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1. For a subcutaneous injection, the nurse should use a 5/8 25G needle.

2. An individual who has an autosomal dominant inherited condition carries a


gene mutation for that condition on one chromosome of a pair.
3. X-linked conditions may be inherited in families in recessive or dominant
patterns. In both, the gene mutation is located on the X- chromosome.
4. All males inherit an X chromosome from their mother with no counter-part;
hence. All males express gene mutation.
5. Sickle cell anemia is associated with the African-American population.
6. A stage 1 pressure ulcer is an area of nonblanchable erythema, tissue
swelling and congestion, and the patient complains of discomfort.
7. A stage 2 pressure ulcer exhibits a break in the skin through epidermis and
dermis.
8. A stage 3 ulcer has a deep crater with or without undermining of adjacent
tissues noted.
9. A stage 4 pressure ulcer extends into the underlying structure, including the
muscle and possibly the bone.
10.Prophylaxis is disease prevention.
11.Body alignment is achieved when body parts are in proper relation to their
neutral position.
12.Chinese and Japanese who are rapid metabolizers of the N-acetyltransferase
who are taking isoniazid are at risk for developing isolated-induced hepatitis.
13.Prostaglandins are believed to increase sensitivity to pain receptors by
enhancing the pain-provoking effect of bradykinin.
14.Patients with orthopnes prefer not to lie flat and will need to maintain their
beds in a semi- to high-fowlers position.
15.Dyspnea on exertion refers to difficulty breathing with activity.
16.Hyperpnea refers to increased rate and depth of respiration.
17.Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea refers to orthopnea that occurs only at night.
18.Intermittent claudication is a sign of peripheral arterial insufficiency.
19.An aneurysm is a localized sac of an artery wall formed at a weak point in the
vessel.
20.Essential or primary hypertension denotes high blood pressure from an
unidentified source.
21.Secondary hypertension denotes high blood pressure from an identified
cause, such as renal disease.
22.Supplemental potassium is given with Furosemide because of the potassium
loss that occurs as a result of this diuretic.
23.The living will is a type of advance medical directive in which the individual of
sound mind documents treatment preferences.
24.Separation anxiety is a major source of stress for a hospitalized toddler.
25.A proxy directive is the appointment and authorization of another individual
to make medical decisions in behalf of the person who created an advance
directive when he is no longer able to speak to him.
26.A durable power of attorney for health care is a legal document that enables
the signer to designate another individual to make health care decisions on
his behalf when he is unable to do so.

27.A competent adult has the right to refuse lifesaving medical treatment.
However, the individual should be fully informed of the consequences of his
refusal.
28.Although a patients health record or chart, is the health care facilitys
physical property, its contents belong to the patient.
29.Before a patients health record can be released to a third party, the patient
or the patients legal guardian must give written consent.
30.To minimize interruptions during a patient interview, the nurse should select a
private room, preferably one with a door that can be closed.
31.Crackles in the lungs are a classic sign of left-sided heart failure. These
sounds are caused by fluid backing-up into the pulmonary system.
32.Elevated venous pressure, exhibited as jugular vein distention, indicates a
failure of the heart to pump.
33.An apical pulse is essential for accurately assessing the clients heart rate
before administering digoxin.
34.One of the most common signs of digoxin in toxicity is the visual disturbance
known as the green halo sign.
35.To maintain package sterility, the nurse should open a wrappers top flap
away from the body, open each side flap by touching only the outer part of
the wrapper and open the final flap by grasping the turned-down corner and
pulling it toward the body.
36.Clean-contaminated cases are those with potential, limited source for
infection, the exposure to which, to a large extent, can be controlled.
37.Clean cases are those with no apparent source of potential infection.
38.Standing orders or protocols establish guidelines for treating a specific
disease or set of symptoms.
39.To prevent brain damage, treatment of phenylketonuria must begin within the
first few weeks of life.
40.A traumatic wound with foreign bodies, fecal contamination, or purulent
discharge would be considered a dirty case.
41.The patient receiving Lactulose is monitored closely for the development of
watery diarrheal stools, because they indicate a medication overdose.
42.Ketone bodies are acids that disturb the acid-base balance of the body when
they accumulate in excessive amounts.
43.In acute ulcerative colitis, cathartics are contraindicated when the patient is
being prepared for barium edema or endoscopy because they may
exacerbate the condition.
44.Even when the anemia is severre, RBC transfusions should not be used
because the patients body has compensated over time by expanding the
total blood volume.
45.Autologous donation a donation of the clients own blood before a
scheduled procedure.
46.Laminectomy- surgical excision of a part of posterior arch of vertebra and
removal of protruded disc to relieve compression of spinal nerves.
47.A throat culture is the only method by which an accurate diagnosis of
streptococcal infection of the throat can be made.

48.An elderly patient whose chief complaint is back pain, and who has an
elevated protein level, should be evaluated for possible myeloma.
49.Patients with myocarditis are sensitive to digitalis.
50.Symptoms of cardiac tamponade: falling arterial pressure, rising venous
pressure, and distant heart sounds.
51.A pericardial friction rub is diagnostic of pericarditis.
52.Perception of pain is highly individualized.
53.Subculture refers to a group of people distinguished by genetically
transmitted characteristics.
54.Planning includes identification of teaching strategies and writing the
teaching plan.
55.Physical readiness refers to the patients ability to cope with physical
problems and focus attention upon learning.
56.Emotional readiness refers to the patients acceptance of an existing illness
or the threat of an illness and its influence on the ability to learn.
57.Experiential readiness refers to past experiences that influence a persons
ability to learn.
58.Because the patients serum potassium level may drop quickly due to
rehydration and insulin treatment, potassium replacement must begin once
potassium levels drop to normal.
59.Severe untreated hypothyroidism is characterized by an increased
susceptibility to the effects of all hypnotic and sedative agents.
60.The nurse must monitor for myocardial ischemia or infarction, which may
occur in response to therapy in patients with severe, long-standing
hypothyroidism or myxedema coma.
61.In all patients with hypothyroidism, the effects of analgesic agents, sedatives
and anesthetic agents are prolonged.
62.Dehydration is a concern in patients who have chronically elevated blood
glucose levels.
63.Initiation of insulin treatment along with fluid and electrolytes as needed, is
essential to treat hyperglycemia and rapidly improves the metabolic
abnormalities.
64.Latex catheters and drainage systems must not be used with patients who
have known or possible latex allergy.
65.The nurse never adjusts the clamps on the external fixator frame. It is the
physicians responsibility to do so. Countertraction must be maintained for
effective traction.
66.The most accurate indicator of fluid loss or gain in an acutely ill patient is
weight.
67.A 1-kg weight gain is equal to 1,000 mL of retained fluid.
68.In myasthenia gravis, maintenance of stable blood levels of anticholinergic
medication is imperative to stabilize muscle strength.
69.The earliest sign of increasing ICP is change in LOC. Slowing of speech and
delay in response to vertebral suggestions, are other early indicators.
70.IV glucose and insulin or Calcium gluconate may be used as emergency and
temporary measures to treat hyperkalemia.

71.Diagnostic procedure for poliomyelitis is Pandys test, determining increase


number of protein in CSF.
72.Never massage the calves or thighs due to the danger of dislodging
undetected DVT.
73.Failure of the permanent dialysis access (fistula or graft) account for the most
hospital admissions of patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis.
74.Hand hygiene is essential when moving from one patient to another to
provide care and before and after handling any part of the catheter or
drainage system.
75.The nurse must never remove weights from skeletal tractions unless a lifethreatening situation occurs. Removal of the weights completely defeats the
purpose and may result in injury to the patient.
76.Nursing diagnosis refer to actual or potential health problems that can be
managed by independent nursing interventions.
77.Routing stabilization of the cervical spine is not necessary unless there is
diving, water slide, signs of injury or alcohol.
78.Providing pin site care: the nurse must inspect the pin site at least every 8
hours for signs of inflammation and evidence of infection.
79.The reasons case management has gained such prominence can be traced to
the decreased cost of care associated with decreased length of hospital stay,
coupled with rapid and frequent inter-unit transfers from specialty to standard
care units.
80.Hospice care delivery refers to the delivery of services to the terminally ill.
81.Collaborative problems require both nursing and physician-prescribed
interventions.
82.The major components of a nursing care plan are outcome criteria (patient
goals) and nursing interventions.
83.Schedule II drugs, such as morphine, opium and meperidine (Demerol), have
a high abuse potential, but currently have accepted medical uses.
84.Utilitarian theory is based on the concept of the greatest good for the
greatest number.
85.In categorizing nursing diagnoses, the nurse addresses life-threatening
problems first. Followed by potentially life-threatening concerns.
86.Residual volume is the volume of air remaining in the lungs after a maximum
exhalation.
87.Expiratory reserve volume is the maximum volume of air that can be exhaled
forcibly after a normal exhalation.
88.Tidal volume is the volume of air inhaled and exhaled with each breath.
89.Inspiratory reserve volume is normally 3000mL.
90.The epiglottis is the valve flap of cartilage that covers the opening of the
larynx during swallowing.
91.The thyroid cartilage is the largest cartilage structures; part of it forms the
Adams apple.
92.The arytenoids cartilages are used in vocal cord movement with the thyroid
cartilage.
93.The cricoid cartilage is located below the thyroid cartilage

94.The nurse shouldnt dry a patients ear canal or remove wax with a cottontipped applicator because it may force cerumen against the tympanic
membrane.
95.A patients identification bracelet should remain in place until the patient has
been discharged from the health care facility and has left the premises.
96.Inotropic agents are administered to increase the force of the hearts
contractions, thereby increasing cardiac output.
97.The S1 heard on auscultation is caused by closure of the mitral and tricuspid
valves.
98.In assessing a patients heart, the nurse normally finds the point of maximum
impulse at fifth intercostal space, near the apex.
99.Use of Schedule II drugs may lead to physical or psychological dependence.
100.
Schedule III drugs such as Paregoric and Butabarbital (Butisol), have a
lower abuse potential than Schedule I or II drugs.
101.
Abuse of Schedule III drugs may lead to moderate or low physical or
psychological dependence.
102.
Schedule IV drugs such as Chloral Hydrate, have a lower abuse
potential compared to Schedule III drugs.
103.
Schedule V drugs such as cough syrups that contain Codeine, have the
lowest abuse potential of the controlled substances.
104.
In Clergymans sore throat, the pharynx is characterized by numerous
swollen lymph follicles.
105.
Atrophic pharyngitis is characterized by a membrane that is thin,
white, glistening and at times wrinkled.
106.
Hypertrophic pharyngitis is characterized by general thickening and
congestion of the pharyngeal mucous membrane.
107.
In categorizing nursing diagnoses, the nurse addresses life-threatening
problems first, followed by potentially-life threatening concerns.
108.
Activities of daily living are actions that the patient must perform every
day to provide self-care and to interact with society.
109.
Testing of the 6 cardinal fields of gaze evaluates the function of all
extraocular muscles and cranial nerves III, IV and VI.
110.
Ventricular septal defect occurs when the septum between the left and
right ventricles does not close during the first 8 weeks of gestation.
111.
The six types of heart murmurs are graded from 1 to 6. A grade 6 heart
murmur can be heard with the stethoscope slightly raised from the chest.
112.
An infant with a gastrostomy tube should receive a pacifier during
feeding unless contraindicate to provide normal sucking activity and satisfy
oral needs.
113.
Fruits are high in fiber and low in protein, and should be omitted from a
low-residue diet.
114.
The nurse should use objective scale to assess and quantify pain.
Postoperative pain varies greatly among individuals.
115.
Expiratory grunting is an abnormal breath sound that is heard as an
infant attempts to breathe out against closed glottis.
116.
For an infant, the nurse should start an IV line in a peripheral vein or a
vein in the temporal region.

117.
Common cause of acidosis are salicylates, ethylene glycol and methyl
alcohol.
118.
Hepatitis B is transmitted through contact with infected blood or
plasma.
119.
Accidents are the leading cause of death in children and are commonly
age-related.
120.
Most infants with cerebral palsy are long, thin, move asymmetrically,
have difficulty feeding and cry excessively or feebly.
121.
An infant with Celiac disease has fatty, foul-smelling feces.
122.
A serum Lithium level that exceeds 2.0mEq/L is considered fatally
toxic.
123.
The nurse should encourage the parents to communicate with their
hearing-impaired child through mime, gestures and body language.
124.
Kawasaki disease is characterized by a high temperature for 5 days
longer.
125.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an inherited form of muscular
dystrophy, is an example of a genetic abnormality caused by structural gene
mutations.
126.
After surgical reconstruction of an imperforate anus and formation of a
temporary colostomy, an infant should remain prone, with the hips elevated.
127.
Child neglect is abandonment or failure to provide a safe, secure
environment for a child.
128.
When determining which information to give to a hospitalized child
about a procedure, the nurse should consider the childs developmental age,
not his chronological age.
129.
Although a cleft palate can be repaired at any time, the optimal time
for corrective surgery is before the child begins to speak and learn faulty
speech habits.
130.
Marphan syndrome is a genetic condition that may occur in a single
family member as a result of spontaneous mutation.
131.
The concept of object permanence develops between ages 6 and 8
months.
132.
Polydactyly (more than the normal number of fingers and toes) is a
congenital anomaly.
133.
The magico-religious view holds that illness is caused by forces of evil.
134.
The biomedical view holds life events as cause and effect and
incorporates the bacterial or viral explanation of communicable diseases.
135.
The scientific view holds life events as cause and effect and
incorporates the bacterial or viral explanation of communicable diseases.
136.
Asking a patient an open-ended question is one of the best ways to
elicit or clarify information.
137.
Cognitively intact patients who have stress or urge continence may
gain bladder control through biofeedback.
138.
The naturalist or holistic perspective believes that health exists when
all aspects of a persona are in perfect balance or harmony.
139.
Automaticity is the ability of specialized electrical cells of the cardiac
conduction system to initiate an electrical impulse.

140.
Kegel exercises are pelvic floor exercises that strengthen the
pubococcygeus muscle.
141.
The diagnosis of autism is often made when a child is between ages 2
and 3.
142.
Defense mechanisms protect the personality by reducing stress and
anxiety.
143.
Suppression is voluntary exclusion of stress-producing thoughts from
the consciousness.
144.
Psychodrama is a therapy thats used with groups to help participants
gain new perception and self-awareness by acting out their own or assigned
problems.
145.
In psychodrama, life situations are approximated in a structured
environment, allowing participant to recreate and enact scenes to gain
insight and to practice new skills.
146.
Oshanders sign increase pulsation of vagina during pregnancy.
147.
Ladins sign increase in cervical vascularity during pregnancy.
148.
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities are
more common among boys than girls.
149.
Large cell carcinoma is a fast-growing tumor that tends to arise
peripherally.
150.
Bronchioalveolar cell cancer arises from the terminal bronchus and
alveoli and is usually slow-growing.
151.
Adenocarcinoma presents as peripheral masses or nodules and often
metastasizes.
152.
Squamous cell carcinoma arises from the bronchial epithelium and is
more centrally located.
153.
Small cell carcinomas arise primarily as proximal lesions, but may arise
in any part of the tracheobronchial tree..
154.
Most poisonings in children younger than 6 occur when the child takes
a substance orally.
155.
The heart of a child with tetralogy of fallot appears boot-shaped on Xray films because the right ventricle is enlarged.
156.
Atheromas are fibrous caps composed of smooth muscle cells that
form over lipid deposits within arterial vessels.
157.
Atherosclerosis is an abnormal accumulation of lipid deposits and
fibrous tissue within arterial walls and lumens.
158.
In evaluating dehydration in an infant, the nurse should assess skin
turgor on the inner thigh.
159.
Phenylketonuria is an inborn error of phenylalanine metabolism that
causes high serum levels of phenylalanine leading to cerebral damage and
mental retardation.
160.
Lactated Ringers and 0.9% NaCl are isotonic solutions.
161.
A solution that is 5%NaCl is hypertonic.
162.
In hypovolemic shock, there is a decrease in the intravascular volume.
163.
Cardiogenic shock results from the failure of the heart to pump.
164.
Shock treatment: Dopamine improves contractility, increases stroke
volume and increases cardiac output.

165.
Shock treatment: Epinephrine (Adrenaline) improves contractility,
increases stroke volume and increases cardiac output.
166.
Shock treatment: Methoxamine (Vasoxyl) increases blood pressure by
vasoconstriction.
167.
A patient who is admitted to a psychiatric hospital involuntarily loses
the right to sign out medical advice.
168.
Signs of lithium toxicity include diarrhea, tremors, nausea, muscle
weakness, ataxia and confusion.
169.
A labile effect is characterized by rapid shifts of emotions and mood.
170.
Amnesia is loss of memory from an organic or inorganic cause.
171.
The ductus arteriosus connects the pulmonary artery to the aorta,
bypassing the lungs.
172.
The ductus venosus connects the umbilical vein and the inferior vena
cava, bypassing the liver.
173.
The foramen ovale is the opening between the right and left atria of
the heart bypassing the lungs.
174.
Amniotic fluid is the pale, straw-colored fluid in which the fetus floats.
A cushion against injury and maintains a constant body temperature for the
fetus.
175.
Milk shouldnt be included in the clear liquid diet.
176.
Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) is the most common chromosomal
disorder.
177.
When caring for an infant, a child or a confused patient, consistency in
nursing personnel is paramount.
178.
The three membrane that enclose the brain and spinal cord are the
dura mater, pia mater, and arachnoid.
179.
The most common intra-abdominal tumor in children is Wilms tumor
(nephroblastoma).
180.
The hypothalamus secretes vasopressin and oxytocin, which are stored
in the posterior pituitary gland.
181.
For the first few months of Levothyroxine (Synthroid) therapy, a child
may have temporary hair loss.
182.
In an infant, feeding problems, such as fatigue, tachypnea, and
irritability during feeding, may be early signs of a congenital heart defect.
183.
An adolescents eating habits are significantly influenced by his peer
group.
184.
Neurogenic shock is associated with spinal cord injury and anesthesia.
185.
Anaphylactic shock is associated with hypersensitivity reactions.
186.
Dextran is a colloid, synthetic plasma expander that interferes with
platelet aggregation and is not recommended for hemorrhagic shock.
187.
Neoplasia refers to uncontrolled cell growth that follows no physiologic
demand.
188.
Dysplacia refers to bizarre cell growth resulting in cells that differ in
size and shape, or arrangement from other cells of the same type of tissue.
189.
Hyperplasia refers to an increase in the number of cells of a tissue,
most often associated with a period of rapid body growth.

190.
Metastasis is the term that refers to the spread of cancer cells from the
primary tumor to distant sites.
191.
Emergency surgery means that the patient requires immediate
attention and the disorder may ne life-threatening.
192.
Nadir is the term that refers to the lowest point of WBC depression
after therapy that has toxic effects on the bone marrow.
193.
Bereavement is the period of time during which mourning a loss takes
place.
194.
When the nurse performs chest percussion therapy on a child,
percussions (clapping) should be confined to the area around the rib cage.
195.
Alopecia is the term that refers to hair loss.
196.
Grief is the personal feelings that accompany an anticipated or actual
loss.
197.
Mourning is the individual, family, group and cultural expressions of
grief and associated behaviors.
198.
Hospice is a coordinated program of interdisciplinary care and services
provided primarily in the home to terminally ill patients and their families.
199.
Preoperative phase is the time from when the decision for surgical
intervention is made to when the patient is transferred to the operating room
table.
200.
Urgent surgery means the patient requires prompt attention within 2430 hours.
201.
Required surgery means that the patient needs to have surgery, and it
should be planned within a few weeks or months.
202.
Abrupt withdrawal of steroids may precipitate cardiovascular collapse.
203.
Monoamine oxidase inhibitors increase the hypotensive effects of
anesthetics.
204.
Psychologists, physical therapists and chiropractors arent authorized
to write for drugs.
205.
Thiazide diuretics may cause excessive respiratory depression during
anesthesia due to an associated electrolyte imbalance.
206.
A nasogastric tube Is used to remove fluid and gas from the small
intestine pre and post-operatively.
207.
The area around the stoma is cleaned with mild soap and water.
208.
The nurse should use a tuberculin syringe to administer a
subcutaneous injection of less than 1mL.
209.
A pleural friction rub is heard secondary to inflammation and loss of
lubricating pleural fluid.
210.
The nurse should inject heparin deep into subcutaneous tissue at a 90degree angle to prevent skin irritation.
211.
Crackles are soft, high-pitched, discontinuous popping sounds that
occur during inspiration.
212.
In central sleep apnea, the patient demonstrates simultaneous
cessation of both airflow and respiratory movements.
213.
Mixed sleep apnea is a combination of central and obstructive apnea
with one apneic episode.

214.
Squamous cell carcinoma is more centrally located and arises more
commonly in the segmental and subsegmental bronchi in response to
repetitive carcinogen exposures.
215.
Bronchiectasis refers to chronic dilation of a bronchi or bronchi in which
the dilated airway becomes saccular and a medium for chronic infection.
216.
Pigeon chest results from a displaced sternum.
217.
Small cell carcinomas arise primaly as proximal lesions, but may arise
in any part of the tracheobronchial tree.
218.
In the neonate, a common manifestation of cystic fibrosis is meconium
ileus caused by obstruction of the small intestine by viscous meconium.
219.
Neonates who have cystic fibrosis but dont have meconium ileus at
birth have good appetite, but gain weight slowly.
220.
Urge incontinence is involuntary elimination of urine associated with a
strong perceived need to void.
221.
Primary/essential hypertension has no known underlying cause.
222.
Neurogenic incontinence is associated with a spinal cord lesion.
223.
Isolated systolic hypertension is demonstrated by readings in which
the systolic pressure exceeds 140 mmHg and the diastolic measurement is
normal or near normal.
224.
Cataract is the development of opacity of the lens of the eye.
225.
Although no cure exists for Tay-Sachs disease, serum analysis for
hexosaminidase A deficiency allows accurate identification of genetic carriers
of the disease.
226.
Cystic fibrosis, which is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait,
causes dysfunction of the exocrine glans, sweat glands and respiratory and
digestive systems.
227.
Dependence occurs when a patient who has been taking opioids
experiences withdrawal syndrome when the opioids are discontinued.
228.
Cavernous hemangiomas resemble strawberry hemaniomas, but dont
disappear with age.
229.
Balanced analgesia occurs when the patient is using more than one
form of analgesia concurrently to obtain more relief with fewer side effects.
230.
Lasix is the most common treatment of cardiac failure.
231.
Commisurotomy is frequently used for mitral stenosis.
232.
Annuloplasty refers to repair of cardiac valves outer ring.
233.
Chordoplasty refers to repair of the chordae tendonae of
atrioventricular valve leaflets.
234.
Valvuloplasty is a general term referring to repair of a stenosed or
regurgitant cardiac valve by commisurotomy, annuloplasty, leaflet repair
and/or chordoplasty.
235.
Xanograft refers to replacement of tissue from animal tissue.
236.
Allograft refers to replacement using human tissue and is a synonym
for homograft.
237.
Homograft refers to replacement using human tissue and is a synonym
for allograft.

238.
Restrictive cardiomyopathy is characterized by diastolic dysfunction
caused by rigid b=ventricular walls that impair ventricular stretch and
diastolic filling.
239.
Lymphangitis is an acute inflammation of the lymphatic channels.
240.
Elephantiasis refers to ta condition in which chronic swelling of the
extremity recedes only slightly with elevation.
241.
Chlorothiazide and chlorothalidone are categorized as a thiazide
diuretic.
242.
Spironolactone is categorized as a potassium-sparing diuretic.
243.
Thromboangitis obliterans is a peripheral vascular disease also known
as
Buergers disease.
244.
Saccular aneurysms collect blood in the weakened outpouching.
245.
An anastomotic aneurysm occurs as a result of infection at arterial
suture or graft sites.
246.
Expiratory grunting is an abnormal breath sound that is heard as an
infant attempts to breath out against a closed glottis.
247.
In infants, normal urine output is 1 to 3 mL/kg of body weight per hour.
248.
Thrombocytopenia refers to a lower-than-normal platelet count.
249.
Trousseaus sign is positive when carpopedal spasm is induced by
occluding the blood flow to the arm for 3 minutes with the use of a BP cuff.
250.
A positive Trousseaus sign is suggestive of latent tetany.
251.
A positive Homans sign is demonstrated when the patient complains
of pain in the calf when his foot is dorsiflexed.
252.
Laparoscopic cryomyolysis is the procedure in which electric current is
used to coagulate the fibroids.
253.
Laparoscopic myomectomy is the removal of fibroids through a
laparoscope inserted through a small abdominal incision.
254.
Laparoscopic myolysis is the procedure in which a laser or electrical
needles are used to cauterize and shrink the fibroid.
255.
Narcan is the drug used to reverse signs and symptoms of medicationinduced narcosis.
256.
Solids are introduced to the infant in the following order: rice, cereal,
fruits, oatmeal, vegetables and meat.
257.
To promote sleep in a very young child in a hospital setting, the nurse
should ask the parents about the childs rituals.
258.
IV antibiotic therapy is used to treat a child who has bacterial
meningitis so that the drug will penetrate the blood-brain barrier.
259.
To maintain fluid balance, normal saline solution should be used when
giving an enema to an infant.
260.
A common symptom of acute lymphocytic leukemia in toddlers and
preschoolers is leg pain.
261.
Sialadenitis refers to inflammation of the salivary glands.
262.
Actinic cheilitis is the result of cumulative exposure to sun.
263.
Antacids are given to manage gastric acidity.
264.
Proton pump inhibitors are given to decrease acid secretion.
265.
Famotidine is a histamine-2 receptor agonist.

266.
Odynophagia refers specifically to acute pain on swallowing.
267.
Achalasia presents as difficulty swallowing both liquids and solids.
268.
Hiatal hernia presents as heartburn, regurgitation and dysphagia in
many patients, while at least 50% are asymptomatic.
269.
Indigestion is termed as dyspepsia.
270.
Acholic stool (pale, gray, clay colored) results from biliary obstruction
resulting to absence of bile pigment in the stool.
271.
With a sigmoid colostomy, the feces are solid.
272.
Metronidazole is an antibiotic, specifically an amebicide.
273.
Bupropion HCl (Wellbutrin) is an antidepressant medication.
274.
Side effects of Xenical: increased bowel movements, gas with oily
discharge, decreased food absorption, decreased bile flow and decreased
absorption of some vitamins.
275.
Gastric sump tubes are used to decompress the stomach and keep it
empty.
276.
A gastric sump and nasoenteric tube are used for gastrointestinal
decompression.
277.
Vitamin B6 affects neuromuscular function.
278.
A measles-mumps-rubella vaccine shouldnt be given before age of 12
months.
279.
To promote rest for a young child with meningitis, environmental
stimulation should be decreased.
280.
The nurse shouldnt put anything (including thermometer) in the
mouth of a child who is suspected of having epiglottiditis.
281.
A spiral fracture of the humerus may indicate child abuse.
282.
A consistent finding in a child with meningococcal meningitis is
purpuric skin rash.
283.
Antacids are given to manage gastric acidity.
284.
Fluoxetine HCl (Prozac) has not been approved for use in the treatment
of obesity.
285.
Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are given to decrease the acid
secretion in the stomach.
286.
With an ascending colostomy, the feces are fluid.
287.
With a descending colostomy, the feces are semi-mushy.
288.
With a transverse colostomy, the feces are mushy.
289.
An anal fistula is a tiny, tubular, fibrous tract that extends into the anal
canal from an opening located beside the anus.
290.
A hemorrhoid is a dilated portion of vein in the anal canal.
291.
Azotorrhea is the term used to refer to excess of nitrogenous matter in
the feces or urine.
292.
The larynx is the narrowest portion of the upper airway; thus
obstruction is a life-threatening emergency.
293.
Ventricular fibrillation is precipitating rhythm in most early myocardial
infarction deaths, and most likely to develop during first 4 hours.
294.
In Total laryngectomy, there is no risk for aspiration, normal speech is
lost and a permanent tracheostomy is applied.

295.
Regional enteritis is characterized by a prolonged and variable course
while ulcerative colitis is characterized by exacerbations and remissions.
296.
A high-fat, high-protein, low-fiber diet is a risk factor for colorectal
cancer.
297.
Hepatocellular jaundice is the result of liver disease.
298.
Loose, semisolid stools are associated more often with disorders of the
colon.
299.
Obstructive sleep apnea is the leading cause of excessive daytime
sleepiness.
300.
In the process of weaning a mechanical ventilator, the machine is first
removed followed by the tube and ends with the removal of oxygen (as
manifested by PaO2 >70mmHg).
301.
Congenital heart defects are classified as cyanotic or acyanotic.
302.
The individual with Hashimotos disease demonstrates inflammation of
the thyroid gland, resulting in hypothyroidism.
303.
Biguanides facilitate insulins action on peripheral receptor sites.
304.
The onset of short-acting regular insulin is 30 minutes to 1 hour.
305.
The onset of action of intermediate acting NPH is 3 to 4 hours.
306.
The onset of action of long-acting Ultralente is 6 to 8 hours.
307.
Cretinism occurs as a result of congenital hypothyroidism.
308.
Hearing is commonly believed to be the last sense to remain intact
during the death process.
309.
Yellow to milky white urine may indicate infection, pyuria, or in female
patient, the use of vaginal creams.
310.
Lipase aids in the digestion of fats.
311.
Trypsin aids in the digestion of protein.
312.
Secretin is the major stimulus for increased bicarbonate secretion from
the pancreas.
313.
Nocturia refers to awakening at night to urinate.
314.
Dysuria refers to painful or difficult urination.
315.
Crystalluria is the term used to refer to crystals in the urine.
316.
An ileostomy has a continuous watery fecal drainage and therefore
does not require the use of irrigation.
317.
Milk is alkaline, thereby stimulating the gastric parietal cells to secrete
HCl acid causing rebound acidity.
318.
Regional enteritis the inflammation is discontinuous.
319.
Ulcerative colitis- the inflammation is continuous. It begins with the
rectum until the entire lower colon is inflamed.
320.
A client who has undergone an abdominal-perineal resection (Miles
surgery) requires a permanent colostomy due to the removal of the sigmoid
colon and rectum.
321.
Pain is considered the 5th vital sign. Client is the real authority on
his/her pain.
322.
Referred pain felt at the dermatomes at different part of the body.
323.
Intractable pain- highly resistant to relief.
324.
Neuropathic pain related to damage to nerves and may not have
stimulus; long-lasting and unpleasant.

325.
A tourniquet should be place at the bedside to a patient who has an
amputation.
326.
The drug of choice for alcohol withdrawal is Librium. For alcohol
detoxification is Antabuse (Disulfiram).
327.
Risk of death from CAD is 70 to 200 times greater for men who smoke
one or more packs of cigarettes per day compared to those who do not
smoke.
328.
Dactylitis pertains to painful swelling of hands and feet in sickle cell
disease.
329.
Client taking spironolactone may experience body image changes that
result from a sexual identity.
330.
Psychiatric drugs are preferably given after meal except minor
tranquilizers (anxiolytics).
331.
Haloperidol (Haldol) is commonly given for psychotic patients.
332.
Tofranil and Elavil are commonly prescribed for depressed clients under
Category of TCAs.
333.
Hypotension and urinary retention are anticholinergic side effects of
TCAs.
334.
Sinemet (Levodopa-Carbidopa) is the drug of choice for patients with
Parkinsons disease.
335.
Energizing the patient to commit suicide is a paradoxical effect for
antidepressants therefore suicidal precaution should be instituted.
336.
Follicle-Stimulating hormone in males increases sperm cell production
in the seminiferous tubules.
337.