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Characters

Marc Antony: In Act IV of Julius Caesar, Antony discusses the upcoming battle against
Brutus and Cassius with Octavius, and how to divide power amongst the triumvirate (the threemember ruling body of Rome.) Antony, however, thinks little of Lepidus as a leader, saying,
This is a slight unmeritable man, meet to be sent on errands, is it fit the threefold world divided,
he shall be one of the three to share it?
Antony then tells tells Octavius that Lepidus is like is donkey without a load, which
grazes on common pasture land. After talking about Lepidus with Octavius, they come to an
agreement that Lepidus is only useful as a servant and as a tool. Afterwards Brutus makes plans
to join forces with Octavius and fight the alliance of Brutus and Cassius.
Octavius: In Act IV, Octavius talks with Antony about the power each member of the
triumvirate holds, and the future war between the joined forces of Brutus and Cassius against the
new alliance he holds with Marc Antony. When Antony talks negatively about Lepidus,
comparing him to a donkey without work, Octavius defends him, saying, You may do your will,
but hes a tried and valiant soldier. This shows the greater loyalty Octavius feels towards his
friends. It may also hint at further cracks in alliances Marc Antony may form, since he is so
quick to turn on his comrades.
After Antony and Octavius finish discussing Lepidus and the upcoming battle, Octavius
tells Antony, Let us do so, for we are at stake, and bayed about with many enemies. In this
quote, Octavius compares himself and Antony to chained bears attacked by the dogs of Brutus
and Cassius.
Brutus: In Act IV, Brutus argues with Cassius and discusses battle plans. At the
beginning of Scene 2, Brutus welcomes Titinius and Pindarus into his camp. Afterwards,
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Lucilius tells Brutus that Cassius is near. As soon as Cassius arrives, Cassius starts accusing
Brutus of accepting bribes. Brutus sharply denies this, asking, Wrong I mine enemies? And if
not so, how should I wrong a brother? Brutus tries to calm Cassius down, and tells him that
they shouldnt argue before their armies, but in the privacy of Brutus tent. Inside the tent,
Cassius once again accuses Brutus of accepting bribes from the Sardians. Brutus promptly
responds by saying to Cassius, You wronged yourself to write in such a case. Brutus then tells
Cassius to remember the ides of March, and that there is no terror in your threats, for I am
armed so strong in honesty.
Cassius keeps denies Brutus claims. Brutus responds by telling Cassius, I do not like
your faults. Cassius responds by saying, A friendly eye would never see such faults. Brutus
immediate rebuttal is, A flatterers would not, though they do appear as huge as high Olympus.
A poet then arrives, telling Brutus and Cassius to settle their differences and be friends
and love each other. After the poet leaves, Cassius tells Brutus that his philosophy of stoicism is
useless
Brutus replies by telling Cassius, No man bears sorrow better. Portia (Brutus wife) is
dead. Brutus continues by telling Cassius that Portia, distraught by the the power shift of Marc
Antony and Octavius growing stronger while Brutus was forced to leave Rome, swallowed hot
coals and killed herself.
Cassius and Brutus share some wine. Brutus then tells Cassius that he has received word
that Antony and Octavius are headed for Philippi. Cassius wants Antonys army to come to
them, but Brutus thinks their army should meet Antony at Philippi. He eventually convinces
Cassius of his plan.

After they finish discussing a battle strategy, Brutus tell his army good night, and settle
down in their tents. Brutus has Lucius play his lute, and both of them fall asleep. However,
Brutus is suddenly driven awake by the ghost of Caesar, who tells Brutus, Thou shalt see me at
Philippi. Brutus, frightened and surprised, wakes up the army and asks if anyone else saw the
ghost as he did.
Cassius: In Act IV, Cassius meets with Brutus at the camp to plan for the upcoming
battle, only to argue with him for most of their meeting. In Scene 2, Cassius arrives at Brutus
camp and is welcomed by the army. However, he immediately accuses Brutus of accepting
bribes. When Brutus denies the claim, Cassius tells Brutus that at this time it is not meant that
every trivial offense should be criticized. Cassius denies Brutus claims. Brutus responds by
telling Cassius, I do not like your faults. Cassius responds by saying, A friendly eye would
never see such faults. Brutus immediate rebuttal is, A flatterers would not, though they do
appear as huge as high Olympus.
About this time, near the doorway of Brutus tent, a poet tries to come in to break up
Brutus and Cassius fight for he feels they should not be meeting alone. Cassius asks, Whats
the matter? to the poet, who tells Cassius that Brutus and Cassius should be friends and love
each other. After the poet leaves, Cassius tells Brutus that his philosophy of stoicism is useless
and continues to criticize
Brutus replies by surprisingly telling Cassius, No man bears sorrow better. Portia
(Brutus wife) is dead. Cassius is surprised and emotional, and he is sorry for accusing Brutus.
Cassius and Brutus share some wine. Brutus then tells Cassius that he has received word that
Antony and Octavius are headed for Philippi. Cassius wants Antonys army to come to them, but

Brutus thinks their army should meet Antony at Philippi. He eventually convinces Cassius of his
plan.
After they finish discussing a battle strategy, Cassius settles down in his tent their armies
good night, and settle down in their tents. However, Brutus is suddenly awakened by the ghost
of Caesar, who tells Brutus, Thou shalt see me at Philippi. Brutus, surprised and frightened,
wakes up and asks if anyone else saw the ghost as he did, waking up Cassius in the process.
Act IV shows the complex and shifting power lines in the two gathering forces. Marc
Antony emerges as a slippery leader. He who has joined with Octavius, but shows himself as
someone who will speak ill behind a friends back, and may turn on them as well. This trait
could prove to be his undoing, since his former friends will also remember the betrayals.
Octavius may have a growing distrust of his partner.
Brutus is also showing more of his character flaws, as it is revealed he may be wheeling
and dealing in bribery for his own personal gain. Political and financial gain are the goals that
seem to drive him. He tells his followers what they want to hear, and he is belittling of anyone
who may stand in the way of his gaining power in Rome. Cassius may also start feeling that
Brutus is only using him as a tool to success in the same way that Lepidus is being used. Also,
Cassius is trying to gain unnecessary power by arguing with Brutus, who clearly has more power
and is trying to convince Cassius that his plans and ideas are better.