a brother, Tom Sanders, and a grandson, Dylan Yates.
She was in the Womens Army Corp (WAC), U.S. Army
from 1958-1960. She was one of the first women in Van Wert
County to join WAC and was very proud of this achievement.
She worked at Delphos Memorial Home for 23 years.
She was an avid gardener, enjoyed the outdoors and animals
and loved to travel. Marilyn was very involved in her grandchildrens lives and frequently attended activities the children
participated in.
Mass of Christian burial will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at Immaculate Conception Church in Ottoville with
Father Jerome Schetter officiating. Full military grave
rites will be held directly following Mass.
Friends and family may call from 2-8 p.m. Monday at
Harter and Schier Funeral Home in Delphos.
Memorial contributions can be made to Angels for Animals.
To leave condolences please go to www.harterandschier.
com.

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Bonnie R.
Rodman
Aug. 13, 1937 - Feb. 19, 2015
HAVILAND, Ohio
Bonnie R. Rodman, 77, died
Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015 at
Van Wert Hospital, Van Wert,
Ohio.
She was born Aug. 13,
1937, in Paulding, Ohio, the
daughter of Edward Ed and
Gladys E. (Carlisle) Tope.
On Dec. 27, 1955, she married Charles Rodman, who
survives.
She was a member of
Country
Chapel
United
Methodist Church, Haviland,
where she was a ladies aide.
She was a former member of
Grange and Order of the Eastern Star.
She is survived by her
husband, Charles, Haviland;
three children: Charlene
Coulter of Van Wert, Shelly
(Albert) Bartoch of Salem,
Indiana, and Renee (Tim)
Hall of Cambridge City, Indiana; six grandchildren, and
two great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her parents, a brother,
Lowell Tope, and a sister, Alice Mallone.

Velma Altenburger

A Mass of Christian Burial will be 10:30 a.m. Monday


at Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville.
Visitation will be from 2-4
p.m. and 5-8 p.m. on Sunday
at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral
Home, Jackson Township,
where there will be a VFW
Auxiliary service at 3 p.m.

Lori Ball

Services will begin at


10:30 a.m. Monday at Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral Home,
Spencerville. Friends may
call from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m.
Sunday and one hour prior to
services Monday.

Ruth Dunlap

A memorial service will


be held on Saturday, beginning with lunch at 1 p.m. in
Dunlap Hall of Palms West
Alliance Church, 16401
Southern Blvd., Loxahatchee,
FL 33470.

Steven Hall

His family will receive


friends on Sunday, from 1-4
and 6-8 p.m., at the John
Quint Treboni Funeral Home,
1177 West Fifth Avenue, Columbus (with a prayer service
at 8 p.m.). His funeral mass is
Monday, Feb. 23, 2015, at 10
a.m. at Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church, 1559 Roxbury Road (Marble Cliff).

Paul Jettinghoff

Mass of Christian burial


will be celebrated at 10 a.m.
Saturday at St. Josephs Catholic Church in Newton, N.C.
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Bonnie R. Rodman
Funeral services will be
conducted at 11 a.m. Monday, Feb. 23, 2015, at Den
Herder Funeral Home,
Paulding. Burial will follow
in Blue Creek Cemetery,
Haviland, Ohio. Visitation
will be 2 8 p.m. Sunday,
Feb. 22 at the funeral home.
There will also be visitation
one hour prior to services
on Monday.
Donations may be made to
Country Chapel United Methodist Church or Scott EMS.
Online condolences may
be sent to www.denherderfh.
com.

VISITATION & SERVICES

Van Wert Sheriffs Office


2-04 7:30 a.m.
Quinton Schmenk, 32, of Leipsic, was arrested for a probation violation.
2-06 8:55 a.m.
A Van Wert man called in a complaint of trash being left
at the corner of Zook and Dull Robinson roads for the trash
company to pick up. The person responsible was contacted and
agreed to not put the trash there anymore.
2-06 2:42 p.m.
A Venedocia woman in the 19000 block of Plum Street,
Venedocia, reported an incident of assault. No charges were
filed.

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10, 2015

Order online at www.HongKongBuffetVanWert.com

Hardware
242 N. Main St.,
Ph. 419-692-0921

Mon.-Fri. 8-6:30
Saturday Winter Hours 8-3:30

Jack Langdon

A memorial service in his


honor will be Feb. 21, 2015, at
11 a.m., at the Jennings Road
Church of Christ, 1124 Jennings Road, Van Wert.

Susan Leiendecker

Services will be held at


2 p.m. Saturday at Cowan
& Son Funeral Home, Van
Wert. Calling is one hour prior to the service.

Louis Lianez

Mass of Christian Burial


will be at 10:30 a.m. Saturday
at St. Mary of the Assumption
Catholic Church.

Nellie Miller

Services will be held at


10 a.m. Monday at Calvary Evangelical Church, Van
Wert. Visitation is from 12
4:30 p.m. Sunday at the
Zwick & Jahn Funeral Home,
Decatur, and one hour prior to
the service at the church.

Richard Richardson
Sr.

Funeral services will be


held on Monday at 11 a.m.
at Harter and Schier Funeral Home. Family and friends
may call on Sunday from 1-3
and 6-8 p.m. at the funeral
home. To view funeral service online, please visit www.
harterandschier.com at the
time of the service. (Password: webcast9)

Bonnie Rodman

Funeral services will be


conducted at 11 a.m. Monday
at Den Herder Funeral Home,
Paulding. Visitation will be
2 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home. There will also
be visitation one hour prior to
services on Monday.

Stanley
Springer

Dick

Services will be 1 p.m.


Saturday at Feller and Clark
Funeral Home, 1860 Center
St., Auburn. Visitation will be
from 10 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday prior to the service at the
funeral home.

THANK YOU
I would like to thank
each and every one for
the many cards and
gifts I received for my
90th birthday.
You made me feel so
special and you are
special also.
-Cloyd Waltz

A DHI Media publication

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Community calendar items include the name of the event or
group and date, time and place of the event. Please include a
daytime phone number when submitting calendar items.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21
9-11:30 a.m. Delphos Project Recycle at Delphos Fuel and
Wash.
9 a.m.-noon Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
9 a.m. St. Vincent dePaul Society, located at the
east edge of the St. Johns High School parking lot, is
open.
10 a.m.- p.m. Delphos Postal Museum is open.
10 a.m. The 60+ Group will meet at Wesley UM Church,
corner of Blaine and Center.
12:15 p.m. Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire
and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.
7 p.m. Delphos Eagles Auxiliary meets at the Eagles
Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth St.
7:30-10:30 p.m. Van Wert Dance Club will hold its February ballroom dance in the Goedde Building, 205 W. Crawford St., Van Wert. Cost is $5/person. For more information,
contact: Diane at (419) 238-6571.
8 p.m. Van Wert Amateur Radio Club will meet at the
Emergency Management Agency Complex, 1220 E. Lincoln
Highway.
8 p.m. AA open discussion at First Presbyterian Church.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22
1-3 p.m. The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241
N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. Putnam County Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
1:30 p.m. Amvets Post 698 Auxiliary meets at the Amvets post in Middle Point.
2 p.m. AA open discussion at 1158 Westwood Dr.
4 p.m. Amvets Post 698 regular meeting at the Amvets
post in Middle Point.
7:30 p.m. Sons of Amvets Post 698 meet at Amvets Post
in Middle Point.
7:30 p.m. Middle Point Amvets Post 698 Sons to meet.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Ottoville Branch Library is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
5 p.m. Weight Watchers will hold its weigh in. Meeting
will follow at 5:30 p.m. Both are held in the Fellowship Hall
on the second floor at Trinity United Methodist Church, South
Walnut St., Van Wert.
6:30 p.m. American Legion Post 178 will have an executive board meeting.
6:30 p.m. Shelter from the Storm support group meets in
the Delphos Public Library basement.
7 p.m. Ottoville village council meets at the municipal
building.
7 p.m. The York Township Zoning Board will meet at the
township house in Jonestown.
7 p.m. Marion Township Trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. Van Wert City Council will meet.
7:30 p.m. Delphos Eagles Aerie 471 meets at the Eagles
Lodge.
8 p.m. AA Big Book meeting at First Presbyterian
Church.

Van Wert Downtown grant


informational meeting announced
InformatIon submItted
VAN WERT An informational
meeting has been set for Tuesday, February 24 at 6:30 p.m. to officially kickoff the CBDG Van Wert Downtown
Revitalization Grant program. It will be
held at the Hotel Marsh, 128 E. Main
Street. All property owners and businesses within the Van Wert Downtown
Redevelopment District are encouraged
to attend, along with area contractors interested in using the grant.
With this CDBG Grant program,
$270,000 has been made available for
eligible private downtown rehabilitation
projects. These funds will be awarded

LIMA The Mental Health and Recovery


Services Board of Allen, Auglaize and Hardin
counties along with Partnership for Violence
Free Families will present a town hall meeting
focusing on youth substance use at 4:30 p.m.
on Tuesday at the Allen County Museum, 320
W. Market St., Lima.
The event is free and open to the public.
Allen County Juvenile Court Judge Glenn
Derryberry and Mental Health and Recovery
Services Director Michael Schoenhofer will
host the conversation on how alcohol and other drugs are impacting youth, families and Allen County as a whole.
Discussion will be held on what prevention
initiatives are currently happening and how
the community can be involved further for so-

InformatIon
submItted
VAN WERT Candidates
facing contested races in the May
5 primary election will be sharing their views at the next meeting of the Van Wert County Republicans on March 19 at 7 p.m.
at the Wassenberg Art Center.

VAN WERT The Van


Wert County 4-H program
will host an open house
for interested families to
explore project areas, talk
with 4-H club advisors and
pick up important paperwork to join 4-H for the
2015 year! With 25 clubs

Contested elections will


be on the ballot for Van Wert
mayor, city council president,
city council at-large, and fourth
ward city council. Those candidates are invited to share their
views and an opportunity will
be provided for questions and
answers afterward. Refreshments will be available, and

InformatIon submItted
ROCKFORD A St. Patricks Day
dance with a live band, Blind Date, will
be held on Saturday, March 14, from 8-11

Wayne Trace Board


of Education to meet
InformatIon
submItted
HAVILAND

The
Wayne Trace Local School
District Board of Education
will meet in regular session
on March 9 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Wayne Trace High School
Lecture Hall.

cial support of this important issue.


Below are some facts that will be highlighted throughout the conversation:
Children whose parents talk early and often about the dangers of alcohol, tobacco, and
other drug use are 50 percent less likely to use.
Every day more than 2,000 kids use a
prescription drug to get high for the first time.
Two thirds get their drugs at home or from
friends.
In addition, 47 percent of those who begin drinking before the age of 15 experienced
alcohol dependence at some point in their life,
compared to 9 percent of those who began after age 21.
Alcohol and drugs are the leading factors
in teenage suicide.
For additional information go to www.wecarepeople.org.

and more than 200


projects to choose
from there is something in 4-H for everyone.
Visit the 4-H
open house on
Thursday, Feb. 26,
from 5-7:30 p.m. at
the extension office
on the fairgrounds. For questions please call the exten-

The meeting will include an overview


of the CDBG Downtown Revitalization
Grant awarded to Van Wert County in
late 2014. Types of eligible
projects will be presented
along with an overview of
the requirements and procedures of this grant. There
will be ample time to ask
questions.
If unable to attend, anyone with questions should
contact Adam Ries, Main
Street Van Wert Program
Manager, at (419) 238-6911, or Sarah
Smith, Van Wert County Economic Development Director, at (419) 238-6159.

additionally, a raffle will be


held with proceeds to benefit
the Military Memorial Chapel,
located beside the Courthouse.
Both city and county Republicans are invited to attend the meeting.
Vying for the office of
mayor are Jerry Mazur and
Kenneth E. Mengerink. Run-

ning for council president are


Stan Agler and Pete Weir. The
race for Fourth Ward council
is between Louis J. Ehmer
and Steven T. Trittschuh, and
the race for the three council
at-large positions is between
Don Farmer, Fred Fisher,
Denny Staude, Warren J. Straley, and Jon C. Tomlinson.

St. Patricks Day dance set in Rockford

4-H open house to be held Thursday


InformatIon
submItted

on a reimbursement basis upon completion of an eligible downtown rehabilitation project, up to 50 percent of total
cost with a cap of $10,000
per project.
Examples of eligible projects include (but not limited
to) faade improvements,
exterior painting, roof replacement, tuck pointing
and other brick/masonry
repair, window and door
repairs/replacement, entryway repair, awning installation, business signs, plumbing, electrical
and/or HVAC upgrades for properties
within the downtown district.

Republicans to hold candidate forum

Town hall meeting on youth


substance use set Tuesday
InformatIon submItted

sion office at (419)


238-1214 or email
Heather
Gottke
at gottke.4@osu.
edu. Assistance is
available for anyone who is unable
to attend.
Membership
deadline is March
15. Get enrollments in today!

FREE Farm Estate and


Business Planning Seminar
Tuesday,
Tuesday,March
March3,5,2015
2015at
at7:00
7:00 p.m.
p.m.

Wassenberg Art Center, 214 S. Washington St., Van Wert, OH


*Refreshments Served*

Call 419.238.2488 to RSVP

p.m. (Doors open at 7 p.m.) at the Rockford Community Building entrance of US


Rt. 33 west of Rockford. Price of admission is $10 per person at the door.
Beverages, snacks and sandwiches

available. Donations accepted. The dance


is sponsored by St Teresa Parish. A raffle,
door prizes, 50/50 drawing will be held
during the dance. The building is handicap
accessible. The public is invited to attend.

February

ClearanCe

4 huge floors of incredible $aving$!

soFas

reCliners
From

249

95
From

399

95

We Offer the Entire Ashley Line of Sofas, Recliners, Dinettes, Bedrooms,


Occasional Tables, Lamps & Accents at LOW Factory Direct Prices.

soliD WooD

Master
beDrooMs
Discontinued Suites
and Odd Pieces

50-60% off
DisContinueD

Mattress sellout

Twin, Full, Queen & King


Discontinued Sets
and Odd Matts

50% off

until Gone!!!
Visit Us at www.francisfurniture.net

local/state

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

times Bulletin/Delphos Herald

Pet coRNeR
the allen county Dog Warden has dogs waiting
for adoption. each has been vaccinated. they are open
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m Monday through Friday and 8 a.m.
to noon on saturday. call 419-223-8528.
the Humane society of allen county has many pets
waiting for adoption. each comes with a spay or neuter,
first shots and a heartworm test. call 419-991-1775.

LSO offers
Down on
the Farm
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
LIMA The Lima Symphony Orchestra will offer
its annual family concert at 3
p.m. March 1 at the Veterans
Memorial Civic Center.
This years theme is Down
on the Farm with favorites
like Thank God Im a Country Boy, Dueling Banjos,
Achy Breaky Heart and
God Bless the U.S.A.
Square dancers, banjo players, a fantastic country singer
and the Liberty Arts Magnet
Touring Company will join
our orchestra in a captivating
concert perfect for children
of all ages. A petting zoo will
also be offered in the exhibit
hall prior to the concert.
General admission tickets
are $10 each.
For more information, call
the Lima Symphony Orchestra at 419-222-5701 or visit LimaSymphony.com.

Grover Hill students have fun


learning numbers and colors
Learning to recognize numbers and colors can be fun through playing UNO.
Simple games like these also help to develop social skills and taking turns.
Pictured with Mrs. Jacobs at Grover Hill Elementary are Chad Garberson, Dylan
Hershberger and Zack Wieland. (Photo submitted)

Livestock Quality
Assurance dates
announced
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
VAN WERT Quality
Assurance is a state-required
training program for any 4-H
or FFA member who is planning to exhibit market livestock at the 2015 junior fair
(excluding rabbits). The Ohio
State University Extension is
hosting the first QA in 2015
at the Van Wert County Fairgrounds on Sunday, March
1, starting at 2 p.m. until approximately 4 pm. The gate
on Washington Street will be
closed and members will be
asked to enter at the gate off
Balyeat Avenue. Members
must register at the Jr. Fair
Building upon arrival the day
of the event. Further instructions will be provided at this
time.
For members eligible for
test out, it will be offered
starting at 1 p.m. at the Jr. Fair
Building. Test out is offered
one hour prior to start of event.
The second and final QA offered in Van Wert County will
be on Thursday, April 23 from
6:30 p.m. to approximately
8:30 p.m. with test out option
starting at 5:30 p.m.
In case of inclement weather please check the OSU Extension webpage at http://vanwert.osu.edu or the Van Wert
4-H Facebook page at http://
www.facebook.com /vanwert4h
For a list of regional quality
assurance dates or for questions
please contact The Ohio State
University Extension at (419)
238-1214 or email Heather
Gottke at Gottke.4@osu.edu.

Students use dissection to learn anatomy


Anatomy students Evan Hayes, Liz Winhover and Wes Buettner seem to
be having way too much fun learning the muscles of the cat. They are
students in Dan Hopkins Anatomy and Physiology class at St. Johns High
School. (Photo submitted)

INFORMATION SUBMITTED

249

$ 99

Mon.-Sat. 9-7; Sun. 10-5

Accepting food stamps & wic

lb.

Check Us on FACEBOOK for Special Daily Deals!

Assorted
Select Flavors

2
$ 89
1

Pringles ............................

$UPER $AVER $UNDAY

Friendlys

WHOLE
$

5 lb.

only

Pork

249 lb.

Shoulder Roast, Pork Steak


& Western Style Ribs
only

BULK
Sausage
BigPack
Pack
Big

$ 25

BBQ
$
Sauce .................................... 2/

Feb. 22 - 10am-5pm
Co-Jack & Pepper-Jack

only

66

2 99 lb.

Deli Sliced
Sliced
Deli

2 99 lb.

sliced

3 39 lb.

1
$ 99
2

$ 39

Eckrich - Vac Pack

Bologna & Hot Dogs . ea.


Habanero-Jack

itsHOT, HOT, HOT!


$

3.39 lb.

BONELESS

5# LIMIT!
Family Pack

only

$
LittleDebbie
Debbie..............
..............2/
2/$
Little
SMOKED
99
SMOKED
$$ 99
...............................lb.
lb.
Chops...............................
Chops

BULK Cheese

BULK Cheese.......SLICED:

lb.

w/addl. $15 purchase

WHOLE Virginia or
Pork Loin Honey Ham

Gr. Beef

lb.

22

$ 49

Family Pack

only

KC Masterpiece

BULK
Bacon

Ribeye
only

Loin End Roast... lb.

Family Pack

Bone In

Bone In
& Fridays
$ Ash
49Wednesday
$ 39

Roast.............................. lb.

Some Items May Not Be Available.


Quality & Printing Rights Reserved.
Typed Items Take Preference Over Photos.
Not Responsible for Typographical Errors

POLLOCK

Center Cut Pork

Prices Good 2/18 - 2/25

Lenten
Special!!

(419) 586-5777

$
VE
VE 4$ 4lblb.!.!
SA
SA

pital and is now in progress is Group Life Style


Balance. They meet each week and are working
toward changes in their diet, life style, reading
labels, and becoming more active. The hospitals
registered dietitian, the hospital staff/diabetic educator, and Dunn are the three staff leaders of this
program.
Two new members were welcomed to Twig III:
Bobbie Smith and Jane Linaz.
The Gift Shop reported that monies for
the hospital staff s wooden hospital are to be
placed in their envelope. No donation amount
is known. The shop committee completed the
inventory and it has been given to the treasurer.

VAN WERT Twig III met Feb. 10 at the Van


Wert Hospital with 10 members present.
Chairperson Lisa Dunn introduced Anne
Dunn, Wellness Program coordinator, who spoke
to the group about the development and growth
of the hospital employee wellness program. Much
advancement has been made in receiving health
information, including timely results from lab
work, which helps in profiling the needs for heath
awareness among all staff. Incentive programs are
offered to encourage employees to adopt healthy
lifestyles. A new and free program which was recently offered to the public by the Van Wert Hos-

725 W. Logan

Crackers .......................... 2/

VAN WERT GriefShare is a special seminar and support


group for people grieving the loss of someone they loved. The
meetings include video sessions
that are designed to help participants successfully travel their
grief journey where hurting
people find understanding, healing and hope.
Anyone who has experienced a loss through death, should
consider attending on Tuesday evenings, March 3 - May 26
from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Van Wert Area Impatient Hospice
Chapel, 1155 Westwood Drive, Van Wert, Ohio 45891.
Co-facilitators are Wayne and Linda Taylor and Dixie Painter.
For more information contact Linda Taylor at (419) 6052247, ldtaylor1947@yahoo.com.

Wellness Program coordinator speaks at Twig III meeting

of Celina

Town House &


Cheez-It

the following pets are available for adoption


through the Van Wert animal Protective league:
cats
M, 8 years, neutered, white, black on tail, name
Patches
M, 8 years, gold eyes, neutered, name Black Jack
Kittens
M, F, 8 weeks, yellow, gray tiger
M, F, 6 weeks, black and white, beige and orange
M, F, 8 months, white, black, tiger
Dogs
Fox terrier, F, 6 years, black and white, 4 pounds,
name Pebbles
cockapoo, M, 4 years, light tan, neutered, shots,
name Whizzer
For more information on these pets or if you are in
need of finding a home for your pet, contact the animal
Protective league from 9-5 weekdays at 419-749-2976.
If you are looking for a pet not listed, call to be put on a
waiting list in case something becomes available. Donations or correspondence can be sent to Po Box 321, Van
Wert oH 45891.

INFORMATION SUBMITTED

Markets

Chops ............................ lb.

Romeow was found as


a stray and limping. He
was brought into the shelter and ended up being a
polydactyl kitty. Romeow
is one special tripod who
loves to be held and never
lets his disabilities get in
the way.

GriefShare to begin

ly
d
n
e
i
r
F
Thick or Butterfly

charlie here! Im a pretty spunky guy! I am quite


scared at first but once I
warm up to you I am really
nice! My previous owners
took me here, Im not sure
why but that was a big transition for me.

CUT
FREE
EE!!
FR

only

Cooked
Cooked
$
.................................. lb.
lb.
Ham..................................
Ham

$ 99

lb.

10#
10# Box
Box

only

399 lb.

29 Frozen
Frozen
$$ 79
79
POLLOCK
POLLOCK......lb.lb.

Dues of $10 are now due to the treasurer. A special project list has been placed in the drawer for
all members to note their contributions to the gift
shop. A copy of the hospital wish list was given to
members to bring back to next meeting for discussion. There is to be no contribution at this time to
the cheer fund.
Wendy Price will be the interim contact person
for the hospital. Calendars were corrected and a
new sign up for working hours in the gift shop was
completed.
The hostesses for the evening were Marilyn Bebout and Eileen Lucier. The next meeting will be
Fun Night on March 10.

A DHI Media publication

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

Life beyond the Manhattan Project with Oppenheimer


BY KIRK DOUGAL
DHI Media Group Publisher
kdougal@timesbulletin.com
He is remembered for his work on
the most destructive weapon of his
day, earning the name, Father of the
Atomic Bomb.
But J. Robert Oppenheimers career encompassed much more than
just his work on the Manhattan
Project, leading to the development
of Fat Man and Little Boy, the two
atomic bombs the United States
dropped on Japan to end World War
II. A brilliant theoretical scientist, he
was so clumsy with his hands in the
laboratory his professors insisted he
stay in theory.
Oppenheimer did not attend college straight out of high school. Because of an illness, he had to wait a
year before he began his career at
Harvard, majoring in chemistry. To
make up for the delay, he took extra
classes and graduated summa cum
laude in three years.
It was impossible to obtain a world
class education in physics in the United States in the 1920s so he went to
Europe. To understand just how intelligent he was, a person only needs
to look at his friends and colleagues:
Werner Heisenberg, Paul Dirac, Enrico Fermi, Edward Teller and Max
Born. Born was actually one of his
professors but they authored a paper
together, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, that explained how to

From the
Archives
By
Kirk Dougal

ow I am become
N
death, the
destroyer of worlds.
- Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer
quoting Hindu scripture in an
interview on the first nuclear
detonation
negate the movement of nuclear particles in formulas in order to more
easily calculate the movement of
electronic motion in molecules. The
paper is still cited by scientists today.
While still in school, he wrote a
number of papers on the burgeoning
field of quantum physics, studied art,
literature, Greek architecture and the
classics. While an undergraduate, one
of the most brilliant theoretical physicists of the 20th century never took a
physics curse. He tested out and completed the hours by independent study.
He was an inquisitive man who

Oppenheimer, Who Fathered


Atomic Bomb, Dead at 62
PRINCETON, N.J. (AP) - After the atomic bomb
he helped create had done its work in World War II, J.
Robert Oppenheimer returned from a visit to Europe
and said he foresaw a dark future.
For, he said, men of our times will never have a
sense of security again.
Oppenheimer died of cancer last Saturday night at
his home in Princeton where he had spent 18 years as
director of the Institute for Advanced Study. He was 62.
Scientists around the world sent words of praise and
grief at the news of the death of the man who has been
called the father of the atomic bomb.
Oppenheimer had retired last June as director of
the institute because he said he wanted time to seek
an understanding, both historical and philosophical, of
what the sciences have brought to human life.
A tall, nervous man who chain smoked, Oppenheimer had a keen sense of humanity which many of
his friends, in speaking of him, mentioned.
When the first atomic bomb was exploded in the
New Mexico desert in 1945 - a project he directed for
took an interest in everything. While
taking his oral exam for his doctorate at the University of Gottingen,
school legend says Oppenheimer
took control of the questioning and
made the professor exclaim with
relief when the exam was over. He
often jumped from topic to topic in

Community-based initiative
Museums are typically
looked at as the playground
of geeks. Sure, we drag our
children to some for their
educational enjoyment, but
as adults, museums are not
viewed as a fun place to go.
Looking at various forms of
feedback from our visitors,
they either really like us or
they found little interest in
our exhibits and our tour. So
what other benefits are derived by having the Delphos
Canal Commission museum
or Museum of Postal History? To answer that question,
I need to delve into some basic principles of economics.
I do not intend to give you
a lecture on economics 101;
but if you look at what generates money, it is money itself.
Researchers have found that
every dollar spent by visitors
to our community who are
staying for several hours or
possibly overnight actually
is multiplied by 2.9 times as
part of a trickle-down effect.
Let me put that in raw
numbers. Allen County in
2014 generated $34 million
of revenue because of the
travel and tourism industry.
That is almost $3 million a
month. In much larger markets, these numbers go up

exponentially. Most people


think this means that the hotels, the restaurants and the
attractions are where the bulk
of the money ends up. It is so
much more complicated than
that. For a moment, look at
your own spending, whether
it is a shopping trip to Easton
Mall or a flight to some place
warm. Plane ticket revenue
generates salary for airport
and airline personnel. Money is spent by the airlines for
insurance, fuel and maintenance staff as well as food
services, fuel service contractors, airport restaurants and
gift shops. Include parking,
skycaps, the manufacturers
of wheeled carts for luggage,
TSA employees, and equipment manufacturers of x-ray
machines, conveyor belts,
airport vehicles, firefighting
equipment, and the list goes
on. Have you noticed that we
have not even left our base of
origin? Try to compile a list
of items for the city of your
destination. It is as simple as
the outcome of one person
getting a jobfrom buying a
car, clothing, education, taxes, even lunch money for the
cafeteria at school.
The Museum of Postal
History has been welcoming

groups at an average of three


per month. Over the next four
months we have three tours
scheduled that each consist
of 56 passenger tour busses,
three tours by groups coming from the Lima area, a car
club interested in bringing 50
antique vehicles and 100 people, a group of Mini Coopers,
GOBA (Great Ohio Bicycle
Adventure) and those are the
ones I have at the tip of my
tongue.
In previous articles, I alluded to a group forming in
Delphos whose mission was
to bring more dollars into our
community by increasing the
number of visitors to our fair
city. We have chosen a name
for this group of hard working professionals: Destination
Delphos Marketing Group.
Our group consists of Christine Pleva, executive director
of the Lima-Allen County
Convention and Visitors Bureau; Larry Lee, executive director of the Van Wert Area
Convention and Visitors
Bureau; Bob Ebbeskotte,
Co-chairman; Tara Krendl,
executive director of the Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce; Marg Ashby, artistic/
graphic designer; Ruth Ann
Wittler, secretary; Bob Ulm,

over two years with such energy that his six-foot frame
was reduced to 115 pounds - he recalled the Hindu
scripture: I am become death, the shatterer of worlds.
In 1954, Oppenheimer was denied access to atomic
secrets as a security risk. The Atomic Energy Commission found that although Oppenheimer was loyal, he
was a security risk, in part because of his association
with known Communists extended far beyond the tolerable limits of prudence and self-restraint.
He had denied that he had Communist ties but said
that he had known Communists in the late 1930s and
early 1940s.
I did not regard then as dangerous, he said, and
some of their declared objectives seemed to me desirable.
Nine years later, in 1963, the AEC gave Oppenheimer its highest honor, the $50,000 Enrico Fermi
Award. President Johnson presented him with the
award, and it was speculated that he might return to
secret government work.
But he remained at the Institute for Advanced Study.

a conversation, landing on whatever


interested him for a particular length
of time. His friends and teachers
would become exasperated with
him, telling him if he only stayed on
one subject any subject he would
accomplish great things. Instead, he
taught himself to read Sanskrit so

CURATORS
CORNER

OppenheImeR/14

THOSE WERE THE DAYS


25, 50, and 75 Years Ago
BY DhI meDIA StAFF
info@timesbulletin.com

By
Gary Levitt

technical advisor; Phyllis


Henderson, director of Outreach, Rhodes State; and myself.
We started meeting right
after the first of the year and
originally intended to meet
monthly; however, we have
found in order to be effective
we are meeting bi-weekly.
We have made advances in
identifying several administrative functions such as mission statement, vision statement, and objectives.
Our first piece of literature
to be published is in the final
draft stage. As part of the Van
Wert County Visitors Guide,
Delphos will have its own
section outlining attractions,
family dining, historic landmarks, walking tours, factory
tours, both school districts,
Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce, shopping, and
recreational opportunities. It
appears we may fill almost 10
pages of the guide.
CURAtOR/14

he could study the Bhagavad Gita,


a sacred Hindu scripture that is considered one of the most important
works on philosophy and literature
in history, just so he could read it in
its original language.

25 Years Ago
This week in 1990, the ballot was filling up quickly for
the 8th Congressional District race. Two more candidates had
joined the fray, taking the total number running for the seat to
six with incumbent Donald Lukens still expected to file. Lukens
had been convicted the previous May on a misdemeanor charge
of contributing to the unruliness of a minor after a 16-year-old
Columbus girl testified they had sex. The front runner for the
position was State Representative John Boehner.
Liz Wrocklage of Delphos broke the Heidelberg College
55-meter high hurdles record she set in 1989. She finished
fourth in 9.1 seconds at the Mount Union Invitational, breaking
her record of 9.3 seconds. Wrocklage, a St. Johns High School
graduate, was also a member of the four-lap relay team which
took first in 1:29.7 and the 1600-meter relay team which took
third in 4:37.
In celebration of National FFA Week, Lincolnview students
drove tractors to the school for a day of activities. Eric Pugh,
Scott Davis, Chad Overholt, Trent Rager, Jay Evans, Jason
Ropp, Tim Johnson, and Dave Kemler all posed for a photo on
their tractors. Most notably, all of the FFA members were outside in short sleeve shirts and two of them were wearing shorts.

50 Years Ago
This week in 1965, singer and pianist Nat King Cole died.
He began his career playing jazz as a teenager in the 1930s
but rose to prominence in the clubs of Los Angeles, earning a
record deal with newcomer Capitol Records. Cole later became
one of the first African-American hosts of their own television
show.
Jefferson High Schools Coach Rudolph Lucas and his ninth
grade basketball squad became the champions of the Northwest Conference Freshmen League. Squad members included
Paul Wreede, Terry Wisher, Cary Prine, Mike Nixon, Darrel
Lucas, Homer Nihiser, David Long, David Holmes, Ronald Illyes, Bill Gunter, Richard Dunn, Mike Closson, Darrel Daulbaugh, and Bruce Clevenger.
Approximately 400 volunteers were set to walk door-todoor in Van Wert on Heart Sunday as part of the fundraising
efforts for the Heart Fund. Heart Sunday chairman John AlWhite came to town and two toughs that spach said all funds would go to the Heart Association and that
were the terror of the community, deter- people who were not home during the drive would receive a
mined that they were going to fight him. Heart Fund envelope at their door to return a donation.
White could have picked them up and
cracked their heads together but instead
75 Years Ago
stayed in Swinefords grocery until they
This week in 1940, American aviator Harold Dahl and sevwere tired of watching for him. Some en others were released from a prison camp, the last eight U.S.
of the citizens urged him to go on the citizens still detained from the Spanish Civil War. Nicknamed
street and if attacked, to give them a good Whitey because of his albino-like blond hair, Dahl had been
thrashing, but he said it would not be a mercenary pilot during the war and a member of the Ameriright as that would be inviting trouble and can Patrol. He was credited with nine aerial kills before being
while they deserved a good thrashing, if shot down and captured.
he avoided it, it would be better.
DAYS/14
He lived to a good age and was never
known to do an act that could not be endorsed by his neighbors. He was respected by everyone.
From History of Van Wert County by
Gilliland
(This is a reprint of my article dated
Feb. 20, 2008. R.H.)

Old Negro Has Two


Civil War Coats
In a negro cabin here, hang two coats
one grey, the other blue. One, once worn by
Gen. Robert E. Lee, the other by General
Henry Boynton, a Union commander.
Every night, 108-year-old Mark
Thrash, a negro, sleeps by the two coats,
guarding them. At dawn, when he wakes
p
a le r s h i
e
D
up, his first glance is towards the gare
r
y He
ments, to see if they are still there.
ere, Pa
H
y
u
B
Thrash, who prefers to be known as
est
as New
e
r
the old black man, says the faded grey
A
e
Th
coat with three stars on the collar was
given him by Masse Lee, whose horse
he once held. The Yankee coat, came
from General Boynton after the federal
255
forces advanced past Chickamauga.
238 .5

William White, a Van Wert County ex-slave


Among the early settlers, a young colored man, Wm. White, came to Willshire,
Van Wert County. He had been a slave and
because of his wonderful physical development, his master decided to train him as
a prize fighter so as to make money on him
in the ring. He entered it with his usual energy and soon became a scientific boxer,
so quick of eye and motion that soon his
best trainer could not stand up to him. His
master found an antagonist who was considered the champion of the South.
They entered the ring with the betting
largely in favor of Whites antagonist, but
the contest was short. White, with his
wonderful strength and quickness, forced
his right hand past his adversarys guard
and hitting him on the shoulder, broke it
so that he had to be carried from the ring.
White then told his master that he would
never fight in the ring again, that he might
send him South to the cotton fields or
anything else. His master soon gave him
his freedom and he came to Willshire.
White, as a young man, used to come to
Van Wert to see Nancy Young, who afterward became his wife. He was over six
feet tall and weighed about 250 pounds,
not a pound of needless flesh.
At one time, he and some of his neighbors had gone to the Grand Lake to enjoy
some fishing. A party from Auglaize County was there, and hearing Whites name,
one of them said, Are you the White they
say is best man in the Van Wert County?
Oh, no, said White, there are plenty of
better men in the County. Well, said
the man, I have whipped the best man in
Allen County, Auglaize County and Mercer County and now I am going to whip
you. White told him he would not fight

WiNDOW TO
THE PAST
By
Bob Holdgreve

him. The man said, take off your coat,


you will have to fight. White laughed and
replied that he guessed not. The man said,
prepare yourself, and struck at White,
who dodged and caught the mans arm and
threw him about 15 feet into the reservoir.
His friends had to jump in and help him
out and the man carried his head to one
side for several weeks, the jar had nearly
dislocated it.
At one time, White had hauled five
barrels of coal oil from Van Wert to
(Casto and Eyler) and drove into the alley back of the warehouse, where posts
were set so he could not drive nearer than
ten or twelve feet of the wareroom. Eyler
was getting a plank to roll them, when
White said, you do not need that, taking out the end gate, he took the first barrel, walked with it to the wareroom, set it
down and turning around said, roll out
the next. The five were safely put in the
wareroom, apparently without any effort.
He would not use a common axe,
but had one made to order weighing six
pounds, and would swing it all day with
apparent ease. He would put up six cords
of wood with as much ease as other choppers would two or three.
At one time during the Civil War,

Bring in this coupon


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Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

Times Bulletin/
Delphos Herald

Times Bulletin & Delphos Herald


WEEKEND EDITION

KIRK DOUGAL
Group Publisher
Nancy Spencer
Ed Gebert
Delphos Editor
Van Wert Editor
A DHI Media Publication serving Van Wert, Delphos & Area Communities

Were here to help


11.4 million.
You may have seen that big number thrown around this
week as the Obama administration touted 11.4 million sign-ups
during the enrollment period for health insurance as dictated
by the Affordable Care Act.
You probably did not see these other numbers:
800,00 - The number of Obamacare users who received
incorrect tax form information from the government for their
2014 tax returns.
$325 or 2 percent - The penalty for uninsured Americans
for 2015 rose from $95 or 1 percent of income, whichever was
greater, in 2014 to $325 or 2 percent of income this year.
44 percent - The estimated percentage of Americans without insurance who realize they will be penalized for not having health insurance five years after the passage of the ACA.
That means approximately 23 million Americans are unaware
of the fines. (Health Reform Monitoring Survey by the Urban
Institute)
84 percent - The number of sign-ups on HealthCare.gov who
pay premiums, therefore completing the transaction to have
health insurance. At that rate only 9.5 million of the 11.4 will
have insurance this year. (Statistics from www.forbes.com)
Those are some pretty frightening numbers.
To recap, the stated purpose of the ACA when the legislation became law was to provide health insurance for those
in the country who did not have it, typically because of cost.
(There are political arguments from both sides of the aisle for
what the ACA was really trying to accomplish but for the sake
of argument in todays editorial, lets assume the stated goal
was the real goal.)
So how is Obamacare doing when compared to its goal?
In 2013, the year before the implementation of major parts
of the law, an estimated 41 million Americans did not have
health insurance.
In 2014, the administration bragged about the eight million
people who signed up for insurance through HealthCare.gov or
the state-run websites. But only 84 percent of enrollees paid so
that number dropped to 6.7 million.
However, the same year an estimated 4.7 million U.S. workers lost their health insurance plans because they did not comply with the ACA standards. Net gain of insured in 2014: two
million.
In 2015, 11.4 million sign-ups will translate into roughly 9.5
million premium-paying health insurance recipients. Even if
every single one of the new enrollees is a previously uninsured
citizen, a figure which the administration does not track, then
the gain over the first two years of the ACA is less than five
million people. Since it is a statistical improbability for 100
percent of enrollees to be new, the actual figure is even lower.
Also, in 2010 the Congressional Budget Office, using figures provided by the Obama administration, predicted 13 million people would be enrolled in the ACA health insurance programs by the end of 2015, with only two million of those being
previously insured, a net gain of 11 million insured Americans.
Last month, again using statistics from the Obama administration, the CBO changed their prediction, now stating only 12
million people would be enrolled with five million of those previously holding insurance. The net gain using the administrations own numbers show a reduction of four million previously
uninsured. So even the rosiest of numbers show only 17 percent
of the people intended to be the benefactors are being helped.
And no one denies that those people are the ones who need
the aid the most. Those 800,000 enrollees who were sent the
incorrect premium information for tax forms are the people
who qualified for tax credits. These are the people who need
tax refunds the most - the working poor and those below the
poverty line. Now they are being told they must wait weeks for
that much anticipated money but that they should be able to
file their taxes on time. While that 800,000 figure only represents one percent of all U.S. filers, it is nearly 20 percent of
all HealthCare.gov users.
When not even the government can decipher how to file taxes involving the ACA - the administration used the incorrect
benchmark for premiums according to the law - then it is
easy to call the law a failure.
Repeal and replace, change the law, do away with it - whatever the administration and Congress can agree to do is better
than what the ACA is now: an unmitigated disaster for the people it was intended to help.

Helping our students


with House Bill 7
Ohio House Bill 7 is a bill
sponsored by Representative Jim
Buchy that prohibits scores from
this first year of new state assessBy
ments, including those supplied
State Rep.
by the Partnership for AssessTony Burkley
ment of Readiness for College
and Careers (PARCC) from being used against students in any
way, offering them safe harbor.
The bill was passed in the Ohio House on Wednesday, Feb. 11
with broad bipartisan support.
I believe that this bill helps students to succeed by providing
additional time to prepare students for higher expectation.
The provisions of this legislation are straightforward. The
bill disallows the use of students scores from state assessments
to make decisions regarding grade promotion or retention and
granting of credit. It ensures that students may re-take end-ofcourse examinations for high school courses throughout their
high school career. The bill also clarifies that the new state
assessments are not used to meet requirements under the third
grade reading guarantee, and prohibits the release of individual
students test scores from tests administered during the 201415 school year.
House Bill 487, passed and signed into law during the last
General Assembly, provided protection to teachers and administrators by allowing local districts to decline to use the student
test results from the 2014-15 school year to make decisions
such as termination and granting tenure. I was proud to support this bill. However, I feel that it is our duty to provide that
same level of support to the students who are taking these tests.

Sportsmanship stinks
I like sports. I also understand sports. Well, most of
them, anyway. I dont follow
jai alai or cricket or Australian rules hopscotch. But the
major sports, I at least understand the principles and most
of the rules.
If I attend a game or match
Im not one of those posers
who claim to know the rules,
but are simply there to yell
for their favorite team. Sure,
a person like that can say,
How could they call that a
fumble? when the ball had
been rolling for 50 yards
without anyone picking it up.
This past week, I saw a
fan standing on the bleachers at a basketball game, arm
in the air with thumb pointing
downward, protesting the call
of the referee. He was yelling
too, things too garbled and
nonsensical to make out. It
seems that he knew the referee had made a terrible mistake and called a foul against
a player on his team.
There was a problem.
It was rather obvious that
the accused player was trying to foul to stop the clock
and force a possible change
of possession if the shooter
would miss the shot. So, in
short, the player did as he was
supposed to do commit a

foul to stop the clock, but not


an intentional foul that would
call for two shots. Good job,
player! But as for the guy
standing on the bleachers
with downturned thumb,
maybe you should pay attention instead of assuming that
all calls against your side are
deliberate favoritism.
This type of fan has always been around, but with
98 different sports channels
on cable and endless sports
events to be seen live, one
would think anyone following
a game would know the rules.
But I guess many things can
affect eyesight, including being related or close to one of
the players.
I remember when my boys
played Little League and
younger versions for smaller kids. That was where you
got to watch some serious
fans in the grandstands.
I saw plenty of mothers and
fathers who were sure that every pitch Junior threw was a
strike and every pitch thrown
to them was way outside or
too low or whatever.
If youve attended a game
live, youve seen them too.
Mom or Dad or whoever will
yell at the top of their lungs
to Hit the next pitch down
his throat! Usually while

the vocal display is going on,


Junior is ignoring the loudmouth parent and looking
sheepishly at his teammates
or the coach.
Worse yet are the unofficial coaches who urge Junior to do it the way I told
you! and ignore the coachs
instructions. Between raising
two boys and living through
my own mountain of baseball games, I think Ive seen
almost everything from the
bleachers. Ive watched plenty of times as irate parents
take their rage out on the
coach/manager who wouldnt
let Billy play shortstop.
In my playing days, I
was glad my parents werent
the type to be obnoxious in
the bleachers. It helped that
my dad was usually at work
during my games. So when I
became a sports dad, I tried
to remember what some of
my teammates used to say
when their Dad threw a fit
while they tried to hide in
the dugout. Im sure I was
better than some parents, but
Im also sure I wasnt perfect.
Its hard to be objective when
my own offspring is being
wronged in my eyes.
Somewhere along the way
I matured just a little. Very
little, but a little nonetheless.

My
Two
CenTs
By
ed Gebert
I realized that officials make
honest mistakes. And sometimes they make stupid mistakes. One umpire stopped
a game to reprimand me for
cheating by using a first basemans mitt in the field. When
I looked at him and simply
told him, Um, Im playing
first base, he realized he was
a bit confused and restarted
the game allowing me to continue my sinister mitt usage.
We all make mistakes.
Understanding that made a
huge difference to me. There
is no use blowing through
blood pressure medication
because the guy dressed like
a zebra cant tell that the
left guard is holding on every play. Realize he or she is
trying his or her level best to
get it right, and that may not
always favor Junior and his
team.
Its made my viewing experience more enjoyable, and
if my kids were still playing,
Im sure theyd enjoy it more
too.

LetteRS tO the
edItOR POLIcY
Letters to the editor must
be signed and contain the
address and phone number
of the writer. The phone
number will not appear in
the newspaper unless the
contributor requests it to
be printed.
Letters should be typed
and addressed to: Letter
to the Editor, The Times
Bulletin, PO Box 271, Van
Wert, Ohio 45891. Letters
may also be emailed to
egebert@timesbulletin.
com or nspencer@delphosherald.
The publisher and editor
reserve the right to edit or
reject any letter deemed
libelous or patently incorrect. Writers may submit
one letter per month for
publication. Letters containing more than 300
words generally will not
be published.

They dont make em like they use to


A co-workers refrigerator
went out last week after only
seven years of use. According to the appliance guy, that
was about right. Our major
appliances have become disposable items.
I can remember having
the same avocado green refrigerator in our kitchen for
umpteen years. It matched
the avocado green dishwasher and so on. It wasnt really bad when we got rid of it;
it was just so old that it was
a pretty good bet it would
give out over the weekend or
at some other inopportune
time. It was relegated to the
garage and a new one took its
place.
The same can be said for
the range top. It was set in
the countertop and had a really cool control panel on the
wall. A modern, black, flat
cook top took its place and
come to find out, its life expectancy is only about seven
years.
The old cook top made it
through 20-some years be-

On the
Other
hand
By Nancy
Spencer

fore it became a questionable


risk. It even survived through
a small Christmas Eve fire
when I left papers a little too
close to a burner and a button
was inadvertently pushed by
an errant item on the counter.
Luckily, the mess was quickly swept into the nearby sink
and doused with water.
Many other household
items have joined the disposable list. Washers and
dryers, DVD players, CD
players, TVs and like are
no longer fixtures in our
homes.
It makes me wonder if
they are not made as well or
if we as consumers have directed the need for newer

YOUR OPINIONS
Delphos Ladies Club to
disband, thanks its supporters

To the editor,
After much deliberation, The Delphos Ladies Club has
decided to disband.
We would like to take this opportunity to thank the surrounding area businesses, crafters and the general public for
all of the support you have given us over the years.
Because of you, we were able to donate to many area
causes for the benefit of youngsters and oldsters and those
in between.
Over the years, there have been many craft shows, bake
sales, Canal Days parades and fundraisers and all in all they
have made us realize how true Bob Hopes quip was when he
said Thanks for the memories!
Sincerely,
The Delphos Ladies Club
HOUSE/7

and better every few years.


With technology outpacing
itself, there is always something faster, better and on the
must-have list. Computers
are obsolete by the time we
get them home and they havent even been taken out of
the box.
Most big-ticket appliances
should still be counted on to
work for a good 10-20 years.
Heres a list I found of their
average life spans:
Dishwasher 13 years
Clothes washer 14
years
Clothes dryer 18 years
Freezer 21 years
Range 18 years
Refrigerator 17 years
(Note: this is 10 more years
than my friends lasted)
I couldnt find one for
small appliances but Im
guessing they last about one
day or so past the manufacturers warranty, which is
usually from 1-3 years. If you
are like me, I have a drawer
full of those little warranty
cards I always meant to send

in but never got around to


it. Ive even found them still
tucked in the users guide.
We are keeping up with
the Joneses, who are keeping
up with someone else and so
on. Along the way, it seems
we have given up reliability,
consistency and the satisfaction of getting our moneys
worth (and perhaps our money just isnt worth as much).
We dont seem to mind
shelling out our hard-earned
cash for something that we
will eagerly replace again in
a few years for the latest and
greatest model.
The switch on the wall
lamp in the spare bedroom
took a dive the other day.
That lamp has hung on the
wall for as long as I can remember. Im seriously considering having it fixed by
my brother for a few dollars
in supplies from the local
hardware store. Im betting I
can get another 30 years or so
out of it.

The First Amendment


Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or
the right of the people peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

OpInIOns

A DHI Media publication

County update
Every Sunday morning at
around 8:20 a.m. on 99.7 FM
there airs a program called
The Commissioners Corner. On that show, county
business is discussed by host
Chris Roberts, myself, and
another commissioner or two.
Many of the things discussed
there either arent involved
enough or developed enough
to fill a column, but combined, they make for a nice
county update.
The hottest topic under
discussion is still the Starr
Campus and the possible
Northwest State/Ohio State
presence there. By last November, representatives from
the Starr, OSU and Northwest State had met the idea
with enthusiasm but left it for
us to provide a business plan.
For the next few months, we
waited on a lease or purchase
price from the Starr hard to
develop a plan without a number. Unbeknownst to us, the
Commonwealth was involved
in its own restructuring.
Although we still dont
have a price, the project for
the campus is back on the
front burner and well be
meeting with Starr higher-ups next week. As far as
a business plan, I threw a
rough draft together and our
Economic Development office is working it over into
something presentable. As
it stands, all the parties involved still present are enthusiastic but are waiting on us
to make it happen, so we will.
Speaking of our ED office,
this past week, the superintendents from Van Wert,
Lincolnview, Crestview, and
Delphos Jefferson met in our
office for a presentation from
a Colorado group about middle school physics. Its a program that has been successful
in interesting younger kids in
basic physics out there, which
facilitates an easier and earlier transition to higher levels
of science and tech in high
school. Van Wert already
has a program in its middle
schools that resembles what
we presented.
Demographics seem to
indicate that the most important factor for locating a
business in the future will be
workforce availability. If our
schools can find a way to fit
middle school physics into an
already crowded curriculum,
Van Wert County will immediately be well ahead of the
rest of the state for next decades workforce. With a top
notch vocational facility out
at Vantage and the possibility of an Ohio State presence,

Citizen Wolfrum

were hoping to get the jump


on a rapidly changing national economic landscape, one
that isnt promising for rural
communities.
We keep looking for ways
to build our infrastructure
as well. At last months Regional Planning Commission
(RPC) meeting, grant coordinators presented some possible projects for the county.
One promising project involves developing bike trails
through the county. There
was a $3 million grant that
went unclaimed in the state
last year for such a project
well be sure it wont go unclaimed a second time. Trails
from Ohio City to Van Wert
and from Van Wert to Delphos have been discussed.
Also at that RPC meeting, from the myriad of programs examined, an idea
developed to try to apply for
a different project in each of
our villages this year. Middle
Point has the big grant work
coming in 2015 with North
Adams Street and some other
side streets being reworked.
But smaller projects, such as
lights in ballparks, were also
discussed as part of bringing
our villages into a process
where they work together to
rotate through the different
available grant programs.
Now for trash talk. The
lease for the countys transfer
station terminated at the end
of 2014. Thats the building
on the top of the hill across the
highway from Towne Center.
We are currently looking at
bids for a new company to operate that solid waste disposal
facility. It had only been open
on Saturdays for some time
but whatever company takes
it over will likely have it open
at least some days throughout
the week soon.
The current County Engineer buildings are going up
for auction in the next few
months. These are the buildings and lots on the corners of
South Market and East Crawford Streets. For information
on the sale, contact Bee Gee
Realty. The Engineers office
will be moving all of its operations to its location on Grill
Road in the coming years.
(Or Kear Road or Bonnewitz
Avenue, depending on how
far youve gone and in which
direction Van Wert residents get the joke.)
We spent 2013 searching
for a new health insurance
provider for county employees. The company we went
with came in about a half million below four other quotes
that were all about the same.

Teen seeks right


approach to genderbending classmate
DEAR ABBY: I am 17 and a senior in
high school. During freshman year, one of
my classmates was a boy Ill call Alex. This
year, I have been told that Alex has changed
his name to Aly, a more feminine name. Aly
now sometimes dresses like a girl and sometimes like a boy. What gender should I refer to
Aly as? Would it be rude to ask my classmate
which gender he/she identifies with? GENDER DILEMMA
DEAR G.D.: Considering that Aly could
be in a process of transition, I not only dont
think the question would be rude, I think its
an intelligent one. If you ask your classmate
politely and privately, Im sure Aly will be
glad to answer.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I gave up a baby girl for
adoption 29 years ago. I thought when she
became an adult she would want to contact
me, but I have heard nothing. I have known
how to contact her for many years, but havent
done it because I didnt want to intrude in her
life. I have left contact totally up to her if she
chooses. Like I said, so far Ive heard nothing,
and Im just wondering why she wouldnt want
to contact me or know anything about me.
WONDERING BIO-MOM
DEAR BIO-MOM: Are you certain your
daughter knows she was adopted? While
many adopted children want to know their
birth parents, not all do because they dont
feel anything is missing in their lives. They
may also think it would be disrespectful to the
parents who raised them. Please dont take it
personally.

By
Todd D.
Wolfrum

Any time the quote is that


much lower, you have to take
it but you also have to wonder
what mess youre getting into.
Despite a few glitches that
could be expected with any
switch in insurance carriers,
2014 went off well and 2015
has begun well. The savings
have enabled a budget surplus. Big thanks to Gallagher
Bassett for thinking outside
the box for us and with us.
We will be fortunate if
that surplus is not quickly
eaten up in 2015. Our first
budget problem is payroll.
There are 52 weeks in a year
plus a day or two depending
on if there is a Leap Day. The
county pays its employees
bi-weekly. That extra day or
two adds up to an extra pay
period every twelve years or
so. That happens this year.
That one extra pay period
costs a couple hundred thousand dollars.
Another budget hit could
come compliments of our
friendly neighborhood WalMart. Since moving out to
Towne Center, it has twice
successfully applied for a reduction in its property taxes.
The dynamics between WalMart, Equity (the company
that owns Towne Center), the
City, and the County actually
could fill an entire column,
but the final analysis is this:
Equity is not returning phone
calls about delinquent tax
and debt payments, said delinquency is, in part, caused
by the reduction in payments
from Wal-Mart, and the
county guaranteed it all way
back when. Another couple
hundred thousand hit could
come if Equity goes under.
Windmills are on hold
while the state decides how it
wants to handle setbacks and
incentives. Weve heard some
rumblings from our state officials that the schools who are
getting windmill PILOT payments may get their state formula funding reduced. That
this would happen had been
anticipated by many people
on both sides of the windmill
debate, but that it is happening this quickly is surprising,
especially after all the guarantees from our pro-windmill
state officials that it would
never happen.
So it goes in Van Wert
County, February, 2015.

Twains anecdote validates adage


Mark Twain was a clever journalistic psy- secret sources to get intelligence to protect our
chologist. And he often resorted to apt humor democracy. We do have some secrets. One of
as a means of punching home a valuable point. the foundations of our democracy is a secret.
Its called the ballot box.
Twain could tell a story to al*******
most any group, whether they
I also ran across this little
be salesmen or clergymen,
PeoPle
tidbit called Who Am I?
and his audience would get
make the
I am a little thing with a
the point.
differenCe big meaning. I help everyone.
Twain had Abraham LinI unlock doors, open hearts,
colns knack for telling a fitBy
dispel prejudices, I create
ting story to illustrate a major
Byron
friendship and good will. I inidea. He used the following
McNutt
spire respect and admiration. I
story to show the value of
bore nobody. I violate no law.
the old adage that proved the
I cost nothing, for I save
axiom (its critical to) strike
money and make sense. I please all alike, those
while the iron is hot.
I was sitting on the back pew of a large in high places and those performing menial
church, he began, and was so inspired by the tasks. I affect everyone every day. Countless
address given by a returned missionary that I people know my value. None has condemned
me. I am the worlds best social lubricant.
felt uplifted and generous.
Who am I?
So, when the collection was announced, I
Im COURTESY!
reached into my pocket and pulled out a $20
********
bill. But in taking the collection, the ushers
Valentines Day was about ten days ago.
started at the first row and worked on back toThe following story is an old one, but it stands
ward the rear.
By the time they got to the middle pews, the test of time. Put yourself in this young
my enthusiasm had cooled off till I exchanged mans shoes.
It was Valentines Day and the young man
my $20 bill for a $10. Indeed, before they finally arrived at my back row, I had even sub- went into the towns drug store and asked the
man behind the counter for a one-pound box
stituted a $1 bill for the $10.
And by the time they ultimately reached of candy, a two-pound box of candy and a fiveme, I not only had returned the $1 bill to my pound box of candy.
The store owner said he had never sold so
pocket but I swiped a 50-cent piece from the
much candy to one young man before. The
collection plate!
Twains point was, whether they are speak- young man told him he had a special date that
ers or salesmen, they often dissipate the pros- night with a very popular girl and he wanted
pects enthusiasm with too much sales chat af- the candy gift wrapped in separate boxes.
See, the eager young man confided, Im
ter the target has already reached the dotted
line stage. Salesmen need to know when to taking this girl to the movies tonight and if
stop talking, and close the sale while the iron I get to hold her hand Ill give her the onepound box of candy.
is hot.
If I get to hold her hand, smooch a little on
Twain said he has witnessed on several occasions a pulpit orator work the congregation the way home and kiss her good night, Ill give
up to a high emotional climax, where many her the two-pound box.
With a big grin on his face, the young man
converts were ready to come forward to the
altar, only to lose the sale by continuing to said, If I get to hold her hand, and get lucky
on the way home and kiss her good night, then
preach.
shell get the five-pound box.
********
Later that night, the young man stopped
In todays world, our personal privacy is
under attack. Government agencies, and cor- at the girls house for dinner before going to
porate conglomerates, are tracking our every the movies. When it came time for the dinner
move and transaction. We even invite this prayer, the young man sat there for ten mininvasion of our personal space by embracing utes with his head bowed. Even his potatoes
Facebook, using credit cards, GPS and Smart- got cold!
phones. Were wired! Security cameras are
As the couple was leaving for the romantic
everywhere.
date, the girl told him she hadnt realized he
I found a newspaper clipping in my files was so religious. She had never seen anyone
from the late 1970s. Former CIA Director with so much to pray for.
William Colby made the following comments
I didnt either, he admitted, but I didnt
to a UCLA audience.
know your dad was the druggist.
We need some secrets and we need some

with
Jeanne
Phillips

** ** **
DEAR ABBY: Im stuck in the middle
between my mom and my husband, Gary,
regarding a onesie my brother bought for our
daughter. Gary is a die-hard Raiders fan. My
mom and brother love the Chargers. Mom and
my brother thought it would be funny to gift
my daughter with a Chargers onesie. Mom
asked me to have my child wear it during the
game. When I asked Gary what he thought,
he got upset and said, Please dont do that. I
dont want your mom buying Chargers clothes
thinking she can turn our daughter into a
Chargers fan. Mom texted me for a photo of
the baby wearing it. I said I was sorry, but her
dad doesnt want her to wear it, and she got
mad and said, Whatever! I cant please everyone. What should I do? GOOD SPORT
OUT WEST
DEAR GOOD SPORT: Whether your
mother and your brother thought it would be
funny to give your daughter a Chargers outfit
is beside the point. Your husband doesnt see
the humor in it, so my advice is to let the child
be logo-free until shes old enough to decide
for herself whom to support.
** ** **
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
** ** **
COPYRIGHT
2015
UNIVERSAL
UCLICK

best interest of the students.


With the testing already
taking place in some school
districts, it is imperative that
these protections are put in
place expeditiously. With the
bills passage in the House,
we now must wait on our colleagues in the Senate to continue the process. With their
support, we can have this bill

dear
abby

house
(From page 6)
By ensuring that these test
scores do not hold any of our
students back, we are giving
them a better chance to succeed. While HB 7 is not a fixall solution to our education
system, I believe that it is a
step in the right direction.
Acting sooner rather than
later on this issue is in the

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

become a law soon enough to


help our students this school
year.
As always, I would appreciate hearing your feedback
on this and any other issues in
the state legislature. I encourage you to contact my office
with any concerns or ideas in
regards to state government.

Karen in Ohio sent this picture of her blue-and brown-eyed border collie, Ollie.
(Photo submitted)

Text is on the list


Dear Heloise: If I have
a to do or shopping list,
I simply text it to myself.
Whenever the information
needs updating, I copy the
prior text, paste it into a new
text box, edit what needs updating and send it to myself
again. Since we all have our
cellphones with us, this is a
lot easier than little slips of
paper, which are easily misplaced. Just be careful not to
put overly sensitive information (passwords or PIN numbers) on those texts. Mario
F., Mission Viejo, Calif.
PET PAL
Dear Readers: Karen in
Ohio sent a picture of her
gorgeous
blue-and-browneyed border collie, Ollie.
Karen says, He is the light of
our lives and makes us laugh
every day! To see Ollie and
our other Pet Pals, visit www.
Heloise.com and click on
Pets. Heloise
CAT SNACK
Dear Heloise: I read your
article about dog treats in
the Amarillo (Texas) GlobeNews. What about cats? Do
you have any suggestions
about treats for them? The
only people food weve found
that our tom likes seems to

be ham. Thanks. Terry in


Amarillo, Texas
Terry, youre right! I did
not mean to slight our feline
friends. Some human food,
within reason, is a nice treat.
When you have chicken, cut
off small pieces and then treat
your cat just a few little
nibbles at a time. Can we say
tuna? What cat wouldnt
love a treat or two of tuna?
Do also check a pet-supply store. Most carry cat
grass seed. The directions on
the packaging explain how
to sprout cat grass. Seeing
sprouts? Move the container to a sunny spot and mist.
When its 2-3 inches tall,
present it to your cat and see
what happens.
Even though your cat likes
ham, it probably is very rich
and high in sodium for a cat
to ingest. Remember, these
furry friends dont drink
much water. Check what your
veterinarian suggests. These
creatures do have a mind of
their own, so it might take a
little time to find just the right
treat. Meow, meow, Heloise
NAILED IT
Dear Heloise: First, let
me say that I read your col-

hints
from

heloise

umn every day in the Orange


County (Calif.) Register and
really enjoy it! My hint is: If
you have a broken fingernail
that needs fixing, you can use
instant glue, then cover it with
nail polish. Right now, my
badly broken nail has been
protected for three weeks.
Sue D., Costa Mesa, Calif.
Yep, Ive done this forever! Do note that one or two
drops is better than a big glob
of glue. Heloise
HOLEY COW!
Dear Heloise: When Im
frying a lot of hamburgers, I
put a hole in the center of the
patty like a doughnut. It
will fry faster and more evenly. I put a slice of cheese and
some ketchup on each patty,
then it goes into a hamburger
bun and I freeze them for later. Ann K., Jackson, Mich.
(c)2015 by King Features
Syndicate Inc.

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

Dowdy pours in 27, Lancers rout Paulding


By JEREMy SCHNEIDER
DHI Media Correspondent
sports@timesbulletin.com

Lincolnview senior Justis Dowdy (22) goes up for a


second-half bucket during the Lancers comfortable
win over Paulding on Friday night. Dowdy and his
four classmates played their final home game. (DHI
Media/Tina Eley)

MIDDLE POINT Every time Justis Dowdy had the ball


in his hands on Friday night, one word kept coming to mind
unstoppable. It was obvious nothing or no one was going to
stop the senior from doing what he wanted when he wanted.
Dowdy torched Paulding for 27 points on 77 percent field
goal shooting and paced Lincolnview to a 69-51 win over the
Panthers. The Lancers are now 13-8 overall and 3-4 in the
Northwest Conference.
Dowdy hit 10-of-13 field goals, including three 3-pointers,
and made 4-of-6 free throws. He was especially potent in the
second half, when he scored 19 points.
I know I can make shots when Im open, Dowdy said. I
drive to the hole or when Im open for 3, hit it.
Lincolnview coach Brett Hammons has coached Dowdy
since he was a freshman on the JV team and the last three
seasons on the varsity roster. Hammons called it a privilege
to coach Dowdy.
Hes just a competitor. He loves the challenge, Hammons
said. Hes probably one of the best finishers around the basket Ive coached. He has such great body control. He does the
little things right, and its feeding off to the rest of the guys.
Hes a leader of this team, and I think thats why we have the
record we do.
On three straight possessions in the fourth quarter alone,
Dowdy went coast-to-coast for a bucket after pulling down a
defensive rebound, scored a transition layup and free throw,
and pulled off an up-and-under post move which would make
men eight inches taller than him weep.

I post up a lot, thats a part of my game. I used to do that in


junior high a lot, Dowdy said. Coach (Andy) Breese showed
me a couple of moves, too.
Dowdy almost made Hammons weep in late in the first
half when he picked up his third foul going for a steal. Fellow
regular starters Austin Leeth and Hayden Ludwig also picked
up their second fouls in the second quarter.
Dowdy went to the bench with his second foul and a 17-13
lead, and Leeth followed him shortly, but instead of wilting
under the pressure, the Lancers expanded the lead to 23-13
before Paulding hit a couple quick buckets and prompted
Hammons to insert his starting backcourt into the game.
When you have three of your starters (in foul trouble), its
tough, but Im proud of the way the kids battled, Hammons
said.
The Lancers held a 33-22 lead at halftime and a 51-41 lead
after three quarters, but they really slammed the pedal down
in the fourth quarter, out-scoring Paulding 18-10.
Chandler Adams had 10 points, Leeth added nine, and
Derek Youtsey had five points and eight rebounds.
It was a fitting tribute on senior night to the five seniors on
the Lancers roster Dowdy, Tyler Brant, Troy Thompson,
James Smith and Tyler Wannemacher. While Brant has been
dealing with a knee injury all season, the other four seniors
started the game and came on to close up at the end.
Those guys have helped to get the program where its at,
Hammons said. It was great to get them out there and have
their names announced at the beginning, and then the start
they gave us, they got us out to a 6-2 start. It was great to get
them in there. They deserve it.
LANCERS/10

Jays send 5 seniors out on winning note


By LARRy HEIING
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

Van Werts Brant Henry (3) defends on the perimeter


against Wapaks Ethan Good during Friday nights
Western Buckeye League matchup in Van Wert. The
Cougars rallied late, but Wapak survived with a 5350 win. (DHI Media/Angela Stith)

Cougar rally comes


up short; Wapak wins
By JIM COX
DHI Media Correspondent
sports@timesbulletin.com
VAN WERT A Wapakoneta offensive rebound and put-back
of a missed free throw with 10 seconds left in the game throttled
a Van Wert comeback and gave the Redskins a 53-50 win Friday
night at the Cougar Den. Wapak is now 11-9 overall and 4-4 in the
Western Buckeye League. Van Wert is 6-13, and 2-6.
Wapak led from wire to wire, but things got really interesting near the end. The Redskins had jumped out to a quick
8-2 lead, and that margin fluctuated between six and 11 points
until early in the fourth quarter. A corner 3-pointer by Gavin
Cross and two Connor Holliday free throws got the Cougars
within three, 44-41, with 6:16 left. An old-style 3-point play by
Wapaks Adam Henderson stretched the lead to 47-41, and it
stayed there for four long minutes.

DELPHOS The St. Johns boys


basketball team returned home after
an incredible road win over stateranked Versailles last Friday night.
At the Vatican, the Blue Jays defeated New Bremen in Midwest Athletic Conference action 64-59.
Before the game, St. Johns honored five senior basketball players:
Evan Hays, Andy Grothouse, Tyler
Conley, Alex Odenweller and Austin
Heiing. Also recognized were senior
cheerleaders (Alyssa Martin and Livi
Miller) and senior pep band members
(Logan Hessling and Eli Jones) for
their dedication to the blue-and-gold.
With the tournament draws over
and both teams out of the running
for the conference title, New Bremem
coach Adam Dougherty and Aaron
Elwer of St. Johns were looking for
momentum heading into the final
week of the season.
The Blue Jays gained the early edge
in the game as Grothouse dished off to
Heiing for the first points of the game.
After the Cardinals tied the game with a
pair of free throws, the Blue Jays great
team play continued as Hays passed
from the corner to a streaking Odenweller across the lane for the bucket.
The old adage is that great defense
generates great offense as Odenwellers steal led to a pair of free
throws by Hays. Grothouse traded a
3-pointer with New Bremens Ben
Schwieterman as St. Johns maintained an 11-7 lead.
The assists continued for St. Johns,
as Odenweller passed to Heiing for
the bucket and Grothouse connected
for a baseline jumper. During the of-

St. Johns senior Tyler Conley goes to the rim in front of a New
Bremen defender during first-half action on Friday inside Arnzen
Gymnasium. He was one of five seniors that played their home
finales for the Blue Jays. (DHI Media/Kenny Poling)
fensive showcase, St. Johns made its
first six shots from the floor, but led
only 15-11 as New Bremen stayed
with them. Aaron Reindel surprised
the New Bremen defense, nailing a
triple from the corner to end the first
quarter for St. Johns.
The opposing squads appeared to
be mirror images of each other, playing
physical defense combined with good
ball movement sparked by numerous

player substitutions by both coaches.


The Cardinals opened the second period with a triple by Kaelen
Reed, but Odenweller answered with
a 3-pointer following a pair of free
throws. Sophomore Tim Kreeger was
a force on the floor, scoring the next
six points for St. Johns in opening up
a 10-point lead, 29-19.
JAyS/10

COuGARS/10

Jefferson Wildcats roll past Allen East, 75-57


By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS Jefferson
head boys basketball coach
Marc Smith has a good idea
of what his Wildcats will
face night in and night out:
defenses geared to try and
neutralize junior star Trey
Smith and, to a lesser extent,
sophomore point guard Jace
Stockwell.
That means the role players will get their chances to
shine.
Stockwell and Smith got
their numbers, with 21 and
17 points, respectively, but
junior Dalton Hicks came up
with a huge double-double: a
varsity career-high 18 points
and 10 rebounds as the Wildcats smacked Allen East 7557 in Northwest Conference
action Friday night at The
Stage of Jefferson Middle
School.
We have faced gimmicks
and junk defenses all year
and well keep facing them

until we can make defenses pay on a consistent basis.


Teams want to make basketball miserable for us and its
supposed to be fun, Coach
Smith noted. I told my players that teams are making
the game simple for us: go
out, play basketball and play
through it. You have to make
layups and free throws, rebound and play defense. Tonight in particular, Jace had
a great first half and Dalton
had a terrific game overall to
help pick up the slack.
Despite the very cold night
outside, that trio helped the
Wildcats (11-8, 3-4 NWC)
shoot a solid 31-of-61 from
the field (5-of-13 long range)
for 50.8 percent.
The Mustangs (6-14, 2-6)
were an even better 24-of-44
from the field (5-of-14 downtown) for 54.5 percent, but
got clubbed on the boards
35-23 (14-4 offensive) and
turned it over 12 times.
Our game plan was to
stop Trey. I felt we did a good
job on him but Stockwell

ning his own opening tap five


seconds into the game and
the Wildcats never trailed.
Facing a variety of defenses: box-and-1, triangle-and-2
and some man-to-man, they
struggled some, shooting
7-of-18. They were helped by
six offensive boards and five
Mustang turnovers. Smith
was held to four points but
Stockwell rolled with seven
points and Drew Reiss added five. Allen East was 5-of10 but when Stockwell took
a half-court steal to a layin
with 21 seconds showing, it
gave the home team a 19-12
edge.
With Smith still being
shackled by Allen East in the
second period wherever he
went, Stockwell exploded for
eight points and Hicks three
Jefferson junior Dalton Hicks pops a baseline baskets. They stayed a steady
jumper over Allen East center Jacob Sherrick during 7-of-16 from the floor but four
NWC play on Friday night at The Stage of Jefferson offensive boards and forcing
Middle School. (DHI Media/Kenny Poling)
five more miscues made their
task much easier. After the
killed us the first half, Allen and we arent deep enough to Mustangs twice got within
two, the latter at 21-19 on a
East coach Brad Clum said. come from behind.
That dug us a deep hole
Smith got a layup off win- basket by Spencer Miller at

the 5-minute mark, the Wildcats steadily built their lead,


reaching 35-21 on a drive
by Stockwell. He missed the
and-1 and Wireman then
banked in a half-courter with
2.1 seconds on the board to
get the visitors within 35-24.
The Wildcats maintained
a comfortable margin in the
third period, preventing Allen East from getting any
closer than seven twice. With
Smith finally shaking loose
for eight points, the hosts
grabbed a 55-42 edge on a
4-footer by Hicks with 43
seconds showing.
The Wildcats kept up the
pace, dropping in 8-of-14
shots, and scoring the first six
points of the fourth period, to
keep the Mustangs from getting any nearer than 15 the
rest of the night.
Jeffersons junior varsity
received 20 points from Alex
Rode and 10 by Davion Tyson to seize a 68-49 triumph.
Shane Gipson paced the
Mustangs with 21.
WILDCATS/10

SportS

A DHI Media publication

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

Bluffton outlasts depleted Raiders claim


GMC crown
Knights in overtime
BY KEVIN WANNEMACHER
DHI Media Business Mgr
kwannemacher@timesbulletin.com

BY JOHN PARENT
DHI Media Sports Editor
sports@timesbulletin.com

ANTWERP Wayne Trace broke open a close game with


a 12-0 run in the second half and the Raiders cruised from
there to a 71-52 win over Antwerp Friday night at the home of
the Archers. The victory gives the Raiders an outright Green
Meadows Conference championship, the 26th league title for
Wayne Trace.
I am proud of this basketball team, noted Raider head
coach Jim Linder. We have had to battle through injuries and
we have found different ways to win basketball
games this year. Its a fun group of kids and
they work hard.
Antwerp gave Wayne Trace all it could handle for most of the first three quarters, however
the Raiders started what proved to be the pivotal run of the contest by scoring the final six
points of the third quarter to extend the margin
to 51-37 entering the final period.
Leading 40-34, a steal and basket by Luke
Miller along with a 3-pointer from Corbin
Linder put Wayne Trace on top 45-34. After
the Archers Trenton Copsey answered with
a 3-pointer, the Raiders got an Alec Vest basket to go along with two free throws each by
Miller and Ethan Linder to wrap up the third
quarter scoring.
Wayne Trace then opened the fourth quarter with six straight points by Ethan Linder as
the Raiders widened the advantage to 57-37.
Thats what they do, commented AntBlufftons Bret Rumer (right) fouls Crestview guard Cody Mefferd
werp head coach T.J. Hammer of the Raider
(22) on his way to the hoop during Friday nights Northwest
run. They put together those six or eight point
Conference game in Convoy. Rumer scored six points in overtime as
runs and then they come back with another one
Bluffton won, 56-51. (DHI Media/Tina Eley)
right after that and you look up and you are
down 15-20 points.
leading scorer had to head to the bench. missed the game due to injury) is down.
The Raiders continued to pull away in the final period,
Blufftons Bret Rumer knocked in Its not excuses, but its tough to put othpushing the lead to as much as 67-40 on a Corbin Linder basket
both ends of a one-and-one with 1:35 on er kids in situations that theyre not used
before settling on the 71-52 win.
the click, putting Bluffton ahead by one. to. (Our effort) was great; our kids realIt wasnt easy tonight by any means and we knew that comOn the Pirates next trip, Rumer ran a ly rallied around each other.
ing in here, added Linder. We expected Antwerp to put forth
Blufftons defensive gameplan was to
beautiful give-and-go with Joe Schria great effort and they did just that. We were able to come up
ner, getting a return pass on the baseline put pressure on Crestviews guards, and
with some big plays there in the third quarter that allowed us to
and cutting to the hoop for a basket and not allow space to Lautzenheiser, Mefget a little bit of a lead.
foul. After Rumer dropped in the foul ferd and Rickard. Though Mefferd finEarly on, it appeared Wayne Trace was going to open the
ished with a team-high 17 points, to go
shot, the Pirates held a 52-49 lead.
game up.
Connor Lautzenheisers two free along with seven rebounds, LautzenheThe Raiders jumped in front 20-9 after eight minutes of acthrows brought Crestview to within iser was held to just nine, and that came
tion as Wayne Trace forced Antwerp into eight first quarter
one, but without Mefferd on the court, on 1-for-13 shooting. Rickard added
turnovers.
Blufftons intense man-to-man defense six points, but only attempted five field
However, the hosts had other ideas. Antwerp pulled within
prevented the Knights from getting any goals.
22-13 on a Copsey basket before a 3-pointer from Trey Mills
Our keys were to try to take Lautmore good looks at the hoop. Bluffton
trimmed the Archer deficit to 24-16. Following a bucket by
sealed the game at the line, hitting four zenheiser, Rickard and Mefferd out of
Wayne Traces Justin Speice, the Archers answered with backfree throws in the last 33 seconds of the game, The Pirate coach explained.
to-back two-pointers from Matt Jones and Copsey to get within
We did a really good job contesting
play.
26-20.
I was really pleased with our guys, him (Lautzenheiser); hes a really nice
Corbin Linder and Jones then traded 3-pointers late in the
Crestview head coach Jeremy Best said player. All three of those guards are
half as the Raiders posted a 29-23 advantage at the intermisafter the game. We had some unique nice players.
sion.
lineups out there; Cody fouled out, P
I thought, when we settled down and executed what we
KNIgHTs/10
(senior guard Preston Zaleski, who
wanted to do, that we were pretty competitive, Hammer noted.
But Wayne Trace gets you out of your game, they pressure you
and rush you into making bad decisions.
Two Copsey buckets and a driving layup from Mills got the
Archers within 32-29.
We came out and had a good start to the third quarter,
continued Hammer. Our kids battled tonight and we did a lot
of good things. They played hard and gave it everything they
had.
Jake Arend followed with two buckets while Ethan Linder
added a basket as the Raiders quickly pushed the lead back to
38-29.
ponent in a first quarter (35) were to stay seeded 4-5 the then had starting forward
Answering that run there at the start of the third quarter
and first half (65).
rest of the way, they would Nene leave in the third quarby Antwerp was big, commented Linder. They came out and
About the only glaring meet in the first round of the ter because of cramps after
played us tough. One thing we did there in the third quarter
mistake the Cavs made was playoffs.
scoring 18 points.
was take advantage of their turnovers and get some points out
the following announcement on all tickets and include in
Kevin Loves flubbed atAnd if Friday was any inFact is, this one was not Print
of them.
PrintEthan
the
following
announcement
onTrace
all tickets
includ
tempt at a driving, two-hand- dication, the Wizards proba- much of a contest at all,
advertising
(see
example
onscorers
previous
page):
Linder
led all
for Wayne
with 18 and
points,
advertising
(see example
previous
ed dunk the basketball hit bly ought to hope that doesnt adding up to Washingtons
four rebounds
and threeon
assists
while page):
Corbin Linder chipped in
points,
Ticketholders
should
be seated
by 0:00 Miller
PM*
the front of the rim.
happen even if they were biggest loss of the season,
16
four
assists
and
three
steals.
Ticketholders
should
be
seatedLuke
by
0:00 PM*also post 10 points,
Unclaimed
will betwo
released
non-ticketholders
at 0:00
All-Star point guard John without starting shooting worse than a 31-point defeat ed
five seats
rebounds,
assiststoand
two steals for the
seatsthe
will
be released
to non-ticketholders
at
* 15 minutes before
concert
** 10 minutes
prior to concert
Wall had 18 points and nine guard Bradley Beal (right leg at East-leading Atlanta on Raiders.Unclaimed
* 15 minutes before the concert ** 10 minutes
prior
to
concert
assists for Washington.
injury) and reserve forward Jan. 11.
RAIDERs/10
The Wizards are 14-16 Kevin Seraphin (flu-like
CAVAlIERs/10
over their last 30 games, symptoms) from the tipoff,
following a 19-6 start that
Controlled distribution of tickets is crucial to monitorin
prompted talk about whether
Tickets available at:
progress
of the publicity
campaign.
Sponsors
should
Controlled
distribution
of tickets
is crucial
to desig
mon
they were ready to be a real
Times Bulletin
a
single
mail-in
distribution
point,
rather
than
freely
distrib
progress
of
the
publicity
campaign.
Sponsors
should
factor in the Eastern ConferOffice Hours:
banks,point,
stores,rather
etc. Uncontrolled
atickets
singlethrough
mail-inlibraries,
distribution
than freely d
8am-5pm M-Th
ence.
tion encourages
to banks,
take more
tickets
than
they inte
8am-1pm Fri.
tickets
through people
libraries,
stores,
etc.
Uncontrol
Entering the first game
use. This
results inpeople
an inaccurate
projection
for both teams after the AllNPAC Box Office Hours:
tion
encourages
to takeaudience
more tickets
than and
they
12pm - 4pm M-F
Star break, the Wizards were
prevent
implementation
of the
overprintprojection
policy.
use.
Thisproper
results
in an inaccurate
audience
fourth in the East, and the
prevent proper implementation of the overprint polic
Cavaliers were fifth. They
A mail-in
coupon
for 2012
tickets
should
be& CounTRy
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coupons
to
the
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vertising.
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CONVOY The Pirates opened


the season by winning their first eight
games. Though conference play presented a stumbling block, Bluffton may
be hitting its stride once again. On Friday night, in a hostile environment in
Convoy, the Pirates survived a last-second shot in regulation and overcame a
4-point deficit in overtime to beat Crestview, 56-51.
What a game, Bluffton head coach
Todd Boblitt said with a sigh following
the victory. Thats what high school
athletics are supposed to be about. We
fought through some adversity. Our kids
hung in there and made plays at critical
times.
In a game that was nip-and-tuck
throughout the second half, Bluffton
dodged a bullet just to get to the extra
session. Trailing by two with 11.3 seconds left, Crestview was to inbound the
ball. Junior guard Cody Mefferd was
called for an offensive foul before the
ball was brought in, giving possession to
the Pirates. In the jubilation, a Bluffton
player got too eager with his celebration
and came onto the court from the bench.
The result was a technical foul.
We had a kid just get really emotional, and he made a mistake. It was the
right call, Boblitt explained.
After Mefferd calmly sank both free
throws, Crestview had the ball with one
last chance to win it in regulation, but
senior Nate Owens, who had hit three
3-pointers in the game to that point,
couldnt find the range on a fourth and
the game went to overtime.
For our guys to stay with it, to get a
stop, and to get it to overtime, is a tribute to them and how far weve come as a
team, Coach Boblitt added.
In the extra period, Crestview (127, 5-2 NWC) came out hot, spurred by
the momentum gained at the end of the
fourth quarter. Two free throws by Owens and a fastbreak layup by Mitchell
Rickard put the Knights up 48-44. After a Pirate timeout, senior Levi Kistler
connected on a trey from the corner
to get Bluffton back in the game. On
the next trip up the court, momentum
swung firmly in favor of the Pirates
when Mefferd was called for another
offensive foul, his fifth of the game.
With 2:20 left in the game, the Knights

71

52

LeBron scores 28 in 25 minutes,


Cavaliers rout Wiz 127-89
BY HOWARD
FENDRICH
Associated Press
WASHINGTON LeBron James set aside first-half
foul trouble to finish with 28
points in only 25 minutes
Friday night, and Kyrie Irving scored 25, helping the
surging Cleveland Cavaliers
overwhelm the Washington
Wizards 127-89.
Cleveland led by as many
as 22 points before halftime
and as many as 40 after to
win for the 15th time in its
past 17 games.
The 38-point margin was
Washingtons largest loss
of the season. The Cavaliers also produced the most
points by a Washington op-

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10

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

SportS

times Bulletin/Delphos Herald

Marion Local soars past Parkway CavaLIerS


(From page 9)
James had 10 points and
Irving added nine in the first
quarter, which ended with
the Cavaliers ahead 35-26.
The Cavaliers piled on in
the second quarter, starting
with a 14-2 run that included 3-pointers on consecutive possessions by Iman
Shumpert. When James hit
a 3 with about 7 1/2 minutes
left in the half, it was 52-30.
Soon after, though, James
headed to the sideline with his
third foul after getting called
for charging while driving

BY NICK JOHNSON
DHI Media Correspondent
sports@timesbulletin.com
MARIA STEIN Parkway faced a tall task as it
visied the Hangar at Marion
Local High School to take on
the Flyers on Friday night in
boys high school Midwest
Athletic Conference action.
The state-ranked home squad
was too much for the Panthers, who dropped a 79-41
final.
The Flyers jumped ahead
early, scoring the games first
seven points. Those came
thanks to a pair of layups
from 6-foot-7 Ryan Bruns
and a 3-pointer from Dustin
Rethman. The Panthers put
three points in the scoring
column thanks to a Brody
Adams triple to make the
score 7-3.
Parkway ended the first
quarter with a Brandon Gibson jumper to cut the Flyers
lead to 12-5 going into the
second period.
The Flyers turned up the
heat during the second quarter, holding Parkway to a single basket while Marion Local got 11 points from Luke
Knapke in route to taking a
40-7 lead into half time.
The Panthers lone bucket
was a jumper from Gibson to
bring the score to 29-7, Flyers
in the second period.
Its fundamental stuff,
said a frsutrated Parkway
coach Rick Hickman following the game. When you are
trying to get open and teams
are playing you close you
have to get into them. You
have to run good solid L cuts
and I tried to challenge them
before the game with that but

COugarS
Parkways Brandon Gibson takes a pull-up jumper during Friday nights MAC
game in Maria Stein. Marion Local used a 28-2 second quarter to fuel a 79-41
win. (DHI Media/Pat Agler)
it didnt take effect until I had
to reinforce that at halftime.
Parkway (4-15, 0-8 MAC)
came out of the second half
with a little more juice as
Sage Dugan opened the half
with a jumper before Gibson
scored five straight points
for the Panthers, including a
3-point play that forced the
Flyers to burn a timeout with
5:54 left in the third. At that
point, however, Marion Local
still led 42-14.
Bruns did most of the
heavy lifting for the Flyers in
the third, as he scored eight
of the teams ten points after
the timeout. Parkway found
their stroke from beyond the
arc as Adams and Gibson
eached knock down triples.
Marion Local (15-4, 7-1
MAC) had a 52-24 going into

the fourth quarter. The Panthers continued to battle Marion Local in the fourth quarter as again both Gibson and
Adams connected on treys in
the fourth period.
With two minutes left in
the fourth quarter, Gibson
drained another triple for the
Panthers and Dugan added
a layup to bring the score to
73-41. The Flyers scored the
final six points of the game to
pick up the 79-41 victory.
In the second half we
did a better job on our L cuts
and we got open shots. And
we were able to knock down
those open shots, Hickman
added. It was probably a
three or four point ball game
in the second half compare to
the 40-7 game it was during
the first half. Thats the name

of the game when you are


playing teams like that.
Parkway had the games
leading scorer as Gibson
scored 22 points and Adams
chipped in with 11 points for
the Panthers. Marion Local
had two players with double
figure points as Bruns had
a team-high 20 points and
Knapke had 17.
Score by quarters
Parkway 5 2 17 17 -41
Marion Local 12 28 12
27- 79
Parkway
Adams 11, Agler 2, Bates
2, Gibson 22, Dugan 4
Marion Local
Rethman 3, Albers 7,
Bruns 20, Seitz 5, Griesdorn 2, Schwieterman 2,
CMescher 9, Homan 4, Knapke 17, TMescher 8, Koenig 2

JaYS
(From page 8)
The second half began like the first
as Heiing scored on an offensive tip. The
Cardinals cut the lead to six points but
Conley hit a 14-footer, followed up by
another Grothouse assist to Heiing. New
Bremen went on a 8-0 run to pull within one, but Hays was clutch in nailing a
3-pointer to push the lead to 42-38. As
the third quarter drew to a close, Grothouse hit a duck-under layup as the Jays
maintained their lead.
The Blue Jays first possession of the
fourth resulted in a turnover and the
Cardinals took advantage to trim the
lead down to two. Grothouse continued
to play unselfishly with another assist to

Kreeeger under the basket, and the Jays


next three buckets came on layups as
Grothouse, Odenweller,and Conley all
scored as St. Johns led 55-50.
St. Johns committed another costly miscue as Braden Elshoff scored for
the Cardinals on the break. Elshoff then
muscled inside for a hard-fought two
as New Bremen pulled within 55-54,
but defensive specialist Hays made the
play of the game with a steal that led to
a Grothouse layup. The Jays sealed the
game at the foul line in converting 4-of6 attempts to send the seniors off with
the victory.
This was a good win for us, exclaimed coach Elwer after the game.

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Free Estimates Certified for Warranty Work

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along the baseline against


Marcin Gortat. James sat out
the rest of the half, which
Washington ended with a 6-0
spurt.
Still, Clevelands 65-51
halftime edge was plenty
comfortable. The Wizards
didnt help themselves by
shooting 0 for 11 on 3-point
attempts in the half; they finished 1 for 16.
After the Wizards got
within 12 early in the third
quarter, a pair of 3s by James
made it 77-59.

Hours:
Tuesday - Friday 10-5
Sat 9-2

Once I Was
repurposed with style
www.facebook.com/1ceiWas

121 S. Washington St.


Van Wert, OH 45891

Carson Manger is one of the best players in the region and Evan Hays did a
great job limiting him to four field goals.
In addition to Evan, this was a great
team win for us and we are playing our
best basketball of the year right now.
St. Johns was led in scoring by Grothouse with 17 points and Heiing was also
in double figures with 10. Odenweller
(9), Hays (8) and Conley (7) played their
final game on the hardwood of Robert A.
Arnzen Gymnasium.
The Jays shot 45 percent from the
floor and the Cardinals landed 43 percent of their attempts.
The Blue Jays travel to Bath High
School Saturday at 6 p.m.

(From page 8)
Hendersons two free throws made it 49-41 at 1:47. Holliday
used his forte, squirming inside and drawing fouls, which led
to two more freebies, but the Redskins 6-2, 260 pounder, Corey Crawford, escaped for a breakaway layup, making it 51-43
at 1:14.
Cross landed another corner triple, and, after a Wapak turnover, a 15-foot baseline jumper to trim it to 51-48 with 0:36 left.
Wapak missed the front of a one-and-one, and Holliday took
advantage, bouncing in a difficult 10-foot fall-away at 0:24 for
a 51-50 margin. Then came the decider.
Henderson was fouled at mid-court with 16 seconds left. He
missed the front end, but 6-foot-6 Aaron Huffman snared the
rebound and put it back to make it 53-50. Wapak fouled Holliday at mid-court, but it was only the sixth team foul. At the
buzzer, Nick Keber front-rimmed a 30-foot desperation shot.
During the first half the visitors hit six 3-pointers and an
equal number of power layups, which led to a 34-23 lead after
16 minutes. While the Redskins were firing away at a 63 percent clip (12 of 19) the Cougars were a woeful 33 percent (9 of
27), including three triples. The other stats were nearly even.
They (the Redskins) are good spot shooters, said Van
Wert coach Mark Bagley. They hit six threes the first half.
I dont think our hands were active enough. Our hands were
down, and they made us pay. Theyre very strong, physical athletes, but we had good shots early on. We just missed a lot of
easy shots.
Van Werts offense and defense improved considerably in
the third quarter. The gap narrowed to 42-36 after three.
For the game as a whole Wapakoneta shot a blistering 61
percent from the field on 19 of 31. Van Wert shot 40 percent on
19 of 47. The Cougars were 6 of 6 from the line, all by Holliday,
while the Redskins were 8 of 12. The boards were even at 18
apiece. Van Wert had only six turnovers, while Wapak had 11.
Bagley cited two critical times, one at the end of the first
half and one at the end of the game. The killer was when we
cut it to four in the second quarter, but they finished the half
on a 7-0 run. Our kids really battled, as I knew they would. We
gave up only 16 points in the second half.
As for the big Wapak put-back of the missed free throw,
Bagleys only comment was that A lot of things happened on
that play. Thats all Im gonna say.
Holiday, Keber, and Cross led Van Werts scoring with 14,
8, and 8. Keaton Metz, Henderson, and Crawford had 12, 12,
and 9 for Wapakoneta.
Van Wert (12-7) won the junior varsity game 43-37. Davis
Munroe had 15 points for the Cougars. Kyle Huffman had 9
points for Wapakoneta (13-5).
Score by quarters
Wapak 16 18 8 11- 53
Van Wert 9 14 13 14- 50
Wapakoneta (53)
Good 5, Henderson 12, Metz 12, Huffman 6, Crawford 9, Koch 6, Burton 3
Van Wert (50)
Henry 3, Smith 7, Keber 8, Holliday 14, Myers 0, Kelly 6, Braun 4, Cross 8

WILdCatS LaNCerS

KNIgHtS

(From page 8)
VARSITY
ALLEN EAST (57)
Logan Ryan 2-0-5, Caleb Smelcer 4-0-9,
Spencer Miller 6-4-16, Johnny Brinkman
0-0-0, Travis Wireman 4-0-9, Luke Perkins
3-0-7, Jacob Sherrick 4-0-9, Kain Foster
1-0-2. Totals 19-5-4-57.
JEFFERSON (75)
Jace Stockwell 9-2-21, Drew Reiss 3-08, Josh Teman 1-2-4, Brenen Auer 1-0-2,
Trey Smith 8-1-17, Ryan Goergens 0-1-1,
Dalton Hicks 8-2-18, Grant Wallace 2-0-4,
Kurt Wollenhaupt 0-0-0. Totals 26-5-8-75.
Score by Quarters:
Allen East 12 12 18 15 - 57
Jefferson 19 16 20 20 - 75
Three-point goals: Allen East, Ryan,
Smelcer, Wireman, Perkins, Sherrick;
Jefferson, Stockwell 3, Reiss 2.
JUNIOR VARSITY
ALLEN EAST (49)
Trace Williams 0-0-0, Chris Kleman 1-2-4,
Shane Gipson 9-2-21, Kayne Richardson
2-0-5, Robert Lutes 3-0-6, Caleb Austin
2-0-4, Johnny Brinkman 1-0-2. Totals 192-5/12-49.
JEFFERSON (68)
Alex Neubert 0-1-1, Caleb Lucas 0-0-0,
Trey Gossman 0-1-1, Cole Arroyo 1-0-2,
Brenen Auer 2-5-9, Davion Tyson 3-410, Kyle Wreede 0-1-1, Alex Rode 9-2-20,
Tyler Bratton 1-1-3, Christian Stemen 3-19, Nick Long 3-0-6, Drake Schmitt 1-4-6.
Totals 21-2-20/29-68.

(From page 9)
Owens wound up as the
beneficiary of the extra attention paid to his teammates.
The senior wound up with 13
points, and was instrumental
in getting the Knights back in
the game after Bluffton took a
31-24 halftime lead.
Owens stepped up and had
a great game for them, Boblitt
said. We wanted to their
fourth of fifth guy to try to
beat us, and, fortunately, it was
maybe one or two shots short.
Owens hit on back-to-back
treys to start the third quarter,
part of an 11-2 Knight run that
put Crestview on top, 28-26.
Bluffton did a great job
defensively, but I thought we
fought through that, Best added. We came out and had a
great start to the second half. If
we could have secured a couple
of rebounds here and there or
gotten a couple of stops here or
there, its a different game.
The Pirates (14-6, 3-4
NWC) finished 18-for-39 (46
percent) overall, but only
4-for-13 from 3-point range.
Bluffton missed its firs 10
from long range until Rumer
connected on a trey from the
right wing with 1:38 left in
the fourth quarter. That shot
gave the Pirates a 40-39 lead.
Kistlers triple with 14 seconds
left put the Pirates up 44-42,
setting the stage for the strange
end-of-regulation sequence.
Its a really good win for us,
Boblitt added. On this floor,
against a really quality team.

Schrader
Realty

228 N. Main Street, Delphos Office: 419-692-2249


WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET

Put your dreams in our hands

(From page 8)
The Lancers have won four straight games and are arguably
playing their best basketball of the season. They close out the
season Friday at Spencerville before playing Pandora-Gilboa
in a sectional tournament game on March 4.
We had a rough stretch there in December and some in
January, especially on Friday nights, Hammons said. Im extremely pleased with the effort. I think the kids have bought
into the effort and the way we want to play and run with the
basketball. The last four games have probably been the best
four games in my tenure.
Lincolnview 69, Paulding 51

raIderS
(From page 9)
Copsey topped the Archer
efforts with 16 points, four rebounds and two steals. Jones
chipped in 13 points and seven boards for Antwerp, which
falls to 7-12 overall and 2-5 in
the GMC.
Wayne Trace won the rebounding battle 28-26 and
committed only 10 turnovers
compared to Antwerps 21.
The Raiders improve to
18-1 overall on the season and
7-0 in the GMC

Wayne Traces junior varsity improved to 14-5 overall


and 5-2 in the GMC with a
43-22 win over the Archers.
Seth Saylor and Eli Sinn
both bucketed 11 points for
Wayne Trace with Brady
Stabler adding 10. Clint Sinn
topped the Raiders with 10 rebounds followed by Eli Sinn
(nine) and Saylor picked up
seven.
Dylan Peters and Brandon
Laney posted nine and seven
points, respectivlely

Stock Up on Warm and Cozy.

as you attend the

COOL CASH

Home Expo

Sunday, March 1st 1:00-4:00pm


at the Delphos Eagles

Dozens of local experts such as Banks, Insurance companies,


Home Improvements, Custom Cabinetry, Home Inspectors &
many more ready to give you 1st hand advice all in one room!
. FREE admission . Refreshments provided
. Lots of door prizes
. Plus a Grand prize donated by Schrader Realty!!
If buying or selling a home is in your future, plan to join us!

REBATES UP TO

$1,450

ONAQUALIFIED
HOMECOMFORTSYSTEM
BYCARRIER

Ayers Mechanical Group


222 N. Market Street
Van Wert, OH 45891
419-238-5480
OH License #20401
Years of comfort. Years of savings. The years best offer.
Theres never been a better time to upgrade to Carrier quality and efficiency. For a limited time, you can
claim up to $1,450 in Cool Cash rebates on a new system or receive up to 60 months of 0% financing.*

Dont wait. Cool Cash is only available for a limited time.


*Purchase of qualifying products required. 0% financing cannot be combined with Cool Cash.
CARRIER CORPORATION 7/2014. A unit of United Technologies Corporation. Stock symbol UTX.

Score by quarters
Bluffton 14 10 8 12 12- 56
Crestview 8 9 15 12 7- 51
Bluffton (56)
Levi Kistler 5-10 8-10 20, Mitchell Ault 6-9
0-0 12, Bret Rumer 3-8 4-5 11, Joel Siefker
1-3 3-4 5, Joe Schriner 2-5 0-0 4, Austin
Bricker 0-3 2-2 2, Brady Parkins 1-1 0-0 2,
Eli Runk 0-0 0-0 0, Nick Friesen 0-0 0-0 0;
Totals- 18-39 17-21 56
Crestview (51)
Connor Lautzenheiser 1-13 6-10 9, Nate
Owens 4-10 2-4 13, Cody Mefferd 6-8 5-5
17, Mitchell Rickard 2-5 2-3 6, Jake Lippi
2-3 0-1 4, Derek Stout 1-2 0-0 2, Spencer
Rolsten 0-0 0-0 0; Totals: 16-41 15-23 51
Three-point field goals: BlufftonKistler 2, Rumer; Crestview- Owens 3,
Lautzenheiser
Technical foul: Schriner
JV score: Bluffton 57-26

A DHI Media publication

CoMICs

Comics & Puzzles


Zits

Blondie

For Better or Worse

Beetle Bailey

Pickles

Garfield

Born Loser

Hagar the Horrible

Barney Google & Snuffy Smith

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015 11

Todays
Horoscope
By Eugenia Last

SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 21, 2015
Take control of your life
and move into a leadership
role. Make updating or improving any policies, investments and contracts a priority. Personal and professional
partnerships will contribute to
your success. Making heartfelt contributions will pay off
and promote recognition of
your assets.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Think before you speak.
Blurting out your opinions or
feelings will leave you in a
compromising position. Consider the consequences of
your actions before you make
a move.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- If you feel uncertain
about your future and unable
to take action, consider picking up skills that will help you
pinpoint your priorities and
form a concrete plan to get
ahead.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Dont let the little things
get you down. Join a group
that specializes in positive
thinking, and focus on your
strengths. Its up to you to
make things happen.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Pleasure trips, a short
excursion or an impromptu getaway will alleviate the
boredom you are experiencing. Reach out to a special
friend you may have lost
touch with, and reminisce.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Youll lack motivation
if you listen to unnecessary
complaints. Focus on the
things you can do to improve
your life and surrounding
community.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-- Make the most of your day.
Book a vacation, make a new
friend or take up a new hobby.
Procrastination will lead to all
sorts of missed opportunities.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- A safe investment will
be a source of financial security. Dont risk your savings on
an untested commodity. Plan
to make money using careful
analysis in conjunction with a
trusted financial adviser.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- Creativity and finding solutions are highlighted today. Indulge in something that frees
your imagination and shows
your unique flair if you want
to attract interest. Romance is
on the rise.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- You will be amazed at
the things you can do when
you put your mind to it. If you
challenge your intellect and
expand your talents, you will
get the best of any opponent.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- Entertainment and good times should
be scheduled. Get out with
friends and enjoy an event
that will enrich your mind and
relationships. Be sure not to
leave anyone out.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) -- Complete a project
or take care of a responsibility
thats holding you back. Once
you finish what needs to be
done, it will be easier to take
on projects you enjoy.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 19) -- Get involved in
community affairs. There is a
lot going on behind the scenes,
and you can make valuable
contributions. Making new
acquaintances will lead to interesting opportunities.
COPYRIGHT 2015 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR UFS

Answer to Sudoku
Hi and Lois

Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS
1 Pikes
discovery
5 Nope
(hyph.)
9 Cooking
spray brand
12 -- mater
13 Piqued
14 Night
before
15 Astonish
16 Solar
phenomena
18 Threw
20 Places for
hinges
21 Get closer
22 Attack
word
23 Noisy kiss
26 Lahore
language
30 NYC
sports venue
33 Baja water
34 Chimney
deposit
35 Stop the
car
37 Beetle
Bailey dog
39 NASA
counterpart
40 Pita sandwich
41 Cattails
43 Just as I
thought!
45 Cubicle
filler
48 String-quartet member
51 Late summer flowers
53 Kitchen
tool
56 Labor
57 AAA suggestion
58 Listless
59 Humdinger
60 -- Paulo
61 Vacillate
(hyph.)
62 Fashion
magazine

3 Do a comedians job
4 Corn Belt
state
5 Pre-owned
6 Ad -- committee
7 Home page
addr.
8 Alpine
heroine
9 Pedros
coin
10 State firmly
11 Jam or
pickle
17 Hocus- -19 Ms.
Bombeck
22 Glide on ice
24 Mall, for
Plato
25 Appealing
27 Lobster
eggs
28 -- and
donts
29 Ms. Hagen
30 Auto-sticker
info
31 Make a
comment
32 Watchdogs
warning

Yesterdays answers
36 Eucalyptus muncher
38 Vegas
numbers
42 Come
to terms
44 Accessible
46 Korean
capital
47 Whales
diet
48 TV
hookups

DOWN
1 Time gone
by
2 Rocket
Man John

Marmaduke

The Family Circus By Bil Keane

49 Modicum
50 Dairycase buy
51 Guthrie
of folk music
52 Fishtail
54 Twosome
55 TV
Tarzan Ron --

Classifieds

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

12

Times Bulletin/delphos Herald


To place an ad:

Delphos Herald 419.695.0015 x122


Times Bulletin classifieds@timesbulletin.com

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS:
100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
105 Announcements
110 Card Of Thanks
115 Entertainment
120 In Memoriam
125 Lost And Found
130 Prayers
135 School/Instructions
140 Happy Ads
145 Ride Share

205 Business Opportunities


210 Childcare
215 Domestic
220 Elderly Home Care
225 Employment Services
230 Farm And Agriculture
235 General

105
l

ANNOUNCEMENTS

235
l

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION LOVING,
secure life awaits 1st
baby. Expenses paid.
Penny & Kevin. 1-888772-0068. (A)

WINDOW CREATIONS
LLC
Looking for full-time and
seasonal workers for
construction-type work.

Overtime is available to
qualified hard-working
individuals. We also offer
health and life insurance.
You can apply
in person.
We are located 3 1/2
miles west of Ottoville on
224.

tweet
tweet!
Follow us on
twitter.com/ivanwert
twitter.com/delphosherald

235
l

305 Apartment
310 Commercial/Industrial
315 Condos
320 House
325 Mobile Homes
330 Office Space
335 Room
340 Warehouse/Storage
345 Vacations

235
l

HELP WANTED

A LOCAL manufacturer
is seeking a motivated
individual to fill the
position of safety
coordinator.
The position will be
responsible for the
day-to-day
implementation and
administration of
company safety policies
and required training to
stay compliant with
OSHA and state safety
requirements. This
position will also be
responsible for
maintaining all reports
required by OSHA and
the Ohio BWC.
The applicant must have
extensive knowledge of
OSHA 1910 standards
and excellent
organizational and
communication skills. A
Bachelors degree is
preferred but
not required.
Send resume to
Haviland Drainage
Products
P.O. Box 97
Haviland, Ohio 45851

525 Computer/Electric/Office
530 Events
535 Farm Supplies And Equipment
Feed/Grain
400 REAL ESTATE/ FOR SALE 540
545 Firewood/Fuel
405 Acreage And Lots
550 Flea Markets/Bazaars
410 Commercial
555 Garage Sales/Yard Sales
415 Condos
560 Home Furnishings
420 Farms
565 Horses, Tack And Equipment
425 Houses
570 Lawn And Garden
430 Mobile Homes/
575 Livestock
Manufactured Homes
577 Miscellaneous
435 Vacation Property
580 Musical Instruments
440 Want To Buy
582 Pet In Memoriam
583 Pets And Supplies
500 MERCHANDISE
585 Produce
505 Antiques And Collectibles
586 Sports And Recreation
510 Appliance
588 Tickets
515 Auctions
590 Tool And Machinery
520 Building Materials

350 Wanted To Rent


355 Farmhouses For Rent
360 Roommates Wanted

240 Healthcare
245 Manufacturing/Trade
250 Office/Clerical
255 Professional
260 Restaurant
265 Retail
270 Sales And Marketing
275 Situation Wanted
280 Transportation

300 REAL ESTATE/RENTAL

200 EMPLOYMENT

Ph: 419.238.2285
Fax: 419.238.0447
700 Fox Rd., Van Wert, OH 45891 | www.timesbulletin.com

We accept

Display Ads: All Copy Due Prior to Thursday 3pm


Liner copy and correction deadlines due by Friday noon

235
l

HELP WANTED

235
l

HELP WANTED

235
l

BFGoodrich Tire Manufacturing


Fort Wayne, Indiana

PRODUCTION OPERATORS

We are currently recruiting applicants interested in a career with the Worlds


Leading Tire Manufacturer.
CANDIDATES MUST:
Be legally authorized to work in the United States.
Be at least 18 years of age.
Be willing to work full-time on a 12-hour rotating shift schedule.
Be able to operate semi-skilled machinery.
Be able to perform frequent lifting, bending and standing for extended
periods.
Must successfully complete a medical examination, drug screen and
background check prior to beginning work.
Must be WorkKeys certified to the required job levels specified by
BFGoodrich certifications.
PAY:
New hire rate is $14.645/hour.
Additional pay includes shift premiums plus incentive pay for good
performance in certain jobs.
Opportunities to progress to higher paying position after six months.
ALL EMPLOYEES ON OUR TEAM:
Are eligible for an excellent benefits package with medical coverage
after 30 days.
Earn while learning new skills and knowledge.
Are considered for advancement and leadership.
Are empowered and respected.
Work in a friendly and professional environment.
Can participate in our Tire Rebate Program.
Are eligible for holiday pay.
Can participate in our healthy living program.

Saturday,
February 28

Saturday,
February 28

8:00am-12:00pm

8:00am-12:00pm

8:00am-12:00pm

WorkOne Allen County

WorkOne Dekalb County

WorkOne Adams County

201 E. Rudisill Blvd.


Ste. 102
Fort Wayne, IN 46806
(260)745-3555

936 W. 15th Street


Auburn, IN
45706
(260)925-0124

251 W. 850 North


Decatur, IN 46733
Region 8 Education
Services Center
(260)724-2037

A division of Michelin North America, Inc.


BFGoodrich is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is committed to providing employment
opportunities to minorities, females, veterans, and disabled individuals.

HELP WANTED

605 Auction
610 Automotive
615 Business Services
620 Childcare
625 Construction
630 Entertainment
635 Farm Services
640 Financial
645 Hauling
650 Health/Beauty
655 Home Repair/ Remodeling
660 Home Services
665 Lawn, Garden, Landscaping
670 Miscellaneous

235
l

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED
timesbulletin.com delphosherald.com

Building
Estimator

Must possess
computer and
building trades
knowledge.
Previous experience estimating
residential and
light commercial
projects is a plus.
Apply in person
at:
Mendards
1920 Havemann Rd.
Celina, OH
45822

235
l

HELP WANTED

235
l

Plastic Mfg.,
Packaging/
Assembly
Material Handler,
Food Service,
Housekeeping

Full time/Part time


Must have work
experience
No felonies,
H.S. Diploma/GED
Apply @
1198 Westwood Dr.,
Van Wert
419-238-9675
M F 8:30 4:00

675 Pet Care


680 Snow Removal
685 Travel
690 Computer/Electric/Office
695 Electrical
700 Painting
705 Plumbing
710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding
715 Blacktop/Cement
720 Handyman
725 Elder care

800 TRANSPORTATION

805 Auto
810 Auto Parts And Accessories
815 Automobile Loans
820 Automobile Shows/Events
825 Aviations
830 Boats/Motors/Equipment
835 Campers/Motor Homes

HELP WANTED

LOVE FOOD and a fast


pace? Hickory Pit BBQ
is looking for a Food
Service Specialist. Excellent customer service
skills and a happy smiling attitude are essential.
Apply within The Point
Marathon. 1150 Elida,
Ave., Delphos.
MANUFACTURING
OPPORTUNITY
Roberts Manufacturing
Co., Inc. is currently
seeking candidates for
employment at our Oakwood, Ohio facility. Visit
our website for further
details: http://robertsmanufacturing.net/(Employment Opportunities)
NOW HIRING
Part-time
Must be able to work
evenings, weekends,
holidays, work alone and
work on call. Register
experience desired.
$8.25 per hour. Must
have High School
diploma, GED or 3 years
retail experience.
Apply at:
Lassus Handy Dandy
885 N. Washington St.

HELP WANTED

SWINE PRODUCTION
TEAM MEMBER
Kalmbach Swine Management, a leading producer

of pork in Ohio, has employment opportunities available at our sow unit 10 mins. North of Middle Point.

Full Time Employment!

We Offer Competitive Pay!


Candidates with previous experience in manufacturing, production or agriculture desired. Livestock
experience preferred, but not necessary. Pre-employment drug screens and background check required.
For a full job description and to apply online
please visit www.kalmbachfeeds.com

235
l

HELP WANTED

POSITIONS
AVAILABLE

Custom Staffing

235
l

600 SERVICES

APPLICATIONS ARE
HELP WANTED
now being accepted
to Start Immediately!
for part-time
ALL AMERICAN
YWCA Summer Food
HOMES
Growing snack food
Program Mentors.
taking applications
facility (Mercer County)
Experience and course
for plant.
is looking to hire
of study in a field related
Apply at 1418 S. 13th St.
dedicated and reliable
to working with children
Decatur, IN.
individuals who desire
preferred. If interested
Must pass drug test.
apply by March 6. Email stable employment, and
opportunities for career
resume and cover letter
growth. Opportunities
to dannichiles
available on 1st and 3rd
DRIVERS: CDL-A: So@roadrunner.com
Shifts. We offer on the
los, CO & O/Ops: New
or complete an
job training, attractive
Openings! Round-trip. application at the YWCA.
new wage and full
Dedicated Lane from
benefits package. To
Ottoville, OH to Chicago,
apply, send resume to
IL. Home Nightly! Great LOOKING FOR a deBonus Programs! 855- pendable Class A CDL careers@tastemorr.com,
driver. Driving experior apply in person
200-3671
ence preferred. Home
(M-F 9AM-5PM). EOE
Find a job. Post a job. daily. Send resume to:
L&S Express, PO Box
Tastemorr Snacks
726, Saint Marys, OH
300 East Vine Street
45885 or E-mail to:
Coldwater, Ohio 45828
lsexpress@bright.net or
419-605-9660
call 419-394-7077.

HELP WANTED

Saturday,
February 21

235
l

592 Wanted To Buy


593 Good Things To Eat
595 Hay
597 Storage Buildings

United
Suppliers
seeks a

Seasonal Warehouse
CDL Driver
in Lima.

This position will operate light truck with capacity


under 23 tons to transport crop protection materials within 150 miles of warehouse. Local travel, no
overnights. Trucks maintained in excellent condition.
Job requirements:

*Three to six months verifiable previous driving


experience;
*Must be 21 years of age;
*Class B CDL license with airbrakes, HAZMAT
and tanker endorsements;
*Favorable DOT physical required;
*Negative-result drug test.
For a complete description and how to apply, go to:
www.unitedsuppliers.com or call

(419) 221-5006

or stop by 1132 E. Hanthorn Rd., Lima

235
l

Ph: 419.695.0015
Fax: 419.692.7116
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 | www.delphosherald.com

HELP WANTED

Regional DRiveRs neeDeD


Yearly pay potential to $65,000

ADDITIONAL $2,000.00 SIGN-ON BONUS

Animal Feed Industry


F/T NO WEEKEND or HOLIDAY WORK
HOPPER and PNEUMATIC TRAILERS

COMPANY WILL TRAIN ON EQUIPMENT


2 YRS. EXPERIENCE REQUIRED WITH
TRACTOR/TRAILER COMBINATION
Must have a good MVR
ASSIGNED TRUCKS

ADDITIONAL F/T EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS:


SUBSIDIZED HEALTH, DENTAL & VISION
INSURANCE
PAID LIFE & SHORT/LONG TERM DISABILITY
INSURANCE
PAID HOLIDAYS & VACATION
401K WITH COMPANY CONTRIBUTIONS

COME DRIVE FOR US AND BE PART OF OUR TEAM.

Apply in person at:

Delphos heralD

D & D TRUCKING & SERVICES, INC.


5191 KILL ROAD, DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
419-692-0062 or 855-338-7267

235
l

840 Classic Cars


845 Commercial
850 Motorcycles/Mopeds
855 Off-Road Vehicles
860 Recreational Vehicles
865 Rental And Leasing
870 Snowmobiles
875 Storage
880 SUVs
885 Trailers
890 Trucks
895 Vans/Minivans
899 Want To Buy

925 LEGAL NOTICES


950 SEASONAL
953 FREE & LOW PRICED

HELP WANTED

R & R Employment
Job Fair
February 24th
1:00PM -3:00 PM
Delphos Library
309 W. 2nd Street
Delphos, OH
Sanitation, Production,
Line Operator & Forklift
Drivers
(419) 232-2008
www.rremployment.com

255
l

PROFESSIONAL

BUILDING &
GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
INSTRUCTOR
Vantage Career Center
Starting Date:
2015-2016 School Year
Salary:
Appropriate step on
Teachers Salary
Schedule,
commensurate with
experience
and education.
Job Objectives:
Plans, implements, and
evaluates instruction in
Building & Grounds
curriculum designed to
address a wide range of
maturity and skill levels.
Helps secondary high
school students make
appropriate choices.
Encourages parental
involvement.
Minimum
Qualifications:
Possess or be eligible
for valid state
department of education
license/certificate
appropriate for
the position.
Ability to successfully
teach courses in
Construction Core
(safety, material
handling,
power tool usage);
Custodial Services
(cleaning, maintenance
of building
environments);
Facility and Building
Maintenance
(safety and operation of
machinery, equipment
used in facilities
maintenance);
Remodeling &
Renovation
(structural and
mechanical skills in
order to renovate and
remodel various
structures).
Industry Certification(s)
preferred
Meets all mandated
health requirements
(e.g., a negative
tuberculosis test,
medical exam, etc.).
A record free of
criminal violations that
would prohibit public
school employment.
Complies with
drug-free workplace
rules
and board policies.
Keeps current with
technology and other
workplace innovations
that support
job functions.
Training and/or
experience in
behavioral management
techniques.
Application Deadline:
Send a completed
Vantage application,
letter of interest, resume,
transcripts, copy of
certification, and three
letters of reference by
Friday, March 13, 2015
to:
Staci A. Kaufman,
Superintendent
818 N. Franklin St.,
Van Wert, OH 45891
kaufman.s@vantage
careercenter.com
The Board of Education
does not discriminate on
the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex
(including sexual
orientation and
transgender identity),
disability, age religion,
military status, ancestry,
genetic,
information (collectively,
Protected Classes), or
any other legally
protected category, in its
programs and activities,
including employment
opportunities.

275
l

WORK WANTED

AMISH COUNTRY
Roofing specializing in
metal and shingle roofing. Call Henry or Duane
at 330-473-8989.
HOMETOWN HANDYMAN A-Z Services
*doors & windows
*decks *plumbing *drywall *roofing *concrete.
Complete remodel. 567356-7471

305
l

APARTMENT/
DUPLEX FOR RENT

ONE BEDROOM
Apartment for rent
in Van Wert
419-733-3374

1 BEDROOM & Studios


$300 deposit water and
trash paid
NO PETS
Thistlewood/Ivy Court
Apartments
419-238-4454
2&3 bedroom
apartments, water and
trash paid, appliances
included,
APPLE GLEN
APARTMENTS
1116 Kear Road
419-238-2260
"This Institution Is An
Equal Opportunity
Employer"

NICE TWO
bedroom apartment,
washer /dryer hookup,
large yard, basement,
phone 419-203-2858

320
l

HOUSE FOR RENT

126 E Third St,


Van Wert
Owner seeking rent to
own and lease option
candidates for this
charming, updated 3
bedroom, 1 bath, 1 car
garage home. Old
woodwork, new
windows, newer roof,
updates to the kitchen,
bath, carpet, paint and
more. $575per month.
419-586-8220.

231 N Burt st, Van Wert


Updated 3 bedroom, 1
car garage, newer roof,
bath and kitchen
remodel, wood floors.
Owner financing,
seeking lease option and
rent to own candidates.
$575
per
mo.
chbsinc.com for pics,
video tour and details or
419-586-8220.
3 BEDROOM, 1 bath, 2
car dettached garage,
nice back porch, nice
backyard, 2 available,
very decent,
419-438-7004
NEWER DUPLEX. 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1 car
attached garage. 709
Euclid, Delphos. References & deposit required. $575/mo. Call
Cindy 305-393-1671.
SEVERAL MOBILE
Homes/House for rent.
View homes online at
www.ulmshomes.com or
inquire at 419-692-3951

325
l

MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT

BELL AVE. Park,


2 bedroom mobile home,
Rent -to-own, $400.00
monthly plus deposit,
419-771-0969.
Rent-To-Own
2 Bedroom
Mobile Home
419-692-3951

350
l

WANTED TO RENT

425
l

HOUSES FOR SALE

LOOKING FOR a place


to rent by April, 2-3
bedroom, reasonable
rent as I live on a fixed
income, 419-232-3344

USE YOUR
TAX RETURNS
as a down payment
towards your new home
here. Rent-to-Own, Land
Contract and more
owner financing options
available. Many
remodeled homes
available in Mercer,
Auglaize, Van Wert and
Allen counties.
chbsinc.com for pics,
video tours and details
or 419-586-8220

ClAssIfIeDs

577
l

mISCELLANEOUS

BRIGGS & STRATTON


portable generator, Elite
Series, 5500/8500,
$450.00, 419-203-5779

LAMP REPAIR, table or


floor. Come to our store.
Hohenbrink
TV.
419-695-1229

583
l

PETS AND
SUPPLIES

FREE BECAUSE I don't


need this many felines.
Young cats born last summer, and mother cat then
brought into the garage.
Some have been
spayed/neutered and immunized. Call for information 419-303-5212 in evening.

805
l

235
l

235
l

HELP WANTED
Dominion East Ohio is seeking a

Supervisor of Gas Operations

(Job 2015-6250) for our Lima, Ohio office, focusing


on distribution and transmission infrastructure. This
position will provide supervision of staff in the construction/inspection of distribution delivery projects.
For more information and to apply,
please visit www.dom.com/careers

Dominion is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to a diverse


workforce. Qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment
without regard to their protected veteran or disabled status.

235
l

Call 862-244-4761

RESTAURANT

Looking for
Quality Time with
Patients?

Home Care RNs


Hospice RNs
tweet
tweet!

Find a job. Post a job.

Follow us on
twitter.com/ivanwert
twitter.com/delphosherald

Now HiriNg
Grill Cooks,
Fry Cooks,
Servers &
Hostesses.
Looking for
competitive
wages &
a fun work
environment?
Apply today
at

Frickers
in Van Wert,
Ohio

Times Bulletin Media


The Delphos Herald

timesbulletin.com delphosherald.com

PROFESSIONAL

DRUG COURT COORDINATOR


Westwood Behavioral Health Center in
Paulding is seeking to fill a full time position
for a treatment coordinator/liaison with the
local court system. A bachelors degree
in a social service field and three years
experience in the behavioral health and/or
criminal justice field is required. Licensure
in social work or chemical dependency
is preferred. A sound understanding of
addiction disorders is needed. Duties
include:
develop intensive outpatient
protocols, monitor and report on participant
treatment compliance, collection and
submission of data, public relations activities
related to the Drug Treatment Program.
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CLINICIAN
We have an opening at our Paulding office
for an individual with experience in the
treatment of mental health and alcohol/
drug disorders. The position requires good
clinical skills and competency to work with
diverse populations and clinical issues.
Appropriate licensure and 2 years clinical
experience required.
Deadline for submission of resumes is
March 6, 2015.
SEND RESUMES TO:
Westwood Behavioral Health Center, Inc.
Attn: Clinical Director
1158 Westwood Drive
Van Wert, Ohio 45891

VAN WERT COUNTY HOSPITAL


VAN WERT, OHIO

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
To the President/CEO

Van Wert County Hospital is in


search of an Executive Assistant
with advanced secretarial skills.
The chosen candidate must be
extremely organized, and have
excellent verbal and written
communication skills.
Work
pace may be stressful at times.
Attendance at evening meetings
required.
Associate degree preferred. At least
two years experience required.
Qualified
candidates
are
encouraged to submit a resume/
application to:
Human Resources
Van Wert County Hospital
1250 S. Washington St.
Van Wert, OH 45891
Fax: 419-238-9390
E-mail: hr@vanwerthospital.org
Visit the Hospitals website at:
www.vanwerthospital.org
EOE

240
l

Updated 3 bedroom, 1
car garage, newer roof,
bath and kitchen remodel,
wood floors. Owner
financing
available.
Dont let others tell you
no, contact us about this
affordable home today!
$76,000 Approx mo
pmt $407.98

HELP WANTED

NOTICE OF EXAMINATION
The Delphos Civil Service Commission will be
conducting an open examination for the position of
ASSISTANT ELEMENTARY SECRETARY for the
Delphos City Schools District, Franklin Elementary. The examination will be held at 7:00 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 4, 2015. It will take place in
the Jefferson High School cafeteria.
A grade of 70% is required to successfully pass
the examination. The passing scores will also
serve as an eligibility list. This eligibility list shall
be valid for a period of one year.
CLASSIFICATION
POSITION: Assistant Elementary Secretary,
Franklin Elementary
STARTING SALARY: $12.99-$13.78/hour
HOURS: Full-time for 180 days (applicant
should be available to begin work as soon as
possible)
BENEFITS: Some are available.
BENEFICIAL QUALIFICATIONS: Typing, computer skills, various office machines, bookkeeping and accounting skills.
Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at the Delphos Jefferson Administrative
Building located at 234 North Jefferson Street
February 23 through February 27, 2015, during
regular business hours.
Please bring the application with you the night
of the test along with a valid Ohio Drivers license and proof of military service if applicable.

425
l

HOUSES FOR SALE

HOUSE FOR SALE

00110689

www.chbsinc.com
419-586-8220

Open Fri-sun
9am-7pm

OPEN HOUSE
714 S. RACE ST., VAN WERT
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2015 1-4 PM

3BR, 1 Ba, W/1 Car Attached Garage. With Fireplace,


Carpet with Hardwood Floors Underneath. Newer Roof/
Spouting/Hot Water Heater/Furnace. Very Clean,
Original Condition, Includes All Appliances. $69,900.
Call for Appointment 419-605-8906

126 e. Third, Van Wert

Charming 3 bedroom,
1 bath, 1 car garage. Old
woodwork throughout,
new windows, newer roof,
updates to the kitchen,
bath, carpet, paint and
more. Well updated and
clean. Will offer owner
financed options.

$74,000 approx
$397.25 per month.

www.DickClarkRealEstate.com

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, FEB. 22


1:00-2:30 p.m.
833 Elm Street

Delphos $89,900
Jack Adams
419-302-2171

View all our listings at


dickclarkrealestate.com

Dont make a
move without us!

www.chbsinc.com
419-586-8220

Dick CLARK Real Estate

Find us on

255

HOUSES FOR SALE

231 N Burt St,


Van Wert

HEALTHCARE

Email cover letter


and resume to:
choover@
familylifecarein.org

425
l

Open House

AUTO

INDIANA AUTO
AUCTION, INC. Huge
Repo Sale Feb. 26th.
Over 100 repossessed
units for sale. Cash only.
$500 deposit per person
required. Register
8am-9:30am to bid. No
public entry after
9:30am. All vehicles sold
AS IS!
4425 W. Washington
Center Road,
Fort Wayne. (A)

240
l

235
l

HELP WANTED

Expanding in the Delphos area and need


2 Class A tractor trailer drivers one for
early morning start and the other for early
afternoon start. This is a slip operation out
& back each day Mon thru Fri, home daily.
All hourly pay $20.00 p/h,
plus benefits hosp., dental, life ins, 401K
plus match paid holiday paid vacation.
Year end bonus 2 of the past 3 yrs.
Great company to work for
just ask our drivers.

260
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HELP WANTED

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015 13

Dick CLARK Real Estate

A DHI Media publication

103 N. Main St. Delphos, OH

Phone: 419-695-1006 Phone: 419-879-1006

HEALTHCARE

www.timesbulletin.com | twitter.com/ivanwert

We need you
If you are reliable, patient
and have a desire to enrich
the lives of seniors, this may
be the place for you.
We are currently seeking
self-motivated applicants for PRN
to Full-Time LPNs, PRN Resident
Assistants and Part-Time Cook.
Apply in person at

Hearth and Home


of Van Wert
1118 Westwood Drive
Van Wert, Ohio 45891

l
592

timesbulletin.com delphosherald.com

WANTED TO BUY

Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold

Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,


Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

2330 Shawnee Rd.


Lima
(419) 229-2899

l
515

l
515

AUCTIONS

PUBLIC AUCTION

Date: Saturday, 03/21


Time: 10:30 am
Location: Farmers Grain &
Ag, LLC., Willshire, OH
Items: Wanted clean farm
or industrial equipment
Seller(s): Farmers Grain
& Ag
Auctioneer(s):
Schrader Real Estate and
Auction Company, Inc.

To advertise, please e-mail classifieds@timesbulletin.com or call 419.695.0015 (Delphos Herald)


610
l

AUTOmOTIvE

PUBLIC AUCTION

Date: Wed. 03/18


Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Middle Point Community
Building, 416 N. Adams St., Middle
Point, Ohio
Items: 3 Tracts - 97 Acres Total in
Van Wert County
Seller(s): Estate of Floyd Thatcher
Robert Young -Probate Court Case
#20151003
Auctioneer(s):

Bee Gee Realty &


Auction Co., LTD.

625
l

CONSTRUCTION

D&D
DaviD Drake

Construction
Roofing Siding Decks

Windows Doors & more!


House Remodel/Room Additions

419.203.5665
419.586.8384

625
l

CONSTRUCTION

POHLMAN
BUILDERS
ROOM ADDITIONS

GARAGES SIDING ROOFING


BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED

Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work

Mark Pohlman

579
l

PICTURE IT SOLD

1996 4 WHEEL DRIvE JImmY SLE


4 door, All
power, tires
have 13,000
miles, Interior
good with no
tears.

419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460

640
l

FINANCIAL

Dealey
accounting
Firm, llC

Electronic Filing

SOLD
$1775.00

419-399-2911

Residential
Commercial
Agricultural
40yr Lifetime
Warranty

40 years combined
experience
Call For Appointment

419-852-6537

All Federal
1040 Forms
& All State
Electronic filing
refund to bank!

COnVOy
(419) 749-2765

665
l

LAWN, GARDEN,
LANDSCAPING

Quality is
remembered
long after price
is forgotten.

A&S Tree Service

419.203.7681

fully insured

mhe2008sh@gmail.com

Wanted: Remodeling,
Roofing, Siding,
New Construction,
Pole Barns.

CONCRETE WALLS

or 419.695.0015 dh

GIRODS
METAL
ROOFING

FREE ESTIMATES

CONSTRUCTION

HOmE REPAIR AND


REmODEL

Interior - Exterior
Home Repair
Insured Free Estimates
Combined 60 years
experience

l Amish
625

655
l

Modern Home
Exteriors, LLC

Buying or Hauling

POHLMAN
POURED

classifieds@
timesbulletin.com

HOmE REPAIR AND


REmODEL

Used, Wrecked or Junk Vehicles.


Scrap Metal of all kinds.
Roll-off container
services available
Certified Scale on Site
(419) 363-CARS (2277)

Crew

AUCTIONS

655
l

260-706-1665
Over 28 years of experience

Menno Schwartz

l
660

&G
a
appliance

l
Cal

Repair & Parts


Washers Dryers Refrigerators
Freezers Stoves Dishwashers
Air Conditioners

Best price & service anywhere!

419.238.3480
419.203.6126

L&M l

CONSTRUCTION

We do

ROOFING & SIDING co all your

nstructio
n
needs

All Types of Roofing

Garages Room Additions New Homes

Free Estimates
Call 419-605-7326 or

419-232-2600

655
l

HOmE REPAIR AND


REmODEL

Quality Home
Improvements
Roofing &
siding
Seamless
gutters
Decks
Windows &
doors
Electrical
Complete
remodeling
No job too small!

419.302.0882
A local business

HOmE SERvICES

660

HOmE SERvICES

Smiths Home
Improvement
& Repair

Metal Roofing
Siding
Doors
Garage
Doors

trimming, removal

Free estimates

419.586.5518

TEMANS
OUR TREE
SERVICE

Trimming Topping Thinning


Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Since 1973

419-692-7261

Bill Teman 419-302-2981


Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

670
l

Quality

Fabrication & Welding Inc.

419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR
SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS

TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM

Larry McClure

5745 Redd Rd., Delphos

670
l

567.204.2780

HOmE SERvICES

mISCELLANEOUS

SAFE &
SOUND

Find us on Facebook

660

mISCELLANEOUS

DELPHOS

SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?

refrigeration
air conditioning
heating
plumbing
electrical

Call
Fred
Fisher

419-203-1222

419-692-6336
685
l

TRAvEL

Brent Bs Travel Service


Transport Amish
Clean Driving Record
25 + years of age
Retirees welcome
Extra income driving
260-849-2546
Ask for Brent

Fab

14

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

Winter

(From page 1)
Van Wert Safety Service
Director Jay Fleming said his
workers are also poised for a
weather event.
This winter is definitely
going better than last year.
We are at 250 tons of salt of

the 350 we were able to secure so Im happy about that,


Fleming said. Im excited
the snowfall this weekend is
now expected to be less than
first predicted but all our vehicles are ready and everyone
is on call and ready go.

days
(From page 5)
The paid members of the Delphos Fire Department would
increase. The action was being taken to conform to sections
of the state law. The city of Delphos had three regular paid
firemen: Chief Lewis Leonard, Frank Grothouse, and John Goergens. They were each on duty 48 hours and then off duty for
24 hours.
The 21st Annual Van Wert County basketball tournament
was under way. A standing room only crowd at the Lincoln
gymnasium watched the Willshire Bearcats win 34-27 over the
Union Wildcats and the Hoaglin-Jackson Bulldogs fight from
nine points down for a 27-25, overtime victory over the Tully-Convoy Indians. Second round games included the Middle
Point Polar Bears versus the Ohio City Warriors while Willshire would meet Ridge and Hoaglin-Jackson moved on to the
winner of the York/Wren contest.

oppenheimer
(From page 5)
His work transcended his
lifetime. Papers he wrote discussing theories on gravitational collapse in regards to
neutron stars and black holes
were never proved in his lifetime, remaining just that, theoretical. However, later generations of scientists were able
to prove his work decades after his death, leading some to
suggest that he should be given
a Nobel Prize posthumously.
But despite all his brilliance, Oppenheimer was also
troubled. A tall thin man who
chain smoked cigarettes, lighting one off the butt of the previous one, he would become
so wrapped up in scientific
problems he would forget to
eat. As with many intellectual
geniuses, he also had emotional problems. Carrying a magnetic sort of charisma in oneon-one conversations or in
small groups, in large groups
he would become so shy he
could barely speak. He spent
time with a psychiatrist for
his problems while in college,
but if he was having trouble
finding the solution to a problem, his friends often became
worried for his own safety
because of his state of mind.
Once, when one of them tried
to console him during a severe
depression, he leaped up and
tried to strangle the man.
Oppenheimers work on

the Manhattan Project is well


known, as are the security
hearings held later that alleged
he had Communist ties and
led to his being de-certified
for classified work on nuclear
projects the very field he had
created for the U.S. government.
Despite that, he became the
director for the Institute for
Advanced Studies, a theoretical think-tank that had Albert
Einstein on the staff as the
senior professor of theoretical
physics. After Einstein was
gone, Oppenheimer assumed
the position.
In the 1960s, President
Kennedy took up Oppenheimers cause and arranged
for his being awarded the prize
named after his old friend, Enrico Fermi, even though President Johnson had to perform
the presentation after JFKs
assassination. The award returned Oppenheimer to prominence, effectively wiping
away what many in the scientific community considered
his unjust banishment.
Oppenheimers smoking
habits finally caught up to him
when he developed throat cancer which eventually spread
throughout his body.
Here now is a reprint of a
February 20, 1967, Van Wert
Times-Bulletin article detailing the life and death of J.
Robert Oppenheimer.

JUMP

Times Bulletin/Delphos Herald

eating disorders
(From page 1)
Transgendered youths have
huge barriers, Dickman said.
They have risk factors for suicide and bullying is extremely
high for that population.
Dickman said life experiences cause disorders and sexual
abuse is a huge risk factor among
girls with one in three experiencing sexual abuse as a juvenile.
The more risk factors people have family violence,
sexual and peer abuse, cyber
bullying, alcohol or drug abuse
the greater the chance they
will develop an eating disorder, Dickman said. Research
indicates girls who start their
periods early are at a greater
risk for bulimia.
Eating disorders may appear
to be only about food and weight
preoccupations at first, but individuals who struggle with them
are often using their disordered
eating to cope with feelings and
emotions that may seem overwhelming. Bullying can trigger
feelings of shame, isolation, and
hopelessness and eating disorders. As many as 65 percent
of people with an eating disorder
said that bullying contributed to
their condition.
Bullying does play a part
in eating disorders. They have
this feeling of not fitting in,
Lockert said. Teens and those
in their early 20s turn to dieting
to be successful or look a certain way.
Bullying and weight-related
discrimination are commonplace in a culture that glorifies
thinness and ridicules people

of larger sizes. Unfortunately,


weight discrimination occurs
more frequently than age or
gender discrimination.
According to NEDAs website, all forms of media impact
consumer perceptions of themselves and others. Sixty-nine
percent of the American elementary school girls who read
magazines said the pictures
influence their concept of the
ideal body shape and 47 percent
said the pictures make them
want to lose weight.
Many times the drive for
thinness begins early in an individuals life. Close to 46 percent
of 9-11 year-olds are sometimes or very often on diets
and 35-57 percent of adolescent
girls engage in crash dieting,
fasting, self-induced vomiting,
diet pills, or laxatives.
The binging and purging or
thin culture have a notion that
a person is stronger or very virtuous when they are very thin,
Lockert said.
Male and female athletes
are not immune to body image
problems, disordered eating
and full-blown eating disorders.
Though most athletes with eating disorders are female, male
athletes are also at riskespecially those competing in sports
such as wrestling, bodybuilding, gymnastics, and running,
which tend to place an emphasis on the athletes diet, appearance, size, and weight requirements.
NEDA indicates one-third
of the Division 1 NCAA female
athletes reported attitudes and

street smart

(From page 1)
This program was started to educate
families, to present information to adults,
so they know all the new drug trends. They
wanted to show the paraphernalia the kids
are using and all the drugs they are using,
Toth noted. The presentation is given anywhere in Ohio, and its offered free of charge.
Besides current officers contacting team
members with information, Operation:
Street Smart has another important source of
information the officers in the program.
Toth pointed out, What separates this
program from anything else, weve all
worked undercover. You have narcotics
detectives, road cops, and were telling real
life stories. We know the paraphernalia. We
know the stories out there, and we just want
to deliver it on everyone elses level.

feel guilty because they cant


fix them. Thats where family
counseling can help.
Overcontrolling is not the
answer, Lockert said. Focus
on their feelings. Say things like
we would like to spend more
time with you or ask how are
you feeling?
Dickman said dealing with
anorexia is tougher and requires
family therapy, meal planning
and sometimes hospitalization
before they wither away to
nothing. Bulimia requires cognitive behavioral therapy since
they have developed a pattern
of eating and binging.
NEDA offers a free and confidential screening for eating
disorders on their website mentalhealthscreening.org/neda.
The quiz is designed to help individuals determine if its time
to seek professional help. At the
end of the screening, individuals seeking help will have a
chance to speak with a volunteer or visit the website for more
information.
RRCs website has a free online screening called Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) where an
individual can take the test and
get immediate and anonymous
feedback.
PVFF offers an array of Prevention Services including the
Olweus Bullying Prevention
Program and Mental Health
First Aid and support groups
including Safes Spaces for the
LGBT community.
For more information visit
pvff.org, nedawareness.org and
river-centre.org

symptoms placing them at risk


for anorexia nervosa and 33
percent of males and 62 percent
of females in weight-class and
aesthetic sports are affected by
an eating disorder.
From TV commercials to
best selling books, people are
receiving mixed messages about
health. Many of those messages
are far from healthy and become
a catalyst to an eating disorder.
Research shows that 35 percent
of normal dieters progress
to pathological dieting and of
those, 20-25 percent continue
on to develop partial or full-syndrome eating disorders.
Parents are in the position
to help identify eating disorders
early, get their child professional help, and support them
through the recovery process.
Eating disorders are not a
choice, not just a phase or
an attention-seeking behavior,
they are serious, potentially
life-threatening illnesses that
are best treated with a support
system that includes the family.
Dickman said family members need to begin with a conversation around the behaviors
they are seeing, be non-judgmental and not focus on their
dieting, food, weight, or the way
they look in clothing.
Say things like We really
miss you not having dinner with
us and focus on the behavioral
changes, Dickman urged.
Lockert said the families intention may be to help, but comments have a lot of meaning
for someone focusing on their
weight and sometimes families

The information hits close to home and


brings awareness that being knowledgeable
about drugs last year does not mean that one
is knowledgeable in the present. The stories
were designed so that parents, officers, and
others recognize drug paraphernalia when
they see it.
When people hear about some of the
paraphernalia, the drugs and the trends, its
setting off bells in their brain, disclosed
Toth.
He told the story of a woman who had
found little pieces of sandpaper and only
later found out that her daughter was using
them to shave down pills. Had she have realized, she believes she could have saved
the life of her daughter who later died.
Drugs have been a huge problem in Van
Wert County over the last several years, but

we are not alone.


Yes, were out of Franklin County,
Toth said, but its everybodys problem.
This trip to Van Wert was brought about
through the efforts of Judge Leatherman. I
got to see them last summer at a judges conference in Columbus, she related. I was
completely blown away by the information
that they brought and I wanted to do what I
could to bring that information back to Van
Wert. So I got in touch with Lt. Doug Weigle from the Van Wert Police Department
and he was instrumental in helping to organize and support this.
Those attending the event Friday were
hopeful that the new knowledge they received will make a difference in bringing
down the numbers of persons abusing illegal substances.

Curator
(From page 5)
The Delphos Herald and Van Wert Times Bulletin advertising personnel will be contacting area business advising them
of the benefits of advertising in this widely circulated glossy
magazine of over 12,000 copies. You will find them in area
stores, in hotels, and in tourist information centers throughout
the state.
We would also like to thank the A.C. Dienstberger Foundation, the Lima Allen County CVB, and the Van Wert County
CVB for providing our initial financial support to jump-start
our initiative. Deadline for submitting advertising is March 4,
2015 please consider advertising and supporting a group of
people who have taken their time and effort to make the quality
of life better in our communities.

Sunday Sale
12 Hours Only 8am to 8pm

2/$

WindoW
(From page 5)
The aged negro, born according to federal records
near Norfolk, Va., Dec. 25,
1820, can remember serving
Gen. Andrew Jackson. He
has memories also of the days
when John Quincy Adams
was president.

Van Wert Railroad


Crossing Crash
O.O. Reed, Pennsylvania
crossing watchman, was given
credit today for perhaps preventing a major train disaster,
when the Liberty Limited, No.
58 eastbound, struck a Van
Wert County road maintainer
machine at the Wayne Street
crossing about 5:35 yesterday
afternoon. No one was injured.
The heavy road machine
had stalled on the tracks, and
James Mollenkopf, of west of
Convoy, the driver, alighted
from the machine to crank
the motor. After lowering the
gates, Reed ran west about
three blocks from the crossing
with a flag attempting to stop
the train. The fast passenger
train was slowed considerably
when it struck the road machine and stopped within two
car lengths from the crash.
Local Pennsylvania railroad men said the train might
have been wrecked had it not
slowed and parts of the heavy
steel frame of the machine had
gotten under the wheels of the
locomotive.
Shortly before the crash,

Mollenkopf had the motor of


the county machine running
again. Men who were at the
crossing called to him to run
and he fled to a safe place.
Mollenkopf and others at the
scene doubted if he would
have been able to clear the
tracks before the crash, had he
attempted. After about thirty-five minutes delay the train
proceeded.
The road maintainer, of
heavy steel frame construction, was bought by the county
only a few weeks ago.
Delphos Herald,
Mar. 20, 1979

Train Runs by
Voice Control
in New York
The ambition of every
youngster to have a train that
will stop and go at the command of his voice, is realized
in a voice-controlled electric
train developed by the General
Electric company.
Casey Jones, a toy electric locomotive, starts, forward, reverse or stops at the
instant it is commanded, and
it never makes a mistake, provided the orders are properly
worded.
The voice-controlled locomotive is a development of
the laboratories of the General
Electric company. Orders are
issued through an ordinary
telephone transmitter.
Delphos Herald,
Mar. 20, 1929

Milk

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15

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

A DHI Media publication

White House
tries to counter
Netanyahu trip
WASHINGTON (AP) In
what is becoming an increasingly nasty grudge match, the
White House is mulling ways
to undercut Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahus
upcoming trip to Washington
and blunt his message that a
potential nuclear deal with
Iran is bad for Israel and the
world.
There are limits. Administration officials have discarded
the idea of President Barack
Obama himself giving an
Iran-related address to rebut
the two speeches Netanyahu
is to deliver during his early
March visit. But other options
remain on the table.
Among them: a presidential
interview with a prominent
journalist known for coverage
of the rift between Obama and
Netanyahu, multiple Sunday
show television appearances
by senior national security
aides and a pointed snub of
Americas leading pro-Israel
lobby, which is holding its annual meeting while Netanyahu
is in Washington, according to
the officials.
The administration has already ruled out meetings between Netanyahu and Obama,
saying it would be inappropriate for the two to meet
so close to Israels March
17 elections. But the White
House is now doubling down
on a cold-shoulder strategy,
including dispatching Cabinet
members out of the country
and sending a lower-ranking
official than normal to represent the administration at the
annual policy conference of
the American Israel Public
Affairs Committee, the officials said.

Panel suggests
tax on sugary
foods
WASHINGTON (AP)
A tax on sugary drinks and
snacks is one way a government panel of nutrition experts thinks Americans can
be coaxed into eating better.
Some members of Congress
are already pushing back on
the idea, saying the panel has
overstepped its bounds.
The panels recommendations will help determine what
gets into the new version of
dietary guidelines being prepared by the Agriculture and
Health and Human Services
departments. The advice includes eating more fruits and
vegetables and whole grains
and limiting added sugars and
fat.
However, the panel goes
beyond previous versions of
the dietary guidelines by suggesting a broad list of possible
policy changes a tax is just
one that could make it easier for people to follow that diet
advice.
Taxation on higher sugarand sodium-containing foods
may encourage consumers to
reduce consumption and revenues generated could support
health promotion efforts, the
committee wrote as part of
the recommendations released
this week.

Will Iraqis be
ready for Mosul
operation?

STORY OF THE DAY


Healthcare.gov users
receive wrong tax info

WASHINGTON (AP)
With the military operation
to retake Iraqs second largest
city from Islamic State militants just a few months away,
questions persist about whether the struggling Iraqi military
will be ready for the fight.
Iraqi officials continue to
insist they havent gotten the
advanced weapons they need
for the operation in the northern city of Mosul, and some
question whether they will be
ready for a spring offensive.
But the Pentagon insists the
U.S. has sent tens of thousands
of weapons and ammunition
and more is in the pipeline.
Hakim al-Zamili, the head
of the security and defense
committee in the Iraqi parliament, told The Associated
Press Friday that any operation would be fruitless unless
the brigades are properly prepared and have the weapons
they need.
I think if these weapons
are not made available soon,
the military assault might wait
beyond spring, he said.
The Americans might
have their own calculations
and estimations, but we as
Iraqis have our own opinion.
We are fighting and moving
on the ground, so we have better vision and April might be
too soon.

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) In a new setback for the health
care law and the people its supposed to help, the government
said Friday it made a tax-reporting error thats fouling up the
filings of nearly a million Americans.
After a successful sign-up season, the latest goof could
signal new problems with the complex links between President Barack Obamas health care overhaul and the nations
income tax system.
Officials said the government sent the wrong tax information to about 800,000 HealthCare.gov customers, and theyre
asking those affected to delay filing their 2014 returns. The
issue involves a new government form called a 1095-A,
which is like a W-2 form for health care for people who got
subsidized private coverage under Obamas law.
People can find out whether theyre affected by logging
in to their accounts at HealthCare.gov, where they should
find a message indicating whether they were affected or not.
They also can check by phoning the federal customer service
center at 800-318-2596.
Separately, California announced earlier that it had sent
out inaccurate tax forms affecting about 100,000 households. The state is not part of the federal market but runs its
own insurance exchange.
HealthCare.gov said in a blog post that the federal mistake happened when information on this years premiums
was substituted for what should been 2014 numbers. The
website had a technology meltdown when it was launched
back in 2013, but seemed to have overcome its problems this
enrollment season.
Its just another black mark on the administrations handling of the health care act, said Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center in Washing-

$tocks of Regional Interest


Name

Change

Dow Jones Industrial Average +154.67


NASDAQ Composite
+31.27
NYSE COMPOSITE (DJ)
+70.41
S&P 500
+12.85
American Electric Power Co., Inc. +0.31
AT&T, Inc.
-0.01
AutoZone, Inc.
+4.97
Bob Evans Farms, Inc.
-0.70
Bunge Limited
+0.22
BP p.l.c.
+0.09
Citigroup Inc.
+0.66
CSX Corp.
+0.02
Cooper Tire & Rubber Co.
+0.85
CenturyLink, Inc.
-0.57
CVS Health Corporation
+0.08
Dominion Resources, Inc.
+0.20
Deere & Company
+0.72
The Walt Disney Company
+0.66
eBay Inc.
+0.37
Eaton Corporation plc
+0.39
Ford Motor Co.
-0.03
First Defiance Financial Corp.
-0.19
Federal-Mogul Holdings Corp.
-0.05
First Financial Bancorp.
-0.04
General Dynamics Corporation +2.73
Goodrich Petroleum Corp.
+0.08
General Electric Company
+0.20
Greif, Inc.
+0.17
General Motors Company
+0.14
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber
+0.35
Huntington Bancshares Inc.
+0.08
Health Care REIT, Inc.
+1.83
The Home Depot, Inc.
+1.30
Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
+0.14
International Business Machines -0.24
Johnson & Johnson
+0.26
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
+0.57
The Kroger Co.
+0.35
Kohls Corp.
+1.13
Lowes Companies Inc.
+1.27
McDonalds Corp.
0.00
Microsoft Corporation
+0.35
MOTORS LIQUIDATION
0.0000
Navistar International Corp.
+0.14
Nucor Corporation
+0.34
Pepsico, Inc.
+0.34
The Procter & Gamble Company -0.34
Rite Aid Corporation
+0.16
Sprint Corporation
-0.05
Teleflex Incorporated
+4.00
Time Warner Inc.
+0.61
Textron Inc.
+0.20
United Security Bancshares Inc. -0.09
United Parcel Service, Inc.
+0.26
U.S. Bancorp
+0.30
Verizon Communications Inc.
+0.06
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
+0.78
Wells Fargo & Company
+0.27
The Wendys Company
-0.01

Open
17,985.77
4,919.78
11,025.27
2,097.65
58.33
34.06
618.98
57.56
82.48
41.18
51.05
35.41
36.99
37.40
102.36
73.74
90.66
103.86
57.67
72.13
16.38
32.27
15.47
17.74
139.32
4.39
24.88
42.30
37.49
27.23
10.60
76.66
110.81
33.35
163.53
100.18
58.96
72.58
68.25
72.13
94.19
43.51
0.00
29.08
48.09
98.22
84.95
8.01
4.81
117.92
83.84
44.73
8.29
101.49
44.07
48.84
82.68
54.41
11.23

Close
18,140.44
4,955.97
11,108.67
2,110.30
58.72
34.08
623.31
56.90
82.72
41.28
51.78
35.55
37.71
37.02
102.70
73.99
92.43
104.55
58.02
72.51
16.40
32.00
15.41
17.67
142.24
4.40
25.21
42.50
37.65
27.69
10.72
78.05
112.24
33.51
163.65
100.26
59.80
72.79
69.50
73.56
94.19
43.85
0.0422
29.30
48.48
99.06
84.87
8.15
4.83
120.16
84.53
44.99
8.29
101.96
44.62
48.97
84.30
54.83
11.26

If you are looking to


build a house...

1200 - 1800 square feet


Basement or crawl space
Single story, ranch
About a 15 minute drive from Vantage

...Let the VANTAGE


Carpentry class
take care of it!
Stop in at the Vantage District Office
for an application, or go online to
www.vantagecareercenter.com
and click on the Residential Home Building
application link on the home page.

DEADLINE TO RECEIVE APPLICATIONS IS MARCH 16, 2015!


We are able to start construction
August 2015!
For questions or information,
please contact Jerry Robinson,
Carpentry Instructor, at
419-238-5411 ext. 2157

In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, the HealthCare.


gov website is seen in Portland, Ore. About
800,000 HealthCare.gov customers got the wrong
tax information from the government, the Obama
administration disclosed Friday, and officials are
asking those affected to delay filing their 2014
returns. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
ton. They were hoping for a clean season.
For many of these impacted taxpayers, the tax refund
could be the single largest financial payout of the year, said
Mark Ciaramitaro, H&R Blocks vice president for health
care. Many people due a refund file well before the April 15
deadline. They are being told to wait, he added, further
delaying access to their tax refund.
On another matter, the administration also announced a
special sign-up extension for uninsured people who would
face the health care laws tax penalties for the first time this
year.
Several million households could benefit from that grace
period, which had been sought by Democratic lawmakers.
Uninsured people who go to file their taxes and learn
theyre facing a penalty will have between March 15 and
April 30 to sign up through HealthCare.gov. Otherwise, they
would not have had an opportunity until the fall. Fines for
being uninsured are going up significantly in 2015.

Greece, eurozone settle differences


BRUSSELS (AP) Following weeks of
recrimination and distrust, Greece and its
creditors in the 19-nation eurozone reached an
agreement Friday on extending the countrys
rescue loans, a move that should dramatically
ease concerns it was heading for the euro exit
as soon as next month.
The agreement, which looked a long way
off Thursday when one German official compared Athens request for more time to the infamous Trojan Horse, will mean that Greece
will avoid going bankrupt, at least over the

four months of the extension. It should also


mean that capital controls wont be needed
and that Greek banks will have enough money
to stock up their ATMs.
To get the money though, the Greek government has one more hurdle to clear. On
Monday, it has to present a series of unspecified economic reforms measures that are
deemed acceptable by creditors and rooted
in Greeces previously enacted bailout agreement something the government had promised not to do.

Hurry in for best selection...

New 2015 New 2014


Buick LaCrosse Chevy Spark 1LT
1SL
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Impala 2LTZ Colorado Crew


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28,841 *
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* Plus tax, title and doc fees.

75% of our used


vehicles are CAR FAX
1 owner

PRE-OWNED VEHICLES

14 IMPALA V6 2 to Choose ......................................From $21,500


14 TRAVERSE 2LT, Reduced ....................................Now $26,500
14 GMC Yukon SLT 4WD, Leather ......................................$33,900
14 EQUINOX 2 to Choose, 1LT .................................From $21,500
14 GMC TERRAIN SLE2, AWD 2 to Choose ......................$23,500
14 CRUZE 1LT, Great MPG, Loaded ...................................$13,900
14 SPARK 2LT, Heated Seats & More! ...............................$12,500
13 MALIBU, 2 to Choose, 2LT, LTZ ...........................From $15,900
13 SILVERADO 1500, Ext, 4WD, Local, Loaded ................$27,900
13 CAPTIVA LTZ, Sunroof, Full Power ...............................$17,900
13 IMPALA 1LT, Sunroof, Full Power .................................$13,500

CHEVROLET BUICK

1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos


VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com

12 ENCLAVE CXL, AWD, Dual Sunroof, Loaded...............$31,500


12 CRUZE 1LT, Full Power, Great MPG ..............................$13,500
11 SUBURBAN 4WD LTZ, Has Everything.........................$39,900
11 SILVERADO LTZ, Crew Cab, Loaded, 4WD ..................$29,700
10 GMC SIERRA Ext., SLE, 4WD, Local.............................$24,900
10 LaCROSSE CXL, Diamond White, Loaded ...................$16,900
09 CADILLAC DTS, Biarritz Pkg., 35k mi.,.........................$17,500
07 TAHOE LTZ 4WD, Leather, Loaded ...............................$18,500
06 IMPALA, Sunroof ..............................................................$7,995
01 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT, Local Trade ........................$4,995
99 BUICK LeSABRE LIMITED, 3.8 V6...................................$4,295
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. 7:30 to 5:00; Wed.
7:30 to 7:00; Closed on Sat.
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00; Tues., Thurs. & Fri.
8:30 to 5:30; Sat. 8:30 to 1:00

419-692-3015
TOLL FREE

1-888-692-3015

Saturday, February 21 & Sunday, February 22, 2015

REAL ESTATE

Times Bulletin/Delphos Herald

Average rate
on 30-year
mortgage rises
WASHINGTON (AP) Average
long-term U.S. mortgage rates have risen
for a second straight week yet remained
near historically low levels.
Mortgage company Freddie Mac said
Thursday the nationwide average for a
30-year mortgage jumped to 3.76 percent from 3.69 percent last week. The
average rate is still at its lowest level
since May 2013.
The rate for the 15-year loan, a popular choice for people who are refinancing, increased to 3.05 percent from 2.99
percent last week.
A year ago, the average 30-year mortgage stood at 4.33 percent and the 15year mortgage at 3.35 percent. Mortgage
rates have remained low even though
the Federal Reserve in October ended
its monthly bond purchases, which were
meant to hold down long-term rates.
The recent rise in mortgage rates has
come as bond yields have jumped from
record low levels. Mortgage rates often
follow the yield on the 10-year Treasury
note, which has climbed back over 2 percent. Bond yields rise as prices fall.
The 10-year note traded at 2.08 per-

Home construction slips


WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. homebuilders slowed the
pace of construction in January, breaking ground on fewer single-family houses ahead of the spring buying season.
Housing starts slipped 2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.07 million last month, down from 1.09 million in
December, the Commerce Department said Wednesday.
Leading that decline was a sharp 6.7 percent monthly drop
in starts for single-family houses. Still, a healing economy
has caused building activity to move at a faster clip, with single-family starts climbing 18.7 percent over the past 12 months.
Despite the monthly decline, the broader economy should
help boost home sales and apartment construction this year.
We have strong job growth, strong consumer confidence,
still low borrowing costs, said Jennifer Lee, a senior economist at BMO Capital Markets.
In the past three months alone, the economy has gained
more than a million new paychecks. Employers are adding
workers at an annual clip of 2.3 percent, the fastest rate in the
more than five-year recovery from the Great Recession.
This Jan. 8, 2015, photo shows a home for sale in Charlotte, N.C. (AP
Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
cent Wednesday, up from 1.99 percent
a week earlier. It traded at 2.09 percent
Thursday morning.
To calculate average mortgage rates,
Freddie Mac surveys lenders across the
country at the beginning of each week.
The average doesnt include extra fees,
known as points, which most borrowers must pay to get the lowest rates.
One point equals 1 percent of the loan
amount.

The average fee for a 30-year mortgage was 0.6 point, unchanged from last
week. The fee for a 15-year mortgage
also remained at 0.6 point.
The average rate on a five-year adjustable-rate mortgage was unchanged
at 2.97 percent. The fee was stable at 0.5
point.
For a one-year ARM, the average rate
increased to 2.45 percent from 2.42 percent. The fee remained at 0.4 point.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS


City of Delphos
Penelope G. and Charles
E. Gerdeman, John G. and
Erica M. Pimpas and Paula G. Nakos to Paula G. and
Christos N. Nakos, Dewey
St., Delphos, $100,000.
Timothy K. and Elizabeth L. Staup to Colin E. and
Courtney R. Spieles, 709 Carolyn Dr., Delphos, $88,000.
Village of Elida
H. Wesley and Peggy S.
Boedicker to Richard W. and
Joy L. Walters, 400 Powers
Ave., Lima, $22,000.
Jason M. and Jessica L.
Hays to Amy Sapp, 115 Orchard Dr., Lima, $235,500.
Putnam County
Jay Clementz, Lots 116
and 119, Cloverdale, to Darlena Lawhorn and Martin
Lawhorn.
Glenn W. Brickman and
Linda K. Brickman, 1.418
acres, Liberty Township, to
Glenn W. Brickman and Linda K. Brickman.
Henry L. Gerding and
Lois A. Gerding, 2.43 acres,
40.0 acres and 35.0 acres,
Union Township, to Henry L.
Gerding and Lois A. Gerding.
Henry L. Gerding and
Lois A. Gerding, Lot 93, Kalida, to Henry L. Gerding and
Lois A. Gerding.
Craig R. Brickner and
Kristine E. Brickner, .96
acre, Liberty Township, to
Moses Paniagua.
Raina M. Rausch, Lots
362 and 363, Pandora, to
Thomas J. Gerdeman and
Jodi R. Gerdeman.
Harold M. Smith, dec.,
Lots 95 and 96, Miller City,
to Mildred L. Smith.
David W. Ellerbrock and
Susan T. Ellerbrock, 80.0
acres, 40.0 acres, 40.0 acres,
40.0 acres and 40.0 acres,
Van Buren Township, to Susan T. Ellerbrock and David
W. Ellerbrock.
Charles L. Warnimont TR
and Velma B. Warnimont
TR, 1.36 acres and 77.577
acres, Palmer Township, to
Velma B. Warnimont.
Larry D. Pack and Marilyn P. Pack, Lot 22, Vaughnsville, to Thomas J. Dotson
and Sheena M. Dotson.
Nyle R. Stateler and Helen
F. Stateler, Lot 666, Continental, to Casey G. Spitnale.
Ellen A. Bird, 40.0 acres,
Perry Township, to Chad C.
Bird.
Reta O. Winkler TR, Lot
460, Leipsic, to Eric J. Guerra.
Nicole A. Kline fka Nicole
A. Kahle and Cory Kline,
Lot 2, Ottawa Township, to
Craig A. Duling and Kristin
L. Duling.
Melvin H. Borton and Linda D. Borton, Lot 16, Ottawa
Township, to Melvin H. Borton and Linda D. Borton.
Melvin H. Borton and Linda D. Borton, Lots 268 and
269, Continental, to Melvin
H. Borton and Linda D. Borton.
Melvin H. Borton and Linda D. Borton, Lot 40, Continental, to Melvin H. Borton
and Linda D. Borton.
Janet S. Basinger, Lots 953
and 953A, 15.85 acres and
8.10 acres, Pleasant Township, to Shady Lawn Farms
Inc.
Patrick R. Recker and Emily S. Recker, parcel, Ottawa
Township, to Jill A. Meyerhoffer and Adam Vorst.
Nichole D. Niese, 1.0 acre,
Ottawa Township, to Joshua

David Niese.
Van Wert County
Lester R. Dancer, Lester
Dancer, Mary Ellen Dancer,
Mary Dancer, Sheriff Thomas M. Riggenbach to Dennis
Dancer, inlots 598, 597, Delphos.
Jason Couts, Mandy Couts
to Joshua J. Huber, Chelsea
M. McClelland, portion of
section 24, Tully Township.
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Barbara
Ann Welch Revocable Living
Trust, portion of inlots 281,
280, Van Wert.
JPMorgan Chase Bank to
Federal National Mortgage
Association, portion of section 30, Ridge Township (lot
4, Poes subdivision).
Zach Craig, Maria Craig,
Sheriff Thomas M. Riggenbach to Julie Gamble, Dale
Butler, inlot 3599, Van Wert.
Mary Sites, Mary H. Sites,

Mary Helen Sites, Sandra C.


Schnepp, Harold E. Sites,
Kenneth R. Sites, Jack W.
Sites, Sheriff Thomas M.
Riggenbach to Julie A. Gamble, Dale E. Butler, inlot 155,
Van Wert.
David
Estes,
Sheriff
Thomas M. Riggenbach to
FFF Properties LLC, portion
of lot 274, Van Wert subdivision.
Thomas D. Floyd, Sheriff
Thomas M. Riggenbach to
FFF Properties LLC, inlot
431, Van Wert.
Estate of Iola M. Huffine,
estate of John P. Huffine to
Janice E. Huffine Breitwieser, portion of section 1, Liberty Township.
Dale E. Metzger to Federal National Mortgage Association, portion of inlots 164,
165, Delphos.
Jennifer R. Profit, Gaylord
L. Taylor, Eric D. Profit, Gaylord Taylor to Mark E. Keber,

Deborah S. Keber, portion of


section 15, Liberty Township.
Estate of John K. Linser
Sr. to Leila W. Brown, inlot
2972, Van Wert.
Benjamin J. Hotmire,
Lindsay R. Hotmire to Jared
S. Hufford, inlot 3804, Van
Wert.
Martha E. Keipper to
Samuel L. Brown, Barbara L.
Brown, inlots 714, 741, Van
Wert.
Perry Oney, Ashley C.
Oney to Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corporation, portion of section 29, Jackson
Township.
Jennifer M. Hanna, Jennifer Hanna to Josh Hanna,
outlot 6-1, Delphos.
Estate of John J. Bollenbacher, estate of John Bollenbacher Junior, estate of
J.J. Bollenbacher to Ted E.
Bollenbacher, Janice Bollenbacher, inlots 151-1, 151-2,
Willshire.

LOSE 20-45+
POUNDS in

40 DAYS

TEED!
GUARAN
Because of technology!

ULTIMATE
FAT LOSS SYSTEM
2

ROBIN LOST 73+ POUNDS

AFTER

BEFORE
Robin ................................51 and 198.2lbs
BMI (Body Mass Index) .............................. 37.4
Blood Pressure ............................... 198/108
Metabollic Age ........................................ 90
Complained of the Chest Pain & Being Tired

Robin ................................51 and 124.8lbs


BMI (Body Mass Index) .............................. 23.6
Blood Pressure ................................. 108/70
Metabollic Age ........................................ 25

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HOUSES FOR SALE

Ottoville Office:
419-453-2281

Delphos Office:
419-692-SOLD

BEFORE
BEFORE

Denny Heitmeyer
Office: (419) 532-3482
Mobile: (567) 376-0572

NEW LISTING!!!!
148 WESTWOOD, OTTOVILLE

Beautiful 3/2 Brick Ranch with awesome finished basement. Huge garage and desirable
neighborhood. Call Tony TODAY: 419-233-7911

Vince ................................................. 230lbs


Drake
BMI (Body Mass Index) .............................. 35.6
Fat Mass% ................................. 73.2/32.3%
Metabollic Age ........................................ 85
Sex Life ..................................................... 2

AFTER
AFTER

Drake
Vince ................................................. 177lbs
BMI (Body Mass Index) .............................. 27.8
Fat Mass% ................................. 38.6/21.7%
Metabollic Age ........................................ 43
Sex Life ......................................... LIKE 22!

THIS WILL BE THE BEST DECISION OF YOU

R LIFE!

337 WALNUT, OTTOVILLE

4 BR, 2 Bath, 2 Story on great street. Updates


throughout, great lot, including storage building.
SELLER IS MOTIVATED!!!!!!!
Call Tony: 419-233-7911.

Jeff Weadock
Office: (614) 529-0101
Mobile: (614) 332-4778

Matt Nichols
Mobile: (614) 657-4654

222 WEST, COLUMBUS GROVE

4 BR, Master Bath, Many updates inside and out.


SELLER IS MOTIVATED. MAKE US AN OFFER!
Nancy: 943-2220

NO SHOTS!
NO HORMONES!
NO SURGERY!
NO EXERCISE
NO DRUGS!
NO HUNGER!
NO CRAZY DIET
DOCTOR SUPERVISED!

LOSE
1-2 LBS
PER DAY

We each gain weight differently

609 N. BROAD KALIDA

3 BR, 2 Bath, Brick Ranch on 4+ acres in town.


Take a look! Tony: 233-7911
Nancy Frankart
Office: (419) 943-2220

Discover the TECHNOLOGY we use to personalize your plan


by assessing the factos affecting fat burning including...
The Organs involved in Fat Burning, Fat Storage & Metabolism
Hormones & Neurotransmitters

18860 SR 189 FT JENNINGS

Vitamins & Minerals

3 BR, 1 bath Ranch on One Acre. Basement. Many


updates inside and out. Call Tony: 233-7911

Nick Langhals
Mobile: (419) 236-3450

212 W. CENTER ST. LEIPSIC

3 BR, Updated home under $75,000. Call Nancy:


943-2220.

513 E LIBERTY, LEIPSIC

3 BR, 1 bath, great neighborhood, new shingles.


Call Ron: 523-4897

828 N. MAIN, DELPHOS

4 BR, 1 Bath. Newer vinyl siding and shingles.


Nice sized yard, Basement. Call Tony: 419-233-7911.

LOTS, LOTS, LOTS:


Kalida Country,
Country Acres,
Ottoville Subdivision.
Call for details

See these
listings & more at:

WWW.TLREA.COM

Ronald Pohlman
Office: (419) 523-4633
Fax: (419) 523-4897

Heavy Metals & Toxins


Microbes (Bacteria, Virus Mycoplasma,
Candida, Parasites, etc.)

YOUR OWN PERSONALIZED PROGRAM


IS BASED ON THE INFORMATION
FROM HRF WEIGHTLOSS TECHNOLOGY!
Its like having your Hormonal Fingerprint for weightloss...
giving us the perfect recipe for you to burn fat the fastest...
Burning from 2,000 up to 7,000 calories of fat per day! While
raising your metabolism and resetting your wieght set point so

Steve Landwehr
Mobile: (567) 204-0395

that you keep the weight off.

NEW BREAK THROUGH TECHNOLOGIES

CHECK OUT WHAT


MAKES OUR SYSTEM
SUPERIOR!
Tony Langhals
Office: (419) 453-2281
Mobile: 419-233-7911

AVAILABLE: IN-OFFICE/ONLINE/OUT-OF-STATE

NutriMost
Lima
NutriMost
Michigan
419-232-3322

Schedule a
415 East Kiracofe
Ave., Lima
14550
Riverview
Mi 48193
consultation
forKing Rd10192
St.
Rt.
Drake E. Hughes,
D.C. 118
only $27 nutrimostmichigan.com
LoseFatIn40days.com

in Van Wert
(Across from McDonalds)

419-232-3322
248-476-7775
419-967-6726

A $99 Value

8985 ROAD A. LEIPSIC


5BR, 1 1/2 Bath, 1 Car Attd Garage.
New metal roof and appliances included.
Call Nancy: 943-2220

FREE

IN-OFFICE REVIEW
OF OUR SYSTEM

40694160

16

Toby Looser
Mobile: (419) 236-2482

00112086

10192 St. Rt. 118


in Van Wert
(Across from McDonalds)

LoseFatIn40Days.com

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