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RACING INTO HISTORY

A look back at the


1953 Australian Grand Prix at Albert Park

2 01 3 OFF I CI A L S O U V ENIR PR O G R AM
1

It looked like the


beginning of something special.
And it was.
Neal Charge
1953 Australian Grand Prix
Driver #40 MGTC Spl.

YROTSIH OTNI GNICAR


eht ta kcab kool A
kraP treblA ta xirP dnarG nailartsuA 3591

MARGORP RINEVUOS LAICIFFO 3102


22

reidagirB namriahc eettimmoC gnisinagrO fo stnelat denibmoc ehT


,yllenneK taP rotaneS dna ,hceeL miJ dna lliB strawlats ACCL ,ttoillE
dnarG nailartsuA 3591 eht tnaem ,tsurT kraP treblA eht fo namriahc
.snoitadnuof dilos ylemertxe no tliub saw xirP

IT WAS - AND STILL IS A GREAT PLACE FOR A RACE

eht morf gnigreme llits saw ,erehwesle sa eporuE ni ,gnicar rotoM


By
no detaruguani neeb d
ah sStuart
eires wen Sykes
A .2 raW dlroW fo eramthgin
eht dellac erihsnotpmahtroN ni enotsrevliS fo dlefiria nerrab eht
taht n
rotcayear
eht that
fo ensaw
on teEverest
y sa tubconquered,
,pihsnoipmmotor
ahC dlracing
roW enin
O Australia
alumroF
Ini sthe
.
a
i
l
a
r
t
s
u
A
s
a
d
l
e
fi
a
r
a
f
s
a
d
e
r
u
t
n
e
v
d
a
h
a
m
a
r
d
l
a
n
o
i
tanretni
scaled new heights of its own when Albert Park staged the Australian

tGrand
up dwPrix
orc afordethe
niatrfirst
etnetime.
ohw srats lacol fo yxalag a saw ti oS
kcartHeld
elim-on
521November
.3 eht dnu21,
ora it00was
0,07the
sa 18th
ynam
sa ro 000
,05 taPrix
ylsuoirbut
av
Australian
Grand
titiucwas
ric kthe
raP first
trebltime
A ehthe
t narace
ht rehad
trohvisited
s sertem
0
0
3
y
l
n
o
,
s
e
r
t
e
m
o
l
i
k
3
0
.
5(
a major centre of population.
,As
si tthe
aht ,outstanding
yaw gnorwAustralian
eht decar motor
yeht sysport
ad esohistorian
ht nI .)etGraham
ats tnerrHoward
uc sti ni
.noitcerid esiwkcolc-itna na ni
wrote:
ohw Held
nem on
eerhNovember
t eht erew
rtne the
sulp18th
-04 Australian
eht gnomaGrand
tsomePrix
roF
21,stitnawas
natS ,dbut
rofetitihwas
W gthe
uoDfirst
:tnev
e pathe
l-46race
eht had
rof w
or tnoarfmajor
eht nocentre
pu dedne
time
visited
;laicof
epSpopulation.
nailartsuAAs
nthe
wo outstaears
sih ni sawinnthe
osivwilderness
aD .nosivaD
xeLremote,
dna senoJ
on
9491 windswept
eht now dPhillip
ah hcihIsland
w rac in
ehtthe
saw
t
o
b
l
a
T
o
g
a
L
1
#
s

d
rofeatihW
1920 and 1930s, then on
ni saw
,
n
o
i
p
m
a
h
C
d
l
r
o
W
0
8
9
1
e
h
t
f
o
r
e
h
t
a
f
,
s
e
n
o
J
;
x
i
r
P
d
n
a
r
G
hcnerF
succession of barren airfields in the years following WW2
.laicepScourse
hcabyaon
M the
yranVictorian
idroartxe eht
finally there was a true road-race

att that:
senoJmainland.
dna nosivAnd
aD nothing
,yad ecaless
r nothan
ecitcaarsuperb
p sruoone,
h ow
tsuj down
retfA
graceful
avenues
lined
with
tall
trees
amongst
mown
a ni ,xeL .yhporT kraP treblA eht dellac resiar-niatruc a nilawns,
trap koot
the
Melbourne,
a ni rthree
epooCmiles
0011 from
sih dek
rapbusiness
dah senocentre
J retfaof
now
,oemoR afslightly
lA ertil-9.2
shorter than the proposed pre-war layout .but
dne vastly
eht raeimproved
n elab warts
by incorporating the very fast sweeps of a new road around
eht :the
retsanorth-eastern
sid devil-trohshore
s a sof
aw the
,hglake.
uoht It
,xirwas
P dn
G snowhich,
sivaD
a arlayout
xirP d
narG ehAustralian
t del neht circuits,
senoJ .eccould
eip ehbe
t n
i ylrae only
sgnirby
aebBathursts
sti nar MWH
amongst
rivalled
dna dMt
rofePanorama,
tihW fo raand
elc eatulocation
nim a flequal
ah saw
h 01inpathe
l ybworld.
:elyts dnarg ni
to eany
.dlefi eritne eht deppal dah meht fo owt eht 41 pal yb
Lex Davison: Larger than Life, Sydney, Turton Armstrong, 2004, p.75
drofetihW hcihw gnirud ,pots tip ecar-etal citoahc rehtar a tuB
did eThe
H .nifield
w cirofor
tsihthe
na 1953
fo eporace
h yncomprised
a senoJ tso40
c ,scars;
emit eevery
erht tdriver
sap deswas
iurc
Australian,
this
in
a
period
before
the
birth
of
the
Australian
ot emit dah neve drofetihW .retal spal 51 deriter tub niaga tuTouring
o emoc
aCar
gniChampionship
wollof eryt raand
er thlong
gir gbefore
nissim V8
a hSupercars
tiw flesmhad
ih stever
ip ehbeen
t otnheard
i elbboof.
w
.
s
p
a
l
e
v
fi
f
o
n
i
g
r
a
m
l
l
a
m
s
e
h
t
y
b
n
i
w
d
n
a
s
r
i
a
p
e
r
t
c
e
f
f
e
,
rutcnthe
up
Strange as it may seem, neither sports-mad Melbourne enor

of real
nState
worBofydVictoria
nA dna lat
aicthat
epS Ctime
T Gcould
M ehtboast
ni dnoacemotor
s nodyracing
rB ylruvenue
C htiW
quality. The idea of racing .in
Albert
Park
had
been
raised
almost
20
defiissalc erew srac 81 ,3K GM na ni drih
t
years earlier, but as usual it took a small group of committed individuals
,to
ssoturn
M that
srevwish
ird gninto
icar asreality.
eporuE fo maerc eht sraey eerht nihtiW
.kraP treblA ta PGA dnoces eht etanimod dluow arheB ,daehetihW
Jointly organised by Army
bmSouthern
ilc ot niatCommand,
nuom rehtowhose
na dah HQ
slacowas
l ehat
T
the north-western corner of the park itself, and the Light Car Club of
Australia (LCCA), the inaugural event was a triumph of both military
planning and the sheer enthusiasm that has always driven motor sport.

33

The combined talents of Organising Committee chairman Brigadier


Elliott, LCCA stalwarts Bill and Jim Leech, and Senator Pat Kennelly,
chairman of the Albert Park Trust, meant the 1953 Australian Grand
Prix was built on extremely solid foundations.
Motor racing, in Europe as elsewhere, was still emerging from the
nightmare of World War 2. A new series had been inaugurated on
the barren airfield of Silverstone in Northamptonshire called the
Formula
none
actors
inI that
ailartsuA One
ni gWorld
nicar roChampionship,
tom ,dereuqnocbut
tseas
revyet
E w
as taof
htthe
raey
eht n
international
drama
had
ventured
as
far
afield
as
Australia.
nailartsuA eht degats kraP treblA nehw nwo sti fo sthgieh wen delacs

.emitentertained
tsrfi eht rofa xcrowd
irP dnaput
rG
So it was a galaxy of local stars who
variously
many
the
tub xirPatdn50,000
arG naior
lartas
suA
ht81 as
eht70,000
saw ti around
,12 rebm
evo3.125-mile
N no dleHtrack
(5.03
kilometres,
only
300
metres
shorter
than
the
Albert
.noitalupop fo ertnec rojam a detisiv dah ecar eht emit tsrfiPark
eht scircuit
aw ti
inraits
wrong
d
wocurrent
H mahastate).
rG naIn
irotthose
sih trdays
ops rthey
otomraced
nailarthe
tsuA
gnidnatway,
stuo that
eht sis,
A
in an anti-clockwise direction.
:etorw
Foremost
the
xirP dnarGamong
nailartthe
suA 40-plus
ht81 eht entrants
saw ti ,1were
2 rebm
evothree
N no men
dleH who
endederup
tneconrothe
jamfront
a detrow
isiv dfor
ah the
ecar64-lap
eht emevent:
it tsrfiDoug
eht sWhiteford,
aw ti tub Stan
Jones,eand
Australian
tomeLex
r no Davison.
ssenredlDavison
iw eht nwas
i sraein
atshis
tuo own
eht sA
.noitalupopSpecial;
fo
Whitefords
#1
Lago
Talbot
was
the
car
which
had
a no neht ,s0391 dna 0291 eht ni dnalsI pillihP twon
pewsdthe
niw 1949
French
2WGrand
W gnPrix;
iwolloJones,
f sraeyfather
eht of
ni the
sdle1980
firia World
nerrab Champion,
fo noisseccuwas
s in
the extraordinary
nairotciV eht Maybach
no esruocSpecial.
ecar-daor eurt a saw ereht yllanfi

n
wod :just
taht two
ta ,ehours
no breppractice
us a nahtonsserace
l gniday,
hton d
nA .dnaand
lniamJones
After
Davison
,
s
n
w
a
l
n
w
o
m
t
s
g
n
o
m
a
s
e
e
r
t
l
l
a
t
h
t
i
w
d
e
n
i
l
s
e
u
n
e
v
a
l
u
f
carg in a
took part in a curtain-raiser called the Albert Park Trophy. eLex,
ylthg
ils ,Romeo,
enruoblewon
M foafter
ertneJones
c ssenhad
isubparked
eht mhis
orf 1100
selimCooper
eerht in a
2.9-litre
Alfa
vorpm
i ylthe
tsavend.
tub tuoyal raw-erp desoporp eht naht retrohs
strawdebale
near
dnuora daor wen a fo speews tsaf yrev eht gnitaroprocni yb
Davisons
Grand
,hcihw tuoy
al a saPrix,
w tI though,
.ekal ehtwas
fo earohshort-lived
s nretsae-htdisaster:
ron eht the
HWM
the
stsran
ruhits
taBbearings
yb ylno early
dellavin
ir ethe
b dlpiece.
uoc ,stJones
iucric then
nailarled
tsuA
tsgGrand
noma Prix
in grand style:
clear
.dlrowbyehlap
t ni10ynhe
a owas
t lauhalf
qe naoitminute
acol a d
na ,aof
maWhiteford
ronaP tM and
by lap 14 the two of them had lapped the entire field.
57.p ,4002 ,gnortsmrA notruT ,yendyS ,efiL naht regraL :nosivaD xeL
But a rather chaotic late-race pit stop, during which Whiteford
saw revpast
ird ythree
reve times,
;srac 0cost
4 deJones
sirpmany
oc echope
ar 35of
91 an
ehthistoric
rof dlwin.
efi ehHe
T did
cruised
g
n
i
r
u
o
T
n
a
i
l
a
r
t
s
u
A
e
h
t
f
o
h
t
r
i
b
e
h
t
e
r
o
f
e
b
d
o
i
r
e
p
a
n
i
s
i
h
t
,
n
a
i
l
artsuto
A
come out again but retired 15 laps later. Whiteford even had time
.wobble
fo draehinto
neethe
b rev
e
d
a
h
s
r
a
c
r
e
p
u
S
8
V
e
r
o
f
e
b
g
n
o
l
d
n
a
p
i
h
s
n
o
i
p
m
a
h
C
r
a
pits himself with a missing right rear tyre following Ca
puncture,
effect
repairs
laps.
eht ron enruobleM damand
-strwin
ops by
rehtthe
ien small
,meesmargin
yam tiofsafive
egn
artS

laer fWith
o eunCurly
ev gniBrydon
car rotom
a tsain
obthe
dluMG
oc em
it tSpecial
aht ta and
airotAndy
ciV foBrown
etatS
second
TC
0
2
t
s
o
m
l
a
d
e
s
i
a
r
n
e
e
b
d
a
h
k
r
a
P
t
r
e
b
l
A
n
i
g
n
i
c
a
r
f
o
a
e
d
i
e
h
T
.
y
t
ilauq
third in an MG K3, 18 cars were classified.
slaudividni dettimmoc fo puorg llams a koot ti lausu sa tub ,reilrae sraey
Within three years the cream of Europes
.ytilaer a racing
otni hsdrivers
iw tahtnrMoss,
ut ot
Whitehead, Behra would dominate the second AGP at Albert Park.
tThe
a saw
QHhad
esohanother
w ,dnam
moC nrehtotuclimb
oS ymrA yb desinagro yltnioJ
locals
mountain
fo bulC raC thgiL eht dna ,flesti krap eht fo renroc nretsew-htron eht
yratilim htob fo hpmuirt a saw tneve laruguani eht ,)ACCL( ailartsuA
.trops rotom nevird syawla sah taht msaisuhtne reehs eht dna gninnalp

Circuit
naila1953
rtsu
A 359Map
1
dirg gnitrats laciFfO

ecaR hctarcS erbiL elumroF A


spaL 46 seliM 002

diGr gnitartS
c.c
cc6844
cc0034
cc6443
cc1791
cc6941
cc5734
cc4941
cc5734
cc0034
cc5691
cc3732
cc0034
cc5734
cc0821
cc9941
cc7801
cc7801
cc6801
cc747
cc8841
cc8941
cc0521
cc9993
cc0093
cc0022

raC

revir D.oN

toblaT ogaL
drofetihW guo D.1
hcabyaM
senoJ natS
.2
raugaJ MWH
nosivaD xeL
.3
lotsirB repooC
)SDN( mahbarB kcaJ
.5
LC4 itaresaM
nerraW ceC
.6
nosduH ginielK
ginielK knarF
.7
cc4654 drallA
)SDN( sekwaH mo T.8
C6 itaresaM
nonniKcM nrE
.9
lpS 8V droF
seyaH .H .W
.01
droF atlA
yarG de T.11
53T/73T ittaguB
kcihC ruhtrA
.21
oemoR aflA
)SDN( notregdE noR
.41
lpS 8V droF
xocliW lliB
.51
2J drallA
giarC .J.W
.61
cc6941 AWB
tterraB nailuJ
.71
lpS 04A nitsuA
dlanoDcM no D.81
lpS nilevaJ
eilyW ruhtrA
.91
3K GM
nalluG miJ
.02
3K GM
)SDN( enotS ottO
.12
3K GM
nworB ydnA
.22
Q GM
yhpruM seL
.32
qcarraD tobla T ttuN geR
.42
A15T/53T ittaguB
niltiaC reteP
.52
lpS CT GM
nodyrB yelruC
.62
lpS egdo D nosirraH lihP
.72
sdlO tollaB
euhganoDO seL
.82
nedloH ittaguB )SDN( snimmuC nhoJ
.92
5

1953 Australian
OfFical starting grid
A Formule Libre Scratch Race
200 Miles 64 Laps

Starting Grid
No.
1.
2.
3.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.

Driver

Car

c.c

Doug Whiteford
Stan Jones
Lex Davison
Jack Brabham (DNS)
Cec Warren
Frank Kleinig
Tom Hawkes (DNS)
Ern McKinnon
W. H. Hayes
Ted Gray
Arthur Chick
Ron Edgerton (DNS)
Bill Wilcox
W.J. Craig
Julian Barrett
Don McDonald
Arthur Wylie
Jim Gullan
Otto Stone (DNS)
Andy Brown
Les Murphy
Reg Nutt
Peter Caitlin
Curley Brydon
Phil Harrison
Les ODonaghue
John Cummins (DNS)

Lago Talbot
Maybach
HWM Jaguar
Cooper Bristol
Maserati 4CL
Kleinig Hudson
Allard
Maserati 6C
Ford V8 Spl
Alta Ford
Bugatti T37/T35
Alfa Romeo
Ford V8 Spl
Allard J2
BWA
Austin A40 Spl
Javelin Spl
MG K3
MG K3
MG K3
MG Q
Talbot Darracq
Bugatti T35/T51A
MG TC Spl
Dodge Spl
Ballot Olds
Bugatti Holden

4486cc
4300cc
3446cc
1971cc
1496cc
4375cc
4564cc
1494cc
4375cc
4300cc
1965cc
2373cc
4300cc
4375cc
1496cc
1280cc
1499cc
1087cc
1087cc
1086cc
747cc
1488cc
1498cc
1250cc
3999cc
3900cc
2200cc

GRAND
X I R P DPRIX
NARG NAILARTSUA
snoitaciFissalc
and classiFications
emiT

raC

spal 95/s05:42h2
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.

revirD ecalP

toblaT ogaL
drofetihW guoD
lpS CMM
T GHolden
M
nody2290cc
rB yelruC
Lou Molina
3K GM Spl
nwo3298cc
rB ydnA
Syd Negus
Plymouth
Austin
Q GMHealey
yh2660cc
pruM seL
Jim Leech
lp
S MMHealey
an2660cc
iloM uoL
Bib Stilwell
Austin
nitsuAXK 120
h
ceeL miJ
John Calvert 001 ylaeHJaguar
3442cc
lpS n
osduHXK 120 gninie3442cc
lK knarF
Frank Lobb
Jaguar
001 yel aeHMG
nitsu
A Spl
egrah
C trautS
David McKay (DNS)
TC
1350cc
nilevaJBMW
eilyW328
eilyW ne1971cc
K/ruhtrA
Peter McKenna
2JAustin
drallAHealey
g2660cc
iarC.J.W
Stuart Charge
nitsu
A
llew
llitS biB
Jack ODea 001 yelaeHMG
Spl
1250cc
AW
B Spl tterraB b
iG/nailuJ
Neal Charge
MG
TC
1250cc
T GM Skoda
egr1089cc
ahC laeN
Dan Garringe (DNS) l pS CGarringe
021KXMG
raugTB
aJ Spl
bb1250cc
oL knarF
John Nind
C6 itaresaM
nonniKcM nrE
lpS CT GM
dniN nhoJ
PAJ VkM repooC
nosrettaP lliB
lpS htuomylP
sugeN dyS

RESERVES

Name

Car

STNEMERITER

Bill Patterson
Gordon Greig
Haig Hurst
nosaeR
Ron Phillips
3
p
al ,gniraeB
Vin Maloney
enignE
Harry Thompson
enignE
Silvio Massolla
41 pal ,evlav depporD
enignE
noissimsnarT
DNS
sgniraeB
15 pal ,dehsarC
15 pal ,dehsarC
dehsarC
ALLOCATION
65 pal ,hctulC

Cooper MkV JAP


Cooper MkIV
Allard K2
raC
Allard K2
raugaJ MG
WMTC
H Spl
53T iHRG
ttaguB
lpHRG
S 04A
qcarraD toblaT
823 WMB
A15T ittaguB
Did not start
2K drallA
lpS GRH
LC4 itaresaM
021KX raugaJ
OF PRIZE
AND
hcabyaMONEY
M

.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
.01
.11
.21
.31
.41
.51
.61
.71
.81

c.c
998cc
4375cc
revirD
4375cc

n
o
s
ivaD seL
1250cc

k
c
i
h
C
ruhtrA
1497cc
dlanoDcM noD
1497cc
ttuN geR
anneKcM reteP
niltiaC retaP
tsruH giaH
eipselliG laW
nerraW ceC
trevlaC nhoJ
TROPHIES
senoJ natS

Prize Money:
1st, 500 and Trophy; 2nd, 250 and Trophy; 3rd, 150 and
Trophy; 4th, 100; 5th, 75; 6th, 50; 7th, 25; 8th, 15;
9th, 15; 10th, 15; 11th, 15; 12th, 15. Fastest Lap, 10.
Mechanic of Winning Car, 10. Total, 1,245.

IRP DPRIX
NARG
AUSTRALIAN X
GRAND
classiFications

snoitaciFissalc dna

Place Driver
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Car

Time

Doug Whiteford
Lago Talbot
2h24:50s/59
Curley
MG
TC Spl
cc092Brydon
2
nedloH
MM
aniloM uoL
Andy
cc89Brown
23
lpS htuoMG
mylK3
P
sugeN dyS
Les
MG
Q
cc0Murphy
662
yelaeH n
itsuA
hceeL miJ
Lou
MM
Spl
cc0Molina
662
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1953 Australian Grand Prix


on display
Shortly before Albert Park hosted its first World Championship
race in 1996, the great Sir Jack Brabham agreed to take part in a
photo shoot on the eastern side of the circuit. Much to onlookers
surprise, Australias triple World Champion hopped into his
yellow Maserati, executed a swift U-turn and roared off in the
wrong direction.
In fact Sir Jack was right: the circuit in its original form was used
in anti-clockwise direction, with the Start/Finish line up near what
we now call Turn 3. Sir Jack was merely remembering what he
used to do at Albert Park several decades before. Fittingly, then, many
of the cars which took part in that historic event will go the wrong
way once again in 2013.
We are very proud to have on display a selection of the
original cars which took part in the first Australian Grand Prix
at Albert Park in 1953.
Carefully restored and maintained for the past 60 years or
more, each car is in pristine condition and will participate in a parade
on Sunday 17 March to celebrate the sports thrilling heritage
in the park.
A special marquee in the Shannons Historics precinct will
also showcase a wide variety of memorabilia from that memorable
1953 event. Foremost among this remarkable collection of
photographs, official programs, driver helmets and tools is the
original engine block of the Maybach driven by Stan Jones
which led for a large part of the race.
What follows is a selection of evocative images from
the 1953 event and a short account of each car before,
during and after the race that put Albert Park on the motor
sport map.

Doug Whiteford.

Hay bales were a minimal

Stan Jones Maybach makes an untimely pit stop


which ultimately costs him the race.

Albert Park, then as now, marries the


frantic nature of motor sport with the
serenity of its lakeside surroundings.

1953 Start: Lex Davidson, Stan Jones and Doug


Whiteford lead the way.

Stan Jones manhandling the mighty Maybach


around Albert Park.

10

The start of something special -

concession to safety.

Phil Caitlins Bugatti - a throwback to


pre-war Australian Grands Prix which were
dominated by the French marque.

Just two laps from the end, Doug Whitefords


Lago Talbot shed its right tyre.
Whitefords pride and joy - his Lago Talbot
that won the 1953 Australian Grand Prix.

Jim Leech gets his Austin Heely in a spin but goes on to finish 6th.

Aughtie Walk was then Albert Parks


main straight.

the 1953 Australian grand Prix gets underway.

11

1953 Australian grand Prix


Competition Cars
Car: BROWN MG K3
Driver: Andy Brown
Race #: 22
Position: 3
This car links MGs famous Abingdon
factory in the UK to the royal family
of Siam, as Thailand was once known.
Second-last of the 33 (some sources say 31) very successful K3 models built,
K3030 was Italy-bound until a certain fascist dictator forbade it; the car went
instead to Prince Chula for his royal cousin Prince Birabongse to race at legendary
venues like Brooklands and Donington. The prince, better known as Bira, also
contested 18 World Championship Grands Prix for some famous marques. Brought
to Australia in 1936, K3030 went through several owners hands, including those
of Lex Davison, before South Australian Andy Brown drove it to third place in
the 1953 Australian Grand Prix at Albert Park. Its engine was an MG six-cylinder
inline unit, single overhead camshaft, originally of 1086cc with a power output of
around 120 bhp at 6500 rpm. It had a front-mounted Marshall 85 supercharger.
K3030s last major outing was at the 1955 Australian Grand Prix staged at Port
Wakefield. South Australias Bradey family owned it for over half a century and
took it to Thailand to celebrate Prince Biras career in 1988. John and Helen Gillett
of Drysdale, Victoria, are now its proud owners; John is a keen club racer and uses
this car in races, hillclimbs and regularities. The Gilletts have overseen extensive
refurbishment by Ray Skewes Automotive to its chassis, axles, wheels brakes and
engine, while Historic and Vintage Restorations are responsible for the cars body,
gearbox, electrics and tuning.
Car: WYLIE JAVELIN
Driver: Arthur/Ken Wylie
Race #: 19
Position: 9
Conspicuous by its very yellow presence,
this familiar machine came into being in
1949-50 around a steel ladder frame. It
was the marriage of a Jowett Javelin four-cylinder 1486cc motor with Marshall
Rootes supercharger and SU carburettor, and a body built by one Mr. Thomson,
an aircraft fitter who boasted no previous motor racing experience. The purposefullooking Yellow Greased Lightning or Goanna, as it came to be known, also
had a Jowett Jupiter close-ratio gearbox. The Wylie Javelin could get up to a
startling 210 km/h or thereabouts. Its original owner/builder was Australian Motor
Sport editor Arthur Wylie, who had entered the Australian Grand Prix as far back
as 1934 at Phillip Island in a Bugatti. He co-drove the Javelin with his brother Ken
in the 1953 Albert Park race. Arthur took advantage of the cars speed to move up
to sixth early on before an off, but he and Ken between them got the car through
to ninth place at the finish despite a slipping clutch. Joe Caudo of Attadale in WA
bought the Wylie Javelin in 1997 and is the cars eighth owner; Joe himself is a
stalwart of events such as Targa Tasmania, the 2000 London-Sydney marathon,
12

hill-climbs and a great deal more. After its Albert Park success this car went on to
compete at the 1954 Australian Grand Prix in Southport, Queensland, in the hands
of Arthur Griffiths, retiring with a blown head gasket after distinguishing itself
in the first 15 laps of the race.
MASERATI 4CL
While the Maserati 4CL on display here
is not the one that raced in the inaugural
Australian Grand Prix at Albert Park,
it is a supremely interesting car in its
own right. This is chassis no.1564 the
very first of the 17 4CLs built by the
famous Bologna firm just before World
War II. It belongs to American-based
Irish businessman Paddins Dowling, who
acquired it just over a year ago. This is probably the most original of the 4CLs,
he says. Every body panel still has that #1564 stamped on it! Built to do battle
with Alfa Romeo and ERA in the popular voiturette class of racing, the 4CLs were
constructed on a light-alloy ladder frame; they had a four-cylinder inline engine
with a front-mounted single-stage supercharger and a four-speed box. The car from
Albert Park 1953 had been driven by the legendary Frenchman Raymond Sommer
to beat the Alfas and win at St. Cloud near Paris in 1946. It came to these shores
in 1951 and found its way into the hands of Peter Vennermark; he and Melbournes
Cec Warren shared the drive when the car competed in the 1953 Australian Grand
Prix after making its Down Under debut at Fishermans Bend the previous month.
It endured a difficult race: Vennermark was suffering from heat blisters when he
brought the car in to change both a plug and the driver, then Warren had to take
evasive action when Gillespies car overturned and the Maser was out on lap 51.
Car: PATTERSON BRYDON MG TC
Driver: Curley Brydon
Race #: 26
Position: 2
A TC with a pretty dress on it!
Thats how current owner Richard
Townley describes his MG TC Special,
the car that finished second in the 1953
Australian Grand Prix. It was keen racer Bill Pattersons second TC from the
famous English sports car manufacturer; it was built by Reg Nutt and Doug
Whiteford, and Bill asked Bob Baker to fit a special alloy racing body, adding a
Rootes supercharger to its 1.25-litre OHV pushrod four-cylinder inline engine. It
weighed 559 kilos and, with close-ratio gears for racing purposes, it pushed out 65
kW at 6000 rpm and could nudge beyond 180 km/h. In 1950 it was sold to exfighter pilot Curley Brydon. It posted a DNF in the 1952 Australian Grand Prix
before enjoying its moment of glory at Albert Park: it was originally classified
third but elevated to second after a protest. It was entered in no fewer than five
Australian Grands Prix, but that top-three finish at Albert Park was by far its best
result it failed to finish three races and didnt start in the other. This little car
has had eight owners in its long life. Richard, whose first competition event was a
sprint race in an MG TC road car at Fishermans Bend in the Sixties, acquired it in
2000 and refurbished it, doing most of the work himself. He reckons it has done
more than 50 circuit race meetings, including 16 appearances at Bathurst between
1950 and 1962.
13

Car: LAGO TALBOT T26C


Driver: Doug Talbot
Race #: 1
Position: 1
Talbot Lago or Lago Talbot? The
former seems to have won, as Doug
Whitefords crew fondly called the big
car the Large Tablet. This is the second
T26C owned by Whiteford, chassis
no.110002. It was in chassis no.11007
that Whiteford, a St Kilda garage-owner famous before Albert Park for his exploits
in the Ford V8 Special known as Black Bess, won the 1953 Australian Grand Prix.
The 4.5-litre T26C was introduced in 1948; only 14 were built at the French firms
Suresnes plant. While the car was never quick enough to be a consistent winner, it
excelled through sheer reliability and frugality, often running through to the finish
without a stop for fuel. Whitefords first T26C came via Marseilles in 1950 for its
original Australian owner Tom Hawkes. Whiteford bought it in 1951 and won the
1952 Australian Grand Prix with it at Bathurst. His first Lago Talbot charged to
victory in the 1953 Albert Park race when Stan Joness Maybach retired; Doug even
had time to come in for repairs to a right rear puncture, rejoin and still win by
the handsome margin of five laps. The car on display has belonged since 2006 to
Mount Martha enthusiast Ron Townley, who has put a great deal of work into it:
reconditioned engine (crankshaft, conrods, pistons), new radiator core, pump, brakes
and more. Arriving in Australia in 1954, it did not race until the 1955 Australian
Grand Prix at Port Wakefield.
Car: KLEINIG HUDSON
Driver: Frank Kleinig
Race #: 7
Position: 7
Frank Kleinigs racing career began
on two wheels but his reputation was
forged at the wheel of the Hudson
Special, a car that was already 18 years old when it competed in the 1953 Australian
Grand Prix. It was in the hands of one Mr. Gus McIntyre when it was sold to
Kleinig as one of a pair. The car made its Australian Grand Prix debut at Victor
Harbor in 1937. Its 1.5-litre Miller engine was found wanting when it came to the
challenge of places like Bathurst, venue for the 1938 Australian Grand Prix, so Frank
removed it and dropped in a 4.4-litre Hudson said to come straight out of his own
new road-going sedan. He would develop the Kleinig Hudson unrelentingly over
the next decade and a half, the car eventually being capable of over 200 km/h. Its
bugbear was reliability: although it was fast Kleinig was favourite to win the
1949 Australian Grand Prix at Leyburn in Queensland it rarely lasted the distance.
In fact in its seven AGP appearances the Kleinig Hudson finished only twice: it
was 17th at Lobethal, the South Australian track where Frank was something of
a specialist, and its peak came at Albert Park when it came home seventh. Even
then the car had only first and fourth gears still working The Kleinig Hudson
now belongs to Tom Roberts of Seville, VIC, and will be driven by experienced
hill-climber David Bell at Albert Park.

14

Car: BARRETT BWA


Driver: Julian/Gib Barrett
Race #: 17
Position: 12
This typically ingenious Australian
Special is the second car on display
belonging to Mount Marthas Ron
Townley, himself a keen competitor
whose career in stock cars and hot rods
began in 1956. It was driven by both Alf Barrett, known as The Maestro, and
by his brother Julian, known as Gib. BWA stood for the three key players in its
creation, Barrett/White/Ashton, the latter being the crew chief. Before World
War II it took part in the Rob Roy hillclimb; during the war Gib clad it in a
sportscar body and used it himself. Then they stretched it nine inches, made it into
a monoposto, i.e. a single-seater, and went racing. Built like a crayfish, says
Ron proudly, all the mechanicals are on the outside! It was in essence a pre-war
MG TC but has a Lancia front end and steering box, Lancia wheels, brakes and
diff and 1935 Chevrolet truck drive-shafts for rear axles. It now has a Lee Francis
1.5-litre supercharger to comply with CAMS requirements. Good fun to drive,
adds Ron, but at Albert Park in 1953 they didnt have their best race At its pit
stop a fuel spill saw the car erupt in flames. Yes, it went up alright, recalls Gib
Barrett in Barry Greens lovely memoir, Glory Days. But it looked worse than it
was. They had already lost 15 minutes at the start when its plugs fouled yet
the car still finished 12th.
Car: ODEA MG SPECIAL
Driver: Jack ODea
Race #: 39
Position: DNF
Another member of the Gillett stable,
this MG TC Special began life in South
Australia, where it was built in 1949
for David Harvey by well-known local
specialist Tony Ohlmeyer. Harvey drove it at several South Australian venues, most
notably to second place in the 1950 Australian Grand Prix at Nuriootpa, before it
was sold to Victorian speedway driver Jack ODea. ODea drove it in the 1953
Albert Park race but did not make it to the finish. It came with a 1340cc MG
XPAG engine to which was added a Marshall Nordec supercharger; the gearbox
was standard issue. Its single-seater body brought the car in at a lightweight 550
kilos, the MG being capable of around 115 mph (185 km/h). It could cover the
standing quarter-mile in 15 seconds. After Albert Park the ODea MG was bought
by a certain J. Brabham, who apparently raced it at Sydneys Parramatta Park
before it moved on. Harry Gapps campaigned the car at Mt. Druitt, Orange and
Bathurst, then in 1958 it returned home: bought by Jack Johnson, it specialised in
hillclimbs like Collingrove and also raced at Port Wakefield. By 1963 it was back in
Victoria, where its career ended at Calder Park in that year. Guided by the expert
advice of Tony Ohlmeyer himself, John Gillett acquired it in 1966; he and his son
Charlie Groves, a budding historic racing specialist, have campaigned it widely in
the south-eastern states.

15

PRO7331_2013 F1_60 Year Heritage Booklet_FA2.indd 15

1/03/13 2:37 PM

Car: MM HOLDEN
Driver: Lou Molina
Race #: 30
Position: 5
Be careful not to show too much interest
in this unique car its up for sale!
The owner is Cobram enthusiast John
Anderson, himself a winner of the Alec
Mildren Trophy a few years ago. This
particular car is especially close to Albert
Park: it was built in the bayside suburb in 1953 by Lou Molina and his great
mate Silvio Massola, hence the name MM Holden Special. Constructed around
a 2358cc 48 series Holden engine, the car has a Standard front end and an HRG
differential and gearbox, with everything wrapped in a Burnett aluminium body.
The 1953 Australian Grand Prix was the cars first serious outing, and a remarkable
race it had. You couldnt see a bloody thing at the start! said Lou, who went
on to become one of Melbournes best-known restaurant owners and something
of a raconteur. Thats because the car had to come from the back through the
considerable smoke-screen put up by Ted Grays Alta. Undaunted, Molina not only
made his way through, he made his way up to an outstanding fifth place by the
end of the 64 laps. The MM Holden Special went on to race in the New Zealand
Grand Prix the following year and was back for a top-six finish in the Argus Cup
at Albert Park in 1956. In that year it was fitted with a Repco crossflow head; the
MM Holden clocked 15.3 seconds for the standing quarter at the Geelong Sprints.
Car: MAYBACH Mark 1
Driver: Stan Jones
Race #: 2
Position: retirement, lap 56
This remarkable Australian Special
now belongs to well-known Victorian
historic racing identity Bob Harborow
of Camberwell, who has campaigned it as far afield as New Zealand and at
the famous Goodwood meetings in the UK. Its name is a throwback to Wilhelm
Maybach, the German engineer known as the father of Mercedes. Its original
3.8-litre, six-cylinder Maybach engine was plundered from a German half-track
armoured scout car brought back from the North African campaign in World
War II. Repcos Charlie Dean paid 40 for the engine and married it to a tubular
frame with Studebaker wheels, a Fiat gearbox and a Lancia rear axle. Finished
with a sheet-metal body, the car first ran at Lex Davisons property at Lilydale.
It entered the 1948 Australian Grand Prix at Pt. Cook. Stan Jones, who owned
Superior Motors in Coburg, bought the Maybach in 1951 but while the driving was
left in Stans capable hands it continued to run under the watchful eye of Dean and
Repco. Its original engine was first supercharged, then replaced with a 4.2-litre unit
which has recently been restored to its 1954 specification. That year the car won
the New Zealand Grand Prix, although in the Australian counterpart at Southport
the chassis broke in half, almost with extreme prejudice to its driver. The car led
the 1953 Grand Prix in explosive style but succumbed to clutch problems, allowing
Whitefords Lago Talbot to sail past and win the race.

16

Car: PLYMOUTH SPECIAL


Driver: Syd Negus
Race #: 31
Position: 18
Few cars in any Australian historic field
can boast the pedigree of this remarkable
machine. In 1938 keen West Australian
driver Clem Dwyer took a crashed
Plymouth sedan into his panel-beating
shop and immediately spied an opportunity. The Clem Dwyer Special was built
around the wrecked cars 3.0-litre, six-cylinder engine to which Dwyer added an
oil cooler and SU carburettor as well as increasing its compression ratio. Beguiled
by the beautiful Maserati 6C, Dwyer also crafted a similar-looking body for the
new car and painted it in the eye-catching Italian red. He drove it to second place
with fastest race lap at the Patriotic Grand Prix in Applecross in 1940, then won
the post-war Victory Grand Prix at Caversham in 1946. When the car was sold to
Syd Negus one of the most successful combinations in Australian racing was born.
The apparently bulletproof car completed 102 of its 103 races; it was Syd Negus,
president of the West Australian Sports Car Club, who brought it all the way across
the Nullarbor to compete in the 1953 Australian Grand Prix, the car eventually being
18th and last of the classified finishers. It is also on record as having finished 10th
in the 1951 Australian Grand Prix at Narrogin, WA, but retired from the race at
Caversham in 1957. The car now belongs to South Australias Peter Bell, himself an
enthusiastic participant in events like Targa Tasmania and the popular Grand Prix
Rallies of previous years.
MALONEY MG TC SPECIAL
One of a gaggle of MG TB- and TCbased Specials in the 1953 event, this
little car can boast no fewer than four
appearances in the Australian Grand
Prix. It was built as a central-seated
monoposto on chassis #6080 by the
well-known Head Brothers firm at
Murrumbeena for Vin Maloney, who
was at the wheel in all four of those events. The first was at Nuriootpa in South
Australia in 1950, where Vin came 12th; in both 1951 at Narrogin in Western
Australia and 1952 at Mount Panorama the car was out after 11 laps; and at Albert
Park in 1953 it was originally in the reserve list but was drafted in for a race
start once more, although it failed to finish again. The cars competition history
includes a brief flirtation with a twin-cam MG-A engine, and it ran a Rootes-style
supercharger on its TC unit. Other owners have included Wally Mitchell and Peter
Beasley, the car coming into the caring hands of the Pitman family back in 1990.
Mark Pitman now looks after the car on behalf of his father John Pitman. It has
long been a familiar sight at events throughout South Australia, Victoria and New
South Wales, both on circuits and especially in multiple hill-climb appearances at
Rob Roy, Mt. Tarrengower, Collingrove and other prominent venues. The Maloney
MG TC Special has previously participated in the Historic Demonstration at the
modern-day Australian Grand Prix.

17

Celebrating 60 years
Whats on
In recognition of the heritage of motorsport at Albert Park a number
of exciting activities will take place in the lead up to and during the
2013 Formula 1 Rolex Australian Grand Prix and they are all geared to
demonstrate that Albert Park was and still is a great place for a race.

PUBLIC PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION


Crown Melbourne features a public exhibition celebrating the heritage
of the Australian Grand Prix at Albert Park from Thursday 28 February
to Sunday 24 March 2013. The display is located in the Level 1 retail
precinct leading to Crown Metropol and the air bridge leading to Village
Cinemas. Almost 100 outstanding images, taken between 1953 and 2013,
have been sourced from a variety of archives, including the personal
collections of motorsport enthusiasts involved with the event in 1950s
Melbourne. Many of the images have never been seen before by the
general public.

NATIONAL SPORTS MUSEUM


DOCUMENTARY
A short film about the 1953 Australian Grand Prix is the key feature
of the National Sports Museums cinema at the MCG from 1 31 March.
The film is a poignant reminder of life in Melbourne during another era
and poses a stark contrast to the sport of Formula 1 today. Featuring
original and rare footage of the 1953 race, along with original photographs
and interviews with a number of people involved in the event, the
documentary takes us back to a time when motorsport was possibly
considered romantic.

18

STNEMEGDELWONKCA
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sraey 06 gnitarbelec ot noitubirtnoc rieht rof gniwollof eht
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WEB SERIES

Visit grandprix.com.au tonwatch


rubaeRthree
nhoJshort interviews with some of
the fascinating individuals who were involved in the 1953 race. Each has
a different perspective and recalls
and experiences from a
ellivniopersonal
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drivers, a marshals and a spectators point of view.
egrahC laeN

HERITAGE
trofnietS emearDAY
G
Thursday 14 March is renamed
slliW rHeritage
ecnepS Day in recognition of Albert
Parks role in grand prix history and General Admission patrons can enter
sekyS trautS
the event for FREE that day.
nosnikraP ynoT

HERITAGE EXHIBITION

yelnwoT drahciR
A special heritage themed exhibition is located in the Shannons
woraroselection
braH boB
Historics precinct and features
of original cars that lined up
on the starting grid in the 1953 race as well as a wide range of related
etaT naI the original engine block of
memorabilia including, most remarkably,
Stan Jones Maybach which led the race for much of the way.
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Sadly, only a small number
of m
drivers
today. On race day we will pay tribute to them and the cars they drove
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with a parade travelling the wrong way around the Albert Park circuit,
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which was how they raced back then. The parade will be complete
with strategically placed hay
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track in the 50s compared
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19

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Australian Grand Prix Corporation would like to thank
the following for their contribution to celebrating 60 years
since the first Australian Grand Prix at Albert Park.

SEIRES BEW

fo emos htiw sweivretni trohsJohn


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Tony Parkinson

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ni erew taht serusaem ytefas
.yadot ot
Victorian Historic
Racing Register