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City Development plan

Hanumana, Madhya Pradesh

Submitted to:

Urban Administration and Development


Department, GoMP
Palika Bhawan, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh

Project co-ordination:

City Managers Association,


Madhya Pradesh (CMAMP)
Palika Bhawan, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
Submitted by:

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd.


A-81, Sector 65, Noida, Uttar Pradesh

Hanumana Town

DISTRICT REWA
POPULATION- 16773

Hanumana has become educational hub after 2000. People from


nearby villages come Hanumana to pursue a good education.
Many of the aspirants undertake private technical coaching in
Engineering and Management and get success and selected for
IITs, NITs, and IIMs.

City Profile
CompanyName
ULB Name

DMG Consulting P. Ltd.


Hanumana
Yes

Whether the Sectoral Analysis report is as per UADD requisites

Town Brief

Geographical location (Town)


Average rainfall (annual)
Height above mean sea level
Municipal area (1991)
Municipal area (2001)
Municipal area (2011)
Date of Constitution of ULB

Population

Historic importance
Population Year 1981 (under Municipal
boundary only)
Population Year 1991 (under Municipal
boundary only)
Population Year 2001 (under Municipal
boundary only)
Population Year 2011 (under Municipal
boundary only)

In one or two
sentences

NA

NA
11,346
14,871
16,773
Town level

Name of Population projection Method

Geometric Progression Method

Projected population adopted Year 2015

18,293

Projected population adopted Year 2025

22,525

Projected population adopted Year 2035

27,735

Land Use

Land Use

24 degree 77N
82 degree 09E
1100 mm
500 M
NA
30.35 sqkm
30.35 sqkm
NA

Latitude
Longitude
MM
Mts
Sq kms
Sq kms
Sq kms
Date

Residential
Commercial
Public - semi public
Industrial
Roads
Recreational
Sensitive
Water bodies
Total Developed area
Agriculture / Undeveloped area
Total Municipal Area

% Standard (as per Land use (Tentative Land use (Tentative


UDPFI)
in Sq kms )
in percentage)
45-50%
2-3%
6-8%
8-10%
10-12%
12-14%
rest
rest
rest

1.822
0.034
0.026
0.121
0.074
2.076
28.280
30.35

87.76
1.65
1.23
0.00
5.82
0.00
0.00
3.56
100.00
93.18

City Profile (Ward Wise)


Ward #
Name of ward
Ward Population (2001)
Area (sq kms)
Density (PPSqkm) 2001
Male
Female
SC
ST
BPL
Sex ratio
Literacy rate (%)
No. of Primary schools
No. of Primary Health
Centre

Ward 1

Ward 2

Ward 3

Ward 4

Ward 5

Ward 6

Ward 7

Ward 8

Ward 9

Ward 10

Ward 11

Ward 12

Ward 13

Ward 14

Ward 15

Total

1334
2.5442
524
706
628
NA
NA
NA
890
39.24

744
4.3462
171
396
348
NA
NA
NA
879
74.24

847
1.0627
797
427
420
NA
NA
NA
984
54.8

800
0.5247
1525
453
347
NA
NA
NA
766
82.56

956
1.7921
533
515
441
NA
NA
NA
856
60

1476
1.2852
1148
796
680
NA
NA
NA
854
62.81

1240
3.9614
313
646
594
NA
NA
NA
920
52.32

1142
1.4668
779
579
563
NA
NA
NA
972
72.02

848
1.3396
633
458
390
NA
NA
NA
852
80.79

760
1.1061
687
390
370
NA
NA
NA
949
79.49

1286
2.098
613
656
630
NA
NA
NA
960
65.55

1026
4.5099
227
551
475
NA
NA
NA
862
63.16

777
2.1333
364
417
360
NA
NA
NA
863
71.22

861
1.4175
607
417
444
NA
NA
NA
1065
55.88

774
0.7645
1012
391
383
NA
NA
NA
980
53.96

14871
30.35

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

490
7798
7073
1309
2556
NA

907
64.54
7
NA (but one CHC
with 30 beds is
there)

NA
236

NA
105

NA
127

NA
128

NA
183

NA
304

NA
223

NA
210

NA
123

NA
123

NA
199

NA
176

NA
124

NA
131

NA
121

Manufacturing

Agricultural

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Agricultural

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Agricultural

Agricultural

Agricultural

Seconday occupation

Agricultural

Manufacturing

Agricultural

Trade and
Commerce

Agricultural

Manufacturing

Agricultural

Agricultural

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Agricultural

Agricultural

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Agriculture

Tertiary occupation

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Agricultural

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Agricultural

Agricultural

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Trade and
Commerce

Trade & Commerce

No. of SS/LS industrial


units

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Small scale
industries such as
bidi, soap, pickles,
etc. at HH scale. No
Major industries.

No. of Commercial
establishments

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Slum pockets

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

total 7 wards having


slum.

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

NA
NA

4467
NA

No. of Households
Primary occupation
(Majority)

Slum population
No. of Slum Households
No. of Individual water
connections in the ward

2513
Manufacturing

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

470 HHs

No. of Community water


connections

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Commercial water


connections

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Nil

No. of Tubewells

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Handpumps

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of OHTs

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

2 (volume: 45,000 L
each)

% Coverage of piped water


supply

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Individual Toilets

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Individual Septic


tanks

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

1424

No. of Community Septic


tanks

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Community toilets

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

% of population Open
defecation

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Dust bins

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

City Profile (Ward Wise)


Ward #
Name of ward

Ward 1

Ward 2

Ward 3

Ward 4

Ward 5

Ward 6

Ward 7

Ward 8

Ward 9

Ward 10

Ward 11

Ward 12

Ward 13

Ward 14

Ward 15

Total

Wardwise Waste generated


(Kgs)

333.5

186

211.75

200

239

369

310

285.5

212

190

321.5

256.5

194.25

215.25

193.5

3717.75

Road sweeping (1 time or 2


times)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Total no. of sanitary


workers in the ward

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Length of Pucca road


(Mts)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

16.34 km

Length of Kuccha road


(Mts)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

5.43 km

Length of State Highway

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Length of National
Highway
Length of Road side drains
Pucca (Mts)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

7.45 km

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Length of Natural drains


(Nallah)
Pucca/Channelized (Mts)

224

925

1166

1329

665

520

1124

2344

615

8912

Length of Natural drains


(Nallah) Kuttcha (Mts)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Streetlights

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

300

No. of Electricity
connections

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

in 1867 HHs

Name of Tourist site if any

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Name of Heritage site if


any
Bus stop (No.)
Bus stand(No.)
Parks (No.)
Playground(No.)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

No. of Residential
properties

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

No. of Commercial
properties

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Total Property tax


collection (in Rs.)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Property tax coverage(in


%)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Available Government
land (Sq kms)

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Remarks
Note

* Mark shows ward with slum population.

Population data has been given as per the Census-2001. As per the discussion with RGI Census Data for 2011 has not published, which will publish by July 2013.

Sectoral Analysis

Sewerage
Drainage
SWM

Physical Infrastructure

Water Supply

Source

Existing Source
Tubewell /
Well
Handpump

River/Lake/Talab

No. of Tubewell / River / Well

NA

NA

NA

Water Supplied by Tubewell /


River / Well in MLD

NA

NA

60% of HHs are using Hand pumps

Total water supply in the town (MLD)


Existing Supply rate (LPCD) considering distribution
losses
Water Charges per household per month (Rs.)
Flat/Metered
% Coverage under paid water supply
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N), If yes mention
capacity (MLD)
Proposed source (Surface)
Total sewage generation (MLD)
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes mention
capacity
Total no. of individual septic tanks
Total no. of community septic tanks
Total no. of Sewage/Mud pumps available with the ULB
Frequency of Cleaning Individual Septic tanks
Frequency of Cleaning Community Septic tanks
Name of natural nallah (Storm water drain)
Length of natural nallah (Storm water drain) Kms
Ultimate disposal point of nallah
Length of road side drain (Kms)
Coverage of road side drainage w.r.t roads (%)
Ultimate disposal point of Road side drains
Any treatment plant/procedure adopted
Per capita Solid waste generation (Considering
Standards) (in gms)
Total SW generation (in Tons)
Frequency of SW collection by the ULB (1 time per day/2
times per day)
Collection efficiency of the ULB (%)
Any initiative for DTDC (Yes /No)
Any initiative for scientific disposal of waste
Name of dumping/ landfill site
Is the existing site Dumping site or allotted site for
Scientific disposal
Area of allotted landfill site for Scientific disposal
Distance of the Dumping site/landfill site from main
settlement area (Kms)
No. of Tractor trolleys/vehicles available with the ULB for
carrying Solid waste to the LF site
If site for Scientific disposal is not allotted then whether
formally requested by the ULB

0.19 MLD
30 lpcd
Rs 60 /- per household per month
NA
No
No
0.15 MLD
No
1424
NA
1
NA
NA
Amaiya Nallah and Naiya Nallah
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
No
59.22 grams
37.18 Tons
NA
25%
No
No
NA
dumping site can be in ward no. 3, 7 & 12
NA
NA
Tractor 1 / Trolley 2 / Hand-pull cart 4
yes

Traffic & transportation


Street lighting

Name of National Highway passing from or nearby from


the town (NH-XYZ)

NH 7 (passing through)

Distance of National Highway if nearby from the town


(NH-XYZ) in Kms

NA

Name of State Highway passing from or nearby from the


town (SH-XYZ)

NA

Distance of State Highway if nearby from the town (SHXYZ) in Kms

NA

Total length of Pucca roads (Kms)

CC
WBM
Total (kms)

16.34 km
16.34 km

Total length of Kuccha roads (kms)

(kms)

5.43 km

Gap w.r.t Standards

(kms)

19.83 km by 2035
around 1500 (1000 bicycle, 400 two
wheeler, 100-150 four wheeler)
NA

Total no. of vehicles in the town


Bus stand (yes/No)
Any intracity mass transport mode (yes/no)
Name of locations facing major traffic issues

NA
1
2
3

NA
NA
NA

Name of the street beautified as per the


instructions of UADD

NA

Total no. of street lights

300

No. of Streetlights under working condition

300

No. of Streetlights having Tubes

NA

No. of Streetlights having CFL

150

No. of Streetlights having Incandescent bulbs

NA

No. of Streetlights having LED

NA

No. of Streetlights having Sodium lights

150

No. of Streetlights having LPS

NA

Location of Substation
http://www.mptransco.nic.in
Power

Physical Infrastructure

Roads

Sectoral Analysis

Total no. of residential connections

33/11KV
132 kv

NA
1
NA
1867 HHs

Total no. of Commercial connections

NA

Any subsidy for BPL (Y/N)

No

Duration of Electricity supply per day (in Hrs)

NA
5

Heritage & tourism


Environment

Heritage & tourism

Sectoral Analysis
Name of Heritage site/s
Ownership/agency
Prevailing Heritage Act/s
Name of Tourist site/s
Ownership/agency

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

Total no. of Pilgrims/ Tourists visiting town per day

NA

Name of River/Lake/Forest range/Any specific species

NA

Prevailing Environmental Act/s


Areas facing threats
No. of Primary Health centres/Dispensary

NA
NA

Education

Government

NA

Beds
Private
Beds

NA
NA
NA

Multispeciality hospital if any (Y/N)

Name of Nearby town reffered for Treatment

Social security schemes

Social Infrastructure

Health

No. of Hospitals

NA (but one CHC with 30 beds is there)

NO
Name of
town
Distance
(Kms)

Mirzapur
51 km

No. of Primary schools

No. of Secondary/High schools

No. of Colleges
No. of ITI

0
0

No. of Beneficiaries under SJSRY (Street Vendor)


No. of Beneficiaries under Haath thela/Rickshaw chalak
yojna
No. of Rain Basera/Night Shelter
Ownership of Rain Basera (with ULB/Rental)
No. of Beneficiaries under Gharelu Kamkaji Mahila
Yojana
Name of other Social security schemes

NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
The social security pension scheme

SECTORIAL GOALS
YEAR

SEWERAGE & SANITATION

2015

2025

2035

Network coverage to households

40%

100%

100%

Per capita supply as per norms (135


lpcd)

135

135

135

24/7 water supply

40%

100%

100%

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

Quality of water
Non revenue water

25%

15%

5%

Consumer metering

80%

100%

100%

Cost recovery

100%

100%

100%

Roof water harvesting

40%

80%

100%

Private sector participation


Development of a fresh drainage
system in the town

10%

70%

100%

100%

100%

100%

Rehabilitation of existing pucca drains

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

60%

100%

100%

Sewage Treatment and disposal


arrangements

80%

100%

100%

Sewage Recycling and reuse

60%

80%

100%

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

80%

100%

100%

80%
100%
100%

100%
100%
100%

100%
100%
100%

Partial
Partial
Partial
80%
70%

Full
Full
Full
100%
100%

Full
Full
Full
100%
100%

Rehabilitation of existing primary


nallahs and water bodies
Flood prone areas
Sewer network coverage to
households

Cost recovery (as a % of O&M )


Safe sanitation facilities (with focus on
Urban poor)
Door-to-door collection system
Source segregation
Improve waste collection efficiency

SWM

PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

DRAINAGE

WATER SUPPLY

Components

Mechanized waste handling


Scientific waste disposal
Landfill site adequacy
Cost recovery of O&M
Private sector participation

City specific
Strategies

Preliminary
estimate

By 2035, 24x7
hours water
supply as per the
standard and full
network coverage,
374 Lakhs
water harvesting,
Including slum
consumer
area
metering and low
cost water
treatment plant
(Rapid Sand
filteration).

Implementing agency

Mode of Implementation (PPP etc.)

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

Contract basis

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.


HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

Contract basis

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.


HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
Yes

Preparation of
master plan,
rehabilitation and
improvement
programmes.

190 Lakhs
Including slum
area

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.


To provide 100%
sewerage system
with low cost
sanitation
344 Lakhs
projects, proper
Including slum
treatment before
area
disposal with Root
zone treatment
system and
DEWATS.

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP
HNP
Implementation of
226 Lakhs
Integrated waste
Including slum
management
area
system.

HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP, PWD

PPP

PHYSI

HERITAGE & TOURISM

100%

100%

Road upgradations

50%

100%

100%

Widening/ strengthening

50%

100%

100%

Development of bus terminus

60%

100%

100%

Development of truck terminus

70%

100%

100%

ROBs/flyovers

Junctions and traffic signal


improvements
Mass transit system

Parking facilities
New Installation
Upgradation
Underground cabling

100%
30%
100%
-

100%
70%
100%
70%

100%
100%
100%
100%

Energy savings

70%

100%

100%

24/7 electricity supply


100 % electricity supply
Development of alternative energy
sources

100% *
100% *
-

100% Fire safety coverage

100%

100%

100%

Fully equipped fire station

100%

100%

100%

Identify archaeological resources in


the city (Heritage listing)
Development of green areas as per
norms
Water bodies
preservation/Conservation

Road upgradation
and development,
development of
bus & truck
terminal,
signalised
junctions,
provision of
parking facilities
and strenthening
Public transport.

Installation of
solar street lights
with CFL & LED
lights to save
energy.
Development of
underground
cabling.

1770 Lakhs
Including slum
area

365 Lakhs
Including slum
area

provision of well
equipped fire
station.

BOOT

HNP, PWD

PPP

HNP, PWD

PPP

HNP, PWD

HNP, PWD

BOOT

HNP, PWD

BOOT

HNP, PWD

PPP

HNP, PWD

BOOT

HNP, PWD
HNP
HNP
HNP

Contract
Contract
Contract
Contract

HNP

Contract

HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP

150 Lakhs

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

PPP

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

PPP

Tourist attraction and circuits regional


and city level

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

100% *

HNP

100% *

Disposal of treated sewage in nallahs

100% *

Desilting of nallahs

100% *

Incineration of bio-medical waste


Implementation of norms/standards
for pollution control

100% *

Development of
water bodies,
plantation,
checking of
pollution level, use
of eco-friendly
vehicles,
treatment facilities
for wastes etc.

HNP
HNP & State Tourism Dept.

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

100% *

PPP

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

Conserved natural environment water bodies


Eco-friendly vehicles

State dovt.

HNP

HNP, PWD

Tourist accommodation adequacy

Clean and healthy environment

ENVIRONMENT

HEREITAGE & TOURISM

FIRE
FIGHTIN
G

POWER

STREET
LIGHTNING

ROADS & TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

New road formations

PPP

PPP
HNP, GoMP

PPP

HNP
-

HNP

PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP

HNP

HEALTH
EDUCATION
RECREATIONAL
Social security schemes

SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE

100% doctor-patient ratio


100% patient-bed ratio

100% *
100% *

Effective implementation of health


programmes and related services in
the slum areas of the city

100% *

Regular checks for water


contamination in all water bodies of
the city

100% *

Literacy rates

100% *

Ensure 100% enrollment in primary


schools

100% *

100% Teacher student ratio

100% *

Technical, engineering & medical


education in the city

100% *

Developed existing parks

100% *

Area coverage under recreational


facilities
Playing facilities
Provision for green-belts in future
development plans
Sufficient infrastructure at
mela/exhibition ground
Security of tenure for urban poor
Inclusion of 100% urban poor
population under various central and
state govts social sectors schemes like
old-age pension schemes, Scheme for
handicapped persons, deen-dayal
antyoday yojana, mid-day meals
schemes, etc

100% *
100% *
100% *
100% *

Strenthening
infrastructures in
200 Lakhs
health centers and
Including slum
to run health
area
initiative
programs.

Provision of coeducation,
strengthning of
740 Lakhs
education
Including slum
infrastructures
area
and opening of
vocational training
centres.
Development of
water bodies, ministadium, exibition
ground,
community halls,
public library etc.

HNP, health dept.


HNP, health dept.

Recruitment
Contract

HNP, health dept.

Contract

HNP, health dept.

Contract

Edu. Dept of M.P. and HNP


Edu. Dept of M.P. and HNP

Recruitment

Edu. Dept of M.P. and HNP

PPP

HNP

Contract / PPP

HNP
Included in
tourism

HNP
HNP
HNP
MPHB, HNP

100% *

SLUMS & URBAN POOR

Pucca housing for urban poor

SLUMS & URBAN POOR

contract

PPP

Access to water connection


Access to public toilets and urinal
facilities for all slum households
Access to dustbins and secondary
storage points
Upgradation of kutcha roads to PCC
roads in slums
Improved drainage systems

100% *

Adequate street lighting facilities

100% *

Education facilities
Community halls etc.
Adequate health facilities

100% *
100% *
100% *

100% *
100% *
100% *
100% *

HNP
Provision of Land
ownership,
improvement
schemes,
relocation of
2166.5 Lakhs for
hazardous slums,
housing only
pucca drain
network, financial
support for the
construction of
houses

HNP

Contract / PPP

HNP

Contract / PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP
HNP
HNP

PPP
PPP
PPP

SLUMS &

SLUMS &

pucca drain
network, financial
support for the
construction of
houses
Security of tenure for urban poor
Note:

housing only

100% *
MPHB, HNP
* Marks - project has to be done till year 2035 by HNP, depending upon city need and available resources.

10

SECTORIAL GOALS
YEAR

SEWERAGE & SANITATION

2015

2025

2035

Network coverage to households

40%

100%

100%

Per capita supply as per norms (135


lpcd)

135

135

135

24/7 water supply

40%

100%

100%

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

Quality of water
Non revenue water

25%

15%

5%

Consumer metering

80%

100%

100%

Cost recovery

100%

100%

100%

Roof water harvesting

40%

80%

100%

Private sector participation


Development of a fresh drainage
system in the town

10%

70%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

60%

100%

100%

Rehabilitation of existing pucca drains


Rehabilitation of existing primary
nallahs and water bodies
Flood prone areas
Sewer network coverage to
households

City specific Strategies

Preliminary
estimate

By 2035, 24x7 hours water


supply as per the standard
and full network coverage,
374 Lakhs
water harvesting,
Including slum
consumer metering and
area
low cost water treatment
plant (Rapid Sand
filteration).

Implementing agency

Mode of Implementation (PPP etc.)

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

Contract basis

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.


HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

Contract basis

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.


HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.
Yes

Preparation of master
plan, rehabilitation and
improvement
programmes.

190 Lakhs
Including slum
area

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

To provide 100%
sewerage system with low
cost sanitation projects,
344 Lakhs
proper treatment before Including slum
disposal with Root zone
area
treatment system and
DEWATS.

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

Sewage Treatment and disposal


arrangements

80%

100%

100%

Sewage Recycling and reuse

60%

80%

100%

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

As per WHO
Standards

HNP

PPP

80%

100%

100%

HNP, UADD, Govt. of M.P.

PPP

80%
100%
100%

100%
100%
100%

100%
100%
100%

HNP
HNP

Partial
Partial
Partial
80%
70%

Full
Full
Full
100%
100%

Full
Full
Full
100%
100%

Cost recovery (as a % of O&M )


Safe sanitation facilities (with focus
on Urban poor)
Door-to-door collection system
Source segregation
Improve waste collection efficiency

SWM

PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

DRAINAGE

WATER SUPPLY

Components

Mechanized waste handling


Scientific waste disposal
Landfill site adequacy
Cost recovery of O&M
Private sector participation

Implementation of
Integrated waste
management system.

226 Lakhs
Including slum
area

HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP
HNP, PWD

PPP

11

PHYSICA

HERITAGE & TOURISM

100%

100%

Road upgradations

50%

100%

100%

Widening/ strengthening

50%

100%

100%

Development of bus terminus

60%

100%

100%

Development of truck terminus

70%

100%

100%

ROBs/flyovers

Junctions and traffic signal


improvements

Road upgradation and


development,
development of bus &
truck terminal, signalised
junctions, provision of
parking facilities and
strenthening Public
transport.

1770 Lakhs
Including slum
area

HNP, PWD

BOOT

HNP, PWD

PPP

HNP, PWD

PPP

HNP, PWD

HNP, PWD

BOOT

HNP, PWD

BOOT

HNP, PWD

PPP

Mass transit system

HNP, PWD

BOOT

Parking facilities
New Installation
Upgradation
Underground cabling

100%
30%
100%
-

100%
70%
100%
70%

100%
100%
100%
100%

HNP, PWD
HNP
HNP
HNP

Contract
Contract
Contract
Contract

Energy savings

70%

100%

100%

HNP

Contract

24/7 electricity supply


100 % electricity supply
Development of alternative energy
sources

100% *
100% *
-

100% Fire safety coverage

100%

100%

100%

Fully equipped fire station

100%

100%

100%

Identify archaeological resources in


the city (Heritage listing)
Development of green areas as per
norms
Water bodies
preservation/Conservation

Installation of solar street


lights with CFL & LED lights
to save energy.

Development of
underground cabling.

365 Lakhs
Including slum
area

HNP

provision of well equipped


fire station.

HNP
HNP

150 Lakhs

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

PPP

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

PPP

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

100% *

HNP

100% *

Disposal of treated sewage in nallahs

100% *

Desilting of nallahs

100% *

Incineration of bio-medical waste


Implementation of norms/standards
for pollution control

100% *

HNP
HNP & State Tourism Dept.

Tourist attraction and circuits regional


and city level

100% *

PPP

HNP, State tourism Dept.,

Conserved natural environment water bodies


Eco-friendly vehicles

State dovt.

HNP

HNP

Tourist accommodation adequacy

Clean and healthy environment

ENVIRONMENT

HEREITAGE & TOURISM

FIRE
FIGHTIN
G

POWER

STREET
LIGHTNING

ROADS & TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

New road formations

PPP

PPP
Development of water
bodies, plantation,
checking of pollution level,
use of eco-friendly
vehicles, treatment
facilities for wastes etc.

HNP, GoMP

PPP

HNP
-

HNP

PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP

HNP

12

HEALTH
EDUCATION
RECREATIONAL
Social security schemes

SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE

100% doctor-patient ratio


100% patient-bed ratio

100% *
100% *

Effective implementation of health


programmes and related services in
the slum areas of the city

100% *

Regular checks for water


contamination in all water bodies of
the city

100% *

Literacy rates

100% *

Ensure 100% enrollment in primary


schools

100% *

100% Teacher student ratio

100% *

Technical, engineering & medical


education in the city
Developed existing parks
Area coverage under recreational
facilities
Playing facilities
Provision for green-belts in future
development plans
Sufficient infrastructure at
mela/exhibition ground
Security of tenure for urban poor
Inclusion of 100% urban poor
population under various central and
state govts social sectors schemes like
old-age pension schemes, Scheme for
handicapped persons, deen-dayal
antyoday yojana, mid-day meals
schemes, etc

Strenthening
infrastructures in health
centers and to run health
initiative programs.

200 Lakhs
Including slum
area

Provision of co-education,
strengthning of education
740 Lakhs
infrastructures and
Including slum
opening of vocational
area
training centres.

HNP, health dept.


HNP, health dept.

Recruitment
Contract

HNP, health dept.

Contract

HNP, health dept.

Contract

Edu. Dept of M.P. and HNP


Edu. Dept of M.P. and HNP

Recruitment

100% *

Edu. Dept of M.P. and HNP

PPP

100% *

HNP

Contract / PPP

100% *
100% *
100% *

Development of water
bodies, mini-stadium,
exibition ground,
community halls, public
library etc.

HNP
Included in
tourism

100% *

HNP
HNP
HNP

100% *

SLUMS & URBAN POOR

Pucca housing for urban poor

SLUMS & URBAN POOR

contract

MPHB, HNP

PPP

Access to water connection


Access to public toilets and urinal
facilities for all slum households
Access to dustbins and secondary
storage points
Upgradation of kutcha roads to PCC
roads in slums
Improved drainage systems

100% *

HNP

100% *

HNP

Contract / PPP

HNP

Contract / PPP

HNP

PPP

HNP

PPP

Adequate street lighting facilities

100% *

HNP

PPP

HNP
HNP
HNP
MPHB, HNP

PPP
PPP
PPP

Education facilities
Community halls etc.
Adequate health facilities
Security of tenure for urban poor
Note:

100% *
100% *
100% *

Provision of Land
ownership, improvement
schemes, relocation of
2166.5 Lakhs for
hazardous slums, pucca
housing only
drain network, financial
support for the
construction of houses

100% *
100% *
100% *
100% *
* Marks - project has to be done till year 2035 by HNP, depending upon city need and available resources.

13

Capital Expenditures

Revenue Expenditure

Capital
Receipts

Revenue Income

Municipal Finance (Should be filled carefully and it should be checked whether the capital income is factual or based on assumption
Year
Rates and Tax Revenue
Assigned Revenues & Compensation
Rental Income from Municipal Properties
Fees & User Charges
Sale & Hire Charges
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Income from Investments
Interest Earned
Tax
Non-Tax
Other Income
Total - Revenue Income
Grants, Contribution for specific purposes
Secured Loans
Unsecured Loans
Deposits
Deposit works
Total Capital Receipts
Establishment Expenses
Administrative Expenses
Operations & Maintenance
Interest & Finance Charges
Programme Expenses
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Miscellaneous Expenses
Transfer to Fund
Other
Total - Revenue Expenditure
Fixed Assets
Capital Work-in-Progress
Investments -General Fund
Investments-Other Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans, Advances and Deposits
Other Assets
Miscellaneous Expenditure
Total Capital Expenditure
Total Income
Total Expenditure

2005-06
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

2006-07
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

2007-08
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

2008-09
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

2009-10
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

4398355

1724900

NA
NA

NA
NA

2010-11
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

16995941
NA
NA

173292
12088447

152447
15998035

600016
5046287

NA
16660094
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
17875382
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
22642244
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

2626914

4204984

5561437

NA

NA

NA

8093999
226950

6043405
1399337

3536482
3330931

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

NA
NA
NA
NA

7212038

4882212

9759670

18159901
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

16529938
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

22188520
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA

Note: Refer Madhya Pradesh Municipal Accounting Manual for further details. Can be downloaded from "Download" Section of www.mpurban.gov.in.

14

Reforms Action Plan


Reforms

Timeline to achieve reforms till 2015

Achieved (Y/N)
2012-13

Full migration of double accounting


System
Property tax reforms, 85% coverage
ratio and 90% collection ratio
Levy of user charges : full recovery of O
& M charges for sewerage, water supply
and SWM
Internal earmarking of basic services to
urban poor
E-governance & Capacity Building
Provision of basic services to urban poor
including security of tenure at affordable
prices, improved existing housing, water
supply, sanitation

Preliminary
Any City specific
estimate (if any)
Strategies
for
adopted
implementation

N
N

2013-14

2014-15

Implementing
agency

2015-16

25%

50%

75%

100%

No

Not Available

UADD

25%

50%

75%

100%

No

Not Available

Nagar Parishad

25%

50%

75%

100%

No

Not Available

Nagar Parishad

25%

50%

75%

100%

No

Not Available

67%

33%

100%

No

40 lakh

50%

75%

100%

No

Not Available

N
N
N

25%

Nagar Parishad &


UADD
UADD
Nagar Parishad &
UADD

15

City Development Plan

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA, Madhya Pradesh

SUBMITTED TO
Urban Administration and Development
Department, GoMP

PROJECT CO-ORDINATION:City Managers' Association Madhya Pradesh

CONSULTANT:DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd.


A-81, Sector- 65, NOIDA (UP)

Chief Municipal Officer


Hanumana
DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Sub Engineer
Hanumana
Page i

HANUMANA

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Table of Contents
LIST OF TABLES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ VII
LIST OF FIGURES------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- X
LIST OF MAPS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- XII
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1
1.

INTRODUCTION -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6

BACKGROUND -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10
CONCEPT AND PRINCIPLE OF CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN ---------------------------------------------------------------10
OBJECTIVE OF THE ASSIGNMENT -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11
UNDERSTANDING OF TERMS OF REFERENCE VIS A VIS METHODOLOGY OF THE STUDY ------------------------------11
APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY FOR PREPARATION OF CDP ---------------------------------------------------------11
SCOPE OF WORK ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------12

2.

INTRODUCTION TO HANUMANA ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------20

2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.4.1
2.4.2
2.5
2.6

ADMINISTRATIVE BOUNDARY --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------20


LOCATION AND CONNECTIVITY -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------20
STUDY AREA---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------21
PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------21
TOPOGRAPHY & GEOLOGY ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
CLIMATE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22
AGRICULTURE, INDUSTRY, MINERALS, FLORA& FAUNA ---------------------------------------------------------------22
SWOT ANALYSIS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------23

3.

DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE TOWN ------------------------------------------------------------------------25

3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.5.1
3.5.2
3.5.3
3.6
3.7
3.8

BACKGROUND -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------25
POPULATION TREND AND URBANIZATION ------------------------------------------------------------------------------25
POPULATION DENSITY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26
POPULATION PROJECTIONS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------27
METHODOLOGY ADOPTED TO ESTIMATE POPULATION ----------------------------------------------------------------28
ARITHMETIC PROGRESSION METHOD------------------------------------------------------------------- 28
GEOMETRICAL PROGRESSION METHOD----------------------------------------------------------------- 28
INCREMENTAL INCREASE METHOD --------------------------------------------------------------------- 29
SUMMARY OF POPULATION PROJECTION THROUGH VARIOUS METHODS --------------------------------------------30
SCHEDULE CASTE & SCHEDULE TRIBE POPULATION --------------------------------------------------------------------30
LITERACY RATE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------30

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Page ii

HANUMANA

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

3.9

SEX RATIO -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------32

4.

SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE OF THE TOWN --------------------------------------------------------------------35

4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.8.1
4.8.2
4.9
4.10
4.11

BACKGROUND -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------35
SEX RATIO -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------35
LITERACY RATE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------35
AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------35
WORKFORCE PARTICIPATION --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------36
WORKFORCE DISTRIBUTION----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------36
DEPENDENCY RATIO ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------37
INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------38
INFORMAL BUSINESS AND LOCAL ECONOMY (TRADE & COMMERCE) ------------------------------------ 39
WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 39
HERITAGE AND TOURISM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------41
SWOT ANALYSIS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------42
ISSUES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------43

5.

PHYSICAL PLANNING AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT ------------------------------------------------------45

5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.5.1
5.5.2
5.5.3
5.6
5.7
5.8

BACKGROUND -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------45
SPATIAL GROWTH TRENDS -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------45
SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION --------------------------------------------------------------------------------45
LANDUSE ANALYSIS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------46
HOUSING SCENARIO ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------48
INTRODUCTION --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 48
HOUSING STOCK -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 48
PRESENT AND FUTURE HOUSING DEMAND ------------------------------------------------------------- 51
FUTURE GROWTH POSSIBILITIES -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------52
SWOT ANALYSIS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------53
CITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN --------------------------------------------------------------------------53

6.

URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------55

6.1
6.2
6.2.1
6.2.2
6.2.3
6.2.4
6.2.5
6.2.6
6.2.7
6.3

INTRODUCTION------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------55
PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------55
WATER SUPPLY --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 55
SEWERAGE AND SANITATION -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 63
DRAINAGE SYSTEM ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 74
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 77
TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 85
STREET LIGHTING AND FIRE FIGHTING ---------------------------------------------------------------- 92
URBAN POOR AND THEIR ACCESSIBILITY TO BASIS SERVICES ------------------------------------------- 96
SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 102

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Page iii

HANUMANA

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

6.3.1
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.5
6.3.6
6.3.7
6.3.8
6.3.9
6.4
6.4.1
6.4.2
6.4.3
6.4.4
6.4.5
6.4.6
6.4.7
6.5
6.5.1
6.5.2
6.5.3
6.5.4
6.5.5
6.5.6
6.5.7
6.5.8
6.5.9

HEALTH -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 102


EDUCATION ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 103
RECREATION AND ENTERTAINMENT ------------------------------------------------------------------ 104
FIRE FIGHTING SERVICES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 104
EXISTING AND PROPOSED SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE-------------------------------------------------- 105
COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS WITH THE UDPFI GUIDELINES ---------------------------------------------- 105
SWOT ANALYSIS------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 109
ISSUES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 110
CITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN ------------------------------------------------------- 110
ENVIRONMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 112
FLORA AND FAUNA ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 112
POLLUTION LEVELS (AIR, WATER AND SOIL) -------------------------------------------------------- 112
CITY GREEN SPACES -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 113
WATER FRONT DEVELOPMENT AND CONSERVATION -------------------------------------------------- 113
SWOT ANALYSIS------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 113
ISSUES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 113
CITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN ------------------------------------------------------- 113
HERITAGE AND CONSERVATION---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 114
IDENTIFICATION OF TOURIST SPOTS AT LOCAL LEVEL ------------------------------------------------ 114
EXISTING REGULATIONS/HERITAGE GUIDELINES AT THE ULB AND STATE LEVEL --------------------- 117
HERITAGE ISSUES ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 117
TOURISM POTENTIAL OF THE TOWN ----------------------------------------------------------------- 117
POSSIBILITY OF TOURISM CIRCUITS ------------------------------------------------------------------ 117
COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS WITH THE UDPFI & UNESCO GUIDELINES --------------------------------- 118
SWOT ANALYSIS------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 118
ISSUES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 119
CITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN ------------------------------------------------------- 119

7.

SPECIAL PAPER ON LOCAL TOURIST CIRCUIT UPGRADATION ------------------------------------------ 121

7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8

BACKGROUND ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 121


MADHYA PRADESH TOURISM AND HERITAGE POLICY ---------------------------------------------------------------- 121
PLACES OF TOURIST INTEREST IN AND AROUND THE CITY------------------------------------------------------------ 122
ARTS & CRAFTS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 124
ASSESSMENT OF TOURISM SUPPORTED INFRASTRUCTURE ----------------------------------------------------------- 125
RECOMMENDED TOURISM DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS-------------------------------------------------------------- 128
BEST PRACTICE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 130
SUMMARY OF PROJECTS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 130

8.

EXISTING INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT ----------------------------------------- 133

8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4

URBAN LOCAL BODY STRUCTURE -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 133


TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING DEPARTMENT --------------------------------------------------------------------- 134
DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 134
PUBLIC HEALTH ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 134

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8.5
8.6
8.7
8.8
8.9

MADHYA PRADESH HOUSING BOARD --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 135


MADHYA PRADESH POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD ------------------------------------------------------------------- 135
ROLE OF PRIVATE SECTOR IN INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICE PROVISION------------------------------------------------ 136
ISSUES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 136
CITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 136

9.

INVESTMENT PLAN AND FINANCING STRATEGIES --------------------------------------------------------- 138

9.1
9.1.1
9.1.2
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
9.6.1
9.6.2
9.7
9.7.1
9.7.2
9.8
9.8.1
9.9
9.10

REVENUE ACCOUNT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 138


KEY ASSUMPTIONS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 138
NON TAX SOURCES --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 138
REVENUE INCOME ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 138
GROWTH IN INCOME --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 139
OBSERVATIONS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 139
REVENUE EXPENDITURE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 140
CAPITAL ACCOUNT ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 140
CAPITAL INCOME ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 140
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 141
KEY FINANCIAL INDICATORS -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 141
REVENUE INDICATORS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 141
EXPENDITURE INDICATORS -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 142
INCOME, EXPENDITURE AND SURPLUS DEFICIT: ANALYSIS ----------------------------------------------------------- 142
FINANCIAL STATUS AT A GLANCE -------------------------------------------------------------------- 142
KEY ISSUES AND CONCLUSION ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 143
CITY SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 144

10.

INVESTMENT PRIORITIZATION PLAN -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 146

10.1
10.1.1
10.1.2
10.1.3
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.6.1
10.6.2
10.6.3
10.6.4
10.6.5
10.6.6
10.7
10.7.1

PROJECT IDENTIFICATION----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 146


PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 146
SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 148
HERITAGE AND TOURISM ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 149
BASIS FOR PROJECT IDENTIFICATION ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 149
PROJECTS FOR SYSTEM AND INFRASTRUCTURE AUGMENTATION ---------------------------------------------------- 150
PROJECTS FOR SYSTEM AND INFRASTRUCTURE REFURBISHMENT ---------------------------------------------------- 151
OTHER DEVELOPMENT PROJECT --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 151
SECTOR WISE PROJECT IDENTIFICATION AND COSTING -------------------------------------------------------------- 151
PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 151
SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 154
TOURISM-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 155
OTHER COMPONENTS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 156
URBAN REFORMS & CAPACITY BUILDING ------------------------------------------------------------ 156
SECTOR WISE TOTAL COST ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 156
CITY INVESTMENT PLAN ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 157
CITY INVESTMENT PLAN FOR 2012- 2015 (PHASE I) ------------------------------------------------ 157

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10.7.2
10.7.3
10.7.4
10.7.5
10.8

CITY INVESTMENT PLAN FOR 2016- 2020 (PHASE II) ----------------------------------------------- 158
CITY INVESTMENT PLAN FOR 2021- 2025 (PHASE III) ---------------------------------------------- 160
CITY INVESTMENT PLAN FOR 2026- 2030 (PHASE IV) ---------------------------------------------- 160
CITY INVESTMENT PLAN FOR 2031- 2035 (PHASE V) ----------------------------------------------- 161
FINANCING PLAN: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 161

11.

URBAN REFORMS --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 165

11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
11.9

BACKGROUND ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 165


OBJECTIVES OF REFORMS: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 165
NEED FOR REFORM INITIATIVES ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 165
STRUCTURE OF REFORMS ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 165
MANDATORY REFORMS: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 166
OPTIONAL REFORMS (STATE AND ULB/PARA-STATAL LEVEL) --------------------------------------------------- 167
STATUS OF MANDATORY & OPTIONAL REFORMS:-------------------------------------------------------------------- 167
ISSUES ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 170
TOWN SPECIFIC STRATEGIES AND ACTION PLAN---------------------------------------------------------------------- 170

12.

TOWN VISION-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 173

12.1
12.2
12.3

SUMMARY OF SECTORAL STRATEGIES: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 173


TOWN VISION: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 183
TOWN POSITIONING: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184

ANNEXURE

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List of Tables
Table 2-1: Study Area ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------21
Table 2-2: Average Annual Rainfall in Hanumana -------------------------------------------------------------------------22
Table 3-1: Comparative Assessment of Urban Population --------------------------------------------------------------25
Table 3-2: Population Growth Trends ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Table 3-3: Population Density Trends ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26
Table 3-4: Demographics of the Town - Hanumana ----------------------------------------------------------------------26
Table 3-5: Trend of Population Growth in Hanumana Town -----------------------------------------------------------28
Table 3-6: Projected Population Arithmetic Progression Method --------------------------------------------------28
Table 3-7: Projected Population Geometrical Progression Method------------------------------------------------29
Table 3-8: Calculation of Population Projection Incremental Increase Method --------------------------------29
Table 3-9: Projected Population Incremental Increase Method ----------------------------------------------------30
Table 3-10: Comparative Assessment of Urban SC & ST Population -------------------------------------------------30
Table 3-11: Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P. -----------------------------------------31
Table 3-12: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P. -------------------------31
Table 3-13: Comparative Assessment of Sex Ratio -----------------------------------------------------------------------32
Table 3-14: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Sex Ratio Hanumana, M.P.-------------------------------33
Table 4-1: Comparative Assessment of Household Size -----------------------------------------------------------------35
Table 4-2: Comparative Assessment of WFPR -----------------------------------------------------------------------------36
Table 4-3: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of WFPR & Work Force Distribution --------------------------37
Table 4-4: Comparative Assessment of Non-working Population-----------------------------------------------------37
Table 4-5: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Dependent Population & Dependency
Ratio ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------38
Table 4-6: List of Important Industries in Rewa District and in its surrounding Districts -----------------------38
Table 4-7: List of Important Centres/Spots for Tourists in Town and in its Proximity ---------------------------41
Table 5-1: Ward Wise Distribution of Population Density --------------------------------------------------------------46
Table 5-2: Existing Landuse Distribution; 2011 Hanumana -----------------------------------------------------------46
Table 5-3: Comparative Assessment of Household Size -----------------------------------------------------------------48
Table 5-4: Ward Wise Present Housing Demand and Gap --------------------------------------------------------------51
Table 6-1: Projected Future demand Water Supply--------------------------------------------------------------------57
Table 6-2: Present and Future Requirement/Demand and Gap Assessment Water Supply -----------------57
Table 6-3: Performance Indicators Water Supply-----------------------------------------------------------------------58
Table 6-4: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Sewerage System ------------------------------------65
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Table 6-5: Performance Indicators Sewerage System -----------------------------------------------------------------66


Table 6-6: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years --------------------------------------------------68
Table 6-7: Length of Drains in Town ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------74
Table 6-8: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps for Drainage System -----------------------------------75
Table 6-9: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years --------------------------------------------------76
Table 6-10: Solid waste generation in different wards. -----------------------------------------------------------------78
Table 6-11: Vehicles required for solid waste handling. -----------------------------------------------------------------80
Table 6-12: Performance Indicators Solid Waste Management-----------------------------------------------------80
Table 6-13: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years -------------------------------------------------81
Table 6-14: Number of vehicles by types. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------85
Table 6-15: Types of Roads and Lengths in Hanumana Town ----------------------------------------------------------87
Table 6-16: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Traffic and Transportation -----------------------89
Table 6-17: Space Standards of Roads ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------89
Table 6-18: Desirable of Footpaths -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------89
Table 6-19: Goals & Services Outcomes for Different Horizon Years ------------------------------------------------91
Table 6-20: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Street Lighting --------------------------------------93
Table 6-21: Performance Indicators Street Lighting -------------------------------------------------------------------93
Table 6-22: Sources of Lighting at Household Level in Hanumana ---------------------------------------------------94
Table 6-23: Type of Cooking Fuel Used at Household Level in Hanumana -----------------------------------------94
Table 6-24: Goals & Services Outcomes for Different Horizon Years ------------------------------------------------95
Table 6-25: Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate ---------------------------------------------------------------- 103
Table 6-26: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate - Hanumana -------------------------------- 103
Table 6-27: Comparative Analysis with UDPFI Guidelines Social Infrastructure ------------------------------ 105
Table 6-28: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Social Infrastructure ----------------------------- 106
Table 6-29: List of Important Tourist/Destination Spots at Regional Level --------------------------------------- 115
Table 7-1: Assessment of tourist destination in & around the city ------------------------------------------------- 124
Table 7-2: Key Concern Areas and related issues ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 126
Table 7-3: list of main projects and sub-projects. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 130
Table 8-1: Power and Functions of Hanumana Nagar Parishad ----------------------------------------------------- 133
Table 9-1: Year wise Income from Various Sources -------------------------------------------------------------------- 140
Table 9-2: Year wise Expenditure of Hanumana------------------------------------------------------------------------- 141
Table 9-3: Income and Expenditure Status of Hanumana------------------------------------------------------------- 142

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Table 10-1: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 151
Table 10-2: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 152
Table 10-3: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 152
Table 10-4: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 153
Table 10-5: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 153
Table 10-6: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 154
Table 10-7: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 154
Table 10-8: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ---------------------------- 154
Table10-9: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. ----------------------------- 155
Table 10-10: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. -------------------------- 155
Table 10-11: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. -------------------------- 156
Table 10-12: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. -------------------------- 156
Table 10-13: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments. -------------------------- 156
Table 10-14 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase I) --------------------------- 157
Table 10-15 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase II) -------------------------- 159
Table 10-16 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase III) ------------------------- 160
Table 10-17: Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase I) -------------------------- 160
Table 10-18 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase V) -------------------------- 161
Table 10-19: Overall financing plan of investment plans-------------------------------------------------------------- 166
Table 10-20 Revenue Collection from 2008-2035 at Normal Growth rate of 10%------------------------------ 178
Table10-21 Revenue Collection from 2008-2035 at Normal Growth rate of 12% ------------------------------ 178

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List of Figures
Figure 1-1: Specific Objectives of CDP .......................................................................................................... 12
Figure 1-2: Stage 1: Inception....................................................................................................................... 14
Figure 1-3: Stage 2: Sector Assessment and City Profile .............................................................................. 15
Figure 1-4: Stage 3: City Vision and Development Objectives ..................................................................... 16
Figure 1-5: Stage 4: Draft CDP ...................................................................................................................... 17
Figure 1-6: Schematic Diagram for Methodology of City Development Plan Preparation .......................... 18
Figure 4.4-1: Informal Business Activities along the Major Roads of the Town .......................................... 39
Figure 4-2Major Markets/Commercial and Wholesale Trading Areas of the Town .................................... 40
Figure 6-1: Hand Pump: Major source of water supply ............................................................................... 55
Figure 6-2: Water Supply Distribution Arrangements .................................................................................. 56
Figure 6-3: A typical rapid sand filter water treatment with components. The filter is
contained within a filter box, usually made of concrete. Inside the filter box are layers of
filter media and gravel. ................................................................................................................................ 62
Figure 6-4Main DEWATS modules for physical and biological wastewater treatment: .............................. 70
Figure 6-5: Use of the biogas generated from the DEWAT .......................................................................... 71
Figure 6-6: Pour flush single pit and twin pit toilet ...................................................................................... 72
Figure 6-7: A simple diagram of a septic tank .............................................................................................. 73
Figure 6-8: Open Drain along the NH ........................................................................................................... 74
Figure 6-9Open Dumping of Solid Waste along road ................................................................................... 77
Figure 6-10Traffic jam on Sidhi Road ........................................................................................................... 85
Figure6-11: Bus boarding and deboarding along road ................................................................................. 86
Figure 6-12Street Light ................................................................................................................................. 92
Figure 6-13: Community Health Centre ..................................................................................................... 102
Firuge 6-14: Secondary School ................................................................................................................... 102
Figure 6-15: Famous Hanuman Temple ..................................................................................................... 114
Figure 6-16: Lord Shiva's Temple................................................................................................................ 115
Figure 7-1 Hanuman Temple ...................................................................................................................... 122
Figure 7-2 Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple .................................................................................................. 122
Figure 7-3 Rani Gujarat Talab ..................................................................................................................... 122
Figure 7-4 Bahuti water fall ........................................................................................................................ 123
Figure 7-5 Rewa Fort .................................................................................................................................. 123
Figure 7-6 Pili Kothi..................................................................................................................................... 124
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Figure 7-7: Major Tourist circuits around the Hanumana city ................................................................... 127

List of Graphs
Graph 3-1: Population Hanumana, M.P

25

Graph 4 1: Gender Wise Work Force Distribution in Different Sectors of Economy.

36

Graph: 4-2 Gender Wise Dependency Ratio Hanumana, M.P..

37

Graph: 5-1 Landuse Distribution Municipal Area..

47

Graph: 5-2 Landuse Distribution Developed Area.

47

Graph: 5-3 Housing Types in Hanumana Nagar Parishad.

49

Graph: 5 4 Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Wall..

49

Graph: 5-5 Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Roof.

50

Graph: 5-6 Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Floor.

50

Graph: 5-7 Housing Ownership Status Hanumana Nagar Parishad..

51

Graph: 6-1 Distribution of Houses by Sources of Water

56

Graph: 6-2 Distribution of Houses by Location of Tapped Water..

57

Graph: 6-3 Facility and Types of Latrines.

63

Graph: 6-4 Demand for Types of Facility for Toilet .

64

Graph: 6-5 Willingness to Pay for Development of Facility.

64

Graph: 6-6 Willingness to Pay for Operation & Maintenance of Services.

64

Graph: 6-7 Distance of Places from Households for Waste Disposal

77

Graph 6.8: Ward Wise Distribution of Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P.

100

Graph 9-1 Year wise Total Income, Hanumana

135

Graph 9-2 Growths in Income, Hanumana.

135

Graph 9-3 Total Expenditure, Hanumana

136

Graph 9-4 Incomes from Various Sources, Hanumana..

137

Graph 9-5 Incomes, Expenditure & Surplus, Hanumana..

139

Graph 10.1: Financing Option- Water Supply..

158

Graph 10.2: Financing Option- Sewerage & Sanitation.

158

Graph 10.3: Financing Option- Solid Waste Management..

158

Graph 10.4: Financing Option-Strom water Drainage.

159

Graph 10.5: Financing Option-Traffic & Transportation

159

Graph 10.6: Financing Option: Street Lighting & Fire Fighting.

159

Graph 10.7: Financing Option- Urban Poor

160

Graph 10.8: Financing Option- Health facility..

160

Graph 10.9: Financing Option- Education Sector

160

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Graph 10.10: Financing Option- Tourism

161

Graph 10.11: Financing Option- Other Components

161

Graph 10.12: Financial options: - urban reforms and capacity building......

161

List of Maps
Map: 2-1Location of Hanumana (maps not to scale .................................................................................... 21
Map: 2-2Regional Connectivity Hanumana, M.P. ..................................................................................... 20
Map: 2-3Study Area Hanumana Nagar Parishad ....................................................................................... 21
Map: 3-1Ward Wise Population Density Hanumana, M.P. ....................................................................... 27
Map: 3-2Ward Wise Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P. ................................................................................. 31
Map: 3-3Ward Wise Sex Ratio Hanumana, M.P. ....................................................................................... 33
Map: 4-1Major Markets/Commercial and Wholesale Trading Areas of the Town ...................................... 40
Map: 4-2 Tourism in and around Hanumana Town ..................................................................................... 42
Map: 5-1Urban Growth Scenario Hanumana, M.P. .................................................................................. 45
Map: 5-2Existing Landuse Map; 2011 Hanumana Nagar Parishad ........................................................... 48
Map: 5-3Hanumana: Future Growth Possibilities ........................................................................................ 52
Map: 6-1Existing and Proposed Water Supply Network .............................................................................. 56
Map: 6-2Drainage Map - Hanumana ............................................................................................................ 75
Map: 6-3Existing and Proposed Road Network in Town .............................................................................. 87
Map: 6-4Location of clusters of Urban Poor in the town ............................................................................. 97
Map: 6-5Existing and Proposed Social Infrastructure of the town ............................................................ 105
Map: 6-6 Tourism in and around Hanumana Town ................................................................................... 115
Map: 6-7 Proposed Tourism Circuits at Regional Level .............................................................................. 118
Figure 7-1: Major Tourist circuits around the Hanumana city ................................................................... 127

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City Development Plan

Executive Summary
Introduction
Government of India (GoI) and Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) have made several initiatives
through various programmes to meet the growing demands of infrastructure and service delivery.
Subsequently, the GoI and GoMP executed various program such as City Development (a) Urban
Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and Medium Towns (UIDSSMT), (b) Integrated Housing
and Slum Development Programme (IHSDP), (c) the GoMP initiated DFID funded MPUSP, which links
reform with investment in infrastructure for the poor, etc. Other than this, there are several
programmes that have been initiated by the GoI and GoMP.
This is the Phase-II assignment of GoMP where they are preparing City Development plans (CDP) for
258 towns. In the phase-I stage they already done CDPs for 258 towns. In this Phase DMG Consulting
Pvt. Ltd did CDPs for 7 towns out of the 258 towns.
Based on this programme, GoMP launched Mukhyamantri Sahari Adhusanrachna Bikas Yojana, which
is going to be, funded all the projects proposed in the CDPs to the respective ULB.
Objectives and scope of the Assignment:
The objective of the assignment is to prepare a City Development plan (CDP) with the vision of a
desired future perspective for the city and formulate a strategic framework and interventions through
sectoral plans translated into actions that define on how the ULB, together with other stakeholders,
intends to work towards achieving their long-term vision in the next five years. The above foremost
objective is to achieve and translate into developmental outputs in the form of projects, programme
and implementation process which intend to cover the following:
The CDP will scale up existing urban development and poverty alleviation schemes within a
comprehensive and coherent strategic planning framework in order to ensure optimal benefit
from available resources for the citizens of the Urban Local Body.
The CDP should aim to catalyze new thinking and provoke debate through a consultative
stakeholder driven process and vision.
Strategic thrusts of the CDP will be built around the lessons and findings of a comprehensive
and rigorous stakeholder consultation and documentation process.
It is expected that the CDP will serve the requirements of the UIDSSMT and IHSDP
programmes as well as JNNURM and other development schemes.
The CDP will generate specific priority actions and projects that can be the basis for mobilizing
funding from diverse sources.
The scope of work include: (a) Inception Report covering Current status, systems and procedures,
reconnaissance and kick off workshop, b) Sector Analysis Report on the economic opportunity and
potential for local/regional economic development with special reference to the poor, transport study
with emphasis on low cost public transport and livelihoods, heritage conservation and tourism,
environmental sustainability, access to housing, employment and social and environmental services by
the poor, health and education services gap in the town, sectoral issues addressed under the Master
Plan . C) City Profile covering assessment of the existing situation in all the sectors identified, emerging
issues, SWOT analysis and projection of the present gaps and future requirements. This will be done
within the framework of parameters relating to demography, economic base, finance, physical and
environmental issues, infrastructure, institutions and universalisation of services especially for the
poor, d) Evolving City Objectives and formulate sectoral strategies based on the stakeholders
consultation f) Development strategy and Action Plan g) Evaluation of Sectoral vision and Action Plan
in consultation with the stakeholders h) Analysis of Governance Framework & Reform Action Plans, i)
Preparation of a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a Financing Strategy (Financial Operating Plan):
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The Draft Final Report provided (a) Introduction including scope of work, methodology adopted and
consultation process of Stakeholders in project identification process b) Physical feature of the town
contains location, physiographic and landform, municipal area and planning area c) Demographic
profile including population projection along with other demographic indicators d) Socio - Economic
profile of the town including sex ratio, literacy, WFPR, industrial activities, trade and commerce,
tourism and issues, e) Physical planning and Growth management including spatial distribution,
growth trends, municipal wards, status of housing and demand, study of Master Plan provisions,
future growth possibilities, f) status of Infrastructure including water supply, Sewerage and Sanitation,
Solid waste management, Drainage and flooding, Traffic and transportation, Street lighting and Fire
fighting, BPL population and Slum population, Social Infrastructure, status of Environment, tourism
and Heritage conservation g) Existing Institutional framework h) current status of municipal
accounting system and financial management system, Investment Plan and Financing Strategies for
revenue account, income, capital expenditure, key issues i) Investment Prioritization plan including
sector wise project identification and costing, Investment plan and financial plan, j) Urban Reforms,
strategy and action plan k) City Vision.
Physical Features of the Town
Hanumana is a small town in district of Rewa in Madhya Pradesh. It is located nearly 100 kms NorthEast from the Rewa district headquarters. The town covers an area of 30.35 Sq kms which
accommodate a population of 16,773 (2011 Census). The town consists of 15 wards most of which
consist of vacant agricultural land. Most of the population is concentrated along the national highway
7 which passes from the middle of the town. The town is the seat of the famous hanuman temple
from which the town derives its name.
The topography of the region is classified as hilly; however the town is located on the north-eastern
plains of the Vindhya Range, at the altitude of 500 m above the mean sea level. The slope of the city is
mainly towards the north. The climate of the area is relatively moderate. During the winter season the
temperature falls down to as low as 6 degree Celsius. In summer, temperature rises to 42 degree
during the month of May and June. The average rainfall varies between 100 cm to 150 cm.
Demographic profile of the town
As per, the census 2011, the population of Hanumana town was 16,773 persons. The town has
witnessed a steady decrease in the growth rates in population since 1981 to 2011. The reduced
growth rates in population can be attributed to the slowdown in the local economy, lack of
infrastructure and employment in the town. The maximum decadal growth of the town was recorded
1961-71 at 41% which has declined to 20% in 2001-2011 decade. As per the Census 2011, the gross
population density in Hanumana was 552.65 persons per sq.km (5.53 ppH), which has increased from
489 (4.89 ppH) in 1991.
Population projection:
The design population for the next 25 years have been forecasted for Hanumana. Decadal Growth
trends and the guidelines detailed out in CPHEEO Manual have also been considered. Thus the
population has been taken as calculated by Incremental increase method which is much close to being
realistic. It is estimated to 19390 populations by the end of the year 2035.
Socio - Economic profile of the town
To assess the socio-economic profile of the project cities, understand the profile of the residents, their
access to services and their priorities for improvement of the existing infrastructure etc, a diagnostic
study is required to be carried out.
As of 2001 the sex - ratio of Hanumana was 907 females/1000 males which is less than average of
Madhya Pradesh (920) and India (933)
As of 2011 the Literacy rate in Hanumana was 63.21 per cent (male literacy rate of 70.87 per cent
and female literacy rate of 54.87 per cent) which seem to be higher than the national average in
2001.
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The total number of Household is 2513 as per the 2001 census. The average household size in
Hanumana works out to be 6.0, which are higher than the average household size of the state.
As per 2001 census, the Hanumana Nagar Parishad has low Work Force Participation Rate (WFPR),
is recorded at 34.36% indicating high dependency ratio, while the National Urban average
accounts for 32.25%.

Industrial Growth Pattern and Potential


The Hanumana town has no major industries within its vicinity; however there are industrial units
within the Rewa District and in surrounding districts which provides direct and indirect employment to
resident of the town apart from Small Scale Household Industries within town.
Trade and commerce
The town is a major centre for the wholesale trade for the nearby villages, as much as 50% of the
working population is involved in the tertiary sector related to the wholesale trading and informal
business. Most of the commercial activities are located along the highway were the settlements are
located. The products sold in the informal markets are vegetables, fruits, cloths, and garments,
hardware and grocery items.
The overall economy of the town is highly localised economy. The economy is confined to only low
economic activities of the hinterland which is primarily agrarian. The town holds the distinction of
being the gateway to Madhya Pradesh but it has not been able to capitalize on its strategic location
due to insufficient infrastructure and maintenance, number of tourists visiting the only tourist
attraction in the town, the Hanumana temple, is limited. So by encouraging tourist activities and
establishing industrial sectors in the hinterland, the economic standards of the city can be uplifted.
Physical planning and Growth management
The Hanumana town exhibits a linear settlement pattern with majority of the houses located along
the national highway 7 which is bisecting the entire HNP area. About 93% of the land is undeveloped
and only 7% of the land is used for settlements. Most of the settlements are located in ward number
4, 5,6,3,10,15 and 11. Other wards are very scantily populated. Major developments have taken place
in the areas along the road in form of mixed land-use congested unplanned developments, which
constitutes about 85% of the developed area. The percentage of commercial activity is miniscule and
most of the developed area is occupied by houses, roads and water bodies.
Housing: As stated before there is high population density along road in the central part of the town.
Outer parts of the towns are sparsely populated relative to the inner town. In the town out of the
total number of houses more than 32% are permanent in nature, 66.91% accounts for semipermanent and 0.44% as temporary houses. As much as 60% of the houses are made of mud or
unburned bricks with most of the houses using indigenous locally available materials for construction
of houses. Based on the current rate of generation of housing stock and the growth in the number of
household it is evident that right now there is a shortage of around 461 dwelling units which is likely
to rise in the future. The demand gap is highest in ward no. 11 followed by ward no. 9, 2, 3 and 15
located in periphery and core areas of the town.
Futures steps towards ensuring sustainable growth of the town are proper land utilization and check
the growth of unauthorized developments. The past trend of development shows growth along the
major road due to the presence of suitable land mainly along the transportation lines i.e. NH 7 in the
form of ribbon development. Since the town is semi-urban in nature, there is abundant of agricultural
land near by the existing development in all directions. The growth potential is also along the other
major transportation line, but the development is quite slow.
Infrastructure
a) Water Supply
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The water supply system in Hanumana Nagar Parishad is predominantly depending on ground water.
The quality of water drawn from pond is fairly good. There is no detectable odor& taste and the color
is found to be turbid. The city encounters bit water shortage during summers. Presently, no water
treatment facility is provided to the Hanumana Town. A fresh water treatment plant should be
installed in the town to provide the residents of Hanumana with safe, clean water. Presently, there
are no proper water supply lines connecting all 15 wards existing in the Hanumana town. The water
supply lines are internally connected in ward no. 9 and 10. Here the water is pumped from two
overhead tanks through pump house. According to the existing system a large percentage of
population is dependent on hand pumps, wells and other sources for day to day need of water. In
order to provide for estimated water large amount of investment is required in this sector.
b) Sewerage and Sanitation
There is no sewerage system existing in the city as on date. Sewerage and sanitation condition in the
town is poor. The sewage disposal system in the town is mainly consisting of individual disposal
system that includes water closet, soak pits or pit type latrines, open drains. Resident in old areas uses
dry-latrines. New developments have individual septic tanks for sewage disposal. The pour flush
latrines and toilets blocks are usually connected to a septic tank and then connected to drains.
Therefore, the current practice indicates that the sewage flows through open channel. This is a cause
of concern as there is a possibility of underground or well water and pond water contamination. The
sewerage system in town needs to develop with 60% sewer network coverage to households by the
year 2015 and 100% by 2025, for this comprehensive steps are required at various levels, these steps
are identified in the following report.
c) Solid waste management
The solid waste generated in the city is mostly domestic waste. At present in the absence of any
incineration unit, waste from medical/ healthcare establishments are either mixed with municipal
waste or indiscriminately dumped. Presently municipal waste is being collected from all the wards
from specific locations. Segregation of waste, both at sources level (primary collection) and at
secondary level is not in practice. There is no prevailing mechanism in the town for processing or
disposal of waste. As the wastes are not segregated, there is no processing of the collected wastes.
There is no area or site is designated for scientific disposal of Municipal Solid Wastes.Presently, there
is lack of infrastructure and capital cost for solid waste management in the town. So the future
strategy for solid waste management in the town must be covering the whole part of the town
including the present as well as the future developments. HNP should take serious efforts to 100
percent segregation and in particular segregation of hazardous wastes like bio medical waste, bio
degradable waste etc. and treatment of solid waste before disposal.
d) Drainage and flood Protection
Drainage network of the city forms an important part of sewerage storm water and domestic waste
water. Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from an area. At
present the town does not have a comprehensive and effective drainage system and facility of
treatment plant. The drainage condition survey in the town indicates that the drainage network in
Hanumana is open and unorganized. Most of the drains do not have capacity to flow the waste water
as they are damaged and remain chocked due to presence of gray matter and disposal of solid waste
in it. This leads to un-channelized flow during the rainy season.It is recommended that 100 percent
coverage of the city through proper drainage system by 2035. Converting all the kutcha nallahs to
pucca and cover all open drains and also minimize the encroachment on the low lying where flow of
water will not be blocked.
e) Traffic and transportation:
Hanumana is well connected by road and railways. . The National Highway No. 7 connects the town to
its District Headquarter Rewa in south western side and in north eastern side to Mirzapur town. The
town is also well connected to rest of the towns of by State Highways and Major District Roads at
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regional level. As town is not directly linked with Indian Railway System, the nearest railway station is
Mirzapur Railway Station in Uttar Pradesh at a distance of 68 Km. The predominant mode of travel in
town is cycles followed by motorized vehicles such as two wheeler (Scooter & Motorcycle) and private
transport which includes Three Wheelers , four wheelers (Tempo, Jeeps, cars etc.). A town in semiurban in nature all the important place are in vicinity. Thus, only major working population uses their
own means of transport such as cycles, scooters, motorcycle, and cars etc. for their workplace and
other places for day to day needs. Rest of the population prefers to walk for various purposes.
Proper road width and spacing are important in reducing traffic on roads. Unfortunately many of the
important roads in town have become so narrow to facilitate the increasing flow of vehicles. The
unauthorized encroachment along both the sides of roads has covered all the available shoulders
thereby reducing ROW from 20m to 6m further decreased the carrying capacity of roads. At present
both the sides of road is full of ribbon development. However, with increasing concentration of
activities in and around the core area of the town, pressure of traffic is increasing on all the major
roads of the town (NH-7).The town lacks transport proper utility/infrastructure systems such as Bus
Terminal, Transport Nagar (Truck Terminal), organized and adequate parking spaces in important
areas to properly facilitate movement of vehicles in the town and improve the traffic situation.
Public Transportation System
The local public transport modes are cycle rickshaw, tempo, auto and mini busses and hired cars and
jeeps. The tempo is the major mode of public transport in inter-city movement. Intra city movement
from Hanumana to surrounding towns/districts is under private operators however there is no
provision of large fleet bus operations to facilitate this movement.
f) Fire service
There is no separate office for the firefighting operations in the town. At present, to handle and
overcome the anthropogenic hazards like fire the ULB is not equipped with any firefighting service
vehicles for the entire town. There is no additional options/manpower available for rescue operations.
g) Street lighting:
There are around 300 street light posts in the town. 150 among them are energy saver and the rest
has sodium vapors lamp. Street light is deficient in the ward nos. 2, 3, 14 and 15.Considering the
present street lighting situation in the city, the future goals for 2035 would be ensuring e 100 percent
coverage to ensure safety and security for all the residents and the tourists, providing street lights in
public gathering spaces and recreation spaces like lake, rivers, monuments and parks. Further, to
reduce high O&M cost by encouraging use of modern power saving technology should be encouraged.
h) Social Infrastructure
Health facilities
The Parishad is actively engaged in maintaining cleanliness and hygiene of the town in general. There
is general awareness among the residents about environment protection and cleanliness in the town.
At present, there is one Community Health Centre (CHC) with 30 beds. Apparently, the existing health
systems seem to be adequate to meet the local requirements of existing population. However, the
demand for health services is bound to increase along with growth in population and there is a need
for creating a specialty hospital for the growing population. The ambulance services have to be made
available to handle transportation of patients who are seriously ill. Vaccination is arranged time to
time, basically in rainy season or at the time of any communicable diseases like malaria or fever.
Educational facilities:
Hanumana has an average literacy rate of 63%, lower than the national average of 65%: male literacy
is 71%, and female literacy is 55%. Altogether there are 9 Nos. of schools in Hanumana. Out of this, 7
are primary, 2 higher secondary school provided by government.
Urban poor
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Around 23% (3400) of total population are urban poor, squatter and other poor population which
mainly resides in ward no. 1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15 of the town. Their contribution to the citys
economy has been growing over the period. In the absence of clear policy to address their problems,
the poor may suffer from many inadequacies in terms of access to basic services, socio-economic
needs. It is necessary, therefore, to articulate policies and programmes to mainstream the slum
communities with the city, both in terms of infrastructure provision and socio-economic development.
Most of the houses in the slums are kutcha type. There is lack of basic services and amenities in terms
of quantity and quality. Due to poor economic conditions, the urban poor are not able to contribute
much into housing. There are seven notified slum areas in the town. The ward number 1, 5, 6, 7, 12,
14 and 15 have partially slum. Ward no 7 is a fully slum ward and the remaining ward number 1, 5, 12,
14 and 15 have partial slum population. Most of the slums residing in Hanumana are located on
government land. Government land includes land belonging to the state or municipal govt. There are
also many slums which are located on private lands belongs to individuals. Government has from time
to time issued the slum households legal ownership/ title of land/ Patta, as part of its policy to ensure
tenure security to the poor and landless.
Environment
At regional level, the region is rich of valuable minerals, forests and wild animals. As per the existing
land use 2011 the town has plenty of agricultural land but does not have any designated and
organized green space or open spaces for the citizens of town.Presently there is no planned water
front development ponds are the major source of water supply in the town. Apart from the pond,
there are two nallahs Amaiya Nallah and Naiya Nallah. Presently no initiatives have been taken by
the HNP for the well planned pond front development and both the Nallahs in the town.To attract the
potential tourists to Hanumana, different water front activities like boating, landscape along the
riverside should be developed. The water pollution is major concern present day in Hanumana. Due to
the religious activities along the Ghats, discharge of drains and poor solid waste management, the
water of pond might get polluted. Also increase in the number of vehicles in the city causes different
environmental problems. Hanumana required an integrated development process, which has to be
inexpensive, functionally utilitarian, environmentally healthy, recreationally adequate and
aesthetically appealing.
Heritage Conservation and Tourism potential of the town
At town level, Hanumana has no any heritage buildings and tourist destination. The Hanuman Mandir
and the Lakshmi Mandir is the only place in the city which generates attraction. Unfortunately, the
town has not been able to capitalize its potential in this sector as the site is in un- developed stage and
lacks sufficient and efficient modes of transportation, infrastructure services such as street lights,
public drinking water, public toilets, eating places etc. that can hold the tourist. In order to address
the tourism scenario the subject has to be addressed at regional level, such interventions has been
suggested in the report in the form of developing a tourist circuit in and around the region.
Existing Institutional framework for Development
The Elected council function is on the model of chairperson/ president-in-council system. It consists
of 15 councillors representing 15 wards of HNP. Under democratic set-up, the chairperson/president
is the head of HNP. The chairperson is elected by the councillors. On the executive side, the Chief
Municipal Officer (CMO) assists the chairperson. The CMO heads the administrative wing of HNP.
There are 2 sections in the HNP namely; Accounts and Engineering. The main activities are providing
civic services, collection of levies local taxes levy of property tax, assessment of property tax/fees,
collection, birth and death certificate, cleaning, solid waste management, street lighting, minor works
and so forth. The municipality is primarily funded by local grants. The Town and Country Planning
Department and MP Housing Board are other line departments which are involved in providing the
city services. But the main drawback among these organisation is the lack of inter departmental
coordination, introduction of computerisation in the work etc.
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Investment Plan and Financing Strategies


a) Revenue
The revenue account comprises two components - revenue income and revenue expenditure.
Revenue income comprises internal resources and external sources of income of Hanumana. Internal
sources of income, also referred to as own sources of income, comprise tax and non-tax items. The
external resources come in the form of shared taxes/ transfers and revenue grants from the State and
Central Governments and loans from the Financial Institutions. Revenue expenditure comprises
expenditures incurred on salaries, operation & maintenance cost, contribution & donations and debt
servicing.
i)
Income
As per the Budget, the contribution of Municipal Taxes and grants is 18.96 Lakhs and Rs.56.46 Lakhs
for the year 2009-10 and 2010-11, respectively. For the same year, the third contributor is income
from non taxes sources which has a contributing of Rs159.97 Lakhs and 207.64 Lakhs in the FY2009-10
and 2010-11, respectively. This source has a very high growth.
ii)
Revenue expenditure:
In the FY 2009-10, total expenditure was less as compare to the previous year but in FY2010-11 total
expenditure of Hanumana increases due to Establishment Expenditure (Salary, Wages, Benefit and
allowance). The total revenue expenditure has increased from around 150 lakhs in the financial year
2009-10 t more than 200 lakhs in the financial year 2010-11.
iii)
Capital Account and Income
The capital account comprises capital income and capital expenditure. Capital income consists of
income earned by the council from loans raised, transfers from revenue surplus and utilization of
funds from sinking funds and grants received for undertaking capital works. The current income of
Hanumana is clearly increasing every year, the income from non tax sources such as rent from
municipal properties and fee charged for various services. The net capita for the financial year 2001011 was around 2.64 crores rupees.
iv) Savings / Over-Expenditure: Trend Analysis
There was no net savings for the HNP for the financial year 2008-09, moreover there was a loss of
around 14 lakh rupees but after that the financial condition has improved steadily and at the end of
the year 2010-11 the net saving increased to be about 42 lakh rupees. Since the Hanumana region is
quite underdeveloped the surplus income should be spent on the general welfare, maintaining a
comfortable margin of surplus for emergency situations. Hanumana Nagar Parishad is in a comfortable
position to invest its additional resources for the suggested upcoming projects.
Investment Prioritization plan
Project identification
Based on the stakeholder consultation meet, the prioritization of projects was done so that the views,
aspirations and felt needs of the local officials, residents, experts, NGOs, elected representatives and
others are given due cognizance. The sectoral priority to the projects is assigned on the basis of
various consultations and discussions held with the government departments involved in the
implementation of CDP. It also takes into account the aspirations of the residents of Hanumana
expressed in a workshop, informal discussions and meetings held for the purpose. By the year 2035
the investment of around 6630 lakh rupees will be required in various identified projects.
Investment plan

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The projects are to be implemented over the plan period of twenty five years as per following
implementation schedule worked out on the basis of time involved in completing the projects and the
priority decided for the same. It will be done in 5 phases
Phase I (2012-2015)
Phase II (2016-2020)
Phase III (2021-2025)
Phase IV (2026-2030)
Phase V (2031-2035)
In the overall finance plan the investment share of central government will be around 19 crores which
will be around 30% of the overall expenditure, the share of state government will be around 26.52
crores which will be about 40% of the overall share the municipal body will contribute around 13.26
crores or 20% of the share while the private sector will contribute around 6.63 crores or 10% of the
share.
Urban Reforms
In terms of compliance to the 74th Constitution Amendment Act of 1992, the Hanumana Municipal
Council is yet to be complied. Devolution of function is incomplete. There is no system of egovernance in the council. It is recommended that the Govt. of MP has to fully implement the 74 th
CAA in letter and spirit by complete devolution of all functions and powers, state level reforms,
Migration to double entry accrual based accounting system and develop customize software for
double entry system, involvement of Private Sector Participation. Indeed, a well framed coordinate
system shall be evolved between Nagar Nigam and para-statals for better management
City Vision
To develop an inclusive city which is economically vibrant, ecologically sustainable and
environmentally pleasing; a city which will meet the aspirations of the local resident as well as the
tourist alike and is manageable.

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CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

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1.1

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

INTRODUCTION
Background

Madhya Pradesh is urbanizing at a fast pace and the Urban Local Bodies of the state are facing the challenge
of meeting the requirements of the growing population with limited technical and financial resources.
Governments of India (GoI) as well as the Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) have initiated a number of
programmes to meet the growing demands of infrastructure and service delivery. Two prominent schemes of
the GoI are: Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and Medium Towns (UIDSSMT) and
Integrated Housing and Slum Development Programme (IHSDP), while the GoMP has initiated DFID funded
MPUSP, which links reform with investment in infrastructure for the poor. Other than these, there are several
programmes that have been launched by the GoI and GOMP.

1.2

Concept and Principle of City Development Plan

A CDP is a planning process and a vision for future development of the city, which builds and improves the
partnership between various stakeholders groups viz. citizens from various social groups including slum
dwellers & senior citizens, trade bodies, citizen forums, professionals, freedom fighters, journalists, informal
business entities etc. and line agencies or government departments/organizations for efficient and improved
delivery & management of various urban basic services within the city.
The consultative approach based CDP preparation assures realistic demand based infrastructure
development, its spatial distribution and equity in services delivery. This process confirms better assets
management, improved delivery of services towards urban poor and good governance. It also encourages the
people to think about the direction and pace of development of their city thereby evolving and defining the
development strategies to translate the vision into strategic plans incorporating sectoral investment plan that
give an impetus to economic growth and poverty reduction.
There are ways and means to undertake a consultative process in a given situation in a city. Therefore, DMG
Consulting (P) Ltd. has adopted the process of targeted focus group discussion in a cluster of wards at a
centrally located destination to document public views in a structured manner. This has brought two aspects
to the notice of the consultant one is divergent views of the public and the other spatial disparity in terms of
municipal services delivery. The consultant has undertaken the process of consultation with various
stakeholder groups like urban poor, women, senior citizens; traders etc. These groups bring their issues,
needs, suggestions and aspirations. Such issues and suggestions are reviewed by the CDP Consultant team
before incorporating and mainstreaming them in CDP preparation. This approach will strengthen inclusive
planning process and will be more inclined towards urban poor, gender-mainstreaming issues etc. resulting in
strategic and sustainable development of the city in the future.
The essence of planning is efficient use of public resources and demand driven services delivery approach. It
establishes a logical and consistent framework for evaluation of investment decisions. The DMG Consulting (P)
Ltd. accesses, analyzes and presents the current stage of the citys development and sets out the directions of
change. It also identifies the thrust areas based on vision of common man and marketing the city economy
for developing a sustainable city development plan, suggests alternative strategies and interventions for
bringing about the desired change and also provides a framework of projects which need to be identified and
implemented on priority basis.
The principle of CDP is to develop a sustainable city with quality life & infrastructure, improved economic
environment and competitiveness of Nagar Parishad Hanumana in industry & services sector with efficient
and transparent city management.
The preparation of CDP will present both a vision of a desired future perspective for the city and the ULBs
strategic framework and investment interventions for the identified sectors, which intends to work towards
achieving their long-term vision in the next twenty five years.

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Objective of the Assignment

The following objectives have been framed to achieve the goal of City Development Plan:

1.4

To identify the challenges of the city.

To prepare a perspective and Vision for the future development of the city.

To improve and strengthen the municipal services including their delivery and management system and
making them self-sustaining.

To focus on the development of economic and social infrastructure.

To suggest policies and programmes those specifically address the issues of urban poor.

It is expected that the CDP will serve the requirements of the UIDSSMT and IHSDP programmes as well
as JNNURM and other development schemes.

To assist the State government to undertake such urban sector reforms, which facilitate flow of
investments into city based infrastructure.

To strengthen the municipal governments their financial management and accounting processes,
thereby promoting transparency in their functioning.

Understanding of Terms of Reference Vis a Vis Methodology of the Study

The understanding of terms of reference under city development plan refers to broad contours of the
assignment including status of the existing infrastructure supply and demand gap assessment, key issues and
concerns of city development, major economic activities& opportunities, city vision and positioning of the city,
identifying key projects to achieve the city vision and aspiration of citizens, preparing city investment plans
and phasing of implementation. Framework including capacity building and reforms to be undertaken to
achieve the envisaged city development goals and vision.
The methodology will document and bring a stepwise process and sequential arrangement of tasks and
activities. These activities will have a set of processes to follow and guidelines to adhere so that the broad
objectives and goals of the study are achieved. In other words, methodology is a set of methods and
techniques employed to achieve the targeted goals/objectives of the proposed study. The understanding of
Terms of Reference is crucial to derive and plan a proper methodology to achieve broad objectives and goals
of the study. Therefore the Terms of Reference (ToR) and methodology are complementary and mutually
inclusive in nature.

1.5

Approach and Methodology for Preparation of CDP

The CDP preparations both a perspective and a vision for the future development of a city captured through a
consultative process. It presents the current stage of the citys development where we stand now? It sets
out the directions of change where do we want to go? It identifies the thrust areas -- what do we need to
address on a priority basis? It also suggests alternative routes, strategies, and interventions for bringing about
the change what interventions do we make in order to attain the vision? It provides a framework and vision
within which projects need to be identified and implemented. It establishes a logical and consistent
framework for the evaluation of investment decisions.
The CDP clearly defines how the Nagar Parishad of Hanumana will serve its citizens, for example how it
intends to guarantee a basic level of urban services to all citizens, make urban planning responsive to
emerging needs, and become responsive to the needs of and improve its services to local businesses.
The CDP also explains how Nagar Parishad of Hanumana will run its business, e.g. how it intends to manage
public finance in an efficient and transparent way, execute urban planning and governance in line with an
established framework, become more responsive and cost and time efficient by integrating technology in its
governance and service delivery processes.

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Finally, the CDP lays down Nagar Parishad Hanumanas strategy to manage its resources, for example using
performance indicators - physical, financial and institutional i.e. it details out the corporations intensions to
increase revenues and expand its tax base to allow for self-sustaining urban service delivery, improve its
creditworthiness and recruit and retain a skilled workforce. This will involve capacity building and includes
Training Needs Assessment (TNA), job holders analysis i.e. who has to do what? Business Plan Preparation for
monitoring implementation will include development of performance indicators Physical, Financial and
Institutional.
The process of CDP preparation has been initiated with a Kick Off workshop which reveals the process,
purpose and outcomes including steps of CDP preparation, a public consultation, focused group meetings with
concerned stakeholders and one to one meetings with Nagar Parishads departmental heads and with the line
departments, elected representatives viz. MP/MLA and business - including trade bodies and professionals.
This forms the basis of all stages of CDP from vision statement, identification of goals and issues, strategy for
development, preparation of priority matrix for project identification, sequential phasing of projects including
city investment plan and long term perspective plan up-to year 2035.
The diagnostic exercise, inception, city profile and sector analysis includes detailed assessment of the existing
situation of the city. The purpose of this analysis is to make a realistic assessment of where the city is, i.e. its
current status, the direction in which it has been moving and its strengths and weaknesses. It covers the citys
demographic, economic, financial, infrastructural (specifically service delivery), physical and environmental
profile. It also considers the citys institutional framework, innovation in management if any and e-governance
initiatives underway and status of e-readiness of Nagar Parishad Hanumana.
The overall objective of the consultation process is to get the viewpoints of the stakeholders in the
identification of issues as well as vision formulation. Specific objectives are:
To involve local residents in the CDP process

To enable stakeholders to express their views about existing


problems and proposals

To create a shared flow of information

To enable local ownership of the city development plan


Figure 1.1: Specific Objectives of CDP

1.6

Scope of Work

The scope of work of preparation of CDP has been divided into four stages: Inception, Sectoral Assessment
and preparation of the City profile, preparation of city visions and identification of the development
objectives, and drafting and submissions of the City Development Plan. DMG consulting Pvt. Ltd. Has prepared
the CDP in conformity with the scope defined in the ToR in close collaboration with the concerned ULB.

Stage 1: Inception
The review and analysis of the current status and unique features of the city with regard to the state of its
development, systems and procedures, as well as its institutional and financial context is taken-up at the
initial stage also known as the inception stage. The main activities include introduction of CDP concept,
purpose and outcome to public representatives like MLA, President, Ward Councillors, citizens forming the

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city, along with Chief Municipal Officer - Heads of Nagar Parishad Hanumana, Departmental Heads and other
personnel involved in the project associated task involves familiarity visit to city and review of its growth
pattern, identification of growth corridors, collection and collation of information and data from Nagar
Parishad and other line Departments/Agencies/Organizations. This stage will identify the strengths,
weaknesses and opportunities in the city for its development and will provide an understanding of what
hampers the service delivery and management within the existing set-up and how can it better off to
contribute to efficient and self-sustaining service provision. This stage involves the following activities.
The assignment commenced with the preliminary meeting with the officials of the Nagar Parishad Hanumana
to understand their requirements from this assignment.

The Major Activities during Inception Stage were as follows:

Reconnaissance

The CDP consultant has conducted introductory meetings with the Chief Municipal Officer, Head of
Departments, Councillors, representatives of ongoing urban programmes, etc. to understand the dynamics
and divergent views about the city and to gather secondary information such as - expansion of the city in
respect of the city boundary including land-use or base map for the Nagar Parishad Hanumana, demographic
profile of the city including data on slums/urban poor, Socio-economic profile, ULBs status in terms of its
functions, strength and composition of various departments, ULBs annual budget reports, ULBs budget
allocations/proposal for coming financial years, other ongoing projects under past and current urban
development programmes , reports giving status of service delivery, relevant documents on heritage listing
and government policy documents etc.
CDP Consultant has had interactions with various, institutions, organizations and key stakeholders such as
PHED, Town and Country Planning Department, local residents of various social groups, local NGOs, CBOs etc.
and other line departments, that have any role and responsibility in city planning and administration with
reference to development, delivery and maintenance of urban basic service to the citys population. Detailed
secondary data on the urban infrastructure and services viz. Drinking Water Supply, Drainage & Sewerage,
Sanitation, Solid Waste Management, Roads, and street lighting etc. was collected through available
documents and reports.
A field reconnaissance has been done with regards to up gradation of base map and various characteristics of
the town such as growth corridors, growth patterns, major physical constraints which limit the citys spatial
growth, major land uses type of the city, exiting planning issues and challenges, housing typology,
development undertaken under public and private sectors including entrepreneur builders, self-construction,
slum growth and locations, major development potentials corridors, regulations, overview of urban basic
services - drinking water supply system, drainage & sewerage network, sanitation, solid waste management,
street lighting, traffic and transportation including- road networks system, pedestrian, public transportation
system, mode of transportation, business and economy, informal and urban haats, major environmental hot
spots, heritage & cultural landscape including monuments, management of religious places and places of
worship and public places management including parks and open spaces. Identification of major economic
and services sector Vis a Vis thrust and potential sectors to identify for special papers preparation under city
development plan of Hanumana.
At the same time with due consultation with President Nagar Parishad Hanumana, Chief Municipal Officer
and other ULBs Officials, consultant has accessed/determined the feasibility and composition of City Level
Steering Group (comprising of Citizen Forum) for the formulation of CDP.

Kick-off Workshop

The kickoff workshop is a formal entry level activity to start the city development plan. The consultant
proposed to have one to one meetings with the Mayor, head of Nagar Parishad and heads of the various
departments of the ULB to fix a date, time and venue for a one day kick-off workshop with the identified
various stakeholders to familiarize them with the purpose, process and expected outcomes of the CDP and

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build enthusiasm, understanding and commitment to the CDP. A one day kick-off workshop with Nagar
Parishad, Hanumanas support was organized (Dated-15/11/2011).
The kick off workshop helped in deriving a consensus along with the stakeholders firming the process and
agreeing upon a structured programme to take the CDP forward. The formation of the Steering Group will also
be announced as well as the sectors for which detailed analysis will be carried out.

Figure 1.2: Stage 1: Inception

Figure 1.3 Kick-off workshops in Nagar Parishad

Stakeholders for the Kick-off workshop include:


Elected representatives such as President and councillors, Line Departments of the state government such as
pollution control board, departments of transport, industries, health, tourism, public health engineering, land
revenue, etc., non-governmental and community based organizations, representatives of the poor
communities, representatives of media, academic institutions, etc.

Preliminary Situational Analysis


Preliminary analysis was done on the basis of secondary data collection and stakeholder consultations. The
analysis and assessment included:
Regional setting, administrative boundary, demography, economy, urban growth, land use change etc.
Urban basic services: water supply, sanitation, municipal solid waste, drainage, roads/urban transport,
urban environment, health and education, fire services, etc.
Institutional arrangements of key stakeholders and their role and responsibilities in city planning with
reference to delivery and management of urban basic services.

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Financial framework of key stakeholder agencies involved in service delivery and O & M.

Stage 2: Sectoral Assessment and City Profile

Sector analysis

The sector analysis was carried out in consultation with the local counterparts. Interaction with various
stakeholder groups (meetings, workshops, focus group discussions, etc.), reviewing relevant publications,
reports, GOs, resolutions, procedures, laws etc. to analyse the current situation in each of the identified
sectors. Detailed analysis at this stage will included study of physical and demographic characteristics of the
town, socio-economic analysis, infrastructure services, housing and slums, traffic and transportation sector,
environment and forests, heritage conservation and tourism etc.

City profile

The findings from the sector analysis have been used in preparing the City Profile consisting of assessment of
the existing situation in all the identified sectors, emerging issues, SWOT analysis and analysis of the present
gaps and future requirements.
The framework of parameters includes issues relating to demography, economic base, finance, physical and
environmental issues, infrastructure, institutions and universalisation of services especially for the poor.

Figure 1.4: Stage 2: Sector Assessment and City Profile

Stage 3: City Vision and Development Objectives


Under this stage a city vision for 25 years was developed and the major actions required for long term and
short term need of the city were discussed. This stage outlined the nature of consultation activities conducted
by the project team as part of goals, city vision and strategy for development of the CDP.
Consultations with local communities, local government and state government were held by the Consultant to
provide an opportunity for community and government participation in the CDP process. These activities
aimed to form an open and cooperative communication process between the team of CDP preparation and all
stakeholders.

Development of Strategies and Priority Actions


This task involves a strategy for bridging the gap between where the city is and where it wishes to go.
Strategies and interventions were identified for attaining the vision and future development perspectives. The
chosen strategies were translated into programmes and projects in this stage.
Development of strategies and prioritization involves identification of specific program and projects in each
development area and a brief description of each of them covering an overview of the proposed
program/project including their goals, objectives, broad financial implications and contribution to the vision
actualization.

2nd ULB Level Workshop

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At the completion of this phase the DMG consulting Pvt. Ltd. will organise 2nd ULB level workshop.
The 1st Stage presentation at the District Level would be organized in front of a Committee Headed by the
District Collector, to monitor the progress of the project.
The 1st Stage discussion at the State Level would be organised at the Directorate of Urban Administration
and Development, Bhopal to monitor the progress of the project.
Preparing a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a Financing Strategy
The consultant will prepare a resource mobilization plan for Remunerative and non remunerative projects
both. Remunerative projects are mainly commercial in nature based on borrowed fund and cost of the fund is
included in the project feasibility. It is mainly bankable projects like shopping complex, housing. However the
non bankable projects are cross subsidized or budget supported which are produced as public goods (parks,
water, drainage etc) under grant and internal revenue accrual mix resource format.
Project costing and determination of funding sources: Determination of types and sources of financing for
priority projects from internal resources, state and central governments, local financial institutions, donors,
and through public-private partnerships.
The Project Scheduling is in phased manner based on scores of priority projects, it will form actions phasing (5
and 25 years period) and developing a City Investment Plan (CIP).

Figure 1.5: Stage 3: City Vision and Development Objectives

Stage 4: Drafting Final CDP

Third workshop on Draft CDP

DMG consulting Pvt. Ltd. with support from ULB will organize third workshop involving all the stakeholders,
who have been part of the CDP preparation process. The workshop will seek an endorsement of the City
Development Plan from the stakeholder group present and agree on procedures for performance monitoring.
The 2nd Stage presentation at the District Level would be organised
The 2nd Stage discussion at the State Level would be organised at the Directorate of Urban Administration
and Development, Bhopal to monitor the progress of the project.

Preparing a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a Financing strategy

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Figure 1.6: Stage 4: Draft CDP

Stage 4: submission of Final CDP Document


Following the third and final workshop, DMG consulting Pvt. Ltd. will finalize the CDP document incorporating
the feedback from the workshop and the inputs received at the 2nd Stage State Level discussion.

The 3rd Stage presentation at the ULB has been organised.


This document will be presented and submitted to council for resolution, along with a summary of the CDP for
publication and wider dissemination by the ULB.

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Figure 1.7: Schematic Diagram for Methodology of City Development Plan Preparation

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CHAPTER 2
Introduction to Hanumana

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2.
2.1

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

INTRODUCTION TO HANUMANA
Introduction to Rewa

Rewa district is situated in the north-eastern part of the state of Madhya Pradesh in India. It was a princely
state of Vindhya Pradesh. The city lies about 420 kilometres northeast of the state capital Bhopal and 130
kilometres south of the city of Allahabad.
It lies between 240 18 and 250 12 north latitudes and 810 2 and 820 18. The district is bounded on the north
by Uttar Pradesh, on the east and southeast by Sidhi on the south by Shahdol and on the west by Satna.
The district has a varied terrain that includes alluvial plains, hills, ravines, scarp, rivers, and water-falls. The
rain-water of the district flows out along two tributary rivers of the Ganges the Tamas and the Son.
According to the 2011 census, Rewa District has a population of 2,363,744, roughly equal to the nation of
Latvia or the US state of New Mexico. This gives it a ranking of 191st in India (out of a total of 640). The district
has a population density of 374 inhabitants per square kilometre. Its population growth rate over the decade
2001-2011 was 19.79%. Rewa has a sex ratio of 930 females for every 1000 males and a literacy rate of
73.42%.
A limestone belt runs through the Rewa district and coal is found in the nearby districts of Shahdol, Umaria,
Sidhi and Singrauli. Cement factories are located in nearby Naubasta, Bela (Satna district) and Bhagwar (Sidhi
district). The Jaypee Group has built a township known as Jaypee Nagar in Rewa. Asia's biggest cement
factory, Prism cement (previously Rasi Cement), operates near Rewa in Satna district. Various Birla Group
Companies, such as Vindhya Tele Links and Birla Ericson Ltd., are also located there.
In 2006, the Ministry of Panchayati Raj named Rewa one of the country's 250 most backward districts (out of
a total of 640 districts in India). It is one of the 24 districts in Madhya Pradesh currently receiving funds from
the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme (BRGFP).

2.2

Administrative Boundary

The study area, Hanumana is a small town and Tehsil of Rewa District in Madhya Pradesh. It is situated 100
kms in North-east from Rewa Town (District Headquarter).Hanumana borders the adjacent State i.e.
Uttarpradesh through NH7 by Road. Geographically, the city is located at 24o77N latitude and 82o09E
longitude at an altitude of about 500 meters above sea level in Bagelkhand Region. The nagar Parishad of
Hanumana town was set up in the year of 1979. Hanumana is known for the famous Hanuman temple. The
Hanumana town constitutes a total area of about 30.35 Sq. Km. under the jurisdiction of Hanumana Nagar
Parishad and is divided into 15 No. of wards for management of civil services and administration. Fig. 2.1 & 2.3
delineates the location of study area and its administrative boundary respectively.

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Map: 2-1 Location of Hanumana (maps not to sca

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2.3

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Location and Connectivity

Located in the North-eastern part of Rewa District near to the States Border of Madhya Pradesh and
Uttarpradesh, the Hanumana town is well connected to the rest of the towns of M.P. and U.P. by Road,
Rail and Airways.

Roadways: Road plays an important role in connecting Hanumana town to other towns and cities of the
country. The National Highway No. 7 connects the town to its District Headquarter Rewa in south
western side and in north eastern side to Mirzapur town. The town is also well connected to rest of the
towns of by State Highways and Major District Roads at regional level.

Railway Linkage: As town is not directly linked with Indian Railway System, the nearest railway station
is Mirzapur Railway Station in Uttarpradesh at a distance of 68 Km. followed by Rewa the District
Headquarter (100 Km.) and Allahabad (111kilometres).

Airways: The nearest airport is Rewa airport which is approximately 101 Km. from Hanumana via Raipur
(Madhya Pradesh) through N.H. 7 followed by Bamrauli (Defence Air Base) in Uttar Pradesh at a distance
of 124 Km. and Satna (approximately 144 kms.) which has an airstrip, however not in use for regular
fights. The Varanasi a holly city is the nearest airport for civil aviation (approximately 143 kms.) from the
Hanumana via Gopalganj through N.H. 34& N.H. 2.

Map: 2-2 Regional Connectivity Hanumana, M.P.

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2.4

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Study Area

The study area Hanumana Town covers an area of about 30.35 Sq. Km. under the jurisdiction of
Hanumana Nagar Parishad (HNP). For the administration and management of civic needs & services the
city is divided into 15 No. of wards represented by ward councillors elected by the citizens. Figure
2.3describe the Study Area: Hanumana Nagar Parishad.
Table 2.1: Study Area

Administrative Body
Hanumana Nagar
Parishad

Area (Sq. Km.)


30.35

Area
(HA)
3035

Remarks
Urban Area
Most of the area under HNP is
agricultural.
Development is slow but have lots of
potentials

Map: 2-3 Study Area Hanumana Nagar Parishad

2.5

Physical Characteristics

2.5.1 Topography & Geology


The town is located at an altitude of about 500 meters above mean sea level in Bagelkhand Region. The
terrain of the region is typified as hilly. The whole of the Rewa District is located on the Vindhya Range of
hills. Hanumana forms the north-eastern plain of Vindhya Range and Kamore Ranges gently sloping
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towards north. The medium deep black soils are intensively cultivated and highly potential. The soil is
calerous, slightly alkaline.

2.5.2 Climate
The climate of this zone can be divided into three distinct seasons, viz.

Monsoon lasting from mid June to September.

Winter from November to February

Summer from March to June.

The area enjoys tropical type climatic conditions. The climate of the town is characterized by hot and dry
summers and mild winters. Summer nights are mainly cool and pleasant. The maximum average
temperature has been recorded in the month of May & June at 42C, whereas minimum average
recorded temperature is 6C. The rainy season starts from the mid June and end in the month of
September. The average annual rainfall is about 1100 mm. During monsoon months the relative humidity
remains more than 60% normally. The month of October witnesses the transition from monsoon to
winter.
Table 2.2: Average Annual Rainfall in Hanumana

Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Year
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007

Average Annual Rainfall (in mm)


1484
1478
1478
1015
1492
1774
780
1063
1063

Source: Project Report of IHSDP

The rainfall distribution pattern is irregular. Approximately 90% of all rainfall in the region caused by the
monsoon falling from June to October accounts for average annual rainfall of about 950-1100 mm but
most of gets lost due to runoff. July and August are the months of maximum rainfall. April is the driest
months of the year, the scant winter rainfall is useful for the cultivation of Rabi crops but it is usually
inadequate without access to supplementary irrigation purposes.

2.6

Agriculture, Industry, Minerals, Flora& Fauna

The chief means of subsistence of the people in this region is agriculture. It is indeed regarded as the best
occupation and a proverb runs. "Agriculture is the best (occupation), trade and commerce stands next,
while (domestic) service is the lowest and alms begging the last resource". Two seasons are recognized
the kharif lasting from May to Oct, in which jowar, kodon etc. are cultivated and the Rabi lasting from Oct
to March in which Soyabean, wheat, grains and masoor are sown.
The town has small scale manufacturing industries. There are not many big or large scale industries in
Hanumana town producing industrial effluent.
At regional level, the region is rich in valuable minerals, forests and wild animals. Bauxite, coal, lime,
basalt, iron ore, etc. are some of the minerals available in abundance in this region. A rich store of fuel
exists in the coal-seams of the Barakar group in the Gondwana series. The colliery at Umariya has been
successfully worked for many years, and the Johilla coal field, contains coal of even better quality.
The prevalent trees in the forests of Rewa District are sagon, sal, tendu, shishum, bambaoo etc. The
brushwood consists mainly of the species Grewiazizyphus, Casearia, Antidesma, Woodfordia, Flueggia,
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Phyllanthus, Bosewellia and Buchanania with occasional trees of mahua (Bassialatifolia). The Rewa
District is famous for white tigers, bears, panthers, sambar (Cervus unicolor), Chinkara (Gazellabenetii)
and other species. Wild fowl of all classes are common throughout its area.

2.7

SWOT Analysis

STRENGTH
Hanumana is well connected to all major towns
and cities at regional level through important
roads.
N.H. 7 passes through the centre of the town.
Natural Drainage Slope.
Most of the area under Hanumana Nagar Parishad
is agricultural.
Town is very much in the influence zone of Uttar
Pradesh state.
The medium deep black soils are intensively
cultivated and highly potential.
OPPORTUNITY
Good road connectivity and abundant agricultural
land can uphold the development of Agro-based
industries and townships.
Being situated in the Bagelkhand Region the town
has rich potential of flora and fauna species.

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

WEAKNESS
The town is not directly linked with Indian
Railway System; therefore, it does not have
Railway Station.
Town has a lack of recreational spaces.
Development is many confined along the N.H.
7 and important roads passing through the
city.

THREAT
Divided into two parts by NH-7, the
development is mainly occurring along NH-7 in
the Hanumana city, it is an invitation to traffic
problems as well as infrastructure problems.

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CHAPTER 3
Demographic Profile of the Town

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3.

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE TOWN

3.1

Background

A demographic profile has been prepared based on analysis of census data, data from HNP and other
secondary sources and discussion with Hanumana Nagar Parishad. The analysis covers apart from the
population growth and trends in the town, an assessment of the other social characteristics of the
population including literacy, education, gender etc. This analysis, together with the economic base will
form the basis for working out the growth scenarios for the town.

3.2

Population Trend and Urbanization

As per the Census of India, 1991 the total population of Hanumana town was about 11,346 which has
been continuously increased throughout the various year and has been registered to about 16,773 in
2011 with a population of density of 5.53 persons per hectare. In the year 2001, as per the Census of
India, the total population of Hanumana Nagar Parishad was 14,871 with a density of 4.89 persons per
hectare. The decadal growth rate for the year 1991-2001 was registered as 31.07%. At present, as per the
Census 2011, Hanumana Nagar Parishad has registered a total population of 16,773 with a decadal
growth rate of 12.79%. A comparative assessment of the total Urban Population indicates that the total
urban population of Rewa District constituted 1.97% total Madhya Pradesh Urban Population while HNP
constitutes 4.24% of Districts total Urban Population.
Table 3.1: Comparative Assessment of Urban Population

Area

Total Population
Urban Population

Urban India
Madhya
(Urban)

37,71,05,760

Pradesh 2,00,59,666

Rewa
(Urban)

District 3,95,487

Hanumana Nagar 16,773


Parishad

Male

Female

Decadal Growth
Rate 2001-2011

19,58,07,196

18,12,98,564

31.80%

1,04,70,511

95,89,155

25.63%

2,07,771

1,87,716

23.40%

8,748

8,025

12.79%

Source: Provisional Population, Census of India, 2011

Population of Hanumana

Population

20000
15000
10000
5000
0
Decades

1991

2001

2011

Graph 3-1: Population Hanumana, M.P.

In terms of population growth there is a decline in the growth rate as per the Census of India 2001 and
2011. The decadal population growth rate was highly skewed during the period 1981-1991 to 2001-2011.
The average decadal growth rate during the year 1991-2001 was about 31.07% and it declines to 12.79%
in 2001-2011. Thus the population of the town is increasing but with slower growth rate. This shows that
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the people are out migrating to nearby big towns from Hanumana which is more semi-urban in nature
where the average household size is high and the options for livelihood are greater.
Table 3.2: Population Growth Trends

Year

Population
HNP

Decadal Growth Rate (%)

Rewa District

HNP

Rewa District

1981 - 1991

11,346

15,54,987

28.77

1991 - 2001

14,871

19,72,333

31.07

26.84

2001 - 2011

16,773

23,63,744

12.79

19.86

Source: Census of India; Provisional Population Figure Census 2011

While at district level the decadal population growth rate is also highly skewed during the period 19811991. The average decadal growth rate during 1981-1991 was 28.77% which declines to 26.84% in 19912001 and decreased to 19.86% in 2001-2011. This is because of out migration in search of livelihood as
the Rewa District itself does not have much potential in terms of education & health facilities, economic
opportunities to cater the growing population. Another reason to increase the decadal growth rate in
1191-2001 in Hanumana Nagar Parishad is the continuous in migration from Uttar Pradesh.

3.3

Population Density

As per the Census of 2011, the gross density of Hanumana town is 5.53 persons per hectare which is
increasing continuously since 1981.
Table 3.3: Population Density Trends

Year

Population

Area in Hectare

Area (in Sq.Km.)

Density (pph)

Density (pp sq.


Km.)

1991

11,346

3035

30.35

3.74

373.84

2001

14,871

3035

30.35

4.89

489.98

2011

16,773

3035

30.35

5.53

552.65

Source: Census of India; Provisional Population, Census of India, 2011

Due to the large percentage of uninhabited land within Hanumana Nagar Parishad boundary the gross
population density of the town is quite low. This shows that the town is scantily populated and much of
the population is concentrated in one part of the town, which in this case is along the national highway.
The Ward Wise Demographics of the town is given below. The higher density i.e. more than 7 pph is
found in the ward nos. 3, 4, 6, 8 and 15 while the lover population density (below 4 pph) is found in the
ward nos. 2, 7 and 12.
Table 3.4: Demographics of the Town - Hanumana

Ward No.

No. of HH

Population
Male

Female

HH Size
Avg.

Area (In ha.)

Total

Population
Density
(pph)

WardNo.1

236

706

628

1334

5.65

254.42

5.24

WardNo.2

105

396

348

744

7.09

434.62

1.71

WardNo.3

127

427

420

847

6.67

106.27

7.97

WardNo.4

128

453

347

800

6.25

52.47

15.25

WardNo.5

183

515

441

956

5.22

179.21

5.33

WardNo.6

304

796

680

1476

4.86

128.52

11.48

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WardNo.7

223

646

594

1240

5.56

396.14

3.13

WardNo.8

210

579

563

1142

5.44

146.68

7.79

WardNo.9

123

458

390

848

6.89

133.96

6.33

WardNo.10

123

390

370

760

6.18

110.61

6.87

WardNo.11

199

656

630

1286

6.46

209.80

6.13

WardNo.12

176

551

475

1026

5.83

450.99

2.27

WardNo.13

124

417

360

777

6.27

213.33

3.64

WardNo.14

131

417

444

861

6.57

141.75

6.07

WardNo.15

121

391

383

774

6.4

76.45

10.12

Total

2513

7798

7073

14871

5.92

3035.21

2.33

Source: Census of India, 2011

Map: 3-1 Ward Wise Population Density Hanumana, M.P.

3.4

Population Projections

The population growth rate of the town has started declining since 1991 as per Census of India. The
average decadal growth rate of Hanumana town for past 3 decades is 21.93%. The design populations for
the next 25 years have been forecasted for Hanumana. The exercise has been done taking into account
the population of past decades and as per the guidelines detailed out in CPHEEO Manual. Looking to the
factors governing the future growth and development of the Hanumana Town likewise location,
educational, industrial, commercial (including investment from outside), tourism, social and
administrative aspects it is felt that the most suitable method for population projection will be
Geographical Progression Method. However, other methods suggested are also followed.
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3.5

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Methodology Adopted to Estimate Population

For populations projection Plan Period three methods i.e. Arithmetic Progression Method, Geometric
Progression Method and Incremental Progression Method were adopted.

3.5.1 Arithmetic Progression Method


Generally, the arithmetic progression method is applicable to large & old cities. This method usually gives
lower population & should be adopted when the future growth of the city is expected to be very slow. In
this method the decadal increase in population is calculated and the total increase in population is
worked out by dividing total increase in population in overall decades.
Table 3.5: Trend of Population Growth in Hanumana Town

Years

Population

1991

11,346

2001

14,871

2011

16,773

Source: Census of India

The average increase of population between successive decades:


Present first decade:

16773 14871 = 1902

First & second decades: 14871 11346 = 3525


TOTAL: 5427
Average increase per decade

= 2713.5

Average increase per five year =1356.75


Average increase per year

= 271.35

Formula = (Recent year population + Average increase per five year)


Taking this into consideration the future population will be:
Table 3.6: Projected Population Arithmetic Progression Method

Years

Population

2011 (Base Year)

16773

2012

17044

2013

17316

2014

17587

2015

17858

2020

19215

2025

20572

2030

21929

2035

23285

Source: DMG Assessment (Arithmetic Progression Method)

3.5.2 Geometrical Progression Method


Geometric means is calculated for finding the growth rate. This method is suitable to project population
for fast growing/developing town and city. It usually gives higher population figure.
Present & first decade:

(16773 14871) *100/14871

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= 12.79%
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First & second decade:

(14871 11346)*100/11346

= 31.07%

TOTAL: 43.86%
Average increase per decade

= 21.93%

Average increase per five year = 10.96%


Average increase per year

= 2.19%

Formula: (Recent year population + (Recent year population * Average increase per five year)
Table 3.7: Projected Population Geometrical Progression Method

Years

Population

2011 (Base Year)

16773

2012

17141

2013

17517

2014

17901

2015

18293

2020

20299

2025

22525

2030

24995

2035

27735

Source: DMG Assessment (Geometrical Progression Method)

3.5.3 Incremental Increase Method


In this method, the increment in arithmetical increase is determined from the past decades and the
average of that increment is added to the average increase. This method increases the figures by
obtained by arithmetical increase method.
Table 3.8: Calculation of Population Projection Incremental Increase Method

Year

Population

Increment per Decade

Incremental Increase

1991

11,346

--

--

2001

14,871

3525

--

2011

16,773

1902

-1623

TOTAL

5427

-1623

Average per decade

2713.5

-1623

Average per five years

1356.75

-811.5

Average per year

271

-162.3

Total five year

545

Total per year

109

Source: DMG Assessment

Average Incremental Increase = -162.3


Average Arithmetic Increase = 271
Formula: (Average Arithmetic Increase = n* Average Incremental Increase)
Where n is numeric value that keep increasing with every projected year like 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 etc.
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Table 3.9: Projected Population Incremental Increase Method

Years

Population

2011 (Base Year)

16773

2012

16882

2013

16991

2014

17100

2015

17209

2020

17754

2025

18300

2030

18845

2035

19390

Source: DMG Assessment (Incremental Increase Method)

3.6

Summary of Population Projection through Various Methods

From the population projection done of Hanumana Town it is calculated that;

Incremental Increase method followed by Arithmetic Progression Method has given very less
population and is not the suitable method for a town like Hanumana which has very good
prospects of growth in near future.
Geometric Progression Method gives higher population as compared with Incremental Increase
through arithmetical progression method and is suitable & close to reality as the town with
abundant agricultural land is located very much closer to the class I urban town Allahabad and
has substantial investment opportunity in various sectors, escorting the development of town.

Thus the population has been taken as calculated by Geometric Progression Method.

3.7

Schedule Caste & Schedule Tribe Population

As per 2001 Census, out of the total population the Hanumana Nagar Parishad had 8.8% (1,309) of
Schedule Caste (SC) population which is less than the National Average and District Average while 17.19%
of total population accounts for Schedule Tribe (ST) Population in the town.
Table 3.10: Comparative Assessment of Urban SC & ST Population

Area

Total Urban Population


ST
Population

% of SC
Population

% of ST
Population

Urban
Population

SC
Population

Urban India

286,119,689

3,36,24,822

69,87,643

11.75

2.44

Madhya Pradesh

1,59,67,145

37,87,827

7,87,026

23.72

4.93

Rewa District

3,20,563

37,413

19,836

11.67

6.19

HNP

14,871

1,309

2,556

8.8

17.19

Source: Census of India, 2011

3.8

Literacy Rate

Literacy, being an important indicator of social development, affects the demographic characteristics and
work force participation. As per 2001 Census, the average literacy rate of Hanumana town was 52.65%
which has increased to 63.21% as per 2011 Census but it is lower as compared to the District Average of
73.42%. The male literacy rate is high as 70.87% while female literacy rate is a significant 54.87%. The
status of women in terms of literacy has been significantly low at town level while literacy rate of women
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is very high in Urban India in comparison of Hanumana (Refer to Table: 3.11 & 3.12). But due to pace of
time the literacy rate has increased from the previous decade, because of introduction of schemes to
promote the education system in MP, like, Improvement in Science Education Scheme, Modernisation
Scheme of Madarsa Education, Integrated Education for Disabled Children, Computer Literacy and Study
Scheme in Schools, District Primary Education Programme, Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, Education Gaurantee
Scheme etc.
Table 3.11: Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P.

Area

Literacy Rate (in %age)


Total
2001

Male
2011

2001

Female
2011

2001

2011

Urban India

79.92

84.98

86.27

89.67

72.86

79.92

Madhya Pradesh

79.39

84.90

87.39

90.24

70.47

77.39

Rewa District

62.01

73.42

75.65

83.67

47.58

62.49

Nagar 52.65

63.21

63.38

70.87

40.83

54.87

Hanumana
Parishad

Source: Census of India, 2001 & Provisional Figure, Census of India 2011.

Map: 3-2 Ward Wise Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P.


Table 3.12: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P.

Ward No.

Literacy Rate (in %age)


Total

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WardNo.1

28.34

39.24

16.08

WardNo.2

61.56

74.24

47.13

WardNo.3

38.84

54.80

22.62

WardNo.4

77.00

82.56

69.74

WardNo.5

48.33

60.00

34.69

WardNo.6

52.10

62.81

39.56

WardNo.7

42.18

52.32

31.14

WardNo.8

62.43

72.02

52.58

WardNo.9

75.12

80.79

68.46

WardNo.10

72.11

79.49

64.32

WardNo.11

56.69

65.55

47.46

WardNo.12

52.83

63.16

40.84

WardNo.13

58.82

71.22

44.44

WardNo.14

40.19

55.88

25.45

WardNo.15

41.73

53.96

29.24

Average

52.65

63.38

40.83

Source: Census of India, 2011

From the above table it is noticed that in ward no. 2, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 literacy rates among the
female population is quite good than the rest of the wards. In present time M.P. government started
some schemes to motivate to increase the literacy rates among poor and BPL families through
introducing schemes, like, mid day meal, scholarships and giving cycles to the them.

3.9

Sex Ratio

The ratio between the number of males and the number of females is expressed in number of females
per 1000 males. The sex ratio measures the extent of prevailing equity between males and females in the
project area. There is a significant improvement in the sex ratio of Hanumana Town from 907 in 2001 to
917 in 2011, while at district level the ratio has declined from 941 in 2001 to 930 in 2011, but its still
higher as compare to the Hanumana Town. The sex ratio among the 0-6 age groups was 966 in 2001 for
Hanumana Town. With regards to Sex ratio among 0-6 age group in Rewa District, it stood at 883 females
per thousand male in 2011 compared to 2001 Census figure of 926 females per thousand males. The
town has a lower sex ratio as compared to the national and state averages.
Table 3.13: Comparative Assessment of Sex Ratio

Area

Sex Ratio

Sex Ratio
(0-6 Age Group)

Sex Ratio (SC)

Sex Ratio (ST)

2001

2011

2001

2011

2001

2011

2001

2011

Urban India

900

926

906

902

923

944

Madhya Pradesh

898

916

907

895

907

912

Rewa District

941

930

926

883

939

924

Hanumana NP

907

917

966

908

863

Source: Census of India, 2001 & Provisional Figure, Census of India 2011.

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Map: 3-3 Ward Wise Sex Ratio Hanumana, M.P.

At town level, as per 2001 Census, ward no. 14 has the highest sex ratio i.e. 1065 females per 1000 males
while the lowest is 766 females per 1000 males in ward no 4. Wards with more than 900 females per
1000 males are 3, 7, 8, 10, 11and 15 (Refer to Table: 3.14). The sex ratio among children (0-6 age group)
is very low i.e. 852 females per 1000 males, discouraging girl child birth in the town.
Table 3.14: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Sex Ratio Hanumana, M.P.

Ward No.
WardNo.1
WardNo.2
WardNo.3
WardNo.4
WardNo.5
WardNo.6
WardNo.7
WardNo.8
WardNo.9
WardNo.10
WardNo.11
WardNo.12
WardNo.13
WardNo.14
WardNo.15
Average

Sex Ratio
890
879
984
766
856
854
920
972
852
949
960
862
863
1065
980
907

Sex Ratio (0-6 Age Group)


966
946
1015
1325
667
847
815
1000
1124
973
1034
975
1020
853
1113
852

Source: Census of India, 2011

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CHAPTER 4
Socio - Economic Profile of the Town

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4.

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SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE OF THE TOWN

4.1

Background

Socio-economic profile reflects the sociological and economical characteristics of the city, which may
include

Sex-ratio
Literacy rate
Household characteristics
Workforce participation rate

Industrial activities
Trade and commerce
Tourism

In this section, an analysis has been done to identify the socio-economic profile of Hanumana and major
issues have been addressed. No data assessment of the economic base of the city is possible as, essential
town-wise economic information is not readily available. It can, however, be conjectured that the
dominant sector of the economy of Hanumana is the primary sector followed by tertiary and secondary
sectors.

4.2

Sex Ratio

The ratio between the number of males and the number of females is expressed in number of females
per 1000 males. The sex ratio measures the extent of prevailing equity between males and females in the
project area. As per the Census 2011, the sex ratio in the Hanumana Town has increased at 917 females
per 1000 males as compared to 2001 Census figure of 907. The average national sex ratio for urban India,
Madhya Pradesh and Rewa District are 926, 916 and 930 female per 1000 males respectively as per the
Census 2011. (Refer to Table: 3.13).

4.3

Literacy Rate

Literacy, being an important indicator of social development, affects the demographic characteristics and
participation in labour. As per the Census 2011, the average literacy rate of Hanumana town has been
increased to 63.21% from 52.63 % in 2001 Census. The status of women in terms of literacy has been
significantly low. The male literacy rate as per 2011 Census is high as 70.87% while female literacy rate is
significant at 54.87%. (For detail please refer to table: 3.11 and 3.12).

4.4

Average Household Size

The total number of households in Hanumana Town as per Census 2001 is 2513. The average household
size in Hanumana Town is 6.00 persons. A comparative assessment of urban population indicates that the
average household size of the town is higher than the national average of 5.12 and Rewa district of 5.7
while the state average is higher at 7.27.
Table 4.1: Comparative Assessment of Household Size

Area
Urban India
Madhya
(Urban)
Rewa District
Hanumana
Parishad

Total Population
28,61,19,689
Pradesh 1,59,67,145
1,83,274
Nagar 14,871

Household

Average HH Size

5,58,32,570

5.12

21,95,725

7.27

32,875

5.7

2,513

6.0

Source: Census of India, 2011

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4.5

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Workforce Participation

As per the 2011 Census, the Hanumana Nagar Parishad has lower Work Force Participation Rate (WFPR)
WFPR is recorded at 34.36% indicating high dependency ratio, while the National Urban average
accounts for 32.25%.
Table 4.2: Comparative Assessment of WFPR

Area

Urban India
Madhya
(Urban)

28,61,19,689

Pradesh 1,59,67,145

Rewa District
Hanumana
Parishad

Total
population

19,73,306
Nagar 14,871

Workers
Total

Male

WFPR (%)
Female

9,22,78,654

7,61,75,323

16,103,331

32.25

48,93,293

39,88,452

9,04,841

30.65

8,62,959

5,02,107

3,60,852

43.73

5,109

3,692

1,417

34.36

Source: Census of India, 2011

4.6

Workforce Distribution

Work force distribution indicates the economic base of any city or town. There are a total of 5109
workers in the town as per the 2001 Census and majority of workers are engaged in tertiary activities
such as trade & commerce. The share of work force involved in trade & commerce (tertiary sector) is
46%. The primary sector (including cultivators & agricultural labourers) and secondary sector (small scale
house hold or manufacturing industries) constitutes 50% and 4% of total work force respectively.
Chart: 4-1Workforce Distribution Hanumana, M.P.
100.00
90.00

23%

80.00

Cultivators

46%

70.00

Agricultural Labourers

In Percentage

60.00

27%

50.00

Household Industries

4%
Others

40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00

Total WFPR

Primary

Secondary

Tertiary

Male

72.26

52.90

50.21

88.93

Female

27.74

47.10

49.79

11.07

Graph 4-1: Gender Wise Work Force Distribution in Different Sectors of Economy

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Table 4.3: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of WFPR & Work Force Distribution

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
HNP

Total
Population
1334
744
847
800
956
1476
1240
1142
848
760
1286
1026
777
861
774
14871

Total Working Population


Total
505
177
203
211
316
588
407
392
285
175
369
364
277
585
255
5109

Male

Female

326
171
178
204
255
361
285
292
254
162
315
266
177
279
167
3692

179
6
25
7
61
227
122
100
31
13
54
98
100
306
88
1417

Total
WFPR
(%)
37.86
23.79
23.97
26.38
33.05
39.84
32.82
34.33
33.61
23.03
28.69
35.48
35.65
67.94
32.95
34.36

Work Force Distribution (%)


Primary
26.73
55.93
18.72
0.47
37.97
60.54
48.65
44.13
0.35
1.14
2.44
20.88
67.15
93.50
64.71
41.22

Secondary
19.01
3.95
18.23
3.79
2.85
1.02
2.21
6.63
5.61
2.29
1.36
4.12
0.00
0.00
0.39
4.68

Tertiary
54.26
40.11
63.05
95.73
59.18
38.44
49.14
49.23
94.04
96.57
96.21
75.00
32.85
6.50
34.90
54.10

Source: Census of India, 2011

4.7

Dependency Ratio

The average dependency ratio for Hanumana Town is 65.64% which indicates that HNP has higher level
of dependent population in comparison to District Average. Like most of the cities or town, females
constitute higher proportion of dependent population of more than 57% of total number of non-working
population.
Table 4.4: Comparative Assessment of Non-working Population

Area
Urban India
Madhya
Pradesh
(Urban)
Rewa District
Hanumana
Nagar
Parishad

Total
population
286119689
15967145

Total
193841035
11073852

1973306
14871

862959
9762

Non-Workers
Male
74378775
4424107
502107
4106

Dependency
Ratio (in %)

Female
119462260
6649745

67.74
69.35

360852
5656

56.27
65.64

Source: Census of India, 2011

The dependency ratio within the town indicates that Ward Nos. 2, 3, 4, 10 and 11 have 70% or more
dependent population. (Refer table 4.5)

42%
58%

Male
Female

Graph: 4-2 Gender Wise Dependency Ratio Hanumana, M.P.

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Table 4.5: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Dependent Population & Dependency Ratio

Ward No.

Total
Population

Total Non-Working Population


Total

Male

Female

Dependency Ratio (%)


Total

Male

Female

1334

829

380

449

62.14

28.49

33.66

744

567

225

342

76.21

30.24

45.97

847

644

249

395

76.03

29.40

46.64

800

589

249

340

73.63

31.13

42.50

956

640

260

380

66.95

27.20

39.75

1476

888

435

453

60.16

29.47

30.69

1240

833

361

472

67.18

29.11

38.06

1142

750

287

463

65.67

25.13

40.54

848

563

204

359

66.39

24.06

42.33

10

760

585

228

357

76.97

30.00

46.97

11

1286

917

341

576

71.31

26.52

44.79

12

1026

662

285

377

64.52

27.78

36.74

13

777

500

240

260

64.35

30.89

33.46

14

861

276

138

138

32.06

16.03

16.03

15

774

519

224

295

67.05

28.94

38.11

HNP

14,871

9762

4106

5656

65.64

27.61

38.03

Source: Census of India, 2011

4.8

Industrial Activities

The town has no major industries within its vicinity; however there are industrial units within the Rewa
District and in surrounding districts which provides direct and indirect employment to resident of the
town apart from Small Scale Household Industries within town. The important industries found in and
around Rewa Districts includesTable 4.6: List of Important Industries in Rewa District and in its surrounding Districts

District/Town

Important Industries

Rewa

Cement Manufacturing Industries


Cottage Based and Handloom Weaving Industries

Satna

Mining Industries
Cement, Tiles and Stone Manufacturing Industries
Agricultural Produce and Agro-based industries Flour, Oilseed milling, pulses, rice
etc.
Handloom Weaving Industries
Cable Manufacturing Industries
Steel Fabricators & Transformer Repairing Industries
Automobile Industries
Engineering Industries
Other Manufacturing Industries

Sidhi

Agricultural Produce and Agro-based industries


Coal Mining Industries
Forest Produced Industries Timber as well as Non-timber.

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Singrauli

Allahabad

Glass and Wire based industries


Indian Telephone Industries Limited for manufacturing of transmission equipment
in Naini.
Manufacturing Industries Hindustan Cables (HCL), GEEP Battery,
Indian Farmers Fertilizer Co-Operative (IFFCO) in Phulpur
Drug Industry - Baidyanath Ayurved has its unit in Naini
Agricultural Produce and Agro-based industries

Chitrakut

Farming, Agricultural Produce and Agro-based industries.

Mirzapur

Coal Mining Industries NCL


Indian Energy/Power Industries NTPC
Chemical and Cement Manufacturing Industries
Other Manufacturing Industries

Carpets and Cotton Durries Manufacturing Industries.


Metal Pots (Brass) Manufacturing Industries.
Cement Manufacturing Industry established by JAYPEE group at Chunar.
Mineral Based Industries.
Agricultural Produce and Agro-based industries

Source: DMG Assessment

4.8.1 Informal Business and Local Economy (Trade & Commerce)


In GNP more than 50% of working population is engaged in tertiary activities such as trade & commerce,
informal business activities. Mandi is located in the town and is very congested & unorganized. The
development of other commercial activities (both formal and informal) is also observed along the major
roads of the town, NH-7 (main road) leading to Mirzapur in north and Rewa in south and other major
district roads. The informal markets/shops predominantly include vegetables, fruits, cloths and garments,
hardware, groceries items etc.

4.8.2 Wholesale Trade


Hanumana Bazar is the only major wholesale trading area for the town.

Informal Vegetable Market

Informal Shops and Fruit Market

Informal Economic Activities

Informal Economic Activities

Figure 4.1: Informal Business Activities along the Major Roads of the Town

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Major
Commercial
area

Map: 4-1 Major Markets/Commercial and Wholesale Trading Areas of the Town

Figure 4.2 Major Markets/Commercial and Wholesale Trading Areas of the Town

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4.9

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Heritage and Tourism

At town level, the Hanumana temple in the town is the only and major tourist attraction. The temple is
150 year old. According to the legends associated, this is considered to be the birth place of God
Hanuman. Though temples potential to be a major tourist attraction has not been fully explored.
Hanumana has no tourist destination and heritage buildings except Hanumana temple. Strategically
located near the state border, the town also holds a status of gateway to the state of Madhya Pradesh.
Unfortunately, the town has not been able to capitalize its potential in this sector. There is lack of
sufficient and efficient modes of transportation, infrastructure services in town that can hold the tourist.
The main attraction centres/spots for tourists in its proximity are listed below.
Table 4.7: List of Important Centres/Spots for Tourists in Town and in its Proximity

Tourist Spot
Sites within the Town
Hanumana Temple

Place

Location
The Hanumana temple in the town is the only and major
tourist attraction. The temple is 150 year old. According to
the legends associated, this is considered to be the birth
place of God Hanuman. Though temples potential to be a
major tourist attraction has not been fully explored.
Distance from Specialty
Town

Sites within its proximity


Cave
under 28-29 Km
Vindhyachal Mountain
Range
Teonthar
(Teonthar 70-72 Km
Tehsil)

Kyunti Water Fall


Rewa

80-82 Km
90 Km

Govindgarh
Gurh

119 Km
88 Km

Prayag and Allahabad

111 km

Varanasi

135 Km

Kamayni Devi Mandir

Buddhist Stupak and Rock Painting declared a monument of


national importance in 1988 by the Govt. of India and is being
preserved and conserved by Archaeological Survey of India,
Bhopal.
Can be developed as tourist spot.
Rewa Fort, Rewa Fort Museum; Venkat Bhawan and Shiva
Temple, Rani Talab Temple
Govindgarh Fort and Lake
Big statue of God Shiva called "Bhairom BaBa"; Famous
Temple of "Shiv Ji & Allied Gods"; Natural Lake called
Kodiak"; Famous Pond of "Rani Ka Talab" & Maharua Ka
Talab.
Sangam a place of religious importance and the site for
historic Kumbh Mela held every 12 years.
Allahabad Fort built in 1583 by Emperor Akbar, stands on the
banks of the Yamuna near the site of confluence with the
pond Ganges.
A Holly City Temples and Ghats

Source: DMG Assessment

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Map: 4-2 Tourism in and around Hanumana Town

The overall economy of the town is highly localized and confined to only low economic activities of the
hinterland. Tourism is also not contributing too much to the economic development of the town, it is
concluded that tourism development and industrial development forwarded contribute to development
of region as a whole.

4.10 SWOT Analysis


STRENGTH

WEAKNESS

The town falls under KhajurahoPanna-SatnaRewa-Mirzapur circuit.


Presence of Hanumana temple in ward no. 10
near pond.

Absence of Heritage Structure.


Lack of Infrastructure for tourism.
Lack of efficient mode of transport.
No rail connectivity.
THREAT

OPPORTUNITY

Hanuman temple can be developed as a tourist Lack of maintenance of the ponds and temples
destination in ward no.
in wards 4,5,10 and 14.
Improvement of the major corridor for better
connection with other towns like NH-7 and
other arterial roads.
Beautification of the ponds by developing
gardens and parks along it in wards 4,5,10 and
14.
Industries can be developed.
Town falls in well-known tourist circuits.

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4.11 Issues
The overall population of Hanumana is increasing but the rate of decadal population growth is almost
constant in the last three decade because of lack of economic activities in the town which causes
migration of people to other cities.
Lack of infrastructure support for tourism development in the area is another important issue large
amount of investment is needed in this sector, which will attract tourist to the region.

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CHAPTER 5
Physical Planning and Growth
Management

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5.
5.1

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

PHYSICAL PLANNING AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT


Background

An urban landuse planning, attempts to achieve an optimal spatial coordination of different human
activities for the enhancement of the quality of life. It plans for community growth and development
based on optimal land use planning, urban design, economic and environmental planning principles. This
chapter highlights the analysis of general spatial growth pattern, directions and land-use distribution of
the town.

5.2

Spatial Growth Trends

The total area of Hanumana Nagar Parishad is about 3035 hectare with a population of about 16773 as
per 2011 Census. Out of the total area, the town has approximately 7% developed area and 93%
undeveloped area or agricultural land. The spatial growth pattern suggests that the town is
predominantly developing along the N.H. 7. These areas have high density with mixed land-use of
residential and commercial development. Consequently, any new development impending in the city
heed directly to the existing commercial centres to achieve maximum economies of scale. The impact is
vivid in the existing spatial development.

Map: 5-1 Urban Growth Scenario Hanumana, M.P.

5.3

Spatial Distribution of Population

As per Census 2001, Hanumana had a total population of 14871 which has increase to 16773 in 2011 with
a decadal growth rate of 12.79% is unevenly distributed in the municipal area. Density varies from one
ward to other and the core or inner areas of the town including some outer areas are densely populated.
It is evident that the pressure of development is more along the N.H. 7 and other major roads of the
town. High density is observed in the core and old areas of town including some periphery area. Ward
No. 4,6 and 15 have high population density followed by moderate density in ward no. 1, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11
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and 14 (Refer Figure 3.1). Other wards have less population density mainly includes the periphery are
with more agricultural land and area along the pond side.
Table 5.1: Ward Wise Distribution of Population Density

Ward No.

Area in Hectare

% to Total Area

Total Population

Population
Density (pph)

WardNo.1

254.42

8.38

1334

5.24

WardNo.2

434.62

14.32

744

1.71

WardNo.3

106.27

3.50

847

7.97

WardNo.4

52.47

1.73

800

15.25

WardNo.5

179.21

5.90

956

5.33

WardNo.6

128.52

4.23

1476

11.48

WardNo.7

396.14

13.05

1240

3.13

WardNo.8

146.68

4.83

1142

7.79

WardNo.9

133.96

4.41

848

6.33

WardNo.10

110.61

3.64

760

6.87

WardNo.11

209.80

6.91

1286

6.13

WardNo.12

450.99

14.86

1026

2.27

WardNo.13

213.33

7.03

777

3.64

WardNo.14

141.75

4.67

861

6.07

WardNo.15

76.45

2.52

774

10.12

Total

3035

100.00

14871

4.90

Source: Census of India, 2011

5.4

Land use Analysis

The study of the land-use would enable us to understand the city as envisaged in the past and the
direction of its future growth and development. A change in land-use is inevitable over time and reflects
the needs and demands of the residents of the city. This section deals with the existing land-use of the
town.
Table 5.2: Existing Landuse Distribution; 2011 Hanumana

Land use
Residential
Commercial

Area in Hectare
182.18
3.43

Industrial
0.00
Public/Semi public and 2.55
Public Utilities
Recreational
0.00
Transportation
12.08
Water Body
7.39
Total Developed Area
207.59
Undeveloped
Area/ 2828.01
Agricultural Land
Total Municipal Area
3035.60

Percentage
87.76
1.65

Remarks
% out of the Total
Developed Area

0.00
1.23
0.00
5.82
3.56
6.84
93.18

% out of the Total


Municipal Area

100

Source: DMG Assessment

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At present the total municipal area for Hanumana town is 3036 hectare out of which current developed
area is 207.59 hectare (6.84%) and 2828.01 hectare (93.18%) area is undeveloped or agricultural land.
This indicates towards a low growth pattern and agrarian economy of town. The table below highlights
the existing landuse pattern of the municipal area which has been tentatively carried out by DMG based
on Google image, town map provided by the Nagar Parishad followed by survey in due consultation with
officials of Hanumana Nagar Parishad.
With existing developed area, 87.76% of the total landuse is residential. A large area (3.56% of the total
landuse) is under water body followed by 5.82% under circulation, 1.65% as commercial, and 1.23% as
public and semi-public area while there is no industrial area.

Graph: 5-1Landuse Distribution Municipal Area

Graph: 5-2 Landuse Distribution Developed Area

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Map: 5-2Existing Landuse Map; 2011 Hanumana Nagar Parishad

5.5

Housing Scenario

5.5.1 Introduction
Housing is a basic social need of each and every individual. It is an important determinant of the quality
of life of the people thus needs to be addressed. Adequacy of housing stock, construction quality, the
number of occupants in proportion to the number of rooms and the provision of basic amenities are all
important determinants of development. Hence, fulfilling the need for housing and tackling housing
needs is an important component of any city Development Plan in Hanumana housing development is
done by Madhya Pradesh Housing Board (MPHB) and private builders.

5.5.2 Housing Stock


As per 2001 Census of India, there are 2513 households in Hanumana Nagar Parishad (HNP) with an
average household size of 6.00 persons which is higher as compared to average national urban household
sizes. At present, as per the census of 2011 the average household size in Hanumana is decline to 5.5
persons.
Table 5.3: Comparative Assessment of Household Size

Area

Total Population

Household

Average HH Size

Urban India

28,61,19,689

5,58,32,570

5.12

Madhya Pradesh (Urban)

1,59,67,145

21,95,725

7.27

Rewa District

19,73,306

1,505

6.05

Hanumana NP

14,871

2513

5.92

Source: Census of India, 2011

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Distribution of houses by Types


In the town out of the total number of houses more than 32% are permanent in nature, 66.91% accounts
for semi-permanent and 0.44% as temporary houses.
0.44%
32.65%

66.91%
Permanent
Semi-permanent
Temporary
Graph: 5-3 Housing Types in Hanumana Nagar Parishad

Categories of Housing Structure


Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Wall
Out of the total number of houses in the town, 35.87% of the houses are categories as wall made up of
burnt bricks. Walls in 59.13% of house are made up of mud, unburnt bricks followed by 2.23% of grass,
thatch, bamboo; 0.66% of wood. Remaining 1.6% houses includes walls made up of stone, concrete,
asbestos sheets, plastic, polythene and other materials.
0.03%
1.54%

0.03%
2.23%
0.03%

Grass, Thatch, Bamboo etc.


Plastic, Polythene

35.87%

Mud, Unburnt Brick


Wood
59.13%

G.I., Metal, Asbestos Sheets


Burnt brick
Stone
Concrete

0.46%
0.66%

Any other material

Graph: 5-4 Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Wall

Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Roof


In Hanumana town, out of the total number of houses more than 0.92% of the houses are having roof
made up of bricks. Roof in 62.94% of house are made up of tiles followed by 1.74% of concrete; 3.75% of
metal, asbestos sheets and 29.89% of stone indicating most of the houses are pucca. Remaining 0.32%
houses includes roof made up of grass, thatch, bamboo mud, wood, plastic, polythene, stone, concrete,
asbestos sheets, plastic, polythene, slate and other materials.

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Distribution of Houses by Material Used for Roof


1.74%

0.16%

0.33%

0.13%

Grass, Thatch, Bamboo, Mud, Woo


d etc.
Plastic, Polythene

29.89%

Tiles
62.94%
Slate
0.92%
G.I., Metal, Asbestos, sheets

3.75%
0.13%

Brick

Graph: 5-5 Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Roof

Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Floor


Out of the total number of houses, 33.12% of the houses do not have pucca floor. 20.04% of houses are
having pucca floor made up of cement. Floors in remaining houses includes 0.39% made up of bricks;
12.45% of stone; 0.23% of mosaic, floor tiles and 66.89% wood & bamboo indicating pucca or semi-pucca
in nature.

Distributionof Houses by Material Used for


Floor
0.23%

0.10%

20.04%
66.39%
12.45%
0.39%

Mud

0.39%

Wood, Bamboo

Brick

Stone

Cement

Mosaic, Floor tiles

Any other material

Graph: 5-6 Distribution of Houses by Predominant Material of Floor

Distribution of houses by Use


In the town, all along the major district roads (NH-7) and in commercial, main bazaar area most of the
houses are used for both residential as well as for commercial purpose. Only in the inner side of the
wards houses are mainly used for residential purpose.

Ownership Status
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In town, 83.06% houses are owned, 11.75% are rented and remaining fall into other types of ownership
status. Thus indicating about most of the people residing in the town has their own land.

Ownership Status of Households


5.18%
11.75%

Owned
Rented
Others

83.06%

Graph: 5-7 Housing Ownership Status Hanumana Nagar Parishad

5.5.3 Present and Future Housing Demand


As per Census of India 2011, the average household size in the town is 6.00 which are higher than the
national urban average of 5.12. Since the town is in transition phase of development (rural to urban), its
semi-urban in nature. The present and future housing demand for town has been estimated by taking
into account the ideal size of a household / dwelling unit (DU) that is 5.0. The average household size in
most of the wards is higher than the ideal household size.
Table 5.4: Ward Wise Present Housing Demand and Gap

Ward No.

Total No. of HH

Total
Population

Avg.HH
size

Housing
Demand

Housing
Gap

Ward No-1

236

1334

5.65

63

31

Ward No-2

105

744

7.09

142

44

Ward No-3

127

847

6.67

117

42

Ward No-4

128

800

6.25

116

32

Ward No-5

183

956

5.22

81

Ward No-6

304

1476

4.86

49

-9

Ward No-7

223

1240

5.56

67

25

Ward No-8

210

1142

5.44

71

18

Ward No-9

123

848

6.89

121

47

Ward No-10

123

760

6.18

121

29

Ward No-11

199

1286

6.46

75

58

Ward No-12

176

1026

5.83

84

29

Ward No-13

124

777

6.27

120

31

Ward No-14

131

861

6.57

114

41

Ward No-15

121

774

6.40

123

34

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Total

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

2513

14871

1463

461

Source: Census of India, 2011 and DMG Assessment

Based on the above assumptions, at present there is a gap for housing of 461 houses. This indicates that
there is a demand for housing. The demand gap is highest in ward no. 11 followed by ward no. 9, 2, 3 and
15 located in periphery and core areas of the town.

5.6

Future Growth Possibilities

The future growth possibilities have been envisaged based on the existing growth pattern. The past trend
of development shows growth along the major road due to the presence of suitable land mainly along
the transportation lines i.e. NH 7 in the form of ribbon development. Since the town is semi-urban in
nature, there is abundant of agricultural land near by the existing development in all directions. The
growth potential is also along the other major transportation line, but the development is quite slow.
Also several industrial/commercial activities have been proposed in the study area along the major roads
that are likely to give boost to urban growth in these areas. The future growth possibilities and directions
has been discussed with respect to five aspects that includes existing urban growth, the transportation
lines, availability abundant agricultural land in HNP, natural and the proposed economic activities.
Municipal body should ensure the future development of town in planned manner as per these identified
zones along with detailed layout master/development plans prepared by TCP Dept., Rewa.

Residential
Growth
Possibilities

Commercial
Commercia
Growth
l Growth
Possibilities
Possibilities

Urban Growth
Possibilities

Map: 5-3 Hanumana: Future Growth Possibilities

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5.7

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

SWOT Analysis

STRENGTH
Hanumana lies in geologically safe seismic zone.
Organic growth along the roads results better
connectivity will all the parts of the town like
NH-7 from NE to SW connecting wards
1,3,4,6,7,8,9,10 and road to Sidhi towards SE
connects wards 10, 12,13,14 and 15 and road to
Shahpura towards NW connects wards 2,6,9 etc.
Presence of water bodies in wards 4, 6 and 13
acting as the major sources of water.
Availability of the agricultural land around the
town especially in wards 1, 2, 7,8,9,11,12 and
14.

WEAKNESS
High population density in core area (wards 3,
4,5,6,9 and 10) along the NH-7 causing
congestion and pressure on existing
infrastructure.
Only 6.84% of the total area is developed and
32% of the built houses are permanent and
66.91% are semi-permanent and 0.44% is
temporary.
Location of the industrial area in ward no. 5
and 6 which is surrounded by the residential
area is not preferable.

OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

The development is happening radial and The locations of the urban poor are in prime
concentrated in the centre which provides an
areas like in wards 1, 5, 6 which diminish the
opportunity for better planning approach.
value of development in these areas.
Development of agro-based industries and Encroachment and congestion along the major
inviting private developers can create housing
roads like NH-7 through the wards 4,5,6,9 and
demand, especially in wards 3, 4, 5,10,11,12 and
10.
13.
Better quality housing demand and cheap land
values can attract real estate developers for
development of new townships in peripheral
areas specially in wards 12,13,14,15

5.8
Sr.
No.
1.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Aspects
Spatial Growth

2.

Landuse
Distribution

3.

Housing

Issues

Strategies and Action Plan

Linear growth All residential and Development of more growth/


commercial
development
is
commercial centres in the town,
concentrated along the NH 7 and
promoting
equitable
growth
along Sahpura and Sidhi road.
throughout the town.
New development is taking place
within the high density area like in
wards 5, 6, 9, 10 etc. further causing
congestion.
The urban poor/ slums are mainly Large percentage of land (wards 1,
concentrated in the core area (ward
2, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15) is still
no. 5,6,12) along major roads
not developed, real estate
developers can play important
Low and slow growth pattern.
role in development of potential
areas within the municipal limit.
Average household size (6) is higher As per the demand construction of
than the national urban average i.e.
houses under LIG, MIG and HIG
(5.12)
schemes should be planned may
be in wards 11,12,13,14 etc.
The demand for housing is high in
the core city areas.

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CHAPTER 6
Urban Infrastructure Services

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6.

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES

6.1

Introduction

The infrastructure profile of a town makes a direct reference on the quality of life within it. Its one of the
crucial considerations for towns economic development and its investment climate. Infrastructure
services and its adequacy require an assessment be made of its coverage, quantity and quality, as also
the demand supply gap. This chapter presents the existing status, estimates the present and future gaps
by the year 2035. It includes all the major sectors/aspects including:

6.2

Water Supply
Sewerage and Sanitation
Solid Waste Management
Drainage

Urban Transport
Community Facilities covered under
both the Physical and the Social
Infrastructure.

Physical Infrastructure

6.2.1 Water Supply


Sources of Water Supply
The water supply system in Hanumana Nagar Parishad is
predominantly depending on ground water. The quality of
water drawn from pond is fairly good. There is no detectable
odour & taste and the colour is found to be turbid. The city
encounters bit water shortage during summers.
The water extracted from ground is hard. The current ground
water level is at the depth of 200 feet.
A significant volume of ground water is also extracted
through hand pumps and wells installed at various locations,
which helps in meeting the demand of the weaker sections of
the society.

Figure 6.1: Hand Pump: Major source of


water supply

Water Distribution System


Presently, there are no proper water supply lines connecting all 15 wards existing in the Hanumana town.
The water supply lines are internally connected in ward no. 9 and 10. Here the water is pumped from two
overhead tanks through pump house.

Water Distribution Arrangements


The present water distribution system includes water pipelines system which is not sufficient. The water
distribution arrangement includes - two OHTs in ward no 7 and 11. The capacity of the OHTs is 45,000
litres each. The water lines are connected to 470 households and Rs 60/- is charged as the monthly
revenue from the households that are connected to the water supply lines.

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Map: 6-1 Existing and Proposed Water Supply Network

Figure 6.2: Water Supply Distribution Arrangements

Internal Distribution Network


As far as the internal distribution network for water supply is concerned, the water pipelines have been
laid down in few wards not in good and working condition. The chart given below will clarify it further.
0% 2% 3% 1%
Tap

20%

Handpump
Tubewell
20%
54%

Well
Tank, Pond, Lake
River, Canal

0%

Spring
Any other

Graph: 6-1 Distribution of Houses by Sources of Water

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26%
46%
Within Premises
28%

Near Premises
Away

Graph: 6-2 Distribution of Houses by Location of Tapped Water

This shows that half of the total households in town are dependent other means/sources of water supply
such hand pumps, own tube wells and wells, Pond canal etc.

Water Treatment Facilities


Presently, no such water treatment facility is provided to the Hanumana Town. A fresh water treatment
plant should be installed in the town to provide the residents of Hanumana with safe, clean water.

Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps


As per the provisional figures of census 2011 Hanumana Nagar Parishad had a total population of 16773.
According to the existing system a large percentage of population is dependent on hand pumps, wells
and other sources for day to day need of water. As per the projected population the water demand has
been estimated till 2035.
Table 6.1: Projected Future demand Water Supply

Sr. No.

Years

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035

Population
16773
17141
17517
17901
18293
20299
22525
24995
27735

Present Supply
(MLD)
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19

Supply (@
LPCD)
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135
135

Water Required
(MLD)
2.26
2.31
2.36
2.42
2.47
2.74
3.04
3.37
3.74

Source: Population Projection & DMG Assessment as per UDPFI Guidelines


Table 6.2: Present and Future Requirement/Demand and Gap Assessment Water Supply

Sr.
No.

Years

Population

Fire Demand
(1%) (MLD)

Industrial
Demand
(3%)

Considering
Losses (5%)

Total
Demand
(MLD)

Supply
Gaps
(MLD)

1
2
3

2011
2012
2013

16773
17141
17517

0.0226
0.0231
0.0236

0.0678
0.0693
0.0708

0.113
0.1155
0.118

0.2034
0.2079
0.2124

2.2734
2.3279
2.3824

4
5
6
7

2014
2015
2020
2025

17901
18293
20299
22525

0.0242
0.0247
0.0274
0.0304

0.0726
0.0741
0.0822
0.0912

0.121
0.1235
0.137
0.152

0.2178
0.2223
0.2466
0.2736

2.4478
2.5023
2.7966
3.1236

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8
9

2030
2035

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

24995
27735

0.0337
0.0374

0.1011
0.1122

0.1685
0.187

0.3033
0.3366

3.4833
3.8866

Source: Population Projection & DMG Assessment as per UDPFI Guidelines


Note: The demand of water for fire-fighting, industries and losses has been assessed by taking %age of water
required, calculated in table 6.3

Comparative Analysis with UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


Presently under the existing water supply system, the per capita supply is very low as compared to the
prevalent national standards of 135 lpcd (UDPFI Guidelines). Thus, the water supply system in the town
requires augmentation schemes on urgent basis.
Table 6.3: Performance Indicators Water Supply

Sr.
No.

Indicators

1
2

Daily per capita supply


Storage capacity with respect to current
supply
Storage capacity with respect to proposed
supply for the next fifteen year period.
Available treatment capacity with respect to
supply
Assessment covered by service connections
Proportion of non domestic service
connection

3
4
5
6

Unit

Current
Status

Normative
Standard

Litres
Percent

30
0.00

135
100

Percent

0.00

100

Percent

0.00

100

Percent
Percent

0.00
0

85
>5

Source: Computed based on the data collected from Hanumana Nagar Parishad

SWOT Analysis
Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH
WEAKNESS
Ground water level is high at 200 ft and the average Present water supply is 0.19 MLD while
annual rainfall (950 1100 mm) is also good.
required unit is 2.31 MLD
Presence of water bodies 4 ponds are located at Detailed layout plans and drawings of water
wards 4,5,10 and 13.
supply distribution lines are not available,
Presence of natural slope towards SW will be
making future planning difficult.
responsible for the reduction in efforts and cost in Existing development of the settlement is
water supply.
scattered like in wards 1,2,11,12,13,14 and 15
which reduces the rate of development.
OPPORTUNITY
THREAT
Water revenue demand can be enhanced through The town dont have any perennial source of
drive of new house connection, and discourage
water, so there is water problem during the
limited stand post installation.
summer season.
Annual average rainfall that is 950 1100 mm is
good, so there is a scope of introducing water
shade management to collect the surface runoff
water.

Issues

Water supply in Hanumana is primary based on hand pumps (60% household).

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Water distribution system is old and has limited coverage, only along the major roads like NH-7
and from 7, 8 to 1, and 11 and along Sidhi road from ward 4 to 12, 13.
All the existing two OHTs in wards 7 and 11 are not utilised properly.
Lack of technical/ skilled man power to handle the system.
The water distribution system is very old and has leakage problem due to which pressure remains
low.
There is lack of technical/ skilled man power to handle the system.
More number of hand pumps for the water supply should be constructed.
There is a large scale of demand and supply gap, which is likely to be increase drastically in future
with respect to increase in population if no measures were taken to augment the water supply
system.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Goals and Service Outcomes
Considering the above issues and challenges, the following goals for different horizon years have been
identified in the following table. The water supply coverage and access to piped water supply in
Hanumana Nagar Parishad needs to be enhanced to 100% by the year 2035. The per capita water supply
should be maintained as per the norm of 135 lpcd at an acceptable level by increasing hours of supply to
4-6 hours a day by 2015, 8-10 hours daily by 2025 and subsequently achieve 24 hours water supply/day
by 2035 promoting together the water storage facility at household level. There is an urgent need to
lower the non-revenue to 25% by the year 2015, 15% by 2025 and 10% by 2035 by implementing 100%
consumer metering system by 2015 and achieve 100% O & M cost recovery by the year 2035.
Table 6.1: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years

Sr. no.

Components
2015

Horizon Period
2025

2035

Network coverage to households

40%

100%

100%

Per capita supply as per norms (135 lpcd)

135

135

135

3
4

24/7 water supply


Quality of water

5
6
7
8

Non revenue water


Consumer metering
Cost recovery
Roof water harvesting

40%
As per WHO
Standards
25%
80%
100%
40%

100%
As per WHO
Standards
15%
100%
100%
80%

100%
As per WHO
Standards
5%
100%
100%
100%

Private sector participation

10%

70%

100%

Strategies and Action Plan

Leakage detection studies; repair, replacement or rehabilitation of old system.


Extension of water pipeline to un-served/ internal areas, thereby ensuring 100% water supply
network coverage.
Implementation of 100% consumer metering system via monitoring and checkout illegal water
connections.
Awareness programme for judicious use of water, recycling and recharging to prevalent water
loss, thereby, encouraging Rain water harvesting at household level.
Use of recycled water for meeting agricultural and cooling demands.

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Widespread investments in the water supply sector without sufficient attention to human
resource development results in poor sustainability of system. Recognizing the urgent need for
capacity building at different levels in water supply sector, HNP should propose to develop
human resources in their organization.
Detailed operation and maintenance programme.
Detailed Project Report should be prepared for the physical infrastructure in the town.

Best Practices
1

Macau Water Supply Concession, China

Background:
Macau, China has a total area of just under 21 square kilometres, which includes the Macau peninsular
and the islands of Taipa and Coloane. It is situated on the western edge of the delta formed by the Pearl
Pond Delta (Zhu Jiang) and the West Pond (Xi Jiang).
By the early 1980s, Macau, Chinas water supply had deteriorated to the extent that:
Unaccounted-for-water was at high levels and the water utility was operating at a loss.
Water quality was extremely poor with high salinity and turbidity. This was due to the poor quality of the
raw water drawn from the eastern tributary of the Pearl Pond, a treatment plant working at overload
capacity and a lack of scientific management and technology.
In 1982, Water supply in Macau, China has had Private Sector Participation. A private company took over
the operations of the Macau Water Supply Company, commonly known as Sociedad de Abastecimento de
Aguas de Macau (SAAM), in 1982. It initiated to work as replacing meters to increase income. The
company also put in place to improve utilitys management and financial systems. The basic idea behind
the replacement of water meters was to reduce the unaccounted-for-water from 40.3 percent in 1982 to
24.5 percent in 1984.
Key Activities Undertaken:
In addition to securing a new source of raw water, the concessionaire has undertaken an on-going
program of investments. These include:
Upgrading and extending water treatment plants.
Replacement of major pipelines.
Reservoir construction and post-chlorination stations.
Leakage detection activities and related investments.
Introduction of a computerized Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system.
Introduction of an automated water production control system.
On-going upgrading or replacement of meters.
Out Comes:
Within three years of signing the concession contract, Macau, Chinas water quality was brought up to the
European Union standard.
Macau, China citizens now receive consistently good quality potable water at a pressure and output that
meets all customers needs 24 hours. Designed water treatment capacity now exceeds maximum daily
demand by over 20 percent.
Unaccounted-for-water from leakages has also declined. The program of meter installation and repair
instigated by New World prior to the concession led to a dramatic reduction in unaccounted-for-water
from 40.3 percent in 1982 to 20.2 percent when the concession commenced in 1985.
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Lesson Learned:
Public private partnership now playing a key role in the success of many infrastructural projects.
There is a positive two-way interaction or relationship between water supply improvements and
economic growth. A good quality water supply encourages, or at least facilitates growth in economic
activity.
The existence of a new high quality and abundant source of raw water helped contribute to Macau,
Chinas water supply achievements.

Public Private Partnership in water supply in Tirupur, Tamil Nadu

The Context:
State Government has implemented the project on a commercial format on Public Private Partnership
basis along with IL&FS. A MoU was signed between GoTN, IL&FS and Tirupur Exporters Association (TEA)
in August 1994, for formulation and development of the project and its implementation.
The project was the first integrated water supply proposed to be undertaken in India in the water sector
on PPP basis.
The scope of the project (the Project) covers the water and wastewater treatment components. The
project also includes provision of low cost sanitation facilities at 100 slums in Tirupur
Shortage of water supply and inadequate infrastructure for collection, treatment and disposal of
industrial / domestic wastewater were the major bottlenecks for the growth of the industries.
Achievements:
Formation of the NTADCL (New Tirupur Area Development Corporation Ltd.) upfront in the process
served as the platform for information exchange, resolution of conflicts and facilitated decision-making in
a transparent manner.
Innovative Insurance Application for Risk Mitigation
Improved Water Supply to Industries and Households
It is estimated that the project would also create employment for about 2 lakh people
Lesson Learned:
PPP has now playing a major role in infrastructural development projects.
A successful implementation of project needs an Innovative Financial Structuring & Insurance Application
for Risk Mitigation.
Note: Hanumana can learn lesson from Khandwa and dewas water supply PPP projects under
implementation. The Hanumanas problem of quality of network can be point of caution and other lessons
are documented and available with UADD Government of M.P.

Low Cost Water Treatment Plant


Water to be supplied for public use must be potable i.e., satisfactory for drinking purposes from the
standpoint of its chemical, physical and biological characteristics. Drinking water should, preferably, be
obtained from a source free from pollution. The raw water normally available from surface water sources
is, however, not directly suitable for drinking purposes. The objective of water treatment is to produce
safe and potable drinking water. Some of the common treatment processes used in the past includes
Plain sedimentation, Slow Sand filtration, and Rapid Sand filtration with Coagulation-flocculation units as
essential pretreatment units.
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Rapid Sand Filtration


The rapid sand filter or rapid gravity filter is a type of filter used in water purification and is commonly
used in municipal drinking water facilities as part of a multiple-stage treatment system. Rapid sand filters
were widely used in small and large municipal water systems, because they required smaller land areas
compared to slow sand filters.
It comprises two chambers with the layers of sand and pebbles, these layers are responsible to
prevent physical impurities within it and soaked water through channels goes to one other
chamber.
In this chamber addition of alum and other chemicals like chlorine which cleans up the chemical
impurities.
After going through the filtration process it collects in the storage such as over head tank or
tanker through water channels.
Diagram of the Rapid Sand Filtration Plant is shown in the following diagram.

Figure 6.3: A typical rapid sand filter water treatment with components. The filter is contained within a filter box,
usually made of concrete. Inside the filter box are layers of filter media and gravel.

Project Identification & Costing


With a vision to provide adequate amount of treated water to the projected population of 2035, the
following projects are identified to achieve the goal in the sector:
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Table 6.2 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

WS 1

Preparation of DPR for Water Supply


System for the entire town.

5.00

WS 2

Construction of 2 OHT each of capacity 4


MLD

300.00

Govt. of M.P.

WS 3

Construction of intake well, pump house


with pumping machinery electrical
Replacement of present pipe line system in
the town. (2.8 km) 150 dia (cost @ Rs1471)

300.00

Govt. of M.P.

41.00

Govt. of M.P.

Extension of present distribution line to


cover the whole of the city (2.1KM)
150MM Dia (cost @ Rs1471)

31.00

Govt. of M.P.

WS 4
WS 5

Project Cost (in Lakh)

Sub Total
Cost (A)

Department
UADD, Govt.
M.P. and HNP

of

677.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011nm,kl.

6.2.2 Sewerage and Sanitation


Existing Sewerage System
Sewerage and sanitation has become a yardstick of socio-cultural development of the nation. Improved
sanitation results in improvement of health, reduced child mortality/ morbidity, improved water quality,
environment and economic growth of any city/town. Presently the town do not have underground
sewerage system to serve the about a population of 16773 residing in 15 wards. The sewage from
households and other commercial establishments flows along with storm water in common open drains,
which is mainly governed by the topography and direction of slope in town.

Means of Sewage Disposal


Sewerage and sanitation condition in the town is poor. The sewage disposal system in the town is mainly
consisting of individual disposal system that includes water closet, soak pits or pit type latrines, open
drains. Some residents also go for open defecation as they do not have any proper in-house sewage
disposal facility. Resident in old areas uses dry-latrines. New developments have individual septic tanks
for sewage disposal. The pour flush latrines and toilets blocks are usually connected to a septic tank and
then connected to drains.
Therefore, the current practice indicates that the sewage flows through open channel. This is a cause of
concern as there is a possibility of underground or well water and pond water contamination.

Household Toilets (Dry Latrines and Flush Latrines)


Sanitation condition in the town is poor. As per the city sanitation survey conducted in 2008, about 25%
of households have in-house toilet facility. But only 56.66% households have water closet latrines
connected to septic tank, 17.23% pit toilet and 26.11% has other toilet facility. Majority of households do
not have toilet facility within premises.

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Type of Toilets within Houses
26.11%

Other latrine

Pit latrine

56.66%

17.23%

Water closet

Graph: 6-3 Facility and Types of Latrines

Public Toilets
The Hanumana Nagar Parishad is responsible for the provision of public toilets in town. But in Hanumana
there is very less effort from the civic body in providing public toilets and public urinals.
As per the city sanitation survey conducted in 2008, mostly people (about 78% of households) demands
for individual toilets but only about 44% and 59% of households are willing to pay for development and
operation & maintenance of toilet and urinal services.

17%

5%

Individiual
Public
No

78%

Graph: 6-4 Demand for Types of Facility for Toilet

44%

Yes

56%
No

Graph:
6-5 Willingness to Pay for Development of Facility
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41%
Yes
59%

No

Graph: 6-6 Willingness to Pay for Operation & Maintenance of Services

Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps


On the basis of projected population for 2035 and taking as 80% water supply comes out as sewage for
the same, the present and future demand and supply gaps for various components of Sewerage and
Sanitation Sector has been worked out for Hanumana town in the table given below.
Table 6.3: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Sewerage System

COMPONENTS

YEARS

Sewage
2011
Generation
(in
MLD)
Total
Water 2.26
Demand

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2.31

2.36

2.42

2.47

2.74

3.04

3.37

3.74

Hanumana
1.81
Sewage
Generation
Existing Sewage 0
Collection
Gaps
1.81

1.85

1.89

1.93

1.97

2.19

2.43

2.69

2.99

1.85

1.89

1.93

1.97

2.19

2.43

2.69

2.99

STP capacity (in


MLD)
Hanumana
Sewage
Generation
Existing Capacity
of
Treatment
Plant
Sewage
Treatment Plant
Demand
Gaps

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

1.81

1.85

1.89

1.93

1.97

2.19

2.43

2.69

2.99

1.81

1.85

1.89

1.93

1.97

2.19

2.43

2.69

2.99

1.81

1.85

1.89

1.93

1.97

2.19

2.43

2.69

2.99

Sewer Connection 2011


(in Nos.)
Existing
0

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

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Connections
Demand
Sewer
Connections
Gap

for 3355

3428

3503

3580

3659

4060

4505

4999

5547

3355

3428

3503

3580

3659

4060

4505

4999

5547

Sewer Network 2011


(in Kms.)
Road
Length 25.16
Demand

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.16

25.16

25.2

25.2

Existing Sewerage 0
Network
Sewerage
25.16
Network Demand
Gap
25.2

25.16

25.16

25.16

25.16

25.16

25.16

25.16

25.16

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.2

25.2

Source: Population Projection & DMG Assessment as per UDPFI Guidelines

There is no form of treatment before or after disposal. Only 25 % percent of households are commonly
using septic tanks, pit for sewage disposal while rest do not have in-house toilet facilities. They either use
public toilet or go for open defecation in town. Thus, town requires immediate actions regarding
provision of sewerage and sanitation facility (Low Cost Sanitation Projects) with 100% network coverage.

Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


As per CPHEEO manual and UDPFI guidelines wastewater generation is assumed as 80% of the water
supply rate i.e. 108 lpcd has been adopted.
UDPFI guidelines suggest small and medium towns may encourage to for adopting low cost sanitation
technologies with technical assistance from urban local bodies and involvement of NGOs in actual
implementation of such programmes. Low cost sanitation projects can be encouraged in Hanumana as
there is no underground sewerage network and majority of households do not have in-house toilet
facility. In that context city investment plan has made provision for sewerage network and low cost
sanitation.
Table 6.2.4: Performance Indicators Sewerage System

Sr. No.

Performance Indicator

Benchmark

Status

Coverage of Toilets

100%

15.15%

Coverage of Sewerage Network

100%

0%

Collection Efficiency of Sewerage Network

100%

0%

Adequacy of Sewerage Treatment Capacity

100%

0%

Quality of Sewage Treatment

100%

0%

Extent of Reuse and Recycling of Sewage

20%

0%

Extent of Cost Recovery in Wastewater Management

100%

0%

Efficiency in redressal of Customer Complaints

80%

0%

Efficiency in Collection of Sewage Water Charges

90%

0%

Source: DMG Assessment as per UDPFI Guidelines

SWOT Analysis

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Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.

STRENGTH
Since settlements are scattered and land
resource is available to develop in every
possible way to enhance the quality of the
town.
Like
settlements
in
wards
1,2,11,12,13,14 etc.

WEAKNESS
There is no treatment plant for treating the
sewerage generated.
Only 25% of households have in-house toilet
facility.
A low level of income prohibits urban poor to
make capital expenditure on development of toilet
units and their maintenance.

OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

There are substantial number of urban poor Almost in all wards like in 5,6,9,10,13 etc the pour
in wards 1, 5,6,7,12,14 and 15, who have land
flush latrines and toilets blocks are usually
titles and houses without toilets.
connected to a septic tank and then connected to
drains which is open and it results poor
There is scope for development of low cost
environment and hazardous to health.
sanitation projects.
New sewerage schemes to increase the
sewerage coverage to 100 %.

Issues

There is absence of hygienic and safe method of sewerage disposal system i.e. underground
Sewerage Disposal System in the town.
Current practice is that the people residing there are keeping their outlet pipes to the drain
outside.
The pour flush latrines and toilets blocks are usually connected to a septic tank and then
connected to drains.
Ground water contamination is a potential threat which will also affect the drinking water quality
as the underground water as on date is a major source of water supply system.
There is no form of treatment before or after disposal. No treatment plant available.
Unmaintained limited no. of public urinals
Town lacks public conveniences/ sanitation facilities such as - community or public toilet which
are limited in number.
The service level cost recovery is going to be the major challenge for HNP as most of the
household are not will to pay for development and maintenance of facilities.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plans


Goals and Service Outcomes
Considering the above issues and challenges, the following goals for different horizon years have been
identified in the following table. The sewerage system in town needs to develop with 60% sewer network
coverage to households by the year 2015 and 100% by 2025. By the year 2015 80% waste water should
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be treated followed by 100% by 2025. In addition to that, 60-70% O & M cost recovery will be achieved
by the year 2015 followed by 80-90% by 2025 and 100% by the year 2035.
Table 6.25: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years

Sr.
No.

Components

Horizon Period
2015

2025

2035

Sewer Network Coverage to Households

Sewage
Treatment
Arrangement

Sewage Recycling and reuse

60%

Cost Recovery (as a % of O & M)

As per WHO As per WHO As per WHO


Standards
Standards
Standards

Safe Sanitation Facility (With Focus on 80%


Urban Poor)

and

60%

100%

100%

Disposal 80%

100%

100%

80%

100%

100%

100%

Strategies and Action Plan


Considering the current issues, challenges and identified goals, a robust strategy for sewerage is adopted
to achieve 100% sewerage system. The following are the brief outline of the projects which have to be
taken up:
1. Low Cost Sanitation Projects:
Exploring the USAB Technology which requires less land and O&M Costs which are
minimal.
Government intervention should be emphasized in providing toilet facilities in urban poor
areas by developing community toilet blocks.
Sulabh Complex or public toilets near market places.
Community participation should be encouraged for designing, construction and
maintenance of public toilets.
Cost recovery through collection of well defined user charges.
2. Comprehensive Sewerage Master Plan:
To meet the current gap and future requirements for Hanumana town, it is proposed to
carry out detailed studies and prepare a comprehensive Sewerage Master Plan including
network lines and STP.
3. Sewerage Quality Studies and Monitoring:
The sewerage quality analysis needs to be undertaken. It is proposed to purchase latest
equipments to establish laboratories for analysis of chemical and heavy metals.
4. Human Resource Development:
Widespread investment in the sewerage sector without sufficient attention to human
resource development results in poor sustainability of system. Recognizing the urgent need
for capacity building at different levels in sewerage sector, it is proposed to develop human
resource in their organization.

Best Practices

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Slum Sanitation in Pune


Background:
Pune city, the educational and cultural capital of the State of
Maharashtra has a population of 28 lakhs, of whom about 40%
live in slums. There are 503 slum pockets, out of which only 348
are notified slums in the city. Pune Municipal Corporations have
Conservancy Departments whose duty it is to clean and maintain
toilet blocks in the city. Similar to other city, the municipal staffs
are not performing their duties including construction and
maintenance of toilets and city sanitation. Since the local
community does not have any control over the sanitation staff,
the latter do not respond to their concerns. Since 1992, only 22
pay and use toilet blocks had been built in the city. In 1992, Municipal Commissioner himself took
initiatives and a massive programme of building toilets in slums through community participation by
giving contracts to non-governmental organizations (NGOs). There were 8 NGOs which were selected to
carry out the first phase of the programme. First priority was given to those settlements with a
minimum population of 500 but had no toilet facilities
Key Components of the Project:
Construction: The Slum Sanitation Program was implemented in phased manner which are as follows;
Phase-1 (1999-2000): In the first phase, it was decided to construct 220 toilet blocks with about 3500
toilet seats through NGOs. The expenditure incurred on the first phase was Rs.22.5 crores.
Phase-11 (2000 -2001): On completion of the second phase (planned for another 220 blocks between),
more than 400 blocks or more than 10,000 toilet seats was supposed to be constructed at a cost of
more than Rs.40 crores and benefiting more than 5 lakh slum dwellers.
Maintenance: In the bid itself, a guarantee was also to be given that the NGOs and the community
would maintain the toilet block for 30 years by collecting contributions from the community. The
programme envisaged the collection of Rs.20 per family per month to fund the appointment of a
caretaker and for cleaning materials. The caretaker is to be accountable to the community and is
supervised by them.
Implementation: During construction, the Municipal Commissioner was himself holding a weekly
meeting to monitor the progress of the work with the highest priority and, as a result, people worked
day and night to complete the programme in a few months.
Lesson Learned: Slum dwellers are not expected to pay anything at all when they use the toilets, they
are expected to pay a general tax for the facilities they are given. However, even if public sanitation is
free, it is not of much use because it is hardly functional.
The relationship between the Corporation, NGOs and communities has been reconfigured. NGOs and
communities are not cast in the roles of clients or supplicants but rather are treated as partners by the
Corporation.
When grassroots democracy is in place, the accountability of institutions is ensured.

DEWATS | Decentralized Wastewater Treatment

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Figure 6.4Main DEWATS modules for physical and biological wastewater treatment:

Main
DEWATS
modules
for
physical
and
biological
wastewater
treatment:
1. Settler 2. Anaerobic Baffled Reactor 3. Anaerobic Filter 4. Planted Gravel Filter
DEWATS stands for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems. DEWATS represents a technical
approach rather than merely a technology package.
DEWATS applications are designed to be low-maintenance: most important parts of the system work
without technical energy inputs and cannot be switched off intentionally.
DEWATS applications provide state-of-the-art technology at affordable prices because all of the materials
used for construction are locally available.
o DEWATS applications are designed to be low-maintenance.
o DEWATS affordable prices because all of the materials used for construction are locally available.
o DEWATS applications provide treatment for both domestic and industrial sources
o Systems can be designed to handle organic wastewater flows from 1-1000 m3 per day
o DEWATS applications do not require sophisticated maintenance
o DEWATS applications are designed with four basic technical treatment modules
o Primary treatment: sedimentation and floatation
o Secondary anaerobic treatment in fixed-bed reactors: baffled upstream reactors or anaerobic
filters
o Tertiary aerobic treatment in sub-surface flow filters
o Tertiary aerobic treatment in polishing ponds
Advantages of DEWATS technology:
Provides treatment for domestic and industrial wastewater
Low initial investment costs as no imported materials or components are needed
Efficient treatment for daily wastewater flows of up to 1000m3
Modular design of all components
Tolerant towards inflow fluctuations
Reliable and long-lasting construction design
Low maintenance costs
DEWATS technology is an effective, efficient and affordable wastewater treatment solution for small and
medium sized towns. At locality level, this system is very efficient.

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Figure 6.5: Use of the biogas generated from the DEWAT


Benefits of DEWATS
Establishment of multi-stakeholder networks to combat water pollution
Increases implementation capacity on various levels
Provides treatment for both, domestic and industrial wastewater at affordable price
Fulfillment of discharge standards and compliance with environmental laws
Wastewater pollution reduction by up to 90% from pre-DEWATS levels.
Provides treatment for wastewater flows up to 1000 m3 / day
Reliable and long lasting applications
Tolerant towards inflow and load fluctuation
Materials/ inputs used for construction are locally available
Minimal maintenance and long de-slugging intervals
Low operation and maintenance costs
Resource efficiency and non-dependence on energy
Resource recovery through wastewater re-use and biogas generation.

Low Cost Sanitation Option


These excreta-disposal systems offer different degrees of user convenience, protection against the
spread of diseases and water demand for their operation. They can be classified in several ways. A basic
classification is based on whether the waste is disposed of within the site or is transported somewhere
else. Under this classification, the technology is either on-site or off-site systems. On-site sanitation
systems include those in which safe disposal of excreta takes place on or near the plot or site of the toilet.
Another way of classifying sanitation systems is through their application as either individual household
sanitation technologies or community sanitation technologies.
Sanitation is more or less a matter of personal habit and prestige. People will maintain properly if the
toilet is their personal property. In small towns the municipal body has neither a number of sanitary staffs
nor a good financial condition to appoint such staffs. We have planned for individual single/twin pit flush
toilets with septic tank as an option which can be modified to suit the economy of the users.

Pour flush latrines


In small town where people use water for toilet, pour flush latrines can be constructed. The squatting
slab can then be sited a metre or two away from the pit, to which it drains via a communication pipe. The
squatting plate and pit cover are easier to construct and are just as satisfactory.
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To prevent smells rising from the pit a U-bend water seal can be incorporated but such seals are worse
than useless if they are not properly flushed; a close-fitting squat-hole cover can do the job just as well.
Raised footpads should be cast into the slab on each side of the squat hole and the surface of the slab
should slope towards it.
Depending on the economy and requirement the single or twin pit latrine can be adopted.

Figure 6.6: Pour flush single pit and twin pit toilet
Septic Tanks
Septic tanks are comprised of a sealed tank having both an inlet and an outlet into which excreta are
flushed from a conventional cistern flush toilet or a pour-flush toilet. The tank acts as a settlement unit in
which solids settle out by gravity. The solids undergo a process of anaerobic decomposition which results
in the production of water, gases, sludge and a layer of floating scum.
The use of this system has the requirement for an in-house connection of water supply for the system to
operate.

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Figure 6.7: A simple diagram of a septic tank


Properly designed and installed septic tanks can function for many years. Annual inspection to determine
sludge depth is desirable to prevent tank solids from overflowing and sealing the soil in the drain field.
Minimize the amount of grease from the kitchen and garbage disposal solids going into septic tank.
Water conservation reduces the loading and saturation of the drain field. To protect groundwater, many
areas increase lot size requirements to reduce septic tank densities. Septic tank permits may be subject
to additional restrictions in groundwater recharge areas.

Project Identification & Costing


Presently there is no sewage disposal system in the city. The in-house sanitation is about 30% for the city
and is limited to many users. Therefore the future efforts should be made to have 100 percent coverage
on the sewerage sector to minimize the sanitation problem of the city. In this regards, the following
projects are identified:
Table 6.6 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

SS 1

Construction of DEWATS in each wards Rs 2000 per sq m of 150.00


land under wet land. Each plant need around 500 sp. m
Construction of treatment plant support electrical, 100.00
mechanical equipments
Construction of eco-toilets in slum areas and public place. 93.00
(Rs 15000 per toilet)

Govt. of M.P

Construction of 20 public urinals (@ Rs5000)


1.00
Construction of individual toilet (Support in terms f 119.36

Nagar Parishad
ULB's, Govt. of

SS 2
SS 3
SS 4
SS 5

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Project
Department
Cost (in
Lakh)

Govt. of M.P
Nagar Parishad

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subsidies for 2387 units)


Sub Total Cost (B)

M.P.
463.36

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

6.2.3 Drainage System


Existing Drainage System
Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and subsurface water from an area. At present the town does not have a
comprehensive and effective drainage system and facility of
treatment plant. The drainage condition survey in the town indicates
that the drainage network in Hanumana is open and unorganized.
Most of the drains do not have capacity to flow the waste water as
they are damaged and remain chocked due to presence of gray
matter and disposal of solid waste in it. This leads to un-channelized
flow during the rainy season.

Figure 6.8: Open Drain along the NH

Drains are connected in the ward no. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 11. The


drains are maintained by the local residing people of those wards.
Table 6.2.7: Length of Drains in Town

Ward No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Total

Length of Pucca Drains (in m)


0
0
224
925
1166
1329
665
520
1124
2344
615
0
0
0
0
8912

Source: Hanumana Nagar Parishad

At present HNP is responsible for operation and maintenance of drainage system in the town. Major
portions of these drains require de-silting and repairs.

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Map: 6-2 Drainage Map - Hanumana

Major Water Bodies


Major water bodies in the form of Talab are the major source of water in the city, the city also faces the
problem of scarcity of water during the summer season. Apart from Talab, there are local well and within
and near premises for supply of water in the city.
The two nallas existing are:

Amaiya nallah
Naiya nallah

Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Drains


The drains mostly exist along the major road (NH-7) in the town. In case of Hanumana, hierarchy of the
drains cannot be categorised. The pucca drains which are present in the town also are in very poor
condition.

Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps


Table 6.28: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps for Drainage System

Project Components/ Service Unit


Drains construction is needed

Ward No.
No drainage line exists in the city. Proper drainage line
and upgradation of existing drains have to be done.

Source: DMG Assessment

A fresh drainage system is required in Parishad.


Construction of new drains and converting the existing open ones to closed type.

Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


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There are no particular quantitative features in the standards laid out in UDPFI guidelines. But generally,
the storm water drainage should be laid along the road to carry the surface run off and maximum pucca
nallahs should be there for the drainage purpose.

SWOT Analysis
Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH
WEAKNESS
The slope (Towards SW) can be utilized for Absence of proper drainage system inside the
developing a drainage system.
wards 5, 6,3,4,12,13 etc which are identified as
dense locality.
Existing drainage system along the NH-7 covering
the wards 7, 8 to 4, 10 and along the local road Reduction in flow capacity of existing drains due
from ward 6 to ward 9.
to dumping of solid waste and presence of gray
matter due to poor maintenance specially in
wards 4,6 and 15
OPPORTUNITY
THREAT
Provision of adopting rain water harvesting due Flooding and spill-over of waste water during the
to sufficient rain (950 1100 mm/Annum) in
monsoon season in internal areas and major
wards 7,8,9 and 15 due to slope.
market areas of the town in wards 7, 8 to 4, and
10 along the NH-7.
Rehabilitation of primary drain, nallah and water
bodies in all the wards.

Issues

No proper drainage system. The present drainage systems basically open type especially in wards
4, 5, 6 and 15 which are highly populated areas.
Disposal of solid waste in drains has reduced the flow capacity of drains.
Less capital investment.
No treatment plant
Disposal of solid waste in drains has reduced the flow capacity of drains.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Goals and Service Outcomes
To enhance the coverage of storm water drains, following goals have been indentified for different
horizon years.
Table 6.29: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years

S. No.

Components

Horizon Period
2015

Rehabilitation of Existing Pucca Drains

Rehabilitation of Existing
Nallahs and Water Bodies

2025

2035

100%

100%

100%

Primary 100%

100%

100%

Development of a fresh drainage 100%


system in the town

100%

100%

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Strategies and Action Plan


In order to address the above discussed issues and achieve the above outcomes in each of the
components of drainage system, strategies for improvement are elaborated below:
1. Drains Rehabilitation and Improvement Programme: The programme would aim at the following
so that to channelize the flow and minimize the localized flooding and over-spilling:
Regular Cleaning of Drains removal of garbage and gray matter to ensure natural flow
of drains.
De-silting, lining and repair of drains.
Removal of encroachment along existing drains along the main road (NH-7).
Educating people for minimization of sewage and domestic waste discharge into drains.
Construction of side walls to confirm to uniform cross-section in built up areas.
2. Rehabilitation of Primary Nallah/ Drains and Water Bodies:
Trapping of nallahs
Converting the Kutcha Nallahs to pucca one by De-silting, lining and constructing side
walls.
Regular Cleaning of Drains removal of garbage and gray matter to ensure natural flow
of nallahs.
Protection of environmental resources such as - open spaces, water bodies.

Project Identification & Costing


Presently there is lack of infrastructure and capital cost for drainage in the city. So the following projects
are identified to achieve the future goals for drainage in the city would be
Table 6.210 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments

Code No.

Projects proposed

D1

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

Preparation of DPR for Storm Water Drainage


System for entire town
D2
Construction of new storm water drainage
network to cover the whole town (3 kms.)
(@Rs44 lakh/km)
D3
Converting the Kutcha Nallahs to pucca one by
De-silting, lining and constructing side walls.
3.5km ((@Rs20 lakh/km)
Sub Total Cost (D)

5.00
120.00

70.00

UADD, Govt. of M.P.


and GNP
Govt. of M.P

Nagar
Parishad

195.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011h

6.2.4 Solid Waste Management


Solid Waste Generation
At present in the absence of any incineration unit, waste
from medical/ healthcare establishments are either mixed
with municipal waste or indiscriminately dumped. This
works out to 59.22 grams per capita per day, which is
relatively less than the standards considered in CPHEEO
Manual for small towns of 250 gm per capita per day. This
is because of town basic character which is in
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Figure 6.9 Open Dumping of Solid Waste along road

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transitional phase of rural to semi-urban.


Table 6.211: Solid waste generation in different wards.

Ward No.

Total Population

Solid Waste Generation


(in KG)

1334

2
744
3
847
4
800
5
956
6
1476
7
1240
8
1142
9
848
10
760
11
1286
12
1026
13
777
14
861
15
774
Total
14871
Source: DMG estimation.

(in MT/Day)

333.5

0.3335

186
211.75
200
239
369
310
285.5
212
190
321.5
256.5
194.25
215.25
193.5
3717.75

0.186
0.21175
0.2
0.239
0.369
0.31
0.2855
0.212
0.19
0.3215
0.2565
0.19425
0.21525
0.1935
3.71775

Constituent of Municipal Waste


There is no information available on constitution of municipal solid waste as such from HNP. But after the
discussion with official of HNP and their perception, waste generated in town includes:
Vegetable and fruit market waste
Metal iron crap
Paper
Aluminium crap
Polythene
Domestic animal excreta
Packing materials
Ash from Chulha
Glass
This indicates that the most of the quantity of waste generated is organic in nature comes from
residential and commercial uses.

Current Practice of Solid Waste Management


Primary and Secondary Collection
No Door-to-Door solid waste collection system from the individual households and other establishments
as primary collection. The solid waste generated from residential, commercial, institutional areas. People
accumulate the household waste generated at some designated place in their ward and the municipal
vehicles come to fetch them. Waste which is thrown on the roads and in drains is collected in heaps along
road sides. The collection efficiency of these wastes is very low. There is no area or site designated for
disposal of municipal wastes. Wastes collected from the all the sources whether it is domestic,
commercial or institutional are dumped at various illegal dumping sites in low-lying areas along the
drains.

Waste Storage and Segregation


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Presently municipal waste is being collected from all the wards from specific locations. Segregation of
waste, both at sources level (primary collection) and at secondary level is not in practice. For the storage
of waste dustbins are provided at some places. Trolleys are provided for collection of the solid wastes
generated at household level. Wastes generated from all the sources are disposed mainly in open spaces
along the road side with wastes from street sweeping and drainage cleaning throughout the town except
in some areas.
As per the city sanitation survey conducted in 2008 by M.P. Govt. only 43% of households have access to
places for waste disposal for < than 50 feet, 24% for 50 100 feet followed by 23% for 100 200 feet.
While more than 10% of households have places for waste disposal at a distance more than 200 feet.
2%
8%
43%

23%

< than 50 feet


50 to 100 feet
100 to 200 feet
200 to 500 feet

24%

500 to 1000 feet

Graph: 6-7 Distance of Places from Households for Waste Disposal

Primary collection system is necessary to ensure that waste stored and segregated at source is collected
regularly and it is not disposed on the streets, drains, water bodies etc. However, step has to synchronize
well with the first step i.e. storage of waste at source.

Processing and Disposal


There is no prevailing mechanism in the town for processing or disposal of waste. As the wastes are not
segregated, there is no processing of the collected wastes. There is no provision of incineration facilities
for hospital wastes. There is no area or site is designated for scientific disposal of Municipal Solid Wastes.
All types of wastes whether it is hospital waste or household waste are disposed or dumped all together
at various illegal dumping sites in low-lying areas along the Amaiya nallah.

Reuse and Recycling


Basically the metals and plastics are collected by the slum dweller, which is source of income for them. It
is further marketed by scrap dealers. Waste materials like metals and plastics are transported to nearby
cities like Allahabad, Rewa, Jabalpur for further recycle and use.

Vehicles for Solid Waste Collection and Transportation


For proper solid waste management, suitable equipment in sufficient number is necessary for handling,
lifting, and transportations. Loading and unloading of municipal solid waste is done manually and waste is
transported through hand pulled carts by sanitary worker. HNP also has two trolleys for the collection of
solid wastes. However, the HNP is not properly equipped with solid waste handling and transportation
equipments.

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Table 6.12: Vehicles required for solid waste handling.

S. No.

Vehicle and Equipment

Numbers

Tractor

Trolley

Hand-pull Cart

Estimation of Waste Collection


Since the HNP is not properly equipped with latest solid waste handling and transporting equipments, the
waste is collected and transported manually through hand pull cart. Therefore, the waste collection
efficiency is very low. As per the consecutive discussions with officials of HNP and based on the strength
of sanitary workers and equipment available to them, it is been estimated that out of total waste
generated (0.19MT) of waste is been collected on daily basis in Hanumana town.

Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


As per the data provided by the HNP, the total waste generation in the town is about 0.19 MT/Day. This
works out to 59.22 grams per capita per day, which is relatively less than the standards considered in
CPHEEO Manual for small towns of 250 gm per capita per day. This is because of town basic character
which is in transitional phase of rural to semi-urban. The following table provides the comparative
analysis with UDPFI and CPHEEO guidelines:
Table 6.213: Performance Indicators Solid Waste Management

S. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.

Indicators
Waste Generation per Capita per day
Waste Collection Efficiency
Door-to-Door
Waste
Collection
Efficiency
% capacity of fleet vehicle to waste
generated

Units
Grams
Percent
Percent

Current Status
Normative Standard
59.22
250
25
100
Nil
100

Percent

Nil

Source: DMG Assessment based on the Data Collected from HNP

SWOT Analysis
Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH
WEAKNESS
Major portion of solid waste generated is bio- Nagar Parishad has limited no. Of vehicles 1
degradable waste which can be used for vermin tractor, 2 trolleys and one hand pull cart results
composting.
low Solid waste collection efficiency (25%).
Availability of land for development of sanitary land Door-to-Door waste collection system is not
fill site of MSW especially in wards 2,7,8,11,12 and
practiced in town.
14, major portion of which are in agricultural use.
No dedicated dumping site in the town.
Segregation of waste is not in practice, neither
at primary collection level nor at final disposal
level.
OPPORTUNITY
THREAT

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To generate revenue by imposing levy on waste Existing behavior of dumping wastes along the
generators especially in most populated wards (4, 6
roads especially in ward no. 4, 5, 6,910 and 15
and 15).
along NH-7 and Sidhi road leading an
unwanted unhygienic and hazardous condition
Identifying a dumping site to dispose all the waste
in these areas.
generated and suitable lands are in least populated
wards i.e. 3,7 and 12

Issues
1. Hanumana Nagar Parishad does not in compliance with MSW handling rules, 2000.
Town has not adopted Door-to-Door Collection system and segregation of wastes at source
level.
Lack of bins for storage of waste at primary level. Limited no. of bins is provided at some places.
Inadequacy of man power and modest equipments (including vehicle for transportation) with
HNP for Solid Waste Management from collection to its final disposal.
At present town does not have any designated sanitary land fill site as per the normative
standards.
2. HNP has not conducted any study in town for determining the composition and characteristics of the
solid waste.
3. Collection efficiency is very low i.e. 25% only.
4. Lack of capital/funds with HNP for the development of SWM facilities.
5. Waste collected by sanitary worker is been disposed of in low lying areas of town near Amaiya
nallah, further leading to contamination or pollution of water which is one of the major source of
water supply for the town.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Goals and Service Outcomes
The local body should effectively involve the private sector in delivering the solid waste management
services. The rationale for private sector participation includes attracting project funding, new
technology, cost saving and service delivery improvements.
Table 6.2.14: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years

Sr. No.

Components

Horizon Period
2015

2025

2035

Door-to-Door Collection System

80%

100%

100%

Source Segregation

100%

100%

100%

Improve Waste Collection Efficiency

100%

100%

100%

Mechanized Waste Handling

Partial

Full

Full

Scientific Waste Disposal

Partial

Full

Full

Landfill Site Adequacy

Partial

Full

Full

Cost Recovery O & M

80%

100%

100%

Private Sector Participation

70%

100%

100%

Strategies and Action Plan

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In order to achieve the above outcomes, and to address the above discussed issues in each of the solid
waste management components, strategies for improvement are elaborated below:
1. Segregation of Waste at Sources:
Highest priority has to be accorded for storage, segregation and of waste at sources
irrespective of the area of generation so as to facilitate an organized and environmentally
acceptable waste management measures.
A number of campaigns/ community awareness programmes should be organized for
introducing segregation of wastes at sources.
Segregation of hazardous wastes like bio-medical waste, bio degradable waste etc.
2. Primary Collection of Wastes: The following measures have been recommended for improving
the primary collection practices of Hanumana.
Phased implementation of Door-to-Door collection system through community organizations
on PPP basis by mobilizing, facilitating, organizing and supporting community activities with
the help of local NGOs.
Encourage performance based incentives to enhance efficiency and output.
Installation of Community Storage Bins in all areas where house to house collection cannot
be implemented.
Placement of containers or bins sufficient in size and no. at markets for ensuring that all the
vendors place the waste in containers.
Bio-medical wastes and other hazardous wastes to be segregated and collected from
municipal solid wastes for separate incineration as per the guidelines of Ministry of
Environment and Forest 1998 and 1989 respectively.
3. Secondary Waste Collection and Transportation: At present, the HNP has inadequate no. of
sanitary workers and equipments for loading, unloading and transportation vehicles (including
bins) for secondary collection and transportation of wastes. Therefore, it is recommended that HNP should involving private sector participation in secondary collection, transportation and
treatment of MSW facilities.
HNP should purchase sufficient no. of modest equipments including vehicles - such as loader,
unloader, hydraulic closed truck/waste carrier for transportation and disposal of waste.
Construction or demolition wastes / debris to be separately collected and disposed off in
separate landfill site for future use.
HNP should prepare a Detailed Project Report (DPR) for Municipal Solid Waste Management
for town, ensuring the quantity and quality of required modest equipments, techniques and
vehicles for collecting, processing and transporting MSW. This will also ensure the
Institutional strengthening, human resources development leading to overall capacity
building.
4. Processing and Disposal: The characteristics and quality of solid waste generated in the city
primarily influence the disposal options. Considering these aspects, it is recommended to develop
a landfill site for safe disposal of solid waste. The disposal strategy for Hanumana town for short
term at town level will be Compost the organic fraction of the waste.
Encourage aerobic vermin composting at local level.
Sanitary land filling of inorganic fraction of waste and the compost rejects.
Educating the community on 4R strategy (Reuse, Recover, Recycle and Reduce) that can help
ease pressure on compost sites and affords resource recovery.
For the long term, it is further proposed that, Development of Scientific the Hanumana Nagar
Parishad should co-ordinate with State Government for clustering in regional engineered landfill
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site for waste disposal involving other neighbouring ULBs. This also ensures the scale and
viability to the private partnership mode.
5. Improved sanitary landfill method

Method of controlled disposal of municipal solid waste (refuse) on land.


Waste is deposited in thin layers (up to 1 m) and promptly compacted by heavy
machinery (e.g., bulldozers);
Several layers are placed and compacted on top of each other to form a refuse
cell (up to 3 m thick).

At the end of each day the compacted refuse cell is covered with a layer of
compacted soil to prevent odors and windblown debris.

When the landfill is completed, it is capped with a layer of clay or a synthetic liner in order to
prevent water from entering.

A final topsoil cover is placed, compacted, and graded, and various forms of vegetation may be
planted in order to reclaim otherwise useless lande.g., to fill to levels convenient for building
parks, golf courses, or other suitable public projects

In the improved version of the sanitary landfill, bio-gas can be tapped for energy generation

SANITARY LANDFILL METHOD

Cross Section of Sanitary Landfill

Best Practices
Box: Solid waste Management in Surat
Background:
The Surat city is largely recognized for its textile and diamond businesses. Surat is also known for a
complete transformation from one of the filthiest cities to one of the cleanest cities in the country. In
September 1994, the city faced an unprecedented crisis when the killer disease PLAGUE broke out in the
city. However, in May 1995, a new programme was launched by Surat Municipal Corporation (SMC) to
clean the city through waste management. The programme created an enormous impact on the
cleanliness, which resulted in a significant improvement in the health status and quality of living
environment. So much so that Surats image was transformed from one of the filthiest to the second
cleanest city in the country.
Key Components of the program
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The SMC adopted multi-pronged strategies to achieve the programme goals, include:

Streamlining of functional, administrative, financial and technological aspects within SMC;


Awareness creation and capacity building of the municipal staff and city population, especially
weaker section;
Inviting private sector participation in garbage management;
Introduction of a very well orchestrated garbage removal and
disposal schedule;
Educating the public and issuing of instruction for the correct way
of garbage disposal.

Private Sector Participation:


Involving Private sector on a temporary basis during the plague
epidemic to cleanse the filth and remove dead carcasses accumulated
in the water-logged areas. It was also strengthened and regulated in
the post-plague period in (i) hiring of private vehicles for garbage collection, ii) contracting out cleaning
of certain roads and iii) employing private sweepers for transporting municipal refuse from collection
points to disposal sites.
Private contractors, at present, handle almost 40 per cent of the solid waste generated in the city every
day. However, private contractors work under strict supervision of the municipal staff and penalties are
imposed on them for not performing their assigned work.
Enforcing Sanitation standard
The SMC started to enforce strict hygiene and sanitation standards in eating houses, sweetshops, fruit,
and vegetable shops.
Levy of fines for littering of the public places was instituted. Under this system, the grievances were
categorized. For ensuring feedback, a Reply Card system has been introduced.
A Public Health Mapping exercise was initiated in 1995 by the city government, with a major focus on
preventive and primitive health care.
Streamlining the function of the SMC
The administrative setup for solid waste management was modified and the six zones were sub-divided
into 52 sanitary districts for better waste collection efficiency.
A daily monitoring system was introduced. At the macro-level, the entire administrative and financial
management system of Surat Municipal Corporation was revamped.
A network of about 274 surveillance centres, 90 percent of which are located in slums. This network
includes two municipal hospitals, health centres, major private hospitals and private medical
practitioner.
Impact
The programme has created tangible impact on cleanliness, living environment and awareness level
leading to significant improvement in the mortality and morbidity. A partnership approach between
public and private sector, citizens and community is slowly emerging.
Lesson Learned:
Decentralize governance can play a vital role for the decision making and good governance.
Micro- planning is a very necessary tool for the plan implementation.
Public support facilitates innovations in urban environment management.
Political will is extremely important for successful public policy changes.
Media support plays a dominant role in the creation of public awareness and acceptance of change.
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Project Identification & Costing


Presently there is lack of infrastructure and capital cost for solid waste management in the city. So the
following projects are identified to achieve the future goals for solid waste management in the city would
be
Table 6.215 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

SWM 1

Preparation of Detailed Project Report for Municipal 5.00


Solid Waste Management for entire town.

UADD, Govt. of
M.P. and GNP

SWM 2

Construction maintenance of Sanitary Landfill Site 136.00


with other infrastructure facility in ward no. 1
(@Rs1000/ton of waste) exclusive of land cost

Nagar Parishad

SWM 3

Providing equipments and machines to support the 30.00


SWM system

Nagar Parishad

SWM 4

Enhancing the capacity of municipality by providing 60.00


Transportation vehicles (1) , Container (30) and &
Handcart (10)

Nagar Parishad

Sub Total Cost (C)

231.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

6.2.5 Traffic and Transportation


Background
Roads and circulation is an important city land-use
allowing efficient function of any city or towns
activities. Urban economy is seen to improve with
urban transport infrastructure. Conversely, it can drag
drown and prove detrimental to its GDP. The objective
of the studying town level transportation is to
understand and analyze the present level travel
scenario of the town and to focus on existing
potentials and scope of development.

Existing Traffic and Transportation Scenario


Figure 6.10 Traffic jam on Sidhi Road

Traffic on the roads has been one of the key


transportation problems of any growing town or city.
The Hanumana town is no exception to this. Investigation into the existing traffic scenario of the town
provides insights on how well the local government (Hanumana Nagar Parishad) and other agencies
(PWD and NHAI) are coping with and managing the growing population and increased economic
activities.

Vehicle Population
The numbers of vehicles in the town are listed below:
Table 6.216: Number of vehicles by types.

Sr. No.
1
2

Mode Type
Cycle
Two Wheeler

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Four Wheeler

100 - 150

Agencies in Traffic and Transportation


The traffic system is regulated under the Rewa District Office of Madhya Pradesh Transport Department.
Whole traffic and transportation can be divided into two categories: inter-city and intra-city based on the
influence of area.

The inter city public transport system for the town can be categorize into two parts i.e. State
Carriage and Private Carriage. State carriage includes buses by the State Government with fixed
routes and fare. The Private Carriage in under purely private domain and includes buses, jeeps,
etc. operated by private operators.
For Intra city Public Transport, bolero and tempo are always available within the town. As
Hanumana is a very small town, all the important places such as major commercial and market
areas, hospitals etc. are in the vicinity. Most of the local people generally use cycle, scooter,
motorcycle and walking etc. as mode of travel for short trips or intra zone trips.

Travel Characteristics
The travel characteristic of a town generally depends on the social status of citizens, types and location of
economic activities which give rise to diverse traffic modes. The predominant mode of travel in town is
cycles followed by motorized vehicles such as two- wheeler (Scooter & Motorcycle) and private transport
which includes Three Wheelers , four wheelers (Tempo, Jeeps, cars etc.). A town in semi-urban in
nature all the important place are in vicinity. Thus, only major working population uses their own means
of transport such as cycles, scooters, motorcycle, and
cars etc. for their workplace and other places for day
to day needs. Rest of the population prefers to walk
for various purposes.

Public Transport/Mass Transit


Private Jeeps and tempos apart from buses also offer
services from one town to the other of shorter
distance. State-transport as well as privately owned
buses runs throughout Madhya Pradesh. Most of
these buses run on daily basis. As far as the public
transport facility within the town is concerned there is
no formal public transport system exists in town. As Figure6.11: Bus boarding and deboarding along
road
the town is very small and is in transformation stage
from semi-urban to urban, the population is very low. The major working class population uses their own
vehicles cycle, scooter, motorcycle for commuting in the town. There are few shared auto rickshaw and
tempo etc. operated by private operators which caters the population residing in nearby villages.

Traffic Management and Circulation


At present, traffic and transportation in Hanumana vests upon a number of agencies i.e. Nagar Parishad,
PWD and NHAI. The Hanumana Nagar Parishad is responsible for development and maintenance of street
network (City Roads), traffic management and circulation system, public transportation system,
development of parking spaces etc. At present the total road length in Hanumana Nagar is 21.77
Kilometres. The roads in the Paraded can be categorised into three types:

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1. National Highways: This category includes the NH 7 (accounting for 7.82 km of road length of
town) connecting Rewa to Mirzapur. The NHAI is responsible for design and O&M of National
Highway in the town.
2. Major District Roads: This category includes the major roads of town namely Sidhi, Shahpur,
(accounting together 5.32 km of road length of town) which connects the town to the nearby
villages or towns. The PWD is responsible for the design and O&M of these major roads in town.
3. City Road: The category includes the all local roads at ward level and main road fall under the
jurisdiction of Hanumana Nagar Parishad.

Table 6.217: Types of Roads and Lengths in Hanumana Town

Sr. No.
1

Type of Roads
Pucca Road (NH -7)

Length of Road (Km)


7.45

Pucca Road (Major District Road)

8.89

4
TOTAL

Kutcha Road (Local Roads within Wards)

5.43
21.77

Source: Hanumana Nagar Parishad

Proper road width and spacing are important in reducing traffic on roads. Unfortunately many of the
important roads in town have become so narrow to facilitate the increasing flow of vehicles. The
unauthorized encroachment along both the sides of roads has covered all the available shoulders thereby
reducing ROW from 20m to 6m further decreased the carrying capacity of roads. There are 4 important
roads in the town.

Map: 6-3Existing and Proposed Road Network in Town

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At present both the sides of road is full of ribbon development. However, with increasing concentration
of activities in and around the core area of the town, pressure of traffic is increasing on all the major
roads of the town (NH-7).
Furthermore, important centres such as Police Station, Educational Institutions, Nagar Parishad Office
and informal shops are located in the core area of the town also one of the traffic generating centres of
the town since major administrative and commercial activities take place in this area. The other
important traffic generation centres in town includes1. Sidhi Road
2. Sahpura Raod
3. Community Health Centre
Core Area of the Town
The core area of the town are predominately along the National Highway- 7 consisting of
encroachment by informal shops, thela; unorganised parking; vegetable and fruit market; presence
of important centres etc. This leads to traffic congestion or regular basis.
Accident Zones
Accident zones are those areas where collisions, ramming and hit-and-run mishaps usually take
place. The heavy and speedy traffic flow on NH, informal commercial developments, unavailability
of transport nagar and unavailability organized parking spaces etc. has increases the possibilities of
accidents in the town. The junctions on national Highway 7 are the most prominent accident
zones in the town due to the heavy and speedy traffic flow.

Inter-City Bus Transport


For smaller towns in Madhya Pradesh it differs in terms of the provider and the type of facility or bus
frequency available to the passengers. The transit service to public for state capitals is no different than
any other city transit, whether its a metro or a small city.
The inter-city bus facility covers almost all the important centres within the district as well as other
surrounding districts. This is provided wither by the state corporations buses or by private operators.
Madhya Pradesh State Road Transport Corporation provides transit services to the passenger. It runs
regular services intercity services and interstate services connecting to the neighbouring states with
fixed routes and fares.

Intermediate Public Transport


At present Hanumana town does not have any Intermediate Public Transport System (IPTs) which serve
the citizen of town. As the town is a very small town all the important places such as major commercial
and market areas, bus stands, hospitals etc. are in the vicinity. Most of the local people generally use
cycle, scooter, motorcycle and walking etc. as mode of travel for short trips or intra zone trips. Shared
three-wheelers auto-rickshaws, four wheelers such as jeeps, and other such vehicles are often found in
the town as public transport providing point-to-point services to the people commuting from the nearby
villages for shopping and other purpose.

Parking Requirement
There is no provision have been made for organized on-street parking and off-street parking at major
commercial centres of the town. Traffic problem is more vulnerable on market days on Tuesday and
Friday. Thus, the capacity of the road is further reduced resulting in conflict between pedestrians and
vehicular traffic. Therefore, there is urgent need/requirement of authorized parking as per the standards
for major commercial areas and in other important areas such as along NH-7, institutional areas etc. of
the town.

Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps


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The present and future demand of road (in km) is calculated considering the per capita demand to 1.5 m.
Widening of major important roads and improvement of major junctions and accident prone areas for
better traffic condition are also considered in future demand.
Regarding infrastructure augmentation, it is required to construct/develop a Transport Nagar by 2020, a
bus stand with basic amenities by 2015 and provision of on-street parking with pavement on major roads
by 2015 and more until 2025. These demands are also incorporated in the draft master plan. Table 6.26
provides the information of present and future demand and supply gaps for roads in the town.
Table 6.2.18: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Traffic and Transportation

COMPONENTS
Years

YEARS
2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

Projected
16773
Population for
Hanumana
Road Network 2011
(in Km)

17141

17517

17901

18293

20299

22525

24995

27735

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

Existing
Road 21.77
Network
Road
Length 25.16
Demand

21.77

21.77

21.77

21.77

21.77

21.77

21.77

21.77

25.71

26.28

26.85

27.44

30.45

33.79

37.49

41.60

Gaps

3.94

4.51

5.08

5.67

8.68

12.02

15.72

19.83

3.39

Comparative Analysis with UDPFI and Other Guidelines


The above demand and supply are calculated as per the manual of Indian Road Congress and service level
benchmarking for Urban Transport issued by Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India.
Table 6.2.19: Space Standards of Roads

Type of Roads

Norms
ROW

Current Status

Carriage Way

ROW

Carriage Way

Arterial Road

50 60 m

21 m

60 m

60 m

Sub-Arterial Road

30 40 m

14 m

10 25 m

58m

Collector Road

20 30 m

10.5 m

46m

3m

Local Street

10 20 m

7.5 m

34m

3m

Source: DMG Field Survey and UDPFI Guidelines

Footpath (Sidewalk)

No footpaths are available in the town.


Table 6.2.20: Desirable of Footpaths

Capacity (Persons)
All in one Direction
261
300
215

In both Directions
3538
1406
419

Required Width of Footpath


(m)
1.5
2.0
1.5

Source: UDPFI Guidelines

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SWOT Analysis
Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.

Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.


STRENGTH
Hanumana is located along the major roads
like NH-7 connecting Rewa with Mirzapur and
arterial road connecting Sidhi and Shahpur.
Connectivity with all the wards through NH-7
and other local and collector roads as wards
1,4,5,6,7,8,9 and 10 through NH-7 and wards
12,13,14,15 with arterial road towards Sidhi in
SE direction and Shahpura and other local
roads with ward 2.

OPPORTUNITY

WEAKNESS

Narrow and poor conditions of roads


causes Traffic problem which is more
prominent on the weekly market day i.e.
on Tuesday and Friday in ward no. 4 and
10 along NH-7.

Encroachment of roads - reduced road


width in commercial area of wards 4, 10
and 13.

No designated parking is there in


commercial areas of wards 4, 10 and 13.
On street parking causes congestion during
peak hours especially on Tuesday and
Friday.

THREAT

Land availability for major projects like


development of Bus Terminal, Transport
Nagar for goods carriers and parking facilities
in ward no. 7 and 8.
Widening of major important roads and
improvement of major junctions and accident
prone areas (wards 4, 5, 6 and13 along NH-7
and Sidhi road) for better traffic condition are
also considered in future demand.

Highly dense development along the major


connectivity in wards 4, 10 and 13
resulting permanent encroachment which
can
create
difficulties
for
the
redevelopment of the town.

Issues

The junctions on national Highway 7 are the most prominent accident zones especially in wards
6, 10 and 4 due to the heavy and speedy traffic flow.
Congestion in commercial/ market areas due to rampant encroachment, on-street parking in
wards 4 & 10 along NH-7 and in ward 13 along Sidhi road.
Lack of designated and organized on-street parking in town street furniture along the major roads
NH-7 and Sidhi road.
Traffic problem is more prominent on the weekly market day i.e. on Tuesday and Friday.
The town lacks transport proper utility/infrastructure systems such as Bus Terminal, Transport
Nagar (Truck Terminal), organized and adequate parking spaces in important areas to properly
facilitate movement of vehicles in the town and improve the traffic situation.
Narrow streets in the core areas of the town need to be widened through proper planning and
addressing the encroachment problems.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Goals and Service Outcomes
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To improve the status of traffic and transportation system in the town following goals have been
identified for different horizon years
Table 6.221: Goals & Services Outcomes for Different Horizon Years

S. No.

Components

Horizon Period
2015

2025

2035

New Road Formation/Development

100%

100%

Road
Up-gradation
(Widening
Strengthening, footpath)

/ 50%

100%

100%

Development of Bus Terminal

60%

100%

100%

Development
of
(Transport Nagar)

Terminal 70%

100%

100%

Parking Facilities

100%

100%

Truck

100%

Strategies and Action Plan


In order to address the above discussed issues and achieve the above outcomes in each of the
components of traffic and transportation in the town, strategies categories under short term measures,
medium term and long term action plans are elaborated below:
1. Short Term Measures: Short term measures includes immediate trouble shooting actions and
traffic management actions such as Intersection or junction improvement in the core areas and accident prone areas to
town.
Removal of encroachments on major roads & pavements to provide free flow of traffic.
Establishment of Traffic Police Stations and Traffic Management Centres.
These measures should be taken up on a continuous basis as the travel characteristics and
loading of different links, intersections etc. and change owing to natural growth and change in
land use.
2. Medium Term Action Plan: This aims at to the development of transportation infrastructure over
a perspective plan period of 5 15 Years to bring about coordinated development among
different components. These measures typically will include various infrastructure projects
including network improvements such as Road up-gradation - Improvement of all existing major roads connecting town to
peripheral areas through widening, strengthening and developing footpaths in phase
manner.
Up-gradation of existing kutcha roads into pucca ones.
New road formation/development in different areas of the town as per the future
development of town.
Development, Operation and Maintenance of parking lots with payment on major roads
and commercial areas of town on PPP base.
Development of Bus Stand/Terminal on BOOT basis.
Development of Truck Terminal/ Transport Nagar on BOOT basis.
3. For Monitoring and Evaluation: Preparation of a detailed road register and designing and
implementing a system to update the same on a regular basis, including details of construction
and repair/maintenance history.
4. Long Term Action Plan: The long term action plan aims at to the development of structure plan
for the town with transit as one of the lead components, which will direct the urban growth so as
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to bring about a structural fit between transit infrastructure and urban growth. This will also
include the introduction of eco-friendly intra-city public transport system and also examine a
comprehensive multi-modal Public Transport System to bring about the most optimal mix of
commuting within the town and thus providing a sustainable transit solution.

Project Identification & Costing


The creation of a reliable, comfortable, attractive and affordable traffic management system is the longterm solution for solving the traffic problems in the city. Thus, constructions of new bus stand to provide
a high quality transit system. Provisions of parking facilities are envisaged to solve parking problem and
congestion in core areas. To achieve the goals in this sector the following projects are identified
Table 6.222 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

TT 1

Development of new Bus Stand on BOOT basis 500.00


IN WARD NO. 8

TT 2

Upgradation of kutcha road to pucca (5.43km)

TT 3

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

Construction of new roads for total length of 750.00


15km by 2035 in different areas of town.

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

TT 4

Development of footpath/pedestrian along the 50.00


major roads. (for 5 km)

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

TT 5

Road Widening (major district roads.) (approx 150.00


10km)

PWD

TT 6

Improvement of traffic junctions (5), rotary 50.00


development including installation of traffic
light/signals.

Hanumana
Parishad

Sub Total Cost (D)

270.00

Nagar

1770.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011,

6.2.6 Street Lighting and Fire Fighting


Existing Situation of Street Lights
Providing full coverage by street light is import in development of
town as it facilitates urban movement and safeguards life and
property. There are around 300 street light posts in the town. 150
among them are energy saver and the rest has sodium vapour lamp.
Street light is deficient in the ward number 2, 3, 14 and 15.

Fire Service
There is no separate office for the fire fighting operations in the town.
As has been explained earlier, unorganized on-street parking and
economic activities in town has led to increase congestion, rampant
encroachment and more importantly development of potential fire
generating points in the core area of the town. In such
anthropogenic hazards situation few water tankers being used and
HNP ask help from District Headquarter Rewa.
DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Figure 6.12 Street Light

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Vehicle and Equipments for Fire Fighting and Rescue Operations


At present, to handle and overcome the anthropogenic hazards like fire the ULB is not equipped with any
fire fighting service vehicles for the entire town. There is no additional options/manpower available for
rescue operations.
Other than this, ULB also does not have any electric pole vehicle for streetlight repairing in the town.

Operational System
At present there is no formal fire fighting services is available in the town. In such anthropogenic hazards
situation few water tankers being used and HNP ask help from District Headquarter Rewa.

Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Street Lighting


The present and future demand and supply gaps for horizon year 2035 under street lighting sector for
Hanumana has been worked out according to the length of roads and as per the UDPFI guidelines and is
tabulated below:
At present the street lighting poles within wards have irregular spacing which needs to place as per the
standard of 40m spacing.
Table 6.2.23: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Street Lighting

COMPONENTS
Street Light (in
nos.)
Projected
Population of
Hanumana
Existing Street
Light
(within
wards)
Road
Length
Demand
(in
km)
Street
Light
Demand @ 1
light per 40 m
spacing on one
side of road
(within wards)
Gaps (within
ward)

YEARS
2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

16773

17141

17517

17901

18293

20299

22525

24995

27735

430

430

430

430

430

430

430

430

430

25.16

25.71

26.28

26.85

27.44

30.45

33.79

37.49

41.60

629

643

657

671

686

761

845

937

1040

199

213

227

241

256

331

415

507

610

Source: DMG Assessment

Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI and Other Guidelines


Following table provides the performance indicators for street lights estimated on the basis of norms and
standards.
Table 6.224: Performance Indicators Street Lighting

Sr.
No.
1.

Indicator

Unit

Spacing between Street Light Poles in residential Meters


areas (including kutcha roads)

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Current
Status
irregular

Norms/
Standards
30 - 40
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Spacing between Street Lights on Major Roads

Meters

50

40 - 50

Source: Field Survey, UDPFI Guidelines and * certain experience and thumb rules.

SWOT Analysis
Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH

WEAKNESS

Town has all kinds of roads NH-7, arterial road Irregular spacing of street light poles within
towards Sidhi and Shahpur and other local and
the wards or residential areas of town like in
collector roads of total length of 21.77 Kms.
wards 3, 4, 5,6,10 and 13.
132 kava power substation.
Lack of skilled staff/manpower for street light
and fire fighting services.
Non-availability of vehicles for street lighting
and fire fighting.
OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

Presence of NH-7 which caters traffic 24 hrs Power thefts through street lights in wards
with dense populated are especially in wards
demands widening of the road and proper
4,6,10 and 13.
terminals in ward no. 8 and street furniture.

Lack of monitoring and regularization by the


Implementing the energy efficient approach as
Nagar Parishad.
demand of consuming energy is more than the
availability.

Other Sources of Energy


Census data 2001 shows that a vast majority of town residents use electricity followed by kerosene as the
only source of lighting as illustrated below.
Table 6.2.25: Sources of Lighting at Household Level in Hanumana

Total
households

Sources of Lighting
Electricity

Kerosene

Solar
Energy

Other Oil

Any Other

No Lighting

2527

1867

649

Source: Census of India, 2011


Table 6.226: Type of Cooking Fuel Used at Household Level in Hanumana

Type of Fuel Used


Firewood
Crop Residue
Cow dung Cake
Coal
Kerosene
LPG
Electricity
Biogas
DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

No. of Households
1,777
25
298
0
134
281
1
4
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Any Other
No cooking
TOTAL

2
5
2,527

Source: Census of India, 2011

Out of total 2527 households, majority of households (1777) use firewood as a fuel for cooking purpose
followed by the LPG (281) and Kerosene (134) for domestic cooking. This shows a strain on forest/wood
resources which is a concern and a threat to environment, depletion of natural resources.

Issues

Inappropriate maintenance and functioning of lights. Around 7% of the street lights are not
functioning.
Irregular spacing of street light poles in the residential areas of town.
Inadequacy in number of street lights in the town.
Lack of fire fighting service facilities and staff.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Goals and Service Outcomes
To improve the status of street lighting system in the town following goals have been identified for
different horizon years
Table 6.227: Goals & Services Outcomes for Different Horizon Years

Sr. No.

Components

Horizon Period
2015

2025

2035

Installation of New Street Light Poles

30%

70%

100%

Up-gradation of existing

100%

100%

100%

Underground Cabling

70%

100%

Energy Saving

70%

100%

100%

100% Fire Safety Coverage

100%

100%

100%

Fully Equipped Fire Station

100%

100%

100%

Strategies and Action Plan


In order to address the above discussed issues and achieve the above outcomes in each of the
components of street lighting and fire fighting in the town, strategies categories under short term
measures, medium term and long term action plans are elaborated below:
1. Short Term Measures: Short term measures includes immediate trouble shooting actions such
as Replacement of non working fixture on street light poles.
Up-gradation of existing poles in terms of spacing from one to other.
Strict control on illegal connection
These measures should be taken up on a continuous basis.
2. Medium Term Action Plan: This aims at to the development of infrastructure over a perspective
plan period of 5 15 Years to bring about coordinated development among different
components. These measures typically will include various infrastructure projects including
network improvements such asDMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

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Replacement of tube lights with power saving CFL and LED lights.
Installation of new street light poles at standard spacing for 100% coverage.
Installation of high Mast Light at important junctions, rotary and entry point of the town.
Alternate Street Light options (Solar, energy saver like CFL, LED etc.) and installation of
automated control lights.
Installation of solar based electric poles in public gathering places and recreational spaces
like pond site.
Installation of solar panels for generating solar power/electricity in institutions (such as
ULB, CHC etc.) and on identified government land within the municipal limit.
Institutional strengthening, human resources development leading to overall capacity
building of ULB for both the sector Street Lighting and Fire Fighting - including assets
required for the operation and maintenance.

For Monitoring and Evaluation: Preparation of a detailed register, designing and implementing a
system to update the same on a regular basis, includes details of new installation of fixture, repair
and maintenance history.
3. Long Term Action Plan: The long term action plan aims at to the development of under-ground
cabling/utility ducts for the horizon year of 2035. This will also help in minimizing the theft of
power.

6.2.7 Urban Poor and their Accessibility to Basis Services


Poverty in the Town
Around 23% (3400) of total population are urban poor, squatter and other poor population which mainly
resides in ward no. 1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15 of the town. Their contribution to the citys economy has
been growing over the period. In the absence of clear policy to address their problems, the poor may
suffer from many inadequacies in terms of access to basic services, socio-economic needs. It is necessary,
therefore, to articulate policies and programmes to mainstream the slum communities with the city, both
in terms of infrastructure provision and socio-economic development.

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Map: 6-4Location of clusters of Urban Poor in the town

Slums in the Town


Some of the densely populated areas in the city are classified as slums primarily because of lack of basic
services and also due to their unauthorized construction. Slums have kutcha houses and no open spaces.

General Characteristics of Slum


There are seven notified slum areas in the town. The ward number 1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15 have partially
slum. Ward no 7 is a fully slum ward and the remaining ward number 1, 5, 12, 14 and 15 have partial slum
population. Slums and squatter settlements are essentially products of poverty. In the context of basic
service delivery, almost by definition, the population living in slums lacks access to basic infrastructure
services like safe water, sanitation, solid waste collection and disposal, drainage, access roads, street
lights, neighbourhood amenities like safe play areas for children and community facilities and electricity
connections.
The social composition of a majority of slums comprises SC, ST and OBC population. Most of the slums
have predominantly one caste staying in it or people from one place of origin.
A majority of the working population in slums are engaged in small scale industries or work as agricultural
labourers. Health related obligatory functions of the Nagar Parishad are restricted and health related
activities are insufficient. Primary health is in poor conditions in the slums and lack of awareness among
people.

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Land Ownership and Tenure Status


Most of the slums residing in Hanumana are located on government land. Government land includes land
belonging to the state or municipal govt. There are also many slums which are located on private lands
belongs to individuals.
Government has from time to time issued the slum households legal ownership/ title of land/ Patta, as
part of its policy to ensure tenure security to the poor and landless.
Most of the slum dwellers have legal Land ownership. The land has been given to all the slum dwellers on
patta. The Patta Act, 1984 & 1998 was introduced to grant leasehold rights to the landless persons
occupying urban lands. The act was amended in 1998 under Rajiv Gandhi Ashrya Abhiyan.

Urban Basic Services in Slums (in line with JnNURM 7 point)


Slums within the town do not have adequate infrastructure facilities. The following analysis has been
done taking into account the seven point charter.

Status of Physical Infrastructure in Slums


Housing
The shelter conditions are very scruffy in the selected pockets. The majorities of the houses in these
slums areas are made of mud and wattle with burnt mud tiles (Khapra) and iron sheet roofs. These are a
carry-over from rural housing and its so-called semi-permanent houses (tin roofs plastered/ unplastered floors with the occasional plastered mud wall or wood and bamboo). Many of these houses lack
basic amenities such as toilet, power, water and security.

Water Supply
In present situation most of the residents of the slum obtain their water either from an improved point
sources, like well or bore wells or from municipal council piped supply system. Most of the open wells
rely on hand-drawn methods of water collection using rope and bucket. Some bore well are fitted with
individual hand pumps for local supply.

Drainage
The existing condition of surface drainage is a mess in the whole slum pocket. Most of the roads in the
selected slum areas do not have proper drainage system. During the monsoon most of these roads get
crammed with muddy water, which remain stagnant for weeks and as a result give rise to many diseases.

Sanitation
At present the main type of sanitation in these slum areas is the pit latrine. A few houses have water
closets with septic tanks which has been a major factor in ground water contamination. The sanitation
alternatives in selected sum areas also comprises of public latrine blocks, the pour flush latrines and toilet
blocks which are usually connected to septic tanks and then to nallah flowing to Pond. The present
condition suggests that the public toilets are not successful in the town since a communal facility often
seems to belong to no one. Individual users have very little feelings of responsibility or commitment to
keeping it clean under these circumstances. The latrines become unhygienic and in-sanitary and as a
result people stop using it. Thus, the residents who do not have access to one of these sanitation facilities
have the common practice of open defecation in open spaces.

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Sewerage
In the existing scenario, the underground and protected sewerage system is absent in the entire town
area. In the slum areas sewage, sludge and storm water flows in open kuccha drains which caused serious
health and safety risks.

Road & Street Lighting


All the roads in the selected slums are narrow tracks eroded by runoff water. These roads lack drainage
which compounds the erosion problem. Only few areas in these slums have reasonably good access roads
on the periphery asphalt. In the internal areas of the slums there are largely stone paved/cemented and
kuccha roads. The problem with the existing roads in slum areas is their poor physical conditions and
absence of other supportive services.
At present street lighting in these slum areas are concerned, Nagar Parishad has provided the same to
urban poor but level of provision is low as compared to other areas of the town. Still there are few
pockets in these slum areas where street light has not been provided.

Solid Waste Management


As per the data provided by Hanumana Nagar Parishad, there are 4 dustbins in the selected slum areas.
Most of the households dump their waste in the open or along the pond side. Door-to-door collection
system is still not in practice.

Status of Social Infrastructure in Slums


Access to social infrastructure is an important factor for human development especially in slum areas.
This section highlights the availability of educational and medical facilities within the slum areas/pockets.

Educational Facilities
While as far as slums are concerned, there is no any school within these slum areas. The schools in the
town are not having proper arrangement of basic requirement of drinking water and sanitation facility for
the student. More over the physical condition of the schools are not good.

Health Facilities
As per the survey conducted under the programme, very less percentage of slum pockets have access to
health care facilities within the distance of 100 meters to 500 meters. Most of the urban poor have to
travel more than 1.5 km distance to Community Health Centre for health care facility.

Social Security Schemes and Beneficiaries


The social security pension scheme was launched earlier in the town for Senior Citizens, Physically
Challenged and Widows, but only few peoples are getting benefited through the scheme in the selected
slum areas/pockets.

Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


1. Rajiv Awas Yojana: Guidelines for Slum-free City Planning
City Slum-free Plans of Action will require Slum Redevelopment/Rehabilitation Plans based on (a)
survey of all slums - notified and non-notified; (b) database creation of slums using the geospatial
technologies; (c) integration of spatial and socio-economic data; and (d) identification of
redevelopment model proposed for each slum. It will also require policies and measure for the
non-proliferation of growth of slums in the future.
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States/UTs may consider the following steps for preparation of Slum-free City /Slum
Redevelopment/Rehabilitation Plans subject to the stipulation that the entire process of slumfree city planning will have to be professionally managed and also be participatory, duly involving
the slum communities, NGOs, CBOs, municipal elected representatives, including Mayors and
Municipal Chairpersons, experts etc.
2. Guidelines for Integrated Housing & Slum Development Programme (IHSDP)
Provision of shelter including up gradation & construction of new houses.
Provision of community toilets.
Provision of physical amenities like water supply, storm water drains, community bath,
widening and paving of existing lanes, sewers, community latrines, street lights, etc.
Community Infrastructure like provision of community centres to be used for pre-school
education, non-formal education, adult education, recreational activities, etc.
Community Primary Health Care Centre Buildings can be provided.
Social Amenities like pre-school education, non-formal education, adult education,
maternity, child health and Primary health care including immunization, etc.
Provision of Model Demonstration Projects.
Sites and Services/houses at affordable costs for EWS & LIG categories.
Slum improvement and rehabilitation projects.
3. Guidelines for Basic Services to the Urban Poor (BSUP)
Integrated development of slums, i.e., housing and development of infrastructure projects
in the slums in the identified cities.
Projects involving development/improvement/maintenance of basic services to the urban
poor.
Slum improvement and rehabilitation projects.
Projects on water supply/sewerage/drainage, community toilets/baths, etc.
Houses at affordable costs for slum dwellers/ urban poor/EWS/LIG categories.
Construction and improvements of drains/storm water drains.
Environmental improvement of slums and solid waste management.
Street lighting.
Civic amenities, like, community halls, child care centres, etc.
Operation and maintenance of assets created under this component.
Convergence of health, education and social security schemes for the urban poor

SWOT Analysis
Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH

WEAKNESS

23% of the total population around 3400 resides Urban poor resides in almost all the wards like in
in slums and are associated with informal sector
1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15. This is responsible for the
contributing their role in the economic structure
degradation of the aesthetic sense of the
of the town mainly as agricultural labors, vendors,
residential area.
workshops (Cycle/bike) etc.
The Kutcha houses and thatched roofs limit scope
of housing transformation.
Lack of basic amenities and services in above
mentioned wards.

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OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

Land availability in the wards 1, 2, 7.8.12, 14 etc Due to lack of proper utilities and services the
slums especially in wards 6, 7 and 15 faces the
generates the scope of relocation of the slum
worst impacts of unhygienic and hazardous health
area.
issues due water logging and dumping waste on
Distribution of the slums evenly in all wards arise
the streets.
an opportunity to introduce the scheme of
providing LIG/EWS housing in the wards
1,5,6,7,12,14 and 15.

Issues
Most of the houses in the slums are kutcha type. There is lack of basic services and amenities in terms of
quantity and quality. Due to bad economic conditions, the urban poor are not able to contribute much
into housing. Most of the slums have land tenure ship, which can acts as a potential for improvement of
slums in the city.
-

Presently slum population is around 30.04% of the total population.

Lack of physical as well as social infrastructure and degraded environmental conditions in wards
1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15.

Poor housing condition and unhygienic environmental condition.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plans

Encouraging slum improvement schemes like improvement of physical i.e. water supply,
drainage, sanitation facilities as well as social infrastructure like education, health facilities in the
slums.
Construction of underground sewage system in the town including slum areas.
Solid waste bins must be provided to all the wards and ensure the primary and secondary
collection including segregation of waste at source level.
Pucca drains and culverts must be provided in all wards including slum areas.
Providing land ownership to the slum dwellers that are located in non-hazardous govt. land, so
that the people can invest of their own houses.
For skill up gradation and economic up-liftment various schemes should introduce, so that people
can spare for proper housing.
Involvement of NGOs should be encouraged for improvement of slums.
Government should act as a facilitator rather than provider for the improvement of the housing
condition of the slums.
Community participation should be emphasized in any of the schemes launched by the govt. or
NGOs.
Relocation of slums from hazardous/flood prone areas.

Project Identification & Costing


Presently slum is covering 9.25% of the city and there is lack of physical and social infrastructure in most
of the slums as well. So to make the city slum free the following projects are identified in this sector
Table 6.228 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
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UP 1

Construction of houses for poor in to solve the 2166.5


housing problems in the slums under IHSDP as
per the availability of suitable Govt. Land (for
619 urban poor HH) (at 3.5lakh/unit)
Sub Total Cost (F)
2166.5

MPHB; HNP

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

6.3

Social Infrastructure

6.3.1 Health
Overall Health Facilities
The Parishad is actively engaged in maintaining cleanliness
and hygiene of the town in general. There is general
awareness among the residents about environment
protection and cleanliness in the town. At present, there is
one Community Health Centre (CHC) with 30 beds.
Apparently, the existing health systems seem to be
adequate to meet the local requirements of existing
population. However, the demand for health services is
bound to increase along with growth in population and
there is a need for creating a specialty hospital for the
growing population. The ambulance services have to be
made available to handle transportation of patients who are
seriously ill.

Figure 6.13: Community Health Centre

Basic Health Indicators


The basic health indicators in the city are infant mortality rate, life expectancy, maternal mortality ratio,
Physicians per 10,000 populations, Nurses per 10,000 populations: Professional nurses, Total Expenditure
on Health as % of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Occurrence of epidemics etc.

Medical Facility Provided by Municipal Body


There is no medical facility provided by Hanumana Nagar Parishad. Only vaccination is arranged time to
time, basically in rainy season or at the time of any communicable diseases like malaria or fever.

Role of Municipal Body in Health Programmes


The department of public health and family welfare is
responsible for the health related factors in the state of Madhya
Pradesh. This department organizes several health campaigns
initiated by the state and central government and monitors the
health indicators of the state. Major role of the municipal body
is to assist the state official in the health campaigning and
awareness programmes launched for the citizens. However,
basic health facilities are provided through Community Health
Centre administered by Public Health and family Welfare
Department of State Government.

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6.3.2 Education
Overall Educational Facilities and Teachers in the Town
Altogether there are 9 Nos. of schools in Hanumana. Out of this, 7 are primary, 2higher secondary school
provided by government. The schools are located in busy market area and lacks conducive environment
for good education. The physical conditions of the schools are not good. During rainy season it becomes
very difficult to carry out the educational activities due to seepage/leakage problem. More over the
schools are not having basic requirement of drinking water and sanitation facilities for students, except
private school.
Mid day meals are also provided to the students in the middle schools and primary schools.

Basic Education and Literacy Indicators


Basic education/ literacy indicators are Primary school enrolment ratio (females as a % of males), Adult
literacy ratio (females as a % of males) and Secondary school enrolment ratio (females as a % of males)
etc.
Table 6.32: Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate

Area

Literacy Rate (in %age)


Total
2011
84.98
84.90
73.42
61.42

Urban India
Madhya Pradesh
Rewa District
Hanumana Nagar Parishad

Male
2011
89.67
90.24
83.67
69.69

Female
2011
79.92
77.39
62.49
52.61

Source: Provisional Figure, Census of India 2011.


Table 6.33: Ward Wise Comparative Assessment of Literacy Rate - Hanumana

Ward No.
Total
WardNo.1
WardNo.2
WardNo.3
WardNo.4
WardNo.5
WardNo.6
WardNo.7
WardNo.8
WardNo.9
WardNo.10
WardNo.11
WardNo.12
WardNo.13
WardNo.14
WardNo.15
Average

39.24
74.24
54.80
82.56
60.00
62.81
52.32
72.02
80.79
79.49
65.55
63.16
71.22
55.88
53.96
64.54

Literacy Rate (in %age)


Male
16.08
47.13
22.62
69.74
34.69
39.56
31.14
52.58
68.46
64.32
47.46
40.84
44.44
25.45
29.24
42.25

Female
28.34
61.56
38.84
77.00
48.33
52.10
42.18
62.43
75.12
72.11
56.69
52.83
58.82
40.19
41.73
53.88

Source: Provisional Figure, Census of India, 2011

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90.00
80.00
70.00
60.00
50.00

Total

40.00

Male

30.00

Female

20.00
10.00
0.00
1

10

11

12

13

14

15

Graph 6.8: Ward Wise Distribution of Literacy Rate Hanumana, M.P.

The above figure shows the ward wise distribution of literate population in Hanumana. Most of wards
have higher literate population; ward no. 4 raking the highest followed by ward no. 9 & 10. Overall there
is a higher literate population in the town dominated by male.

Educational Facilities Provided by Municipal Body


All the schools and colleges are administered by state education department of Madhya Pradesh except
private ones.

6.3.3 Recreation and Entertainment


Recreational Facilities (Parks, Playgrounds etc.)
At present there is no any designated and organized parks & playground, in the town as recreational
facilities for the citizens

Sports Facilities
Presently there is no formal provision of stadium facility in Hanumana town for sports by the municipal
body for the citizens of town.

6.3.4 Fire Fighting Services


There is no separate office for the fire fighting operations in the town. The responsibility of fire service
has been delegated to the municipality, among other tasks but there is no formal fire fighting services is
available in the town. In such anthropogenic hazards situation few water tankers being used and HNP ask
help from District Headquarter Rewa. More over there is no additional options/manpower available for
rescue operations.
Thus, the ULB urgently needs a fully fledged fire fighting department equipped with latest fire-fighting
vehicles (including operation and maintenance of assets) and well trained manpower to control the
anthropogenic hazard and fire mishap for Hanumana Nagar Parishad.

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6.3.5 Existing and Proposed Social Infrastructure


Existing and Proposed Social Infrastructure of the Town has been indicated in the map given below.

Map: 6-5Existing and Proposed Social Infrastructure of the town

6.3.6 Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI Guidelines


The following tables provide the information on the comparative analysis with UDPFI guidelines and the
demand and supply gaps for social infrastructure in Hanumana Nagar Parishad.
Table 6.34: Comparative Analysis with UDPFI Guidelines Social Infrastructure

Particulars

Standards/Norms

Current Status

Pre- Primary, Nursery School

1 for 2,500 population

Senior Secondary School

1 for 7,500 population

Educational Facilities

Integrated School with/without hostel 1 for 90,000-1 lakh population


facility

School for handicapped

1 for 45,000 population

College

1 for 1.25 lakh population

Technical Education centre

1 such centre for every 10 lakh

Intermediate Hospital

1 for 1 lakh population capacity

Poly- clinic with some observation beds

1 for 1 lakh population

Health care Facilities

Nursing home, Child welfare and 1 for 0.45 to 1 lakh population


maternity centre with 25 30 beds
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Dispensary

1 for 0.15 lakh population

Community room

1 for 5,000 population

Community hall and library

1 for 15,000 population

Recreational Club

1 for 1 lakh population

Music, dance and drama centre

1 for 1 lakh population

Meditation and spiritual centre

1 for 1 lakh population

Police station

1 for 90,000 population

Police post

1 for 0.5 lakh population

Socio-cultural Facilities

Police

Fire
1 fire station or sub fire station within 1 1 for 2 lakh population
- 3km

Table 6.35: Present and Future Demand and Supply Gaps Social Infrastructure

COMPONENTS

YEARS

Particulars

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

Hanumana
16773 17141
Projected
Population
Health Infrastructure Demand

17517

17901

18293

20299

22525

24995

27735

Particulars
Intermediate
Hospital
Demand
Intermediate
Hospital
Existing
Intermediate
Hospital Gaps

2011
0

2012
0

2013
0

2014
0

2015
0

2020
0

2025
0

2030
0

2035
1

Poly- clinic with 0


some
observation
beds Demand
Poly- clinic with 0
some
observation
beds Existing
Poly-clinic Gaps 0

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Nursing home, 1
Child
welfare
and maternity
centre with 25
30
beds
Demand
Nursing home, 1
Child
welfare
and maternity
centre with 25
30 beds Existing

Gap for Nursing


Home
Child
welfare
and
Maternity
Centre
No.
of
Dispensaries
Required
No.
of
Dispensaries
Existing
Dispensaries
Gap
No. of Beds
Required
at
CHC/
nursing
home
or
maternity
centre
Bed Req. @ 1
per 500 person
for
intermediate
hospital
Bed Req. @10
per poly-clinic
No. of Beds
Existing at CHC,
nursing home or
maternity
centre,
polyclinic

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

34

34

35

36

37

41

45

50

55

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

Bed
0
0
Requirement
Gaps
Educational Infrastructure Demand
Demand
of 4
4
Primary School

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No. of Primary 7
School Existing

Primary School -3
Gap

-3

-2

-2

-2

-1

Demand
for 2
Middle
&
Higher
Secondary
Schools
No. of Middle / 2
Higher
Secondary
Schools Existing

-1
0

-1
0

-1
0

-1
0

-1
0

-1
0

-1
0

Gap for Middle 0


0
and
Higher
Secondary
Schools
Integrated
1
1
School
with
Hostel Facility
Demand
Integrated
0
0
School
with
Hostel Facility
Existing
Gap
for 1
1
Integrated
School
with
Hostel Facility
Demand
for 0
0
colleges
Existing
1
1
Colleges
Colleges Gap
-1
-1
Demand
for 0
0
Technical
Institute
Existing
0
0
Technical
Institute
Gap
for 0
0
Technical
Institute
Recreational Facilities Demand

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Area Demand 29.36


for Recreational
Spaces
in
Hectares @ 14%
of Developed
Area

29.36

29.36

29.36

29.36

29.36

29.36

29.36

29.36

Parks
Hectares
Existing
Gap

0.58

0.58

0.58

0.58

0.58

0.58

0.58

0.58

28.78

28.78

28.78

28.78

28.78

28.78

28.78

28.78

28.78

Gap
for 3
Community
Room
Community Hall 1
and
Library
Demand

Community Hall 0
and
Library
Existing

Gap
for 1
Community Hall
& Library

in 0.58

Community
Room Demand
Community
Room Existing

Source: Population Projection & DMG Assessment as per UDPFI Guidelines

6.3.7 SWOT Analysis


Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH
Health

WEAKNESS
Health

There is a Community Health Centre in There is a lack of specialty/Intermediate


Hanumana which serves as a referral health
hospital and poly-clinic in the town only one
centre in ward no.9
community health centre is there with 30 beds
in ward no. 9.
Indian System of Medicine are also in practice
and popularly used by local population.
Poor people have limited affordability to pay
for health services.
Private medical clinics are also limited.
Education
Education
Hanumana has high literacy rate of 64.54%.
Schools are not having proper basic
requirement of drinking water and sanitation
Sufficient no. of primary (7) and higher
facilities for students, except private school.
secondary school (2) in wards 2,4,9 and 14
There is a lack of integrated school with hostel
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Recreation and Entertainment

facility and technical institute ITI in town.


Recreation and Entertainment

Plenty of land is available for the development of Town does not have any designated place as
recreational area such as park and playground in
park or playground as recreational area for the
the town especially in wards 4,5,10 and 14 due
citizens.
to presence of water bodies.
OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

Health

Health
There is scope for private and low cost health Government programmes are more focused on
Family Planning, RCH and Immunization etc.
infrastructure entry in Hanumana.
There is population without proper medical Government referral and medical facilities are
not properly used because of lack of doctors.
facilities.
State government commitment for health and The infrastructures in Government hospitals
are inadequate to handle the number of
education services.
patients.
High cost of health facilities by private sector
may hinder health service to poor.
Education

Education
State government commitment for education Lack of monitoring and regularization.
Lack of maintenance for educational
service.
institutions such as govt. school.
Right of children for free and compulsory
education act will provide free education for
poor children.
Recreation and Entertainment
Recreation and Entertainment
PPP possibilities are there to develop pond front. Lack of monitoring and regularization.
Community participation fund for social
development.

6.3.8 Issues
1. Health Sector
Town has insufficient facilities for poly-clinic and dispensary and doctors.
Town has no intermediate/specialty hospital and specialized health care facilities for which it
depends on nearest town Rewa.
2. Education Sector
The physical conditions of the schools are not good. During rainy season it becomes very
difficult to carry out the educational activities due to seepage/leakage problem.
Infrastructures in the schools are not well maintained, like parks and play grounds and
buildings. In wards 1, 2,4 and 9.
Schools are not having proper basic requirement of drinking water and sanitation facilities
for students.
Inadequate teaching staff in Government Schools.
3. Recreational and Entertainment Sector
Town does not have community gathering halls or rooms, public library etc. for the citizens.

6.3.9 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


1. Health Sector
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Extension of hospital situated in the premise of community health centre by constructing


multi story residence.
As there is poor infrastructure in health sector in the town, so care should be taken by
providing land for development of new intermediate/ multi-specialty hospitals, poly-clinics,
increase beds and no, of doctors in the existing hospital and health care centres.
Lacking of specialized medical care in the existing health care canters, so specialized medical
services should be facilitated in the town by constructing dispensaries.
Municipal body can initiate the different health campaigns throughout the year and create
the public awareness for prevention of diseases especially during monsoon season.
By providing proper health facilities in the city, health tourism can be promoted in the area
which will serve the region and generate economy for the city.
2. Education Sector
Facilitating provision of more number of schools at the primary and secondary education
level along with required infrastructure facilities for the sector.
Reconstruction or renovation of school buildings and other infrastructure which are in poor
conditions.
Enhancement and maintenance of infrastructure facilities like drinking water, toilet, solid
waste management etc. in schools and other educational institutions.
Public awareness programmes should be encouraged in urban poor areas as they are not
willing to educate their children.
Municipal body shall initiate the literacy campaigning and spread the awareness of
education especially in the slum region.
Municipal body shall initiate the awareness programmes related to Right to Education
especially for girls and its importance to all citizens to increase the literacy rate among the
female.
3. Recreational and Entertainment Sector
Municipal body shall identify the place and initiate the development of community room,
Rain Basera, community halls and public library in town for the citizens as per the norms.
Municipal body shall identify place and designate the same as parks and play grounds for the
resident coped with present and future development of town.
Municipal body shall identify the site for the development of Stadium/play ground for the
town.

Project Identification & Costing


Health Facilities
Most of the population is not served by this because of poor medical infrastructure facilities in terms of
hospital beds and doctors. So the following projects are identified for the overall development of the
sector
Table 6.36 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
H1
Extension of hospital situated in the premise of 150.00
Health Department,
health centre by constructing multi storied
building thereby extending the health facilities
H2
Construction of 1 Poly-clinic @10 no. of beds for 50.00
Health Department,
2035 in ward no. 14
Sub Total Cost (H)
200.00
Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

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Educational Facilities
Considering the emerging issues and potentials in the sector, the following projects are identified in the
education sector
Table 6.37 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

E1

Establishment of 1 no. of Integrated School with 500.00


Hostel Facility in ward no. 6

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

Establishment of 2 nos. of Informal and adult 10.00


literacy centres, Anganwadi centres in ward no 5&
10(@5 lakh each)

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

Construction of Polytechnic college/ Vocational 100.00


Training Institutes and ITIs in ward no. 1

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

Renovation of school buildings which are in bad 50.00


condition

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

E5

Provision of equipments and necessary 10.00


infrastructure like provision of toilets, safe
drinking water, kitchen shed and electricity etc. in
education institutions.

Nagar Parishad

E6

Establishment of Public Library (1 in no.) in ward 70.00


no. 4

Nagar Parishad

E2

E3

E4

Sub Total Cost (I)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

740.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

6.4

Environment

6.4.1 Flora and Fauna


As such there is no records found regarding the flora and fauna in the study area i.e. Hanumana Nagar
Parishad. The project roads run through agricultural land and settlement areas.
At regional level, the region is rich of valuable minerals, forests and wild animals. Variability in climatic
conditions brings about significant difference in the forest types of the state. There are four important
forest types viz. Tropical Moist, Tropical Dry, Tropical Thorn, Subtropical broadleaved Hill forests. The
status of the forests is reserved and protected forests and forests owned and maintained by villagers that
have no protected status.
The prevalent trees in the forests of Rewa District are Mango, Neem, Jamun Sagon, Sal, Tendu, Shishum,
Eucalyptus, Teak, Palas, Saja, Mahua bambaoo etc, The brushwood consists mainly of the species
Grewiazizyphus, Casearia, Antidesma, Woodfordia, Flueggia, Phyllanthus, Bosewellia and Buchanania
with occasional trees of mahua (Bassialatifolia). The Rewa District is famous for white tigers, bears,
panthers, sambar (Cervus unicolor), Chinkara (Gazellabenetii) and other species. Wild fowl of all classes
are common throughout its area.

6.4.2 Pollution Levels (Air, Water and Soil)


1. There is no monitoring facility for pollution level in Hanumana.

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2. Nearest water pollution monitoring centre is in Rewa but the monitoring of pollution level is done
by Pollution Control Board located in Rewa the District Headquarter.
3. But by a general feel we can say that since there are no industries and the region is surrounded
by agricultural land the main cause of pollution to the pond is the outfall of waste water of town
through drains.

6.4.3 City Green Spaces


As per the existing landuse 2011 the town has plenty of agricultural land but does not have any
designated and organized green space or open spaces for the citizens of town. According to the UDPFI
guidelines, the open spaces for parks and playgrounds/ green space should be around 12-14% of the total
developed area, which shows there is a lack of planned developed open spaces in the city.

6.4.4 Water Front Development and Conservation


Located at the centre of the town, ponds are the major source of water supply in the town. Apart from
the pond, there are two nallahs Amaiya Nallah and Naiya Nallah. Presently no initiatives have been
taken by the HNP for the well planned pond front development and both the Nallahs in the town. These
Kutcha Nallahs collect the waste water along with municipal waste from houses throughout the town.

6.4.5 SWOT Analysis


Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH
No industrial pollution as of now.
Good ambient air quality

OPPORTUNITY

WEAKNESS
Inadequate planning efforts for provision of green
spaces.
No environmental compliance system from urban
local body.
Lack of monitoring system for pollution control.

THREAT

States policy implementation for ecotourism in Lack of public awareness regarding environment
management.
Hanumana.
Dumping of municipal solid waste and discharge of
waste water into the pond.

6.4.6 Issues

There is no environmental compliance system at municipal level.


Lack of air, water and soil pollution monitoring facilities for pollution level.
Inadequate planning efforts regarding provision of green spaces for citizens.
Public health is under threat due to absence of basic infrastructure facilities.
Informal sectors and slums settlements in open areas.

6.4.7 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Development of designated and organized parks and playground in the town as per the
standards.
Conservation and plantation of appropriate tree species on the existing roadsides.

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Promotion of rainwater-harvesting and providing more open spaces for water recharge and
plantation at the planning stage for development schemes.
In order to control the environmental pollution, HNP shall initiate the awareness campaigns for
plantation and other pollution control strategies.
There is need of municipal level policy for urban greening of the town with review and
monitoring provisions.

Table 6.38: Goals & Services Outcomes for different Horizon Years

Sr. No.

Components

Clean and healthy environment

100%

Conserved natural environment - water bodies

100%

3
4

Eco-friendly vehicles
Disposal of treated sewage in nallahs

100%
100%

5
6

Desilting of nallahs
Incineration of bio-medical waste

100%

Implementation of norms/standards for


pollution control

100%

6.5

Horizon Period (2015 to 2035)

Heritage and Conservation

6.5.1 Identification of Tourist Spots at Local Level


At town level, Hanumana has no any heritage buildings and tourist destination. The Hanuman Mandir and
the Lakshmi Mandir is the only place in the city which generates attraction. Unfortunately, the town has
not been able to capitalize its potential in this sector as the site is in un- developed stage and lacks
sufficient and efficient modes of transportation, infrastructure services such as street lights, public
drinking water, public toilets, eating places etc. that can hold the tourist.

Figure 6.15: Famous Hanuman Temple

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Figure 6.16: Lord Shiva's Temple

Map: 6-6 Tourism in and around Hanumana Town


Table 6.5.1: List of Important Tourist/Destination Spots at Regional Level

Tourist

Distance

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Place/Desti
nation

from Town

Rewa

100km

Rewa Fort, Rewa Fort Museum; Venkat Bhawan Religious, Cultural,


Heritage
&
and Shiva Temple, Rani Talab Temple
Archaeological

Govindgarh

110Km

Govindgarh Fort and Lake

Gurh

87 Km

Big statue of God Shiva called "Bhairon Baba"; Religious


Famous Temple of "Shiv Ji & Alliad Gods"; Natural
Lake called "Kudia"; Famous Pond of "Rani Ka
Talab" & Maharua Ka Talab.

Adventure, Cultural,
Heritage
&
Archaeological

Prayag and 111 km


Allahabad

Sangam a place of religious importance and the Religious, Cultural,


Heritage
&
site for historic Kumbh Mela held every 12 years.
Archaeological
Allahabad Fort built in 1583 by Emperor Akbar,
stands on the banks of the Yamuna near the site of
confluence with the pond Ganges.

Varanasi

120 Km

A Holly City Temples and Ghats

Chitrakoot

190 Km

Chitrakoot is a town of religious, cultural, historical Religious, Cultural &


and archaeological importance situated in the Archaeological
Satna district in Bundelkhand region of Madhya
Pradesh. It is known for numerous temples and
sites mentioned in Hindu Mythology. Chitrakoots
spiritual legacy stretches back to legendary ages. It
was in these deep forests that Rama, Sita and his
brother Lakshmana spent eleven and half years of
their fourteen years of exile.

Madhav
150 Km
Garh Fort,
Vengkatesh
Temple and
Lord Shiva
Temple

The Madhav Garh Fort is situated near Satna City. Heritage & Religious
It is one of the ruined of the ancient which is
isolated and remained untouched.

Maihar

170 Km

Maihar has a temple by the name of sharda Devi Religious


Situated on the top of a hill about 5 km from the
centre of Maihar town. This temple is known for
its stairway of more than 1,000 steps. Millions of
devotees throng the temple throughout the year.

Khajuraho

260 Km

Khajuraho is a small town located in the Religious, Cultural &


Bundelkhand region of Madhya Pradesh and is Archaeological
famous for groups of Hindus and Jain Temples.
These temples are under UNESCO World Heritage

Religious

The Vengkatesh Temple is situated Satna City.


The Lord Shiva Temple few kilometres away from
the Satna city is situated at Brisinghpur is also a
famous and old temple in the region.

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Site for their beautiful and erotic rock carvings.
Khajuraho has the Vindhya range of mountains as
its beautiful backdrop. This makes Khajuraho a
more fascinating destination

Source: DMG Assessment

The above listed tourist spots such as Buddha Stupak & Rock Painting at Teonthar, Big statue of God
Shiva called "Bhairon Baba" at Gurh, Kyunti Water Fall etc. are in un-developed stage as they lacks
sufficient and efficient modes of transportation, infrastructure services - street lights, public drinking
water, public toilets, eating places etc.

6.5.2 Existing Regulations/Heritage Guidelines at the ULB and State Level


As stated earlier that as such there is no any structure/building of heritage importance in the town, the
Urban Local Body (Hanumana Nagar Parishad) does not have any proper guidelines laid for identification
and improvement of heritage structures. So there is a need to act in this regard and frame proper
guidelines for the declaration and maintenance of heritage structures in and around the city. For this the
guidelines of INTACH can be taken into account to formulate guidelines.
The tourism policy of Madhya Pradesh envisages creation of an environment conducive to attracting
increased private investment in the tourism sector and a more meaningful role for the Government.
Strategy for development of tourism in the State includes the following areas:
1. Improvement and creation of adequate basic infrastructure-land, road, water, electricity, toilet
facility etc.
2. Up-gradation and augmentation of accommodation, catering and recreational facilities.
3. Augmentation of transport facilities.
4. Marketing of destinations to ensure optimal use of infrastructure.
5. Establishment and strengthening institutions for the development of human resources.

6.5.3 Heritage Issues


The main issues related to heritage are:

As of now there is no any such heritage structure in the town; hence, there is lack of proper
guidelines for identification, conservation and maintenance of heritage structures.
Poor awareness among the local people about the heritage values of the structures.

6.5.4 Tourism Potential of the Town


The only potential that attracts population within the town is the Hanuman Temple. Apart from the
Hanuman Temple, there is lack of sufficient and efficient tourist sites in the town.

6.5.5 Possibility of Tourism Circuits


There is some major tourist spots/destination at the regional level. Tourist coming from Mirzapur, Patna
moves straight to Panna, Chhatarpur, Khajuraho, and Orccha through Hanumana. Thus, the Hanumana
town falls under KhajurahoPanna-Satna-Rewa-Mirzapur circuit.
At regional level tourism circuit can be developed on a theme based as given below

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Map: 6-7 Proposed Tourism Circuits at Regional Level

6.5.6 Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI & UNESCO Guidelines


There are no comparative guidelines available for tourism and heritage structure. However, the analysis
has been done for the tourism and heritage structure based on the other cities experiences and certain
assumptions.

6.5.7 SWOT Analysis


Based on the existing situational analysis and extensive participatory consultation with primary and
secondary stakeholders, Citys strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats have been assessed.
Table below presents the SWOT analysis at city level.
STRENGTH
The town falls under KhajurahoPanna-Satna-RewaMirzapur circuit.
Presence of Hanumana temple in ward no. 10 near pond.

WEAKNESS
Absence of Heritage Structure.
Lack of Infrastructure for tourism.
Lack of efficient mode of transport.
No rail connectivity.
OPPORTUNITY
THREAT
Hanuman temple can be developed as a tourist Lack of maintenance of the ponds and
destination in ward no.
temples in wards 4,5,10 and 14.
Improvement of the major corridor for better
connection with other towns like NH-7 and other arterial
roads.
Beautification of the ponds by developing gardens and
parks along it in wards 4,5,10 and 14.
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6.5.8 Issues

Town has not identified its heritage and tourism potential.


There are lacks of infrastructure support in the development of tourism.

6.5.9 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Facilitating infrastructure in terms of good means of transport, hotels and resorts to attract
tourists.
Hanumana can be developed as a rural tourist centre.

Project Identification & Costing


Presently the tourism industry is lacking infrastructure facilities and there is lack of active recreational
space in the city. With a goal to enhance the tourism activities in the city the following projects are
identified for improvement of the sector
Table 6.5.2 Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

T1

Development, beautification, plantations along 150.00


the pond in ward no. 4, 10 & 13.

Sub Total Cost (I)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
Tourism Dept. Govt. of
M.P.

150.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

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CHAPTER 7
Special Paper:
Local Tourist Circuit Upgradation

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7.
7.1

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Special Paper on Local Tourist Circuit Upgradation


Background

Madhya Pradesh offers outstanding opportunity to indulge in various tourism options such as cultural
tourism, heritage tourism, adventure tourism, wildlife tourism and many more. A variety of traditions in
each of Madhya Radishs four geographical and cultural regions-Malwa, Nimad, Bagelkhand and
Bundelkhand have added color to the State's rich cultural tapestry, making it a many splendored land.
There are many deserving tourist destinations in the State widely acclaimed for its rich cultural heritage
sites and wonders. Heritage tourism is one of the most popular options of tourism appealing tourists
from all over the world. Hanumana place is known for Hanuman Temple. The temple is 150 year old.
The myth about temple is lord Hanuman born here. The place was very famous in 1940 to 1970.
Hanumana falls under local tourist circuit of Hanumana Deotalab Bahuti Water fall Rewa circuit.
Despite it ideal location within the tourism circuit with rich inventory of tourism resources, this region
Lacks Tourism infrastructure such as Tourist Information Centers, transportation facilities, public
conveniences such as toilets, refreshment centers, information Centre etc. Further, being located in
isolation in terms of development, the region is facing challenges, which directly and indirectly curb the
growth of tourism. The existing infrastructure, safety & Security, local awareness and others are the
major hindrance for the development of the tourism in this region.
The Hanumana region receives very few numbers of tourists in comparison to other destination of
tourism circuits. Despite its strategic location within the circuit, city has not been developed as a nodal
Centre as base city to cater tourist for its facilities. The existing infrastructure is inadequate to support
tourism in the region and it needs urgent up gradation. The region has wide range of tourism products,
which need to be integrated and made an intra-circuit to increase the duration of stay of the Tourists in
the region. Mauganj city has great potential in the region to cater tourist from the circuit i.e. Hanumana
Deotalab Bahuti Water fall Rewa circuit. Integrating with other destination, Hanumana can be
converted as a transit zone between Mauganj and Deotalab or Bahuti Water fall.
Hence, immense potential for developing Hanuman as one of the religious node with Hanuman Temple,
Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple, Lakshmi Temple and Pond located in the central part of the town near
hanuman Temple, need to be fully exploited. In terms of improving the tourism product, in the short term
quick gains can be made by developing the destination and providing basic infrastructure facilities at
various tourist locations and at city level with high potential, which are already well connected and have
a reasonable infrastructure in place.

7.2

Madhya Pradesh Tourism and Heritage Policy

The State Tourism Policy, Heritage Tourism Policy and Eco and Adventure Tourism Policies of the State
supported with initiatives towards strengthening of infrastructure and facilities at places of tourist
interests is an important indicator of commitment of the GoMP to create an environment conducive for
attracting increased private investment in the tourism sector. In accordance with the aims and objectives
of the Tourism Policy of the State and the provisions made towards development of tourism sector, the
Government of MP, Department of Tourism has issued a Policy for the Allotment of Government Land for
the Development of Tourism in the State.
The Madhya Pradesh Department of Tourism has, to date, sought to develop the tourism potential of the
State by involving itself in three major activities: Providing decent accommodation in areas of tourism
interest, operating a transport fleet of coaches, cars and Gypsies, and organizing package tours. Publicity
and marketing of tourist destinations and facilities has also been a major thrust activity. Apart from these
efforts undertaken by the Government, the private sector has also contributed by way of investment in
hotels, transport, and marketing of some important tourist destinations in the State. However, the efforts
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of the Government and the private sector have not been dovetailed into a common developmental
programme, with the result that there has been overemphasis at certain venues, while some other
important places and activities have been neglected.
The Tourism Policy envisages creation of an environment conducive to attracting increased private
investment in the tourism sector, and a more meaningful role for the Government. The focus will be on i)
Improvement and creation of adequate basic infrastructure- land, road, water, electricity etc. ii) Up
gradation and augmentation of accommodation, catering and recreational facilities, iii) Augmentation of
transport facilities, iv) Marketing of destinations to ensure optimal use of infrastructure, v) Establishing
and strengthening institutions for the development of human resources, vi) Evolving suitable policies for
increasing foreign exchange earnings, vii) Promotion of the arts and crafts of the State.
One of the objectives of the Tourism Policy of Madhya
Pradesh announced in 1995 was to convert the heritage
wealth of the State i.e. forts, palaces, havelies and kothis
into heritage hotels. Later, Madhya Pradesh Heritage
Tourism Policy-2002 also envisages and set urgent needs for
restoration of these beautiful buildings are unable to attract
tourists in large numbers.

7.3

Places of Tourist Interest in and Around


the City

In Hanumana, there is Hanuman Temple, Lakshmi Temple,


Pardeshwar Mahadev temple and Rani Talab etc. are major
destinations in the town which can be developed from
tourism point of view. Town is very near to Bahuti water fall
which has a different scenic beauty. Deotalab is also located
near to the Hanumana town which is famous for Mahadev
temple. Rewa, the district headquarter is also near to the
town but unfortunately, Hanumana town is not able to
attract the tourist in the lack of tourist infrastructure.

Figure 7.1 Hanuman Temple

Hanuman Temple
Hanumana place is known for Hanuman Temple. The
temple is 150 year old. The myth about temple is lord
Hanuman born here. The place was very famous in 1940 to
1970.

Figure 7.2 Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple

Hanuman temple is located in the south eastern part of the


Hanumana town.
Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple
Pardeshwar Mahadev temple is also located in the northern
side of Hanumana town. This town is beautiful and located
on National Highway 7 which connect town to Mirzapur in
northern side and Mauganj in southern side. This temple
attract tourist coming from Mirzapur and Rewa.
Unfortunately this temple has lack of infrastructure and is not
able to attract tourist in large numbers.

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Figure 7.3 Rani Gujarat Talab

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The town have lakshmi temple and Rani Talab which is famous but the condition of both these
destinations is very bad. The town is also a hub of education centre in this region.
Mahadev Temple
Mahadev temple is another temple in Deotalab at a distance of 17 kilometer on Rewa road.
Rani ka Gujra Talab
Rani Gujarat Talab is beautiful place in northern part of the Mauganj town. Hanuman Mandir is also
located near to this Talab which enhance its aesthetic view.
Bahuti water fall
Bahuti Falls is on the Odda River as it rushes down the edge
of the Rewa Plateau to join the Bihad River, which is a
tributary of Tamsa or Tons River. It is near Chachai Falls. It
has a height of 142 meters (466 ft).
The Bahuti Falls is an example of a nick point caused by
rejuvenation. Knick point, also called a nick point or simply
nick, represents breaks in slopes in the longitudinal profile
of a river caused by rejuvenation. The break in channel
gradient allows water to fall vertically giving rise to a
waterfall.

Figure 7.4 Bahuti water fall

Rewa Fort and Museum Complex


Fort Rewa was the seventeenth-century citadel of the
Baghel Dynasty of Rewa, a former princely state in
northeast India. The fort served as the administrative and
spiritual centre of the state, with palatial living quarters
and temples. With the end of princely rule, the palace
ceased to serve its original function and fell into a state of
neglect over a period of forty years. The roof was damaged,
the mud brick of the walls
deteriorated, and the former parade
ground became a derelict space. The
conservators aimed to restore the fort
as a tourist attraction, while
simultaneously constructing a public
school within its precincts. The roof
has been carefully repaired and the
Allahabad brickwork and lime mortar
replaced where necessary. The royal
audience halls have been reopened as
a museum. The fort got official
entries for UNESCO -2009 Awards for
Culture Heritage Conservation.

Figure 7.5 Rewa Fort

The Rewa fort is a typical module of medieval architecture replicates different type of era and its
architecture, thus making it very unique. The Durbar Hall is the most attractive portion of the fort. Pili
Kothi is an outhouse which today hosts the Baghel museum, which is a private collection of stone, arms,
Throne and silver Gallery, White Tiger Gallery, Crockery & Cutleries, Chandelier Gallery, Paintings & Photo
Gallery etc. The gallery has collection of idols and painting of different gods, goddesses & his other
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companions attending the marriage, singing & dancing ladies to welcome the marriage party. In the fort,
major attractions are: The stuffed white tiger- Mohan; Gold & silver elephant seat (Hauda); double barrel
.22 & pen pistol; Chinese Vases and a lot more for any arms, art & history lover.
Pili Kothi
This building was made by Maharaja Vyankat
Raman Singh in 1912 for his beloved daughter. This
building is called Pili Kothi due to its colour and the
area surrounding it is called Pili Kothi campus. This
is building also known as New Kothi. Presently it is
with Maharaj Pushpraj Singh, in which he ran the
Baghela museum for 10 years, but after the
renovation of the Fort Rewa the museum is
transferred there and this building is used for
official purpose by Woman & Child Department on
rent on the 1st and a heritage marriage hall on the
ground floor.

7.4

Figure 7.6 Pili Kothi

Arts & Crafts

Handicrafts / Art crafts & Other Human Resources in the Region:Madhya Pradesh is also known for its carpets where Rewa is one of the centres in the state. The toys
made out of Beatle nut are very rare and famous in this area, which cant be got anywhere else. Except
these there are many women who are involved in bangle making and other artistic works. Ahir (Yadav) &
Kali are the main folk dances of this area. Most of the dishes made in this area are based on dals (Lenten)
and hence very nutritious and less spicy in character.
Existing Status of Major Tourist Destinations
Cleanliness in the surrounding areas is not been taken care of which effects the less number of tourists
visit the place. Landscaping, where ever open spaces are available has not been done and the spaces
been left unseen. Haphazard vegetative growth provides negative impression on the tourists. No safety
measure like provision of guards on most of the temples has been taken.
Direct discharge of sewage from domestic sources, not connected to treatment plants; eventually make
its way into existing water body i.e. Rani Ka Gujra Talab.
Lack of public utilities, proper information, water facility, refreshment counters and above all parking
spaces in or around most of the temple complexes affects the number of visitors at such places.
Table 7.1: Assessment of tourist destination in & around the city

Sr.
No

a.

b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Assessment
Parameters

Major Tourist Destination/sites in and around the City


Hanuman
Temple,
Hanumana

Agency responsible for Nagar


protection
Parishad
Hanumana
Accessibility/ Connectivity Good
Visibility
of
the Good
Building/Sites
Condition of access road
Good
Site displayed Signage
Fair
Cleanliness
of Fair

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Pardeshwar
Mahadev Temple, Bahuti Water
Mahadev
Deotalab
fall
Temple,
Hanumana
Nagar Parishad Nagar Panchayat MP Tourism
Hanumana
Deotalab
Department
Good
Good

Good
Good

Good
Excellent

Good
Fair
Fair

Good
Fair
Fair

Good
Fair
Fair
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Surroundings
g.
h.
i.
j.

Landscaping
Safety & Security
Overall Maintenance
Parking Facilities
Wheeler, Bus, other

Fair
Poor
Good
2 Available

k.
Public Toilets
l.
Refreshment stalls
m. Information Kiosks
n.
Drinking Water Facility
Source: DMG Consulting, Pvt. Ltd.

Not Available
Available (Pvt)
Not Available
Available

Fair
Poor
Good
Available

Not Available
Available (Pvt)
Not Available
Available

Fair
Good
Fair
Fair
Good
Good
Available, but not Available, but
designated
not
designated
Available
Not Available
Available (Pvt)
Available (Pvt)
Not Available
Not Available
Available
Not Available

Presently, no major efforts have been initiated by the government to encourage the tourism in on these
sites. It requires immediate attention to develop the tourism infrastructure on these sites.
Tourist Arrival
Tourism has been identified as one of the key drivers of growth by the MP government. Eight million
domestic tourists and 160,000 foreigners visited the state in 2005-06. The government has approved
$12.2 million for development of 17 tourist locations across the state and is also making concrete efforts
to improve air connectivity to other states. It has taken initiatives to promote eco and adventure tourism
and is keen on promoting medical/ herbal tourism in association with private parties.
There is no record for tourist visiting various sites in and around Hanumana. There is no entrance ticket
system prevailing either at the main entrance of tourist destination or at any of the temples. This is the
major handicap in estimating the accurate tourist influx at Mauganj and Rewa.
Despite, presence of historical building and temple, the city does not fall within any tourism circuit in the
state. Local Tourism prospect of Hanumana (Rural Tourism Circuit) can be viewed with the development
of city infrastructure and existing tourism destination to make a complete circuit with the HanumanaMauganj-Deotalab-Bahuti waterfall-Rewa.

7.5

Assessment of Tourism Supported Infrastructure

Tourism Development of any destination cannot be accomplished without proper development of


support infrastructure facilities including accessibility, accommodation, water supply, sanitation, power
and drainage. In Hanumana city, very limited infrastructure is developed. Except approach road, small
shops and drinking water none of the infrastructure are available like Toilet facility, Solid waste
Management, Street Lightning etc. at the tourist spots.
Transportation
There is good network of roads connecting all the major parts of the state with Hanumana. The National
Highway 7 connects Hanumana with major cities of Madhya Pradesh. Hanumana is not directly
connected to railway line. The nearest railway station is Mirzapur Railway Station at a distance of 68 Km.
followed by Rewa the District Headquarter (100 Km.) and Allahabad (111 kilometers).The nearest airport
is Rewa airport which is approximately 101 Km. from Hanumana via Raipur (Madhya Pradesh) through
N.H. 7 followed by Bamrauli (Defense Air Base) in Uttar Pradesh at a distance of 124 Km. and Satna
(approximately 144 kms.) which has an airstrip, however not in use for regular fights. The Varanasi a holly
city is the nearest airport for civil aviation (approximately 143 kms.) from the Hanumana via Gopiganj
through N.H. 34 & N.H. 2.

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Accommodations (Regional Level)


At town level, Hanumana have only one Dharmshala and one hotel facility to accommodate the peoples
or tourists. But at district headquarter Rewa; there are nearly 497 beds in 24 various categories of
Accommodation. Besides this, the Rewa city has nearly 5-6 Dharmshalas, which accommodates
approximately 400-500 people in total. A three Star level hotel namely Hotel Rewa Raj Vilas (owned by
Maharaja Rewa) is situated in the heart of city.
Suggested Action Programmes
Key Concern Areas for Tourism Development
Key concern areas for enhancement of tourism development in Hanumana have been identified from the
analysis of existing tourist scenarios and overview of SWOT analysis. The following table shows the Key
concern areas.
Table 7.2: Key Concern Areas and related issues

Issues

Limited
inflow

Tourist

Unexplored Religious
and Heritage Assets

On
site/offsite
deficiency
of
infrastructure

Remarks
Continued tourism related
infrastructure constraints
Information Constraints

Suggestions
Specifically define potential area of
tourist attractions where there are
wide ranges of tourism products.

Enhance the attractiveness by


augmenting core activities by
providing additional activities.
Focus is to be given to identify new
tourism products
Transverse tourism circuit linking
destinations of Mauganj with other
major tourist spots in Rewa and
other districts.

Once
Hanuman
temple
of
Hanumana and Mahadev temple in
Deotalab was very famous for its
religious importance in the state,
now they have almost lost their
charm due to poor maintenance
and Lack of tourism supported
infrastructure.
Unexplored marketing
Lack of diversified tourism activities
On site infrastructure is inadequate
Most of the sites are not equipped
with basic tourism infrastructure
facilities such as parking, en-route
facility etc.
Inadequate road widths and poor
condition of roads connecting
various tourist destinations.
Hanumana with its local tourist
circuit can boost as the place of the
religious tourism and scenic beauty
in India.

Improve Connectivity and access by projects covering roads, rail, and


air.

Publicity by Brochure, audio-visual,


literature for various market
segments within the country and
also abroad. Development of
tourist facilities at these localities.
Data Collection / information
collection by ticketing at entry
points of all the potential sites.
Information brochures bulletins
and package tours to be published.
Private partner can bring in
activities such as boating facilities,
jogging track, childrens park,
theme park, water parks, and
nature walks etc. around the Rani

Lack of Publicity

Inadequate
information
dissemination

Limitation in tourist traffic /


monitoring tourist database and
database Management

Lack of Rani Talab


(Near
Hanuman
Temple)
Conservation

Contamination in pond water


because town doesnt have
drainage system and treatment
plan. There is also absence of solid
waste management.

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Pond which would help in accruing


revenue all the year round.
There should be a planned
drainage system and solid waste
management in the Hanumana
city.

Tourism Development Option & Strategies


Despite its strategic location within the tourism circuit, Hanumana city has not been developed as a nodal
centre or as a base city to cater tourist for its facilities. In the tourism circuit of Mirzapur Rewa Panna
Chhatarpur Chitrakoot, Panna is a major Tourist node in the region after Chitrakoot and Chhatarpur.
Hanumana can play a tourist node or base town to support tourist with its supported infrastructure.
Presently, infrastructure is inadequate to support tourism in the region, and it needs urgent upgradation.
Further, an integrated circuit can be formed considering Rewa, Deotalab, Mauganj and Hanumana as part
of religious tourism to support as base facilitation centre. The region has wide range of tourism products,
which need to be integrated and made an intra-circuit to increase the duration of stay of the Tourists in
the region. Hanumana with Hanuman temple and Pardeshwer Mahadev temple has great potential in the
region to cater tourist from the circuit. Some of the destinations like Rani Gujarat Talab (Mauganj),
Mahadev temple (Deotalab), Bahuti water fall etc. can be raised to the status of sub - nodes, with
adequate improvement of infrastructure and development of new tourism product.

Figure 7-1: Major Tourist circuits around the Hanumana city

In the nearest towns of Hanumana, Rewa is one of the art and craft centre in the region and also a major
city for providing lodging and boarding facilities.
At present city is devoid of basic tourism supported infrastructure such as tourism information centre,
basic amenities at destinations within the city as well as accommodation of attracting high end tourism.
Some associated cultural activity areas like Rani Talab and Bahuti waterfall area can be developed which
will form an integrated cultural and natural tourist circuit. The immense potential for developing
Hanumana as one of the destination with heritage and religious destination, it needs to be fully exploited.
In terms of improving the tourism product, in the short term quick gains can be made by developing the
destination and providing basic infrastructure facilities at locations with high potential, which are already
well connected and have a reasonable infrastructure in place.
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The overall tourism development of Hanumana Region can be segmented into two levels
a) Major Tourism Circuits -Though there are many tourism attractions scattered around the Hanumana
City linking Rewa, Deotalab, and Hanumana etc.
b) Minor Tourism Circuits- The Cultural (Heritage) and religious tourism destinations located in and
around the city includes Hanuman Temple (Hanumana), Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple (Hanumana), Rani
Talab (Hanumana), Rani Gujarat Talab (Mauganj), Mahadev temple (Deotalab) and other temple and
heritage can be integrated within this Mega Tourism Project.
Hanumana as a tourist needs to be a co-ordinated effort to improve the quality and range of public realm
spaces, heritage sites and temples and other facilities. The emphasis of this is on Hanumana Nagar
Parishad for overall development of the city.
Overall Development of Hanuman Town- Hanumana has great potential for tourism development.
Planned tourism development in Hanumana would significantly increase domestic and foreign tourist
arrivals and attract their long duration visits. This would result in their higher spending for various
facilities and services within the region. This would directly boost up trade and commerce, transport
sectors and other service sectors. Studies show that tourism is one sector having the highest multiplier
effect. Tourism can trigger off development in many supporting sectors and create a large number of
employment opportunities.

7.6

Recommended Tourism Development Proposals

Considering all these aspects, the activities can be well planned and organised to enhance tourist
attraction by providing;

a) Site attractiveness /enhancement Projects


Conservation of Hanuman Temple and development of basic amenities to the tourist.
Development of tourist infrastructure at Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple, Rani Talab etc.
Development of tourist infrastructure at Bahuti waterfall.
Provide large open areas and street furniture in the city.

b) Additional attractiveness
Waterfront Development
Shopping arcade with Cafeteria selling art materials, dance materials, other essential articles for
students, schools & visitors.

c) Site specific critical infrastructure project


A comprehensive Master Plan of the area needs to be prepared.
Provision of designated paid parking areas for tourist buses, cars and other vehicles.
General landscape plan for the area
Design and location for every component of street furniture

d) Development Guidelines and control


Programmes based on development guidelines and also enforcement controls.

e) Marketing
Defining Tourism Circuit in the State, adding Hanumana as one of the cultural centre.

Action Programme
The action program aims to specify and define potential areas of tourist attractions where wide ranges of
tourism products can be provided, enhancing the attractiveness by augmenting existing core activities by
providing additional activities and improve connectivity and access to already tourist attraction at a
subdued level. The objective is to support regenerate and upgrade the existing attraction through
augmenting core activities by providing additional activities.
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Development of Hanuman Temple Area and Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple Area- Hanuman Temple area
is to be developed as an integrated cultural zone and this will attract tourists.
Construction of public convenience and safe drinking water facilities within the temple
complex
Construction of Parking for tourist vehicles
Establishing `Light and Sound shows
Construction of Entrance Gate: The entrance Gate of monument, which helps to form the
first impression of what, is inside. An artistically designed gateway by incorporating
architectural elements should be provided at the site.
City Level Green spaces and Parks
The City lacks in proper green spaces and the presently there is no park. There is need of park
development.
Establishment of Regional Park- Regional Park may be developed at Rani Talab because it is also near to
Hanuman temple and it is also centrally located. The landscape may incorporate meandering pathways,
seating places, concealed low-intensity lighting, etc. The facilities will also include Refreshment centre,
Toilets, drinking water facilities and Landscaped Garden etc.
Enhancement and Up-gradation of City Level Infrastructure
i.
Designated Parking facilities
a. Provision of designated paid parking areas for tourist buses, cars and other vehicles.
b. Provision of designated taxi and auto stands in at least 2 or 3 locations in the central
area.
ii.
Clock rooms and pay - use toilets for men and women at a minimum of 3 locations by the side
Construct pay & use toilets in places of public assembly and also in tourist locations. It should be made
mandatory for all shopping areas and restaurants having more than a specified built up area to provide
public toilet facilities, which may also be maintained on, pay & use basis. The major roads may also be
provided with wayside coin operated toilets, at least in major urban centers. The models adopted by
Shulabh Sauchalaya in many towns and cities are worth mentioning in this context. The local selfgovernments, both urban and rural, should be made to think and act on these lines.
iii.
General landscape plan for the area
Charming garden with lush green landscape will add elegance to the whole town. The tourist complexes
should be properly landscaped in a manner compatible with the environmental character of the
surroundings. No construction should commence without having secured the consent of the appropriate
authority for the provision of infrastructural services, i.e. electricity, telephone, road access, water, etc.
iv.
Design and location for every component of street furniture
Designed Electrical & telephone poles in the area should be replaced with artistically designed beautiful
ancient looking poles. Stone Benches with shade. The benches in the heritage area should be artistically
designed.
v.
Tourist Facility & Information Centre
Establish tourist facility centre including tourist information centre, toilet and drinking water facilities and
conventional shops near Hanuman temple and Pardeshwer Mahadev temple.
SWOT Analysis
Strength
Weakness
Hanumana falls under a tourist circuit
Non- maintained Hanuman temple and Rani
which has potential to hold the tourist
Talab.
some time.
No proper connectivity to some of the tourist
Number of tourist increasing with time.
centers.
Poor existing infrastructure.
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Opportunity
Threat
Hanumana got good road connectivity
Un-maintained heritage site might result into
and it is also near to Mirzapur Railway
ruined structures.
Station.
Inadequate infrastructure & connectivity may
Hanumana has famous Hanuman
leads to decline in tourist flow.
temple and Pardeshwer Mahdev
temple which will attracts tourist.

7.7

Best Practice

Box: 7.1: Heritage Conservation Gopher meal Restoration & Reuse as Craft centre
Background:
Bhopal is the capital of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and the administrative headquarters
of Bhopal District and Bhopal Division. The city was the capital of the former Bhopal state. Bhopal is also
known as the Lake City for its various natural as well as artificial lakes and is one of the greenest cities in
India.
Gohar Mahal is situated in the banks of the magnificent Upper Lake. It is one of the beautiful palaces in
Bhopal. Gohar Mahal is an architectural marvel, which presents
a
perfect
blend
of
Hindu
and
Mughal
Architecture.
It
is
constructed
by
Kudasia
Begum
in
1819 AD and due to un- maintained conditions; it has
become degraded and dilapidated.
Key Components of the Projects:
To recover that condition detailed documentation and condition assessment of the building has been
done and prepared a restoration and reuse proposal by INTACH. It also involved community in the redevelopment process to know their views and perception.
The palace has been restored and maintained the original fabric and construction details of the buildings.
New functions will be introduced to convert the complex into an Urban Haat to showcase the local craft
and a cuisine. This project has been supported by DC H&H, Government of India and MPHHVN, Govt. of
Madhya Pradesh.
Lesson Learned:
Complete participation of the community at all stages.
Conservation as a tool to promote development and improve living standards.
Partnerships with national and local government bodies as well as with international funding
agencies.

7.8

Summary of Projects

Table 7.3: list of main projects and sub-projects.

Sr. No.

Projects

1
a
b

Development of Hanuman temple area and Pardeshwar Mahadev temple area


Preparation of Conservation Plan
Construction of shopping arcade

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c
d
e
2
a
b
c
d
e
2
a

3
a
b
c
d
e
f

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Construction of public convenience and safe drinking water facilities


Construction of Parking for tourist vehicles
Establishing `Light and Sound
Development of Rani Talab
Preparation of Conservation Plan for Rani Talab.
Purification
and refilling
Construction
of shopping
arcadeof water in Rani Talab.
Construction of public convenience and safe drinking water facilities
Construction of Parking for tourist vehicles
Establishing `Light and Sound
City Level Green spaces and Parks
Establishment of Regional Park at Rani GujraTalab area including landscaped open area
for stage and assembly area for gatherings, dinners, performances etc. including fitting
and fixture of sitting and lighting.
Tourism Supported Infrastructure in the Mauganj City and Bahuti water fall
Construction of Designated Parking facilities for taxi stand and tourist Vehicle
Establishment of Public Convenience
Design and location for every component of street furniture, signage
Tourist Facility & Information Centre- Establish tourist facility centre including tourist
information centre, toilet and drinking water facilities and conventional shops.
Construction of Cafeteria, Restaurants, toilets, shops, etc.
Security /Police Cabins

Project Identification & Costing


Presently the tourism industry is lacking infrastructure facilities and there is lack of active recreational
space in the city. With a goal to enhance the tourism activities in the city the following projects are
identified for improvement of the sector
Table 17-2: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

T1

Development, beautification, plantations along 150.00


the pond in ward no. 4, 10 & 13.

Sub Total Cost (I)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
Tourism Dept. Govt. of
M.P.

150.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

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CHAPTER 8
Existing Institutional Framework
For Development

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8.
8.1

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

EXISTING INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPMENT


Urban Local Body Structure

The main organization in the town is the Hanumana Nagar Parishad which provides all the civic services,
levies local taxes and maintains registers of births and deaths. The municipality is primarily funded by
local grants and levy of property tax.

Chart: 8-1Institutional Setup Hanumana Nagar Parishad

Table 8.1: Power and Functions of Hanumana Nagar Parishad

Law and Application

Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Act, 1961

Administrative Authority

Urban Administration & Development Directorate (UADD)

Executive Authority

Chairman, Chief Municipal Officer

Functions

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slum improvement and urban poverty alleviation


provision and maintenance of roads, sanitation, solid waste
services, fire services, urban forestry, street lighting, parking lots,
parks & burials
protect the environment, promote cultural, educational,
aesthetic, ecological activities
safeguarding the interests of weaker sections of the community
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-

provision of vital statistics

Administrative Powers

to make byelaws (with approval of State Government)


to borrow money (with approval of State Government)
to acquire, hold and dispose of property
to enter into contracts
to prepare budget
establishment of Municipal Council Fund

Revenue Powers

To raise property, trades, betterment, deeds and advertisements


taxes. Property taxes to be based on annual value of property
and be updated every 5 years.

Limitations on powers

rules for imposition of taxes require approval of the State


Government
State Government may remedy, abolish, impose, raise or modify
a municipal tax
bye-laws must be confirmed by the State Government
State Government may make rules and regulations (including
model rules)

Constraints Identified

lack of autonomy over personnel management, training,


appointments and promotions
limited powers to enforce penalties, fines too low and civil
proceedings too lengthy
Quash Judicial Power , no power to prosecute

Source: Hanumana Nagar Parishad

8.2

Town and Country Planning Department

The main function and activity of Town & Country planning are governed under MP Nagar Tatha Gram
Nivesh Adhiniyam, 1973 and rules prepared there under e.g. MP Nagar Tata Gram Nivesh Niyam 1975
and MP Bhumi Vikas Niyam 1984.
The main functions are: preparation of Town Development Plan, Review Evaluation and Modification of
existing Development Plan, Preparation of Regional Development Plan, Monitoring and Enforcement of
various schemes such as Integrated Development Plan of Small and Medium Towns (IDSMT) and Urban
Infrastructure Development scheme for Small & Medium Towns (UIDSSMT), Control on unauthorized
development in towns and functions of State Nodal Agency for National Urban Information System
Scheme.
The activities of the department include preparation of development plan for investment areas of towns,
preparation of regional plans for investment regions, control and inspection of planning for uniform
development of small and medium-sized cities, development of infrastructure of towns, guidance in
execution of development plans, check on unauthorized development of cities, guidance in policy making
to development authorities/ special zone development authorities/ housing board and other institutions,
guidance and assistance to state government and other institutions for management/ land planning/
selection of place and state nodal agency for nation urban information.

8.3

Development Authority

In Hanumana town there is no Development Authority right now.

8.4

Public Health Engineering Department

Public Health Engineering Department (PHED) is one of the major departments of the state of Madhya
Pradesh as it is not only responsible for the provision of the public health but also carries the water
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supply and sewerage and sanitation projects in entire state. Major infrastructure projects under urban
infrastructure are implemented by public health engineering department both in the urban and rural
areas.

8.5

Madhya Pradesh Housing Board

The Madhya Pradesh Housing Board had been set up by the government of Madhya Pradesh as a
corporate body under the 1972 Madhya Pradesh Griha Nirman Mandal Adhiniyam Act. The Madhya
Pradesh Housing Board is the only housing board in India that does not receive any subsidy from the
government. The main objective of the housing board in Madhya Pradesh is to provide housing and basic
accommodation to the needy people in the state. In the state of Madhya Pradesh, the Madhya Pradesh
Housing Board is the single largest builder and developer of real estate. The housing board contributes
around 10,000 plots and 6,000 houses per year to the housing stock in the state. It has invested around
Rs. 2,000 crores in the construction and housing sector.
The various objectives of the Madhya Pradesh Housing Board are:

To construct houses for the various sections of the society that is the low, middle, and the high
income groups
To make various schemes that provide financial help to the high and middle income groups in the
purchase of houses
To select the sites where houses are to be constructed and to decide the various facilities that are
to be provided in the houses

The various activities of the Madhya Pradesh housing board are:

To develop the infrastructure


To construct public and office utility complexes
To construct hotels, public co-operative, and hospitals
To develop community, sports, and leisure projects

The Madhya Pradesh Housing Board has been successful to a large extent in catering to the
accommodation needs of the people of Madhya Pradesh. However, there still exists significant scope for
improvement and the state government is making all possible efforts to ensure that the infrastructure
provided by the Madhya Pradesh Housing Board is efficient and utilitarian.

8.6

Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board

Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board (MPCCB) - The Board has been vested with considerable
authority and responsibility under various environment legislation to prevent the pollution. M.P.
Pollution Control Board presently looks after the implementation of following Acts:

Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1974


Water (Prevention & control of Pollution) Cess Act, 1977
Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1981
Environmental Protection Act, 1986 (certain sections)
Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991

The main objective of Board is to maintain water, air and soil in healthy and usable condition for various
purposes. There are 10 Regional Offices, 4 Sub Regional, 3 Single Window System, 2 Monitoring Centre
equipped with trained personnel and sophisticated instruments, are constantly keeping watch on
environmental activities in the state to attain the objectives.
Major functions of the boards are to reduce, control and monitor the state environmental pollution in
terms of air, water and soil. It also provides several consents for industries to establish and operate in
order to maintain the environmental compliance within the state.

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8.7

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Role of Private Sector in Infrastructure Service Provision

There is no role of private sector in service delivery mechanism or infrastructure creation at Hanumana.
The role of private sector is restricted to social sector - education and health care in a limited manner.
Even outsourcing of activities such as street light provision, solid waste collection and transportation
which are common among small municipalities is not practiced at Hanumana.

8.8

8.9

Issues
Inadequate staff in Hanumana Nagar Parishad.
Absence of private sector roles in provision of infrastructure service and in their delivery
mechanism.

City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


Balance sheet preparation should be started to strength the financial and governance system.
Computerization of the system which mainly includes three things:
o Financial and account
o Workshop: Solid Waste management & Street lightening
o Technical Development: In Water supply, roads networking etc.
Implementation of E-governance with IT applications like GIS, MIS etc.
User charges should be applied to recover O&M cost.
Basic services to the poor and security of tenure at affordable prices
Municipal Council need to gear themselves for meeting future challenges in service delivery.
Therefore, they need to initiate a process of transition by adopting various organization
management principles such as improved accounting techniques, monitoring and evaluation of
projects (including social audit), and improved budgeting methods.
Focus on developing the skills of municipal staff on a regular basis. Human resources are the key
to efficient service delivery in any organization.
Decentralization of functions: Decentralization of municipal functions, particularly in service
delivery, citizen interface and planning will greatly enhance the operational capabilities of
Municipal Council.
Special budget should be incorporate for the target groups like urban poor, women etc. which
gives basically focus on infrastructure development, affordable housing for poor, local economic
generation etc.
Demand Collection Balance should be started at ward level.

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CHAPTER 9
Investment Plan and Financing
Strategies

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9.
9.1

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Investment Plan and Financing Strategies


Revenue Account

The revenue account comprises two components - revenue income and revenue expenditure. Revenue
income comprises internal resources and external sources of income of Hanumana. Internal sources of
income, also referred to as own sources of income, comprise tax and non-tax items. The external
resources come in the form of shared taxes/ transfers and revenue grants from the State and Central
Governments and loans from the Financial Institutions. Revenue expenditure comprises expenditures
incurred on salaries, operation & maintenance cost, contribution & donations and debt servicing.

9.1.1 Key Assumptions


Basic key assumptions are as follows;
Own services sources be increased and grants, funds should be decrease.
Capital expenditure percentage should be increased and current expenditure to the total
expenditure should be reduced.
Tax sources & non tax sources, both should be increased and diversified over a period of time.

9.1.2 Non Tax Sources


Non tax sources are as follows:
Water supply
Rents
Sale of properties.
Penalties
Interest rate

9.2

Revenue Income

The major sources of revenue income are as follows:


Municipal Rates & Taxes
Receipts under Special Acts
Income from sources other than Municipal Property Tax
Receipts from Water Tax
Miscellaneous / Others
Extra-Ordinary and Loans
Based on the Accounts procured from Hanumana, the information in respect of Revenue Income is as
under:
From the figure, it can be clearly observed that the income is increasing every year with a very high
growth rate. Total income of Hanumana in the financial year2009-10 was 178.73 Lakhs and it was 264.11
Lakhs in the financial year 2010-11. Total income of Hanumana is increasing every year because of
increasing Property as well as resources of taxes and grants.

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Total Revenue Income

Income(in Lakhs)

300
250
200
150
100
50
0
2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Financial Year
Graph 9-1 Year wise Total Income, Hanumana

9.3

Growth in Income

As per the Budget, the contribution of Municipal Taxes and grants is 18.96 Lakhs and Rs.56.46 Lakhs
for the year 2009-10 and 2010-11, respectively. For the same year, the third contributor is income
from non taxes sources which has a contributing of Rs159.97 Lakhs and 207.64 Lakhs in the FY2009-10
and 2010-11, respectively. This source has a very high growth.

Growth in income

Growth(in Lakhs)

100
80
60
40
20
0
2009-10

2010-11
Financial Year

Graph 9-2 Growths in Income, Hanumana

9.4

Observations

As compared to the income of Rs.166.59 Lakhs in the FY2008-09, the income for the FY2009-10
was Rs.264.11 Lakhs.

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9.5

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Revenue Expenditure

In the FY 2009-10, total expenditure was less as compare to the previous year but in FY2010-11 total
expenditure of Hanumana increases due to Establishment Expenditure (Salary, Wages, Benefit and
allowance).

Total Revenue Expenditure

Expenditure(in Lakhs)

250
200
150
100
50
0
2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Financial year

Graph 9-3 Total Expenditure, Hanumana

9.6

Capital Account

The capital account comprises capital income and capital expenditure. Capital income consists of income
earned by the Hanumana from loans raised, transfers from revenue surplus and utilization of funds from
sinking funds and grants received for undertaking capital works. Capital expenditure largely comprises
expenses incurred for creation of civic infrastructure and towards debt servicing (principal repayments).

9.6.1 Capital Income


The major sources of capital income are:

Grants received from State Government for undertaking capital works


Loans raised from Financial Institutions
Transfers of revenue surplus from internal accruals
Utilization of funds from Sinking funds
Interest earned on investment (Fixed deposits, bonds, etc.)

Table 9.1: Year wise Income from Various Sources

Year

Tax

Non-Tax

Transfer inc. grants

Total

2008-09

173292

12088447

4398355

16660094

2009-10

152447

15998035

1724900

18112722

2010-11

600016

5046287

16995941

26411140

Source: Hanumana, Budget FY 2008-09 to 2010-11

From above table it can be clearly observed that the income is increasing every year with a very high
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growth rate. The income of Hanumana is driven by three main sources i.e. income from taxes
(Property tax, Water tax, Pilgrimage tax, Sewerage tax, conservancy tax) non taxes sources such as
(Rental from Municipal Properties, sale and other charge, fees) and the grant allocations received
under various central and state government schemes such as (Revenue Grants .Contribution and
subsidies, Interest earned and other income).

Sources Of Income
250

Income (in Lakhs)

200
150

2008-09
2009-10

100

2010-11
50
0
Tax

Non-Tax

Transfer inc. grants

Graph 9-4 Incomes from Various Sources, Hanumana

9.6.2 Capital Expenditure


Capital expenditure largely comprises expenses incurred for creation of civic infrastructure and towards
debt servicing (principal repayments).
Table 9.2: Year wise Expenditure of Hanumana

Year

(Wage & salary) Operation


and Payment
Establishment
Maintenance
Interest

Others

Total

2008-09

2626914

8093999

226950

7212038

18159901

2009-10

4204984

6043405

1399337

4882212

16529938

2010-11

5561437

3536482

3330931

9759670

22188520

Source: Hanumana, Budget FY 2008-09 to 2010-11

9.7

Key financial Indicators

9.7.1 Revenue Indicators

Own sources revenue to Total revenue: Higher the percentage of own sources better is the
financial health of the municipality and less dependent on the Government.
Taxes and non-taxes to own revenue: It is good to have own taxes revenue sources increasing in
trend which shows elasticity and increase of tax revenue in municipal budget. Increase in non-tax
sources indicate municipal services are charged and increased as services consumption also
increased. Therefore, both indicators are independently monitored in municipal finance.
Capital revenue to Total revenue: This source of revenue indicates fund availability of capital
work as well as resources available from the higher level of government and better credit
worthiness of municipalities to access loan from market and financial institutions.

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9.7.2 Expenditure Indicators

9.8

Capital expenditure to total expenditure: More capital expenditure more development, more
asset creation, better infrastructure. This is a good indicator and shows good municipality. More
per capita capital expenditure better is the municipality and vice-versa.
Revenue expenditure to total expenditure: Less the revenue per capita expenditure, better is the
financial health of the municipality. It shows that the municipality does not have surplus money
for capital and infrastructure work and this is bad for the municipal finance.

Income, Expenditure and Surplus Deficit: Analysis

For the financial assessment, three year financial data pertaining to the years 2008 09 to 2010-11 have
been used. At present, Hanumana follows a cash-based single entry accounting system, where income
and expenditure heads are maintained on a cash inflow and outflow basis. In order to gauge the correct
financial picture of Hanumana, it is critical to recast accounts in a standard accounting format with
appropriate heads. Hanumana accounts have, therefore, been recast appropriately. The financial
assessment is then done by looking at the annual growths of various components of income and
expenditure, the sect oral makeup of the finances, the extent of Hanumana s dependence on the State
and Central government grants and reimbursements, the status of debt servicing, performance
indicators and so on.
In this exercise, all the revenues earned by Hanumana from the taxes, fees, shared income etc. have
been treated as revenue income and the income from loans and revenue grants has been treated as a
capital income. Similarly, all expenses towards regular maintenance are treated as revenue expenses,
while expenses on any asset creation have been treated as capital expenses. The financial assessment
thus undertaken is discussed in the following sections.

9.8.1 Financial Status at a glance


The assessment of the income and expenditure statement of Hanumana, at aggregate level reveals that
from all the years reviewed, in 2008-10 it shows buffer margin but in the year 2010-11 it turns into
deficit margin due to more Capital expenditure.
Table 9.3: Income and Expenditure Status of Hanumana

Year

Revenue Income

Revenue Expenditure

Surplus (Buffer Margin)

2008-09

16660094

18159901

-1499807

2009-10

18112722

16529938

1582784

2010-11

26411140

22188520

4222620

Source: Hanumana Nagar Parishad

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Lakhs

Year wise Income, Expenditure & Surplus


300
250
200
150

Revenue Income

100

Revenue Expenditure
Buffer Margin

50
0
-50

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Financial Year

Graph 9-5 Incomes, Expenditure & Surplus, Hanumana

Figure 8.5 Status of Municipal Finance, Hanumana


From the table of income and expenditure it can be analysed that there is a balance between income and
expenditure of Hanumana. Only in the financial year 2010-11, there was more expenditure in comparison
of income. The analysis has been conducted, keeping in mind the limitation arising out of limited total
income in general, and internal revenue generation in particular. The spending pattern of Hanumana
suggests a high spending, as compared to the total income, leaving a very small buffer margin. However,
a buffer margin is maintained as Closing Balance (CB) with a major help of grants & aids. Generating
internal resources is a must to sustain the development activities for a longer time.
Since the job of any Hanumana happens to be a non-commercial one, its not expected and right to have
a much lower total expenditure as compared to the total income. The income is generated to fulfil the
requirements of society and community by spending as much as possible on the development front.
However, a buffer margin should always be kept for any contingency and emergency situation. This
buffer margin takes care of any unplanned project, which at times crops-up as urgent due to
uncertainties in the life. Hence, if the income is good then a relatively narrow buffer margin can also be
kept. Therefore its desirable to increase the spending by increasing the income first as higher income is
important for high spending.

9.9

Key issues and Conclusion

The key issues and conclusion drawn on the basis of above financial analysis are as follows:
The income and expenditure of Hanumana runs neck to neck, which creates limitations.
The potential sources of internal revenue generation should be spruced-up and larger accruals
should be made.
There is a need to properly account all the properties and tax them with adequate rates.
Income from Water Tax & Charges also needs to be augmented with increasing number of builtin area and increase in population and households.
The expenditure should be made proportionate to the internal revenue generation capacity of
Hanumana

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9.10 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Revenue collection needs to be computerized so that data is clearly monitored and defaults can
be identified on a periodic basis. Computerization of the system which mainly includes three
things:
o Financial and account
o Workshop: Solid Waste management & Street lightening
o Technical Development: In Water supply, roads networking etc.

Revision of user charges, property tax collection.


Introduction of Asset Evaluation and Inventory Management System.
Preparation of Demand Collection Balance at ward level.
Funds for identified Towns/Cities would be released to the designated State Nodal Agency, which
in turn would leverage additional resources from the State Govt.
A revolving fund would be created to take care of operation and maintenance of various assets
created under the Mission.
Arrangement of well-equipped necessary systems for implementing reforms and improving
efficiency of Hanumana, which may include new methods of register maintenance, data storage
and retrieval, etc.
e- Governance should be incorporated in grievance redressal system.

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CHAPTER 10
Investment Prioritization Plan

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10. INVESTMENT PRIORITIZATION PLAN


10.1 Project Identification
The sector wise present shortfall and the future requirements by the year 2035 are analyzed to identify
the priority projects under different sectors.

10.1.1 Physical Infrastructure


Water Supply
Sector
Water Supply

Problems / Requirements in 2035


- No water supply lines existing in the
city.
- All the existing OHTs are not
sufficient for the Hanumana Nagar
Parishad.
- Lack of technical/ skilled man power
to handle the system.

Proposed Projects
- Water Supply Distribution Network.
- Replacement of older OHT and
construction of newer ones.
- Up-gradation and extension of WTP
with an enhanced capacity as per the
future demand.
- Employing skilled man power for the
water supply and maintenance works.

Drainage
Sector
Drainage

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

No proper drainage system. The


present
drainage
systems
basically open type.
Disposal of solid waste in drains
has reduced the flow capacity of
drains.

Proposed Projects
-

Channelization of nallahs and


major drains by de-silting, lining
and repair works.
Converting the Kutcha Nallahs to
pucca one by De-silting, lining and
constructing side walls.
Construction of new drains in all
wards and converting the open
ones to covered type.

Sewerage and Sanitation


Sector
Sewerage
Sanitation

Problems / Requirements in 2035


and

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There is no underground
sewerage system in the town.
Considering
the
sanitation
coverage of the city, presently
more than 75% of households do
not have in-house facilities.
Unmaintained limited number of
public urinals.
No community toilets for
exclusive women complex.
DPR has to be prepared by ULB
for development of underground

Proposed Projects
-

Construction
and
renovation of Public Toilets
& Urinal like Sulabh
Complex in urban poor
areas
&
commercial/
market
areas
and
construction of some of the
units especially for women.
Preparation of fresh DPR/
comprehensive master plan
for Sewerage and Drainage
System of town.
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sewerage system in town for
next 30 years.

Construction of one STP


and Network lines.

Solid Waste Management


Sector
Solid
management

Problems / Requirements in 2035


waste

Segregation & storage at source


does not exist.
No proper dumping yard
Lack of infrastructure in terms of
solid waste carrying vehicles and
sweepers.
Lack of waste disposal depots
and dustbins.
No designated sanitary land fill
site.
The
waste
generation
is
expected to increase by 2035
considering
the
population
growth.

Proposed Projects
-

Formation
of
ward
Samiti/committee
to
ensure
the
primary
collection and disposal of
waste on PPP basis.
Provision of vehicles and
sweepers
in
the
municipality.
Identification of proper
dumping yard and working
out management plan.
Provision of dustbins and
construction
of waste
depots in all wards.
Preparation of a Detailed
Project Report (DPR) for
Municipal Solid Waste
Management for town,
ensuring the design, size
and type of Land fill site
and quantity & quality of
required
modest
equipments,
techniques
and vehicles for collecting,
transporting,
processing
and dumping of MSW.

Traffic and Transportation


Sector
Roads
Transportation

Problems / Requirements in 2035


and

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Lack of proper traffic and


transportation
management
system.
Absence of eco-friendly intra-city
Public Transport System.
Lack of proper road network to
accommodate intra & inter-city
transportation.
Transportation
infrastructure
will be under acute strain
Lack of designated and organized
on-street parking in town.
Street furniture, road and
tourism signage are also

Proposed Projects
-

Establishment of Traffic
Police Station and Traffic
Management Centre.
Construction
of
Truck
Terminal/Transport Nagar
on BOOT basis
Development
of
footpath/pedestrian along
the major roads.
Up-gradation of existing
kutcha roads into pucca
ones.
Construction of new roads
for total length of 19.83 km
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HANUMANA

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


insufficient in the city.
-

by 2035 in different areas


of town.
Improved Street Lighting
and covering the whole of
the street length.
High mast lights at entry
points of the City.

Urban Poor
Sector
Urban Poor

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

Urban poor not adequately


indentified.
Lack of physical as well as social
infrastructure.
Degraded
environmental
conditions
Encroachment of vacant public
spaces near to ponds.

Proposed Projects
-

Slum
Improvement
Programmes.
Provision of security of
tenure.
Skill up gradation and
economic
up-liftmen
schemes.
Improvement of shelter
Development of EWS and
LIG colonies by MPHB with
a
focus
or
poverty
eradication in identified
sectoral zones especially for
urban poor under IHSDP.

10.1.2 Social Infrastructure


Health Facilities
Sector
Health facilities

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

Lack of specialty/intermediate
hospitals in the town.
No
specific
government
programmes for health sector
other than Family planning, RCH
and Immunization etc.
Infrastructures in govt. hospitals
are inadequate in terms of
facilities and no. of doctors.

Proposed Projects
-

Increase bed capacity of


existing
hospitals
and
construction
of
new
hospitals.
Providing
essential
infrastructure for better
health facilities.
Construction of Multispecialty/intermediate
hospital.
Construction of Poly-clinic

Educational Facilities
Sector
Education facilities

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Insufficient no. of primary


schools.
Poor infrastructure in education
sector.

Proposed Projects
-

Development of few more


no. of primary school.
Development
of
Middle/Higher Secondary
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-

Vocational or skill improvement


education is lacking.
Low rate of female attendance.

School.
Development of 1 no. of
Integrated School with
Hostel Facility.
Reconstruction
and
renovation
of
school
building which are in bad
condition.
Provision of equipments
and
necessary
infrastructure like provision
of toilets, safe drinking
water, kitchen shed and
electricity etc.
Public
awareness
programmes related to
Right to Education and
others for urban poor and
other citizens.

Recreation and Entertainment


Sector
Recreation
Entertainment

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

and

Proposed Projects
-

No community gathering halls or


room.
No proper development of Pond
Front as picnic spot or
recreational area for town.

Development
of
Community
Halls
and
Rooms.
Development of Rain Baser.
Development of Parks and
Playgrounds.
Development of Stadium.

10.1.3 Heritage and Tourism


Sector
Heritage and Tourism

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

No any heritage structure


Lack of infrastructure support
for tourism development

Proposed Projects
-

Hanuman Temple to be
developed and made as an
important tourist spot.

10.2 Basis for Project Identification


The projects have been identified on the basis of rapid assessment of all the sectors, discussions with
local authorities, stakeholder consultations and long term perspective in various sectors covered under
CDP.

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

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NGOs
Govt. and
Municipal
Bodies

Womens
Group

Religious
bodies

Industry
Assoc.

Stakeholder
Group

Prominent
Local
citizen

RWAs

Students

Slum
People

Chart: 10-1 Involvement of Different Stakeholders in the Consultation Process Hanumana

Based on the stakeholder consultation meet, the prioritization of projects was done so that the views,
aspirations and felt needs of the local officials, residents, experts, NGOs, elected representatives and
others are given due cognizance. The sectoral priority to the projects is assigned on the basis of various
consultations and discussions held with the government departments involved in the implementation of
CDP. It also takes into account the aspirations of the residents of Hanumana expressed in a workshop,
informal discussions and meetings held for the purpose.

10.3 Projects for System and Infrastructure Augmentation

Preparation of fresh DPR for Water Supply System for the town.
Construction of Water Supply Distribution Network.
Construction of water treatment plant & intake well.
Construction of OHT.
Preparation of DPR/Comprehensive Master Plan for Sewerage and Drainage System for the entire
town.
Construction of one STP
Construction of underground sewerage network.
Construction of Community/Public Toilets & Urinal like Sulabh Complex in urban poor areas &
commercial/ market areas.
Construction of some Community/Public Toilets especially for women.
Converting the Kutcha Nallahs to pucca one by De-silting, lining and constructing side walls.
Preparation of a Detailed Project Report for Municipal Solid Waste Management with required
infrastructure and modest equipment.
Provision of dustbins and construction of waste depots in all wards.
Development of scientific Waste disposal site.
Construction of a new bus stand to a newer location with proper ISBT on BOOT basis.
Construction of a Truck Terminal/Transport Nagar on BOOT basis
Development of footpath/pedestrian along the major roads.
Construction of parking lots in main roads/commercial or market areas including O&M on PPP
basis.

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Development of EWS and LIG colonies by MPHB with a focus or poverty eradication in identified
sectoral zones especially for urban poor under IHSDP.
Development of few more no. of primary school.
Development of Middle/Higher Secondary School.
Development of 1 no. of Integrated School with Hostel Facility.
Development of Public Library.
Construction of Multi-specialty/Intermediate hospital.
Construction of Poly-clinic
Development of Community Halls and Rooms.
Development of Rain Basera.
Development of Parks and Playgrounds.

10.4 Projects for System and Infrastructure Refurbishment

Renewal and repairing of Water Supply networks.


Provision of public toilets and sanitation.
Converting the open drains to covered type
Road Widening & Junction improvement.
Improved Street Lighting and covering the whole of the street length.
Improvement of shelter for urban poor.
Renovation of school buildings which are in bad condition.
Provision of equipments and necessary infrastructure like provision of toilets, safe drinking
water, kitchen shed and electricity etc. in education institutions.
Increase the capacity of bed in the existing hospitals

10.5 Other Development Project

Provision for special Hawker zone.

10.6 Sector Wise Project Identification and Costing


On the basis of the sector analysis and quantum of investment required for various sectors in the City
Development Plan over a specified time frame to attain the sustainable growth and to achieve the
Mission goals.

10.6.1 Physical Infrastructure


Water Supply
With a vision to provide adequate amount of treated water to the projected population of 2035, the
following projects are identified to achieve the goal in the sector:
Table 10.1: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

WS 1

Preparation of DPR for Water Supply


System for the entire town.

5.00

WS 2

Construction of 2 OHT each of capacity 4


MLD

300.00

Govt. of M.P.

WS 3

Construction of intake well, pump house


with pumping machinery electrical
Replacement of present pipe line system
in the town. (2.8 km) 150 dia (cost @

300.00

Govt. of M.P.

41.00

Govt. of M.P.

WS 4

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Project Cost (in Department


Lakh)
UADD, Govt. of M.P. and
HNP

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CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Rs1471)
WS 5

Extension of present distribution line to


cover the whole of the city (2.1KM)
150MM Dia (cost @ Rs1471)

Sub Total
Cost (A)

31.00

Govt. of M.P.

677.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

Sewerage and Sanitation


Presently there is no sewage disposal system in the city. The in-house sanitation is about 30% for the city
and is limited to many users. Therefore the future efforts should be made to have 100 percent coverage
on the sewerage sector to minimize the sanitation problem of the city. In this regards, the following
projects are identified:
Table 10.2: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

SS 1

Construction of DEWATS in each wards Rs 2000


per sq m of land under wet land. Each plant
need around 500 sp. m
SS 2
Construction of treatment plant support
electrical, mechanical equipments
SS 3
Construction of eco-toilets in slum areas and
public place. (Rs 15000 per toilet)
SS 4
Construction of 20 public urinals (@ Rs5000)
SS 5
Construction of individual toilet (Support in
terms f subsidies for 2387 units)
Sub Total Cost (B)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
150.00

Govt. of M.P

100.00

Govt. of M.P

93.00

Nagar Parishad

1.00
119.36

Nagar Parishad
ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

463.36

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

Drainage
Presently there is lack of infrastructure and capital cost for drainage in the city. So the following projects
are identified to achieve the future goals for drainage in the city would be
Table 10.3: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

D1

Preparation of DPR for Storm Water Drainage


System for entire town
D2
Construction of new storm water drainage
network to cover the whole town (3 kms.)
(@Rs44 lakh/km)
D3
Converting the Kutcha Nallahs to pucca one by
De-silting, lining and constructing side walls.
3.5km ((@Rs20 lakh/km)
Sub Total Cost (D)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
5.00
120.00

70.00

UADD, Govt. of M.P.


and GNP
Govt. of M.P

Nagar
Parishad

195.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

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Solid Waste Management


Presently there is lack of infrastructure and capital cost for solid waste management in the city. So the
following projects are identified to achieve the future goals for solid waste management in the city would
be
Table 10.4: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

SWM 1

Preparation of Detailed Project Report for 5.00


Municipal Solid Waste Management for entire
town.

UADD, Govt. of M.P.


and GNP

SWM 2

Construction maintenance of Sanitary Landfill 136.00


Site with other infrastructure facility in ward no.
1 (@Rs1000/ton of waste) exclusive of land cost

Nagar Parishad

SWM 3

Providing equipments and machines to support 30.00


the SWM system

Nagar Parishad

SWM 4

Enhancing the capacity of municipality by 60.00


providing Transportation vehicles (1) ,
Container (30) and & Handcart (10)

Nagar Parishad

Sub Total Cost (C)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

231.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

Traffic and Transportation


The creation of a reliable, comfortable, attractive and affordable traffic management system is the longterm solution for solving the traffic problems in the city. Thus, constructions of new bus stand to provide
a high quality transit system. Provisions of parking facilities are envisaged to solve parking problem and
congestion in core areas. To achieve the goals in this sector the following projects are identified
Table 10.5: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

TT 1

Development of new Bus Stand on BOOT basis 500.00


IN WARD NO. 8

TT 2

Upgradation of kutcha road to pucca (5.43km)

TT 3

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

Construction of new roads for total length of 750.00


15km by 2035 in different areas of town.

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

TT 4

Development of footpath/pedestrian along the 50.00


major roads. (for 5 km)

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

TT 5

Road Widening (major district roads.) (approx 150.00


10km)

PWD

TT 6

Improvement of traffic junctions (5), rotary 50.00


development including installation of traffic
light/signals.

Hanumana
Parishad

Sub Total Cost (D)


DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

270.00

Nagar

1770.00
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Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

Street Lighting and Fire Fighting


With a view to cover the whole streets with lighting facilities and to handle and overcome the
anthropogenic hazards like fire in town the following projects are identified
Table 10.6: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

SL 1

Installation of 1040 nos. of street lights at an 260.00


interval of 40m. within the wards/residential
area (25,000/- pole)

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

SL 2

High mast lights at major junctions (5)(Rs 75.00


15lakh/unit)

Hanumana
Parishad

Nagar

SL 3

Procurement of 1 electric pole vehicle

Nagar Parishad

25.00

SL 4

Establishment of Manpower and their training 5.00


& capacity building
Sub Total Cost (E)
365.00

Nagar Parishad

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

Urban Poor
Presently slum is covering 9.25% of the city and there is lack of physical and social infrastructure in most
of the slums as well. So to make the city slum free the following projects are identified in this sector
Table 10.7: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

UP 1

Construction of houses for poor in to solve the 2166.5


housing problems in the slums under IHSDP as
per the availability of suitable Govt. Land (for
619 urban poor HH) (at 3.5lakh/unit)
Sub Total Cost (F)
2166.5

MPHB; HNP

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

10.6.2 Social Infrastructure


Health Facilities
Most of the population is not served by this because of poor medical infrastructure facilities in terms of
hospital beds and doctors. So the following projects are identified for the overall development of the
sector
Table 10.8: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.
H1

H2

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
Extension of hospital situated in the premise of 150.00
Health Department,
health centre by constructing multi storied
building thereby extending the health facilities
Construction of 1 Poly-clinic @10 no. of beds for 50.00
Health Department,

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2035 in ward no. 14


Sub Total Cost (H)

200.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

Educational Facilities
Considering the emerging issues and potentials in the sector, the following projects are identified in the
education sector
Table10.9: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

E1

Establishment of 1 no. of Integrated School with 500.00


Hostel Facility in ward no. 6

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

Establishment of 2 nos. of Informal and adult 10.00


literacy centres, Anganwadi centres in ward no 5&
10(@5 lakh each)

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

Construction of Polytechnic college/ Vocational 100.00


Training Institutes and ITIs in ward no. 1

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

Renovation of school buildings which are in bad 50.00


condition

Education
Department,
of M.P.

Govt.

E5

Provision of equipments and necessary 10.00


infrastructure like provision of toilets, safe
drinking water, kitchen shed and electricity etc. in
education institutions.

Nagar Parishad

E6

Establishment of Public Library (1 in no.) in ward 70.00


no. 4

Nagar Parishad

E2

E3

E4

Sub Total Cost (I)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

740.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

10.6.3 Tourism
Presently the tourism industry is lacking infrastructure facilities and there is lack of active recreational
space in the city. With a goal to enhance the tourism activities in the city the following projects are
identified for improvement of the sector
Table 10.10: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

T1

Development, beautification, plantations along 150.00


the pond in ward no. 4, 10 & 13.

Sub Total Cost (I)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)
Tourism Dept. Govt. of
M.P.

150.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

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10.6.4 Other Components


Other than the above stated sectors, there are some other projects are identified for the development of
the city.
Table 10.11: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

O1

Development of Entrance Gates to town (2 in 10.00


Nos.) one towards north side and other towards
south on NH-75.(@5 lakh/unit)

Nagar Parishad

O2

Developments of hawker zone in ward no 10.

Nagar Parishad

O3

Construction of one Community Hall and two 50.00


Rooms
in
ward
no.
6
and
13
respectively(community hall @ 35 lakh and
Community rooms @15 lakh)

Sub Total Cost (K)

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

5.00

Nagar Parishad

65.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

10.6.5 Urban Reforms & Capacity Building


Table 10.12: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost Department


(in Lakh)

UR 1

Computerization of property tax & other assets

20.00

UR 2

Billing s/w & collection systems; hardware & 5.00


software

Nagar Parishad

UR 3

Training/Manpower Assistance

5.00

Nagar Parishad

UR 4

Strengthening Engineering (MIS, AUTOCAD, all 5.00


h/w & s/w)

Nagar Parishad

UR 5

Other Management Supports training for 5.00


supervisory & staff

Nagar Parishad

Sub Total Cost (L)

Nagar Parishad

40.00

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

10.6.6 Sector Wise Total Cost


Table 10.13: Proposed project, project cost and their implementing departments.

Code No.

Sectors

Project Cost (in Lakh)

Sub Total Cost (A)

Water Supply

677.00

Sub Total Cost (B)

Sewerage and Sanitation

463.36

Physical Infrastructure

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Sub- Total Cost (C)

Storm Water Drainage

195.00

Sub Total Cost (D)

Solid Waste Management

231.00

Sub Total Cost (E)


Sub Total Cost (F)
Sub Total Cost (G)
Social Infrastructure

Traffic and Transportation


Street Lighting and Fire Fighting
Urban Poor

1770.00
365.00
2166.50

Sub Total Cost (H)


Sub Total Cost (I)
Sub Total Cost (J)
Sub Total Cost (J)
Sub Total Cost (K)
Sub Total Cost (L)

Health Facilities
Educational Facilities
Tourism
Other Components
Urban Reforms & Capacity Building

200.00
750.00
150.00
65.00
40.00
7062.90

Based on: PWD (SOR) APRIL, 2011

10.7 City Investment Plan


The city investment plan for the town of Chakghat has been divided into five phases as follows:
Phase I (2012-2015)
Phase II (2016-2020)
Phase III (2021-2025)
Phase IV (2026-2030)
Phase V (2031-2035)

10.7.1 City Investment Plan for 2012- 2015 (Phase I)


These projects are to be implemented over the plan period for first phase ( 2012- 2015) as per following
implementation schedule worked out on the basis of time involved in completing the projects and the
priority decided for the same.
Table 10.14 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase I)

Project Code

Cost of Project (in Schedule of Expenditure (% of project cost)


Lakhs)
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15

Water Supply
WS 2

300

50

50

WS 4

41

50

50

WS 5

31

100

Sewerage and Sanitation


SS 1

150

13.3

SS 2

100

50

SS 3

93

50

50

SS 4

1.00

100

Solid Waste Management


SWM 2
136

SWM 3

30

50

SWM 4

60

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

30
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Traffic and Transportation


TT 1
500

70

TT 2

270

50

TT 3

750

TT 4

50

TT 5

150

25

TT 6

50

16.6

20

20
20
25

Street Lighting and Fire Fighting


SL 1

260

SL 2

75

16.6

16.6

SL 3

25

100

SL 4

30

Urban Poor
UP 1

2166.5

Health Facilities
H1

150

20

33.3

Educational Facilities
E2
10
E3

100

E4

50

E5

10

20

50
100
20

20

20

50

50

Tourism
T1

150

20

Other Components
O1

10

100

O2

100

Urban Reforms and Capacity Building


UR 1

20

50

UR 2

100

UR 3

50

UR 4

100

UR 5

50

50
50
50

10.7.2 City Investment Plan for 2016- 2020 (Phase II)


These projects are to be implemented over the plan period for second phase ( 2016- 2020) as per
following implementation schedule worked out on the basis of time involved in completing the projects
and the priority decided for the same.

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Table 10.15 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase II)

Project Code

Cost of Project (in Schedule of Expenditure (% of project cost)


Lakhs)
2015-16
2016- 2017-18
2018- 201917
19
20

Water Supply
WS 3
2
WS 4
41
Sewerage and Sanitation

50
50

50

SS 1

13.3

13.3

13.3

13.3

13.3

5
50

150

SS 2
100
Solid Waste Management

50

SWM 2
SWM 3
SWM 4
Storm Water Drainage

136
30
60

20

D2
120
D3
70
Traffic and Transportation

25

TT 1
500
TT 2
270
TT 3
750
TT 4
50
TT 5
150
TT 6
50
Street Lighting and Fire Fighting
SL 1
260
SL 2
75
SL 4
5
Urban Poor
UP 1
2166.5
Health Facilities
H1
150
Educational Facilities

15
50
20

15

25
16.6

25

5
16.6

5
16.6

30

10

20

16.6
5
16.6

16.6
5
16.6

5
70

20

20

33.3

33.3
50
20

10
50

20

E6
Tourism
T1
Other Components
O3

70

100

150

20

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

30

20

E2
E4

50

20

30

30

20

20

20

20
100

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10.7.3 City Investment Plan for 2021- 2025 (Phase III)


These projects are to be implemented over the plan period for second phase ( 2021- 2025) as per
following implementation schedule worked out on the basis of time involved in completing the projects
and the priority decided for the same.

13.3

6.6

SWM 2

136

SWM 4

60

2024-25

150

2023-24

Schedule of Expenditure (% of project cost)

2021-22

Project Code

2022-23

Cost of Project (in Lakhs)

2020-21

Table 10.16 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase III)

Water Supply
Sewerage and Sanitation
SS 1
Solid Waste Management
20

Storm Water Drainage


D2
120
Traffic and Transportation
TT 4
50
TT 6

25
20

50

Street Lighting and Fire Fighting


SL 1
260

16.6
5

16.6
5

10.7.4 City Investment Plan for 2026- 2030 (Phase IV)


These projects are to be implemented over the plan period for second phase ( 2026- 2030) as per
following implementation schedule worked out on the basis of time involved in completing the projects
and the priority decided for the same.

136

D2

120

2029-30

SWM 2
Storm Water Drainage

2028-29

Schedule of Expenditure (% of project cost)


2026-27

Project Code

2027-28

Cost of Project (in Lakhs)

2025-26

Table 10.17: Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase I)

Solid Waste Management

25

Traffic and Transportation


TT 4
50
Street Lighting and Fire Fighting
SL 1

260

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

20
5

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10.7.5 City Investment Plan for 2031- 2035 (Phase V)


These projects are to be implemented over the plan period for second phase ( 2026- 2030) as per
following implementation schedule worked out on the basis of time involved in completing the projects
and the priority decided for the same.

120

25

2034-35

136

2033-34

Schedule of Expenditure (% of project cost)


2032-33

Cost of Project (in Lakhs)

2031-32

Project Code

2030-31

Table 10.18 Sector wise Project cost and Yearly Schedule of Expenditure (Phase V)

Solid Waste Management


SWM 2
Storm Water Drainage
D2
Traffic and Transportation
TT 4

50

20

Street Lighting and Fire Fighting


SL 1

260

Health Facilities
H2

50

100

Educational Facilities
E1

500

100

10.8 Financing plan:


As stated above, the required projects have been categorized under various sectors. Each sector
comprises of a number of projects. Financing options for the projects in each sector could be either one
or a combination of the following:

Central Governments Grants: Under Central Government funding there are many scheme are
sponsored by the Government of India like JNNURM, NUIS, UIDSSMT, and Urban Statistics for HR
& Assessment, Rajiv Awas Yojana etc.

State Governments Grants & Loans: State Government also transfers funds to municipal body
based on stamp revenue share, Transport and other funds.

International Funding Agency: International funding agency include multilateral bodies like
World Bank, Asian development Bank etc.

Municipal body: Under domestic funding agency mainly Urban Local Bodies comes.

Financing Institutions: Financing Institutions includes majorly Banks etc.

Private Operator: Under this category mainly private sectors are included.

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Based on the availability of funds with each of the above and their willingness to provide grants/loans,
the projects could be funded.
The suggested pattern of funding is as under:
Graph 10.1: Financing Option- Water Supply

Private Operator

Graph 10.2: Financing Option- Sewerage & Sanitation

Private
Operator

Graph 10.3: Financing Option- Solid Waste Management

Private Operator

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Graph 10.4: Financing Option-Strom water Drainage

Private Operator

Graph 10.5: Financing Option-Traffic & Transportation

Graph 10.6: Financing Option: Street Lighting & Fire Fighting

20%
45%

state government
grants

35%

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private operator

central
government grants

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Graph 10.7: Financing Option- Urban Poor

50%

50%

central govt.
state govt.

Graph 10.8: Financing Option- Health facility

20%

State Governments
Grants

35%

Central Governments
Grants
Private Operator
45%

Graph 10.9: Financing Option- Education Sector

30%
40%

State Government's
Grants
Central Government's
Grants
Private Grant

30%

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Graph 10.10: Financing Option- Tourism

Graph 10.11: Financing Option- Other Components

Private Operator

Graph 10.12: Financial options: - urban reforms and capacity building

Municipal
Council

Private Operator

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Table 10.19: Overall financing plan of investment plans

Funding agencies

Rs. (In Lakhs)

Rs. (In Percentage)

Central Government

1989.15

30%

State Government

2652.2

40%

Municipal Body

1326.1

20%

Private sector

663.05

10%

TOTAL

6630.5

100%

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Normal Growth (10%)


Table 18.1 Revenue Collection from 2008-2035 at Normal Growth rate of 10%
Year
Income
(in
lakhs)

200809

200910

201011

201112

201213

201314

201415

201516

201617

201718

201819

201920

202021

202122

202223

202324

202425

202526

202627

202728

202829

122.62

161.50

56.46

62.11

68.32

75.15

82.67

90.93

100.03

110.03

121.03

133.14

146.45

161.10

177.21

194.93

214.42

235.86

259.45

285.39

313.93

2029-30

345.32

2030-31

379.86

2031-32

2032-33

2033-34

2034-35

417.84

459.62

505.59

556.15

2031-32

2032-33

2033-34

2034-35

Performing Growth (12%)


Table18.2 Revenue Collection from 2008-2035 at Normal Growth rate of 12%
Year
Income
(in
lakhs)

200809

200910

201011

201112

201213

201314

201415

201516

201617

201718

201819

201920

202021

202122

202223

202324

202425

202526

202627

202728

202829

122.62

161.50

56.46

63.24

70.83

79.33

88.85

99.51

111.45

124.82

139.80

156.58

175.37

196.41

219.98

246.38

275.94

309.05

346.14

387.68

434.20

2029-30

486.30

2030-31

544.66

610.02

683.22

765.21

857.03

As shown in the tables of revenue collection through three scenarios from 2008 to 2035, first is natural growth rate at 10% per annum which is around Rs. 556.15lakhs, second is performing growth rate at 12% per annum which
is around Rs.857.03lakhs.

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CHAPTER 11
Urban Reforms

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11. Urban Reforms


11.1 Background
The main thrust of the development strategies is to ensure improvement in urban governance so that
Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) and para-statal agencies become financially sound with enhanced credit rating
and ability to access market capital for undertaking new programmes and expansion of services. In this
improved environment, public-private participation models for provisioning of various services would
also become feasible. To achieve this objective, State Governments, Urban Local Bodies and para-statal
agencies will be required to accept implementation of an agenda of reforms. The proposed reforms shall
broadly fall into two categories:-

Mandatory reforms

Optional reforms

All the mandatory and optional reforms shall be implemented by the State/ULB/Para-Statals within the
Scheme period.

11.2 Objectives of reforms:

Improvement of urban governance

To make ULBs financially sound

To enable ULBs to access market capital

To enable ULBs to undertake new programs and expand services

11.3 Need for reform initiatives

Harnessing the Potential of Reforms in Urban Infrastructure


o reforms to meet development objectives
o investor create an investor-friendly environment

National Need for National-Reform level

Reform-Linked Investments
o Reform linked assistance to State Governments and ULBs.
o Integrate reform initiatives to catalyze investments in urban infrastructure.

Need for Sustainable Infrastructure Development


o link between asset creation and management through reforms

Need for Efficiency Enhancement.

11.4 Structure of reforms


Graph 2: Structure of Reforms

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Reforms

Mandatory

State Government

ULBs & ParaStatal

Optional

State Government

ULBs & ParaStatal

11.5 MANDATORY REFORMS:


Urban Local Body Reforms (at ULB Level)
i) Adoption of modern, accrual-based double entry system of accounting in Urban Local Bodies.
ii) Introduction of system of e-governance using IT applications like GIS and MIS for various services
provided by ULBs.
iii) Reform of property tax with GIS, so that it becomes major source of revenue for Urban Local Bodies
(ULBs) and arrangements for its effective implementation so that collection efficiency reaches at least
85% within the Mission period.
iv) Levy of reasonable user charges by ULBs/Para-statals with the objective that full cost of operation and
maintenance is collected within the Mission period
v) Internal earmarking within local body budgets for basic services to the urban poor.
vi) Provision of basic services to urban poor including security of tenure at affordable prices, improved
housing, water supply, sanitation and ensuring delivery of other already existing universal services of the
government for education, health and social security.

State Level Reforms


i) Implementation of decentralization measures as envisaged in Seventy Fourth Constitutional
Amendment. States should ensure meaningful association/engagement of ULBs in planning function of
Para- statals as well as delivery of services to the citizens.
ii) Rationalization of Stamp Duty to bring it down to no more than 5% within the Mission period.
iii) Enactment of community participation law to institutionalize citizen participation and introducing the
concept of the Area Sabha in urban areas.
iv) Assigning or associating elected ULBs into town planning function over a period of five years;
transferring all special agencies that deliver civic services in urban areas and creating accountability
platforms for all urban civic service providers in transition.

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11.6 OPTIONAL REFORMS (State and ULB/Para-statal level)


i) Repeal of Urban Land Ceiling and Regulation Act.
ii) Amendment of Rent Control Laws balancing the interest of landlords and tenants.
iii) Enactment of Public Disclosure Law to ensure preparation of medium-term fiscal plan of ULBs and
release of quarterly performance information to all stakeholders.
iv) Revision of bye-laws to streamline the approval process for construction of buildings, development of
sites, etc.
v) Simplification of legal and procedural frameworks for conversion of agricultural land for nonagricultural purposes.
vi) Introduction of Property Title Certification System in ULBs.
vii) Earmarking at least 20-25% of developed land in all housing projects (both Public and Private
Agencies) for EWS/LIG category with a system of cross subsidization.
viii) Introduction of computerized process of registration of land and property.
ix) Revision of bye-laws to make rain water harvesting mandatory in all buildings to come
Up in future and for adoption of water conservation measures.
x) Bye-laws on reuse of recycled water.
xi) Administrative reforms, i.e., reduction in establishment by bringing out voluntary retirement schemes,
non-filling up of posts falling vacant due to retirement etc., and achieving specified milestones in this
regard.
xii) Structural reforms
xiii) Encouraging Public-Private partnership.

11.7 Status of Mandatory & optional Reforms:


A.

Mandatory Reforms

1.

Urban Local Body Reforms (at ULB level)

i.

ii.

iii.

Adoption of modern, accrual-based double entry system of accounting Not yet implemented
in Urban Local Bodies
Introduction of system of e-governance using IT applications like GIS Not yet implemented
and MIS for various services provided by ULBs

Reform of property tax with GIS, so that it becomes major source of Computerized
revenue for Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) and arrangements for its property tax system is
effective implementation so that collection efficiency reaches at least yet to be introduced.
85% within the mission period.

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iv.

v.

vi.

2.
i.

ii.

iii.

iv.

v.

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Levy of reasonable user charges by ULBs/ Para-statal with the objective


that full cost of operation and maintenance is collected within the
mission period. However, cities/ towns in North East and other special
category states may recover at least 50% of operation and
maintenance charges initially. These cities / towns should graduate to
full O&M cost recovery in a phased manner.

Internal earmarking within local body budgets for basic services to the
urban poor.

O&M charges
have
been
implemented.

User charges
like in water
billing
etc.
have
been
started.

It is implemented.

Provision of basic services to urban poor including security of tenure at It is implemented.


affordable prices, improved housing, water supply, sanitation and
ensuring delivery of other already existing universal services of the
government for education, health and social security.

State Level Reforms


Implementation of decentralization measures as envisaged in Seventy It is implemented.
Fourth Constitutional Amendment. States should ensure meaningful
association / engagement of ULBs in planning function of Parastatal as
well as delivery of services to the citizens.
Rationalization of Stamp Duty to bring it down to no more than 5%
within the mission period

Not implemented yet.

Enactment of Public Disclosure law to ensure preparation of medium- It


is
under
term fiscal plan of ULBs release of quarterly performance information consideration.
to all stakeholders.
Enactment of community participation law to institutionalize citizen It
is
under
participation and introducing the concept of the Area Sabha in urban consideration.
areas
Assigning or associating elected ULBs into town planning function It is implemented.
over a period of five years; transferring all special agencies that deliver
civic services in urban areas and creating accountability platforms for
all urban civic service providers in transition.

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B.
i.
ii.

iii.

iv.

v.
vi.

vii.

viii.

ix.
x.

xi.
xii.

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Optional Reforms
Repeal of Urban Land Ceiling and Regulation Act.

It is implemented.

Amendment of Rent Control Laws balancing the interest of landlords It is implemented.


and tenants.
Revision of bye-laws to streamline the approval process for
construction of buildings, development of sites, etc.

It
is
implemented.

NIC
is
working
under
the
Town
&
Country
Planning.

Simplification of legal and procedural frameworks for conversion of It


is
under
agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes.
consideration.
Introduction of Property Title Certification System in ULBs.

Not yet implemented.

Earmarking at least 20-25% of developed land in all housing projects It is implemented.


(both Public and Private Agencies) for EWS/LIG category with a system
of cross subsidization.
Introduction of computerized process of registration of land and Not yet started.
property.
Revision of bye-laws to make rain water harvesting mandatory in all
buildings to come up in future and for adoption of water conservation
It is implemented
measures.
Bye-laws on reuse of recycled water.

Not yet stated.

Administrative reforms, i.e., reduction in establishment by bringing out It is implemented.


voluntary retirement schemes, non-filling up of posts falling vacant due
to retirement, etc., and achieving specified milestones in this regard.
Structural reforms

It is under process.

Encouraging Public-Private partnership

It is implemented.

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11.8 Issues

There have been no mandatory reforms laid down for the town.
The municipal staff lacks in adequate awareness of the reform agenda and technical
advancement.
The Nagar Parishad is not well equipped with the necessary systems for implementing reforms
and improving efficiency. Systems include new methods of register maintenance, data storage
and retrieval, etc. Most of the work happens in an ad-hoc manner without laid out procedures.
The Nagar Parishad needs to coordinate with Para-statals such as, Public Health Engineering
Department, Housing Board etc.
It has been found that while the local people have lots of problems and they want to participate
and bring to the notice to the authorities for their problems, the absence of a proper grievance
redressal system has made it very difficult for the local.
Low Efficiency of service delivery in various aspects such as extent of collection of property tax
and other taxes, poor maintenance of roads, poor sanitary conditions, inappropriate solid waste
management practices, inadequate street light provision, etc.
Lack of data/Information Base which could help in the development of area.

11.9 Town Specific Strategies and Action Plan

Private Sector Participation in development, management and financing of Urban Infrastructure


would be clearly delineated.
Funds for identified Towns/Cities would be released to the designated State Nodal Agency, which
in turn would leverage additional resources from the State Govt.
A revolving fund would be created to take care of operation and maintenance of various assets
created under the Mission.
Some demonstration/ presentation should be started to awareness municipal staff about reform
agenda and reforms.
Arrangement of well-equipped necessary systems for implementing reforms and improving
efficiency of Nagar Parishad, which may include new methods of register maintenance, data
storage and retrieval, etc.
A well framed coordinate system between Nagar Parishad and Para-statals should be designed
for better management.
e- Governance should be incorporated in grievance redressal system.
A rich Data/Information base arrangement should be maintain to address the specific problems
and solution for the same.

Table 11.1 Reform Action Plan

Reforms Action Plan


Reforms

Full migration
of double
accounting
System

Achiev
ed
(Y/N)

Timeline to achieve reforms till


2015

201213
25%

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

201314
50%

2014- 201515
16
75% 100%

Any City
specific
Strategies
adopted

No

Preliminary
estimate (if
any) for
implementation

Implemen
ting
agency

Not Available

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Property tax
reforms, 85%
coverage ratio
and 90%
collection ratio
Levy of user
charges : full
recovery of O
& M charges
for sewerage,
water supply
and SWM
Internal
earmarking of
basic services
to urban poor
E-governance
& Capacity
Building
Provision of
basic services
to urban poor
including
security of
tenure at
affordable
prices,
improved
existing
housing, water
supply,
sanitation

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


N

25%

50%

75% 100%

No

Not Available

Nagar
Parishad

25%

50%

75% 100%

No

Not Available

Nagar
Parishad

25%

50%

75% 100%

No

Not Available

Nagar
Parishad
& UADD

67%

33% 100%

No

40 lakh

UADD

50%

75% 100%

No

Not Available

Nagar
Parishad
& UADD

25%

Source: DMG Assessment

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CHAPTER 12
Town Vision

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12. Town Vision


12.1 Summary of Sectoral Strategies:
Water Supply:

Quantity of
supply to be
135
lpcd, Quality as
per standards

Provision of community
stand posts in all slum
areas, public
places, parks, temples

100 percent
population
coverage of
treated water

100 percent water supply coverage which includes the present as well as the future demand by
2035.

Quality and quantity should be ensured as per the standards for the future population. The
coverage of the water supply system can be enhanced by providing community taps or stand
posts in all slum areas, public places and in recreation areas.

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Waste Water Management:

100 percent
population
coverage by
sewerage
system

Provision of
community
toilet blocks
near public
places to
ensure
sanitation

Decentralised
waste water
treatment

Presently there is no sewage disposal system in the town or most of the households have their
own arrangements for the disposal. Therefore for future efforts should be made to have 100
percent coverage for waste water to minimize the sanitation problem of the town. In this
regards, the following steps can considered:

Community toilet blocks should be provided near riverside, market places, in slum areas and core
town areas where there is limited scope of expansion of the dwelling units to have toilet in it.

Sewage treatment system for treatment of the sewage before disposal.

There should be government interventions in providing toilets in urban poor settlements, in


which the government can act as a facilitator or provider.

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Storm Drainage:

100 percent
coverage of
the city

Lining of all
natural
drains or
nalas
Covering of
all open
drains or
nalas

Flood control
measures in low
lying areas

Considering the present drainage system, the following goals would be set to minimize the adverse effect
of poor drainage system:

100 percent coverage of the town through proper drainage system by 2035.

Converting the kutcha nallahs to pucca ones, covering of all open drains and lining of all natural
drains and nallahs.

Encroachment on the low lying natural drainage channel should be minimized so that flow of
water will not be blocked.

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Solid Waste Management:

100 percent
coverage of
the city

Sanitary land
fill and virmicomposting
Provision of
of organic
sweepers, vehicles wastes
and equipment as
per standards
Treatment of solid
waste before
disposal

Present solid waste system is not covering all parts of the town. So the future direction for solid waste
management would be as follows:

Covering the whole part of the town including the present as well as the future developments.

Special care should be given to manage wastes that are generated on any auspicious days on
river beds.

Segregation of hazardous wastes like bio medical waste, bio degradable waste etc. and treatment
of solid waste before disposal.

Encourage participation of NGOs or CBOs in solid waste management.

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Street Lighting:

Special
lighting at
Lake, rivers
, monumen
ts and
100 percent
coverage of the other
city to ensure public
safety for the places
residents as
well as the
tourists

Use of modern
technology, ener
gy saving
equipments like
solar light.

Considering the present street lighting situation in the town, the future goals for 2035 would be:

Ensure 100 percent coverage in town to ensure safety and security for all the residents and the
tourists coming to the town.
Care should be given to provide street lights in public gathering spaces and recreation spaces like
lake, rivers, monuments and parks.
Use of modern power saving technology should be encouraged.

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Roads and Transportation:

Improve road and


rail connectivity
Improve
public bus
stand facility
Improve existing
road network in
terms of road
surfacing, geomet
rics and signals

Though there is opportunity for improved transportation system, there is lacking in the present
road networks and transport facilities. To improve the current situation and to address the
future demand the goals would be as follows:

Improvement of the existing road networks in terms of road geometry, road surfacing
and traffic signals etc.

For intra as well as inter-town movement public transport facilities should be improved.

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Slums:

Ownership
rights

Skill development
and economic
upliftment

Slum
Environment
Improvement

As slum is a major problem in the town. So the follows steps can be taken to make the town
slum free.

Encouraging slum improvement schemes like improvement of physical i.e. water supply,
drainage, sanitation facilities as well as social infrastructure like education, health
facilities in the slums.

Providing land ownership to the slum dwellers.

Involvement of NGOs should be encouraged for improvement of slums.

Community participation should be emphasized in any of the schemes launched by the


govt. or NGOs.

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Health Facilities:

Facilitating
specialised
medical
care
Increasing the
number of
hospitals by
making available
more land for
new
hospitals, thereb
y increasing
beds and
doctors

Promotin
g Health
tourism

The future goals for the health facilities would be as follows:

Providing land for new hospitals, increase beds and no, of doctors in the existing hospital
and health care centres.

Specialized medical services should be facilitated in the town.

By providing proper health facilities in the town, health tourism can be promoted in the
area which will serve the region and generate economy for the town.

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Education:

Facilitating
Specialised
Facilitating education
vocational opportunitie
s
training
centres for
Facilitating adult skill
provision of impartation
more
for gainful
schools, the employment
reby
/ self
increasing employment
no. of seats
and
improving
literacy

Considering the emerging issues and potentials the following goals would be derived for
addressing the future requirements:

Facilitating provision of more number of schools at the primary and secondary education
level and providing required infrastructure facilities for the sector.

For adult skill up gradation as well as self-employment opportunities, establishment of


vocational school should be encouraged.

Public awareness programmes should be encouraged in urban poor areas as they are not
willing to educate their children.

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Tourism:

Facilitating
infrastructure
for specialised
tourist
attractions
Water
such as
sports, the
National
me
parks, boati Parks, etc.
ng, etc.

Improvement of
sites of
monuments and
other heritage
structures for
attracting
tourists

Having the great potential for tourism development in the town, the following goals can be
derived for future development in the sector:

River front development and lake/river based activities like water sports, theme park and
boating etc. to encourage tourism.

Promoting Town as a transit point for the surrounding tourism destination.

Facilitating infrastructure in terms of good connectivity, hotels and resorts to attract


tourists.

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Economy

Forest
based
activities
Agri
Based
commerc
ial
activities,
Other
economic
activities

Tourism
and
Support
economi
c
activities

For the economic up-liftment of the Town, the following goals can be set:

As the town is surrounded by large chunk of agricultural land, therefore agricultural


based commercial activities should be encouraged for the economic development of the
town.

Forest based activities like selling of forest products can be another way of development
economy of the people.

As Town has high potential for tourism development, so tourism related activities like
hotel industry, tourist transportation should be encourage to form a major source of
income generation activity for many people.

12.2 Town Vision:


The vision for Town has been evolved as under:
To develop a commercial town which is economically vibrant, ecologically sustainable and
environmentally pleasing; a town which will meet the aspirations of the local residents as well as the
tourists alike and is manageable.

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Economically
Vibrant

a
commercial
hub

Ecologically
Sustainable

Environmentally
Pleasing

In order to achieve the above vision, strategies have been suggested in the next chapter. Ultimately,
these strategies would be translated into tangible projects which would be viable and implementable.

12.3 Town Positioning:


Town has been positioned as a commercial hub by boosting local economy and at the same time also
showcasing various cultural as well as natural assets. This strategy has been adopted on account of the
fact that there is a great potential for Town to emerge as a commercial destination, given the fact that it
has excellent rail connectivity and rail infrastructure. At the same time, there are various natural assets
such as the forests, river and lake water and national parks nearby. This positioning of the town can give
the town a much needed boost for the local economy and lead to prosperity and economic vibrancy.

The concept is illustrated in the diagram given below:

River and
Lake

Economy

Rail
Infrstructure

Parks

Forests

Governance

Temples

Monuments

Commercial
Hub

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Economic Rejuvenation:
Commercial Activities There are many agro based activities which are related to agricultural
produce. There is a need to boost this area by creating suitable structures so that more people
find gainful self-employment in these activities. For this, it is necessary that land be allotted for
creating facilities for manufacture, storage, display and sale of these products.

Tourism Related Activities The water bodies and other tourist attractions have not been
adequately developed. It is proposed that once these are developed in the form of tourist
circuits, with transportation linkages, boarding and lodging facilities and other related tourism
infrastructure, with adequate marketing and publicity, tourism could be promoted in this region.
The water bodies can also be an area for development of parks, boating and water sport
activities. This can also have a spin off in terms of forward and backward linkages and
employment generation for the local population.

Religious Activities The local temples and parks are held in great reverence by the local
population and regularly, festivals and functions are held. Therefore, proper developments of
these sites along with facilities for the pilgrims are needed so as to cater to the local sentiments
of the people.

Infrastructure Development
There cannot be two opinions on the fact that the civic infrastructure of Town needs to be improved. The
strategy for this is to urgently undertake projects, as identified later in this chapter, so that the required
facilities and amenities area provided to the residents in a timely manner so that the basic quality of life
can be achieved.

Slum Improvement
Slum improvement has to form a central part of town improvement. The strategy for improving the
slums is to upgrade them in-situ. There is a need to prepare a detailed plan for improving the slums and
it is suggested that tenure rights may be granted to the dwellers that do not have the title so that they
are able to upgrade their shelter on their own as there is no fear of eviction.

Governance and Reforms


For the local administration to implement all the projects under the town development plan in the first
instance and later, to maintain the new assets created thereby, it is necessary that the Nagar Parishad be
strengthened. Operations, particularly revenue collection needs to be computerized so that data is
clearly monitored and defaults can be identified on a periodic basis. This would help in proper resource
mobilization. Further, migration from a fund based or cash based system of accounting to a double entry
accounting mechanism is also a must. To do this at a later stage would be more time consuming and
difficult. Therefore, when the municipality is small, it is better to put the modern systems and
computerization of service delivery in place.

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Page 185

HANUMANA

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Annexure

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Page 186

HANUMANA

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd., Noida

Page 187

BASE MAP OF HANUMANA


N

TO MIRZAPUR

Y7

WA

H
HIG
AL
ION

T
NA

WARD
NO-1

WARD
NO-2

RF:1:9000

WARD
NO-11

WELL

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL


PETROL PUMP

REST
WELL
HOUSE

WARD
NO-3

CUSTOME AND TRADE


OFFICE

P.S

TIRAHA HANUMANA

WARD
NO-4
O

WARD
NO-5

.H
VT

POND

NAGAR PARISHAD

OLD.P.STATION

C
.S

WARD
NO-12

PLAY
GROUND

BUS STOP

POND
PARK

TO SAHPURA

GRAIN MANDI

WARD
NO-6

WARD
NO-10

WELL
I.T.I

POND

GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

POND

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE


PA
RK

WELL
CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-7

WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

LEGENDS

WARD
NO-9

PRIMARY SCHOOL

N.P. BOUNDARY
PRIMARY
SCHOOL

AY

WARD
NO-15

HW
IG

NA

N
IO
AT

YA
HI

WARD
NO-8

TO

A
LL

NA

A
W
RE

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180 270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

WATER BODY
BUILT-UP AREA

HI

SID

TO

WARD BOUNDARY

H
AL

ROAD NETWORK

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

NAGAR PARISHAD HANUMANA


COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY

NA
TI
ON
AL

HI
GH
W

AY

TO MIRZAPUR

N
RF:1:9000
TO SAHPURA

BLOCK

LEGENDS
N.P. BOUNDARY
AY

WATER BODY

GH

TI
NA

NA
H

IY
A

HI

ROAD

TO

NA
LL

L
NA

TO

W
RE

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180

270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

HI

CLIENT:

COMMERCIAL

SID

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

DRAINAGE MAP OF HANUMANA


TO MIRZAPUR

AY

HW

AL

HIG

ION

T
NA

WARD
NO-1

WARD
NO-2

WARD
NO-11

WELL

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL


PETROL PUMP

REST
HOUSE

WELL

CUSTOME OFFICE
P.S
TIRAHA HANUMANA

WARD
NO-3

RF:1:9000

WARD
NO-5

.S

WARD
NO-4

VT

.H

POND
NAGAR PARISHAD

WARD
NO-12

PLAY
GROUND

OLD.P.STATION
BUS STOP

POND
GRAIN MANDI

PARK

TO SAHPURA

WARD
NO-6

LEGENDS

HANUMANA
TEMPLE

POND
WELL

WARD
NO-10

I.T.I
BLOCK
GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

N.P. BOUNDARY

POND

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE


PARK

CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-7

PRIMARY SCHOOL

WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

WELL

WARD
NO-9

BUILT-UP AREA
PRIMARY
SCHOOL

AY

WARD BOUNDARY

ROAD NETWORK

WARD
NO-15

HW

IG

LH

TI

NA

WARD
NO-8

HI
SID

LA

AL

TO

IY
AH

A
ON

A
W

TO

RE

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180

270

360

WATER BODY
PUKKA DRAIN

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

LAND USE MAP OF HANUMANA


N

NA
TI
O

NA
L

HI
GH

AY

TO MIRZAPUR

RF:1:9000
LEGENDS
N.P. BOUNDARY
WATER BODY
ROAD
RESIDENTIONAL

TO SAHPURA

COMMERCIAL
MIXED LANDUSE
(RES+COMMERCIAL)
PUBLIC/SEMI PUBLIC
INDUSTARIAL
INSTITUTIONAL
AY

OPEN SPACE /
AGRICULTURAL AREA

W
GH

I
LH

A
ON

TI
NA

NA

HI
YA

TO

NA

LL

TO

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180 270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

HI

SID

RE

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

WARD MAP OF HANUMANA


LITERACY RATE

WARD
NO-1

N
WARD
NO-11

WARD
NO-2

RF:1:9000

WARD
NO-3

WARD
NO-4

LEGENDS

WARD
NO-5

WARD
NO-12

N.P. BOUNDARY
WARD
NO-10

WARD
NO-6

WARD BOUNDARY
LITERACY RATE
WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

WARD
NO-9
WARD
NO-7

BELOW 40
40 TO 60
ABOVE 60

WARD
NO-15

WARD
NO-8

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180

270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager,s Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

ROAD NETWORK MAP OF HANUMANA


TO MIRZAPUR

AY

W
IGH

LH

A
ION
AT

WARD
NO-1

LEGENDS
WARD
NO-11

WARD
NO-2

MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY

WELL

BUILT-UP AREA
GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL
PETROL PUMP

WARD
NO-3

WATER BODY

CUSTOME AND TRADE


OFFICE
P.S

REST
WELL
HOUSE

NATIONAL HIGHWAY 7

TIRAHA HANUMANA

WARD
NO-4
.S

PUKKA ROAD

.H

POND
G

NAGAR PARISHAD

VT

WARD
NO-5

OLD.P.STATION

PLAY
GROUND

BUS STOP

KUTCHA ROAD

WARD
NO-12

POND
PARK

TO SAHPURA

GRAIN MANDI

WARD
NO-6

WARD
NO-10

WELL

I.T.I

PROPOSED TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE

POND

PROPOSED ROAD

GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

POND

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

PA

BS

RK

WARD
NO-7

WELL
CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-13

WARD
NO-9

WARD
NO-14

NAH

PRIMARY
SCHOOL

WARD
NO-15

IYA
NAL
LA
IO

L
NA

G
HI

T
NA

HW

WARD
NO-8

TO

90

180

270

360

720M

HI
SID

TO

A
W
RE

JUNCTION IMPROVEMENT

PRIMARY SCHOOL

BS
AY

BUS STAND

RF:1:9000
CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

WARD MAP OF HANUMANA


POPULATION DENSITY

WARD
NO-1

N
WARD
NO-11

WARD
NO-2

WARD
NO-3

RF:1:9000
WARD
NO-4

LEGENDS

WARD
NO-5

WARD
NO-12

N.P. BOUNDARY
WARD
NO-10

WARD
NO-6

WARD BOUNDARY
POPULATION DENSITY
WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

WARD
NO-9
WARD
NO-7

BELOW 5
5 TO 10
ABOVE 10

WARD
NO-15

WARD
NO-8

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180

270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager,s Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

EXISTING AND PROPOSED SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE


TO MIRZAPUR

Y
WA

IGH

LH

NA

IO
AT

LEGENDS
WARD
NO-1

N.P. BOUNDARY
WARD
NO-2

WARD BOUNDARY

WARD
NO-11

WELL

RELIGIOUS BUILDING

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL

ITI
REST
WELL
HOUSE

WARD
NO-3

PETROL PUMP

CUSTOME AND TRADE


OFFICE

PS
P.S

TIRAHA HANUMANA

L
O
O

.S
.H

POND

SCHOOLS

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

PS

POLICE STATION

NAGAR PARISHAD

VT

WARD
NO-5

WARD
NO-4

OLD.P.STATION

WARD
NO-12

PLAY
GROUND

BUS STOP

POND
PARK

TO SAHPURA

GRAIN MANDI

WARD
NO-6

CS

WARD
NO-10

WELL

I.T.I

POND

PROPOSED SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE

CS

S
H

GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

POND

PC

POLY CLINIC

IS

INTEGRATED SCHOOL

ITI

POLY TECHNIQUE OR ITI

CS

COMMUNITY HALL

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

PA

RK

IS

WARD
NO-13

CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-7

WARD
NO-9

PRIMARY SCHOOL

WARD
NO-14

PC

S
AY

WARD
NO-15

W
GH

ON

PRIMARY
SCHOOL

I
LH

TI

YA

HI

NA

NA

TO

LL
NA

90

180

270

360

720M

HI
SID

TO

A
W
RE

WARD
NO-8

RF:1:9000
CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

WATER SUPPLY NETWORK


TO MIRZAPUR

AY

HW

AL

HIG

ION

T
NA

LEGENDS
WARD
NO-1

N.P. BOUNDARY
WARD
NO-2

WARD BOUNDARY

WARD
NO-11

WELL

BUILT-UP AREA

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL


PETROL PUMP

REST
HOUSE

WELL

CUSTOME OFFICE

ROAD NETWORK

P.S

OHT
TIRAHA
HANUMANA

WARD
NO-3

WARD
NO-4
C

WATER BODY

.S

WARD
NO-5

VT

.H

POND
NAGAR PARISHAD

WARD
NO-12

PLAY
GROUND

OLD.P.STATION
BUS STOP

WATER SUPPLY LINES

POND
GRAIN MANDI

PARK

TO SAHPURA

WARD
NO-6

HANUMANA
TEMPLE

OHT

OHT

POND
WELL

WARD
NO-10

I.T.I
BLOCK
GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

OVERHEAD TANK
WATER SUPPLY LINES

POND

OHT
COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

PROPOSED WATER SUPPLY LINES

PARK

CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-7

PRIMARY SCHOOL

WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

WELL

WARD
NO-9

OHT

PROPOSED OVERHEAD TANK

PRIMARY
SCHOOL

AY

HI

GH

IY
AH
A

WARD
NO-8

HI
SID

LA

AL

N
TO

TO

AL

ON

I
AT

WARD
NO-15

A
W
RE

90

180

270

360

720M

RF:1:9000
CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

DRAINAGE MAP OF HANUMANA


TO MIRZAPUR

AY

HW

AL

HIG

ION

T
NA

WARD
NO-1

WARD
NO-2

WARD
NO-11

WELL

LEGENDS

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL


PETROL PUMP

N.P. BOUNDARY
REST
HOUSE

WELL

CUSTOME OFFICE
P.S
TIRAHA HANUMANA

WARD
NO-3

WARD
NO-4

WARD
NO-5

.S

WARD BOUNDARY

VT

.H

POND

BUILT-UP AREA

NAGAR PARISHAD

WARD
NO-12

PLAY
GROUND

OLD.P.STATION
BUS STOP

POND
GRAIN MANDI

ROAD NETWORK

PARK

TO SAHPURA

WARD
NO-6

HANUMANA
TEMPLE

POND
WELL

WARD
NO-10

I.T.I
BLOCK

WATER BODY

GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

POND

PUKKA DRAIN

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE


PARK

WARD
NO-13

WELL
CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-7

PRIMARY SCHOOL

WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-9

FLOOD PRONE AREA/ LOW LYING


AREAS

PRIMARY
SCHOOL

AY

HI

GH

IY
AH
A

RE

WARD
NO-8

HI
SID

LA

AL

N
A
W

TO

WARD
NO-15

TO

AL

ON

I
AT

PROPOSED DRAIN

90

180

270

360

720M

RF:1:9000
CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

ROAD NETWORK MAP OF HANUMANA


TO MIRZAPUR

AY

W
IGH

LH

A
ION
AT

WARD
NO-1

WARD
NO-11

WARD
NO-2

WELL

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL


PETROL PUMP

CUSTOME AND TRADE


OFFICE

REST
WELL
HOUSE

WARD
NO-3

P.S

TIRAHA HANUMANA

.H

POND

RF:1:9000

NAGAR PARISHAD

VT

WARD
NO-5

.S

WARD
NO-4

OLD.P.STATION

PLAY
GROUND

BUS STOP

WARD
NO-12

POND
PARK

TO SAHPURA

GRAIN MANDI

WARD
NO-6

WARD
NO-10

WELL

I.T.I

POND

GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

LEGENDS

POND

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

PA

RK

WARD
NO-7

WELL
CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY

WARD
NO-13

WARD
NO-9

WARD
NO-14

BUILT-UP AREA

PRIMARY SCHOOL

WATER BODY

PRIMARY
SCHOOL

NAH

WARD
NO-15

IYA
NAL
LA

AY

AL
ON

G
HI

NATIONAL HIGHWAY 7

HW

T
NA

TO

A
W
RE

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180

270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

HI
SID

TO

WARD
NO-8

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

PUKKA ROAD
KUTCHA ROAD

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

WARD MAP OF HANUMANA


SEX RATIO

WARD
NO-1

N
WARD
NO-11

WARD
NO-2

RF:1:9000

WARD
NO-3

WARD
NO-4

LEGENDS

WARD
NO-5

WARD
NO-12

N.P. BOUNDARY
WARD
NO-10

WARD
NO-6

WARD BOUNDARY
SEX RATIO
WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

WARD
NO-9
WARD
NO-7

BELOW 900
900 TO 950
ABOVE 950

WARD
NO-15

WARD
NO-8

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180

270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager,s Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

LOCATION OF URBAN POOR IN HANUMANA


TO MIRZAPUR

Y
WA

IGH

LH

NA

IO
AT

WARD
NO-1

WARD
NO-2

WARD
NO-11

WELL

LEGENDS

GOVT. PRIMARY SCHOOL


PETROL PUMP

REST
WELL
HOUSE

WARD
NO-3

CUSTOME AND TRADE


OFFICE

N.P. BOUNDARY

P.S

TIRAHA HANUMANA

WARD
NO-4
.S

WARD BOUNDARY

.H

POND
G

NAGAR PARISHAD

VT

WARD
NO-5

OLD.P.STATION

WARD
NO-12

PLAY
GROUND

BUS STOP

BUILT-UP AREA

POND
PARK

TO SAHPURA

GRAIN MANDI

WARD
NO-6

WARD
NO-10

WELL

I.T.I

ROAD NETWORK

POND

GOVT.MIDDLE SCHOOL

LOCATION OF URBAN POOR

POND

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

PA

RK

WELL
CMO HOUSE
WATER TANK

WARD
NO-7

WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13
WARD
NO-9

PRIMARY SCHOOL

PRIMARY
SCHOOL

AY

WARD
NO-15

W
GH

ON

I
LH

TI

YA

HI

NA

NA

TO

LL
NA

A
W
RE

90

180

270

360

720M

HI
SID

TO

WARD
NO-8

RF:1:9000
CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

Project coordination:
City Manager's Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

WARD MAP OF HANUMANA


N
WARD
NO-1

RF:1:9000

WARD
NO-11

WARD
NO-2

WARD
NO-3

WARD
NO-4

WARD
NO-5

WARD
NO-12

WARD
NO-10

WARD
NO-6

WARD
NO-14

WARD
NO-13

WARD
NO-9

LEGENDS

WARD
NO-7

N.P. BOUNDARY
WARD
NO-15

WARD BOUNDARY

WARD
NO-8

CLIENT:

Urban Administration & Development


Department, Madhya Pradesh.

90

180 270

360

720M

Project coordination:
City Manager,s Association
Madhya Pradesh

Submitted By:
DMG CONSULTING Pvt.Ltd.
Noida ,Uttar Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN


HANUMANA

Local Tourist Circuit Upgradation


1.1. Background
Madhya Pradesh offers outstanding opportunity to indulge in various tourism options such as cultural tourism,
heritage tourism, adventure tourism, wildlife tourism and many more. A variety of traditions in each of
Madhya Pradesh's four geographical and cultural regions-Malwa, Nimad, Baghelkhand and Bundelkhand
have added color to the State's rich cultural tapestry, making it a many splendoured land. There are many
deserving tourist destinations in the State widely acclaimed for its rich cultural heritage sites and wonders.
Heritage tourism is one of the most popular options of tourism appealing tourists from all over the world.
Hanumana place is known for Hanuman Temple. The temple is 150 year old. The myth about temple is lord
Hanuman born here. The place was very famous in 1940 to 1970.
Hanumana falls under lacal tourist circuit of Hanumana Deotalab Bahuti Water fall Rewa circuit.
Despite it ideal location within the tourism circuit with rich inventory of tourism resources, this region Lacks
Tourism infrastructure such as Tourist Information Centers, transportation facilities, public conveniences such
as toilets, refreshment centers, information Centre etc. Further, being located in isolation in terms of
development, the region is facing challenges, which directly and indirectly curb the growth of tourism. The
existing infrastructure, safety & Security, local awareness and others are the major hindrance for the
development of the tourism in this region.
The Hanumana region receives very few numbers of tourists in comparison to other destination of tourism
circuits. Despite its strategic location within the circuit, city has not been developed as a nodal Centre as base
city to cater tourist for its facilities. The existing infrastructure is inadequate to support tourism in the region
and it needs urgent up gradation. The region has wide range of tourism products, which need to be integrated
and made an intra-circuit to increase the duration of stay of the Tourists in the region. Mauganj city has great
potential in the region to cater tourist from the circuit i.e. Hanumana Deotalab Bahuti Water fall Rewa
circuit.
Integrating with other destination, Hanumana can be converted as a transit zone between Mauganj and
Deotalab or Bahuti Water fall.
Hence, immense potential for developing Hanuman as one of the religious node with Hanuman Temple,
Pardeshwer Mahadev Temple, Lakshmi Temple and Pond located in the central part of the town near
hanuman Temple, need to be fully exploited. In terms of improving the tourism product, in the short term
quick gains can be made by developing the destination and providing basic infrastructure facilities at various
tourist locations and at city level with high potential, which are already well connected and have a reasonable
infrastructure in place.
1.2. Madhya Pradesh Tourism and Heritage Policy
The State Tourism Policy, Heritage Tourism Policy and Eco and Adventure Tourism Policies of the State
supported with initiatives towards strengthening of infrastructure and facilities at places of tourist interests is
an important indicator of commitment of the GoMP to create an environment conducive for attracting

DMG Consulting Pvt. Ltd.

increased private investment in the tourism sector. In accordance with the aims and objectives of the Tourism
Policy of the State and the provisions made towards development of tourism sector, the Government of MP,
Department of Tourism has issued a Policy for the Allotment of Government Land for the Development of
Tourism in the State.
The Madhya Pradesh Department of Tourism has, to date, sought to develop the tourism potential of the State
by involving itself in three major activities: Providing decent accommodation in areas of tourism interest,
operating a transport fleet of coaches, cars and Gypsies, and organizing package tours. Publicity and
marketing of tourist destinations and facilities has also been a major thrust activity. Apart from these efforts
undertaken by the Government, the private sector has also contributed by way of investment in hotels,
transport, and marketing of some important tourist destinations in the State. However, the efforts of the
Government and the private sector have not been dovetailed into a common developmental programme, with
the result that there has been overemphasis at certain venues, while some other important places and activities
have been neglected.
The Tourism Policy envisages creation of an environment conducive to attracting increased private
investment in the tourism sector, and a more meaningful role for the Government. The focus will be on i)
Improvement and creation of adequate basic infrastructure- land, road, water, electricity etc. ii) Up gradation
and augmentation of accommodation, catering and recreational facilities, iii) Augmentation of transport
facilities, iv) Marketing of destinations to ensure optimal use of infrastructure, v) Establishing and
strengthening institutions for the development of human resources, vi) Evolving suitable policies for
increasing foreign exchange earnings, vii) Promotion of the arts and crafts of the State.
One of the objectives of the Tourism Policy of Madhya
Pradesh announced in 1995 was to convert the heritage wealth
of the State i.e. forts, palaces, havelis and kothis into heritage
hotels. Later, Madhya Pradesh Heritage Tourism Policy-2002
also envisages and set urgent needs for restoration of these
beautiful buildings are unable to attract tourists in large
numbers.
1.3. Places of Tourist Interest in and Around the City
In Hanumana, there is Hanuman Temple, Lakshmi Temple,
Pardeshwar Mahadev temple and Rani Talab etc. are major
destinations in the town which can be developed from tourism point of view. Town is very near to Bahuti
water fall which has a different scenic beauty. Deotalab is also located near to the Hanumana town which is
famous for Mahadev temple. Rewa, the district headquarter
is also near to the town but unfortunately, Hanumana town
is not able to attract the tourist in the lack of tourist
infrastructure.
1.3.1. Hanuman Temple
Hanumana place is known for Hanuman Temple. The
temple is 150 year old. The myth about temple is lord
Hanuman born here. The place was very famous in 1940 to

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1970.
Hanuman temple is located in the south eastern part of the Hanumana town.
1.3.2. Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple
Pardeshwar Mahadev temple is also located in the northern side of Hanumana town. This town is
beautiful and located on National Highway 7 which conect town to Mirzapur in northern side and
Mauganj in southern side. This temple attract tourist coming from Mirzapur and Rewa. Unfortunately
this temple has lack of infrastructure and is not able to attract tourist in large numbers.
The town have lakshmi temple and Rani Talab which is
famous but the condition of both these destinations is very
bad. The town is also a hub of education centre in this region.
1.3.3. Mahadev Temple
Mahadev temple is another temple in Deotalab at a distance of
17 kilometer on Rewa road.
1.3.4. Rani Gujra Talab
Rani Gujra talab is beautiful place in northern part of the Mauganj town. Hanuman mandir is also located near
to this talab which enhance its aesthetic view.
1.3.5. Bahuti water fall
Bahuti Falls is on the Odda River as it rushes down the edge of
the Rewa Plateau to join the Bihad River, which is a tributary of Tamsa
or Tons River. It is near Chachai Falls. It has a height of 142 meters
(466 ft).
The Bahuti Falls is an example of a nick point caused by
rejuvenation. Knick point, also called a nick point or simply nick,
represents breaks in slopes in the longitudinal profile of a river
caused by rejuvenation. The break in channel gradient allows water
to fall vertically giving rise to a waterfall.
1.3.6. Rewa Fort and Museum Complex

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Fort Rewa was the seventeenth-century


citadel of the Baghel Dynasty of Rewa, a
former princely state in northeast India.
The fort served as the administrative and
spiritual centre of the state, with palatial
living quarters and temples. With the end
of princely rule, the palace ceased to serve
its original function and fell into a state of
neglect over a period of forty years. The
Figure: Rewa Fort
roof was damaged, the mud brick of the
walls deteriorated, and the former parade ground became a derelict space. The conservators aimed to restore
the fort as a tourist attraction, while simultaneously constructing a public school within its precincts. The roof
has been carefully repaired and the Allahabad brickwork and lime mortar replaced where necessary. The royal
audience halls have been reopened as a museum. The fort got official entries for UNESCO -2009 Awards for
Culture Heritage Conservation.
The Rewa fort is a typical module of medieval architecture replicates different type of era and its architecture,
thus making it very unique. The Durbar Hall is the most attractive portion of the fort. Pili Kothi is an outhouse
which today hosts the Bagheal museum, which is a private collection of stone, arms, Throne and silver
Gallery, White Tiger Gallery, Crockery & Cutleries, Chandelier
Gallery, Paintings & Photo Gallery etc. The gallery has
collection of idols and painting of different gods, goddesses &
his other companions attending the marriage, singing & dancing
ladies to welcome the marriage party. In the fort, major
attractions are: The stuffed white tiger- Mohan; Gold & silver
elephant seat (Hauda); double barrel .22 & pen pistol; Chinese
Vases and a lot more for any arms, art & history lover.
1.3.7. Pili Kothi
This building was made by Maharaja Vyankat Raman Singh in
Figure: Museum in Rewa Fort
1912 for his beloved daughter. This building is called Pili Kothi
due to its colour and the area surrounding it is called Pili Kothi campus. This building also known as New
Kothi. Presently it is with Maharaj Pushpraj Singh, in which he ran the Baghela museum for 10 years, but
after the renovation of the Fort Rewa the museum is
transferred there and this building is used for official
purpose by Woman & Child Department on rent on the
1st and a heritage marriage hall on the ground floor.
1.4. Arts & Crafts
1.4.1. Handicrafts / Articrafts & Other Human
Resources in the Region:Madhya Pradesh is also known for its carpets where
Rewa is one of the centres in the state. The toys made
Figure: Pili Kothi
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out of Beatle nut are very rare and famous in this area, which cant be got anywhere else. Except these there
are many women who are involved in bangle making and other artistic works. Ahir (Yadav) & Kali are the
main folk dances of this area. Most of the dishes made in this area are based on dals (Lenten) and hence very
nutritious and less spicy in character.
1.5. Existing Status of Major Tourist Destinations
Cleanliness in the surrounding areas is not been taken care of which effects the less number of tourists visit
the place. Landscaping, where ever open spaces are available has not been done and the spaces been left
unseen. Haphazard vegetative growth provides negative impression on the tourists. No safety measure like
provision of guards on most of the temples has been taken.
Direct discharge of sewage from domestic sources, not connected to treatment plants; eventually make its way
into existing water body i.e. Rani Gujra Talab.
Lack of public utilities, proper information, water facility, refreshment counters and above all parking spaces
in or around most of the temple complexes affects the number of visitors at such places.
Table 1: Assessment of tourist destination in & around the city

Sr.
No.

Assessment
Parameters

a.

Agency responsible for


protection
b. Accessibility/ Connectivity
c. Visibility of the
Building/Sites
d. Condition of access road
e. Site displayed Signage
f. Cleanliness of
Surroundings
g. Landscaping
h. Safety & Security
i. Overall Maintenance
j. Parking Facilities 2
Wheeler, Bus, other
k. Public Toilets
l. Refreshment stalls
m. Information Kiosks
n. Drinking Water Facility
Source: DMG Consulting, Pvt. Ltd.

Major Tourist Destination/sites in and around the City


Hanuman
Pardeshwar
Mahadev Temple, Bahuti Water
Temple,
Mahadev
Deotalab
fall
Hanumana
Temple,
Hanumana
Nagar Parishad Nagar Parishad Nagar Panchayat MP
Tourism
Hanumana
Hanumana
Deotalab
Department
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Good
Excellent
Good
Fair
Fair

Good
Fair
Fair

Good
Fair
Fair

Good
Fair
Fair

Fair
Poor
Good
Available

Fair
Poor
Good
Available

Not Available
Available (Pvt)
Not Available
Available

Not Available
Available (Pvt)
Not Available
Available

Fair
Good
Fair
Fair
Good
Good
Available, but not Available, but
designated
not designated
Available
Not Available
Available (Pvt)
Available (Pvt)
Not Available
Not Available
Available
Not Available

Presently, no major efforts have been initiated by the government to encourage the tourism in on these sites. It
requires immediate attention to develop the tourism infrastructure on these sites.

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1.6. Tourist Arrival


Tourism has been identified as one of the key drivers of growth by the MP government. Eight million
domestic tourists and 160,000 foreigners visited the state in 2005-06. The government has approved $12.2
million for development of 17 tourist locations across the state and is also making concrete efforts to improve
air connectivity to other states. It has taken initiatives to promote eco and adventure tourism and is keen on
promoting medical/ herbal tourism in association with private parties.
There is no record for tourist visiting various sites in and around Hanumana. There is no entrance ticket
system prevailing either at the main entrance of tourist destination or at any of the temples. This is the major
handicap in estimating the accurate tourist influx at Mauganj and Rewa.
Despite, presence of historical building and temple, the city does not fall within any tourism circuit in the
state. Local Tourism prospect of Hanumana (Rural Tourism Circuit) can be viewed with the development of
city infrastructure and existing tourism destination to make a complete circuit with the Hanumana-MauganjDeotalab-Bhauti waterfall-Rewa.
1.7. Assessment of Tourism Supported Infrastructure
Tourism Development of any destination cannot be accomplished without proper development of support
infrastructure facilities including accessibility, accommodation, water supply, sanitation, power and drainage.
In Hanumana city, very limited infrastructure is developed. Except approach road, small shops and drinking
water none of the infrastructure are available like Toilet facility, Solid waste Management, Street Lightning
etc. at the tourist spots.
1.7.1. Transportation
There is good network of roads connecting all the major parts of the state with Hanumana. The National
Highway 7 connects Hanumana with major cities of Madhya Pradesh. Hanumana is not directly connected to
railway line. The nearest railway station is Mirzapur Railway Station at a distance of 68 Km. followed by
Rewa the District Headquarter (100 Km.) and Allahabad (111 kilometers).The nearest airport is Rewa airport
which is approximately 101 Km. from Hanumana via Raipur (Madhya Pradesh) through N.H. 7 followed by
Bamrauli (Defense Air Base) in Uttar Pradesh at a distance of 124 Km. and Satna (approximately 144 kms.)
which has an airstrip, however not in use for regular fights. The Varanasi a holly city is the nearest airport for
civil aviation (approximately 143 kms.) from the Hanumana via Gopiganj through N.H. 34 & N.H. 2.
1.7.2. Accommodations (Regional Level)
At town level, Hanumana have only one Dharmshala and one hotel facility to accommodate the peoples or
tourists. But at district headquarter Rewa; there are nearly 497 beds in 24 various categories of
Accommodation. Besides this, the Rewa city has nearly 5-6 Dharmshalas, which accommodates
approximately 400-500 people in total. A three Star level hotel namely Hotel Rewa Raj Vilas (owned by
Maharaja Rewa) is situated in the heart of city.
1.8. Suggested Action Programmes
1.8.1. Key Concern Areas for Tourism Development
Key concern areas for enhancement of tourism development in Hanumana have been identified from the
analysis of existing tourist scenarios and overview of SWOT analysis. The following table shows the Key
concern areas.

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Table 2: Key Concern Areas and related issues

Issues

Remarks

Limited Tourist inflow

Continued
tourism
infrastructure constraints
Information Constraints

Suggestions
related

Once
Hanuman
temple
of
Hanumana and Mahadev temple in
Unexplored
Religious
Deotalab was very famous for its
and Heritage Assets
religious importance in the state,
now they have almost lost their
charm due to poor maintenance and
Lack
of
tourism
supported
infrastructure.
Unexplored marketing
Lack of diversified tourism activities
On site infrastructure is inadequate
Most of the sites are not equipped
On site/offsite deficiency
with basic tourism infrastructure
of infrastructure
facilities such as parking, en-route
facility etc.
Inadequate road widths and poor
condition of roads connecting
various tourist destinations.
Lack of Publicity

Specifically define potential


area of tourist attractions where
there are wide ranges of
tourism products.
Enhance the attractiveness by
augmenting core activities by
providing additional activities.
Focus is to be given to identify
new tourism products
Transverse tourism circuit
linking destinations of Mauganj
with other major tourist spots in
Rewa and other districts.

Improve
Connectivity
and
access - by projects covering
roads, rail, and air.

Hanumana with its local tourist


circuit can boost as the place of the
religious tourism and scenic beauty
in India.

Publicity by Brochure, audiovisual, literature for various


market segments within the
country and also abroad.
Development of tourist facilities
at these localities.

Inadequate information
dissemination

Limitation in tourist traffic /


monitoring tourist database and
database Management

Data Collection / information


collection by ticketing at entry
points of all the potential sites.
Information brochures bulletins
and package tours to be
published.

Lack of Rani Talab


(Near
Hanuman
Temple) Conservation

Contamination in pond water


because town doesnt have drainage
system and treatment plan. There is
also absence of solid waste
management.

Private partner can bring in


activities such as boating
facilities,
jogging
track,
childrens park, theme park,
water parks, and nature walks
etc. around the Rani Pond which
would help in accruing revenue
all the year round.

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Issues

Remarks

Suggestions

There should be a planned


drainage system and solid waste
management in the Hanumana
city.

1.9. Tourism Development Option & Strategies


Despite its strategic location within the tourism circuit, Hanumana city has not been developed as a nodal
centre or as a base city to cater tourist for its facilities. In the tourism circuit of Mirzapur Rewa Panna
Chhattarpur Chitrakoot, Panna is a major Tourist node in the region after Chitrakoot and Chhattarpur.
Hanumana can play a tourist node or base town to support tourist with its supported infrastructure. Presently,
infrastructure is inadequate to support tourism in the region, and it needs urgent upgradation. Further, an
integrated circuit can be formed considering Rewa, Deotalab, Mauganj and Hanumana as part of religious
tourism to support as base facilitation centre. The region has wide range of tourism products, which need to
be integrated and made an intra-circuit to increase the duration of stay of the Tourists in the region.
Hanumana with Hanuman temple and Pardeshwer Mahadev temple has great potential in the region to cater
tourist from the circuit. Some of the destinations like Rani Gujra talab (Mauganj), Mahadev temple
(Deotalab), Bahuti water fall etc. can be raised to the status of sub - nodes, with adequate improvement of
infrastructure and development of new tourism product.
In the nearest towns of Hanumana, Rewa is one of the art and craft centre in the region and also a major city
for providing lodging and boarding facilities.
At present city is devoid of basic tourism supported infrastructure such as tourism information centre, basic
amenities at destinations within the city as well as accommodation of attracting high end tourism. Some
associated cultural activity areas like Rani Talab and Bahuti waterfall area can be developed which will form
an integrated cultural and natural tourist circuit. The immense potential for developing Hanumana as one of
the destination with heritage and religious destination, it needs to be fully exploited. In terms of improving the
tourism product, in the short term quick gains can be made by developing the destination and providing basic
infrastructure facilities at locations with high potential, which are already well connected and have a
reasonable infrastructure in place.

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Figure: Major Tourist circuits around the Hanumana city

The overall tourism development of Hanumana Region can be segmented into two levels
a) Major Tourism Circuits -Though there are many tourism attractions scattered around the Hanumana City
linking Rewa, Deotalab, Hanumana etc.
b) Minor Tourism Circuits- The Cultural (Heritage) and religious tourism destinations located in and around
the city includes Hanuman Temple (Hanumana), Pardeshwer Mahadev Temple (Hanumana), Rani Talab
(Hanumana), Rani Gujra Talab (Mauganj), Mahadev temple (Deotalab) and other temple and heritage can be
integrated within this Mega Tourism Project.
Hanumana as a tourist needs to be a co-ordinated effort to improve the quality and range of public realm
spaces, heritage sites and temples and other facilities. The emphasis of this is on Hanumana Nagar Parishad
for overall development of the city.
Overall Development of Hanuman Town- Hanumana has great potential for tourism development. Planned
tourism development in Hanumana would significantly increase domestic and foreign tourist arrivals and
attract their long duration visits. This would result in their higher spending for various facilities and services
within the region. This would directly boost up trade and commerce, transport sectors and other service
sectors. Studies show that tourism is one sector having the highest multiplier effect. Tourism can trigger off
development in many supporting sectors and create a large number of employment opportunities.
1.10.

Recommended Tourism Development Proposals

Considering all these aspects, the activities can be well planned and organised to enhance tourist attraction by
providing;
a) Site attractiveness /enhancement Projects
Conservation of Hanuman Temple and development of basic amenities to the tourist.
Development of tourist infrastructure at Pardeshwer Mahadev Temple, Rani talab etc.
Development of tourist infrastructure at Bahuti waterfall.

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b)

c)

d)
e)

Provide large open areas and street furniture in the city.


Additional attractiveness
Waterfront Development
Shopping arcade with Cafeteria selling art materials, dance materials, other essential articles for
students, schools & visitors.
Site specific critical infrastructure project
A comprehensive Master Plan of the area needs to be prepared.
Provision of designated paid parking areas for tourist buses, cars and other vehicles.
General landscape plan for the area
Design and location for every component of street furniture
Development Guidelines and control
Programmes based on development guidelines and also enforcement controls.
Marketing
Defining Tourism Circuit in the State, adding Hanumana as one of the cultural centre.

1.11.

Action Programme

The action program aims to specify and define potential areas of tourist attractions where wide ranges of
tourism products can be provided, enhancing the attractiveness by augmenting existing core activities by
providing additional activities and improve connectivity and access to already tourist attraction at a subdued
level. The objective is to support regenerate and upgrade the existing attraction through augmenting core
activities by providing additional activities.
Development of Hanuman Temple Area and Pardeshwar Mahadev Temple Area- Hanuman Temple area is to
be developed as an integrated cultural zone and this will attract tourists.
Construction of public convenience and safe drinking water facilities within the temple complex
Construction of Parking for tourist vehicles
Establishing `Light and Sound shows
Construction of Entrance Gate: The entrance Gate of monument, which helps to form the first
impression of what, is inside. An artistically designed gateway by incorporating architectural elements
should be provided at the site.
1.12. City Level Green spaces and Parks
The City lacks in proper green spaces and the presently there is no park. There is need of park development.
Establishment of Regional Park- Regional Park may be developed at Rani Talab because it is also near to
Hanuman temple and it is also centrally located. The landscape may incorporate meandering pathways,
seating places, concealed low-intensity lighting, etc. The facilities will also include Refreshment centre,
Toilets, drinking water facilities and Landscaped Garden etc.
1.13.

Enhancement and Up-gradation of City Level Infrastructure

i.

Designated Parking facilities


a. Provision of designated paid parking areas for tourist buses, cars and other vehicles.
b. Provision of designated taxi and auto stands in at least 2 or 3 locations in the central area.

ii.

Clock rooms and pay - use toilets for men and women at a minimum of 3 locations by the side

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10

iii.

iv.

v.

1.14.

Construct pay & use toilets in places of public assembly and also in tourist locations. It should be
made mandatory for all shopping areas and restaurants having more than a specified built up area to
provide public toilet facilities, which may also be maintained on, pay & use basis. The major roads
may also be provided with wayside coin operated toilets, at least in major urban centers. The models
adopted by Sulabh Sauchalaya in many towns and cities are worth mentioning in this context. The
local self-governments, both urban and rural, should be made to think and act on these lines.
General landscape plan for the area
Charming garden with lush green landscape will add elegance to the whole town. The tourist
complexes should be properly landscaped in a manner compatible with the environmental character of
the surroundings. No construction should commence without having secured the consent of the
appropriate authority for the provision of infrastructural services, i.e. electricity, telephone, road
access, water, etc.
Design and location for every component of street furniture
Designed Electrical & telephone poles in the area should be replaced with artistically designed
beautiful ancient looking poles. Stone Benches with shade. The benches in the heritage area should be
artistically designed.
Tourist Facility & Information Centre
Establish tourist facility centre including tourist information centre, toilet and drinking water facilities
and conventional shops near Hanuman temple and Pardeshwer Mahadev temple.
SWOT Analysis

Strength
Hanumana falls under a tourist circuit which
has potential to hold the tourist some time.
Number of tourist increasing with time.
Opportunity
Hanumana got good road connectivity and it is
also near to Mirzapur Railway Station.
Hanumana has famous Hanuman temple and
Pardeshwer Mahdev temple which will attracts
tourist.

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Weakness
Non- maintained Hanuman temple and Rani Talab.
No proper connectivity to some of the tourist centers.
Poor existing infrastructure.
Threat
Un-maintained heritage site might result into ruined
structures.
Inadequate infrastructure & connectivity may leads to
decline in tourist flow.

11

1.15.

Best Practice

Box: 0.1: Heritage Conservation Gohar mahal Restoration & Reuse as Craft centre
Background:
Bhopal is the capital of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and the administrative headquarters of Bhopal District and Bhopal
Division. The city was the capital of the former Bhopal state. Bhopal is also known as the Lake City for its various natural as well as
artificial lakes and is one of the greenest cities in India.
Gohar Mahal is situated in the banks of the magnificent Upper Lake. It is one of
the beautiful palaces in Bhopal. Gohar Mahal is an architectural marvel, which
presents a perfect blend of Hindu and Mughal Architecture.
It is constructed by
Kudasia Begum in
1819 AD and due to
unmaintained
conditions; it has
become
degraded
and dilapidated.
Key Components of the Projects:
To recover that condition detailed documentation and condition
assessment of the building has been done and prepared a restoration and
reuse proposal by INTACH. It also involved community in the redevelopment process to know their views and perception.
The palace has been restored and maintained the original fabric and construction details of the buildings. New functions will be
introduced to convert the complex into an Urban Haat to showcase the local craft and a cuisine. This project has been supported by
DC H&H, Government of India and MPHHVN, Govt. of Madhya Pradesh.
Lesson Learned:

Complete participation of the community at all stages.

Conservation as a tool to promote development and improve living standards.

Close partnerships with national and local government bodies as well as with international funding agencies.

1.16.
Sr.
No.
1
a
b
c
d
e
2
a
b
c

Summary of Projects
Projects
Development of Hanuman temple area and Pardeshwer Mahadev temple area
Preparation of Conservation Plan
Construction
of shopping arcade

Construction of public convenience and safe drinking water facilities


Construction of Parking for tourist vehicles
Establishing `Light and Sound
Development of Rani Talab
Preparation of Conservation Plan for Rani talab.
Purification and refilling of water in Rani talab.
Construction of shopping arcade
Construction of public convenience and safe drinking water facilities

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12

SE

municipal
sF finance
finance
Y
2
0
0
4
0
5

CT

t
o

OR

F
Y
2
0
0
7
0
8

AN

d
e
2
a

3
a
b
c
d
e
f

Construction of Parking for tourist vehicles


Establishing `Light and Sound
City Level Green spaces and Parks
Establishment of Regional Park at Rani Gujra Talab area including landscaped open area for
stage and assembly area for gatherings, dinners, performances etc. including fitting and fixture
of sitting and lighting.
Tourism Supported Infrastructure in the Mauganj City and Bahuti water fall
Construction of Designated Parking facilities for taxi stand and tourist Vehicle
Establishment of Public Convenience
Design and location for every component of street furniture, signage
Tourist Facility & Information Centre- Establish tourist facility centre including tourist
information centre, toilet and drinking water facilities and conventional shops.
Construction of Cafeteria, Restaurants, toilets, shops,etc
Security /Police Cabins

AL
YS
IS

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13

Hanumana is a small town and Tehsil of Rewa District in Madhya Pradesh.

100 kms North-east from Rewa Town (District Headquarter).

General Information
Population

16773

Area

3035 Ha

Geographical Location
Latitude

24o 77N

Longitude

82o 09E

Altitude

500 m above MSL

Connectivity
Roadways

NH-7 Rewa to Mirzapur passing through the town.

Railway Linkage

Nearest Railway station is at Mirzapur, U.P. (68 Kms) and at


Rewa (100 Kms), and Allahabad (111 Kms)

Airways

Airport at Rewa 101 Kms away from the town and Defense Air
Base at Bamrauli 124 Kms away from the town.

Location of Hanumana, M.P.

Population

16773

SC Population

18%

ST Population

19%

Declining Average Decadal Growth Rate


1991 2001

31.07 %

2001 2011

12.79%

Population Density

5.53 pph

High Density (>7 pph)

In wards 3,4,6,8 and 15

Low Density (<4 pph)

In wards 2,7, and 12

Population Projection

27735 (Year 2035)

Source: Provisional Population, Census of India, 2011

Comparative Assessment of Urban Population


Total Population

Area

Urban Population

Urban India

Male

Female

Decadal Growth
Rate 2001-2011

Madhya
(Urban)

Pradesh

37,71,05,760
2,00,59,666

Rewa
(Urban)

District

3,95,487

2,07,771

1,87,716

23.40%

Nagar

16,773

8,748

8,025

12.79%

18,12,98,564
95,89,155

31.80%
25.63%

Population of Hanumana

20000
15000
Population

Hanumana
Parishad

19,58,07,196
1,04,70,511

10000
5000
0
Decades

1991

2001

2011

Average Literacy Rates


Census 2001

52.65%

Census 2011

63.21%

District Average (2011)

73.42%

Literacy Rate
Male

70.87

Female

54.87

Sex Ratio
Census 2001

907/1000

Census 2011

917/1000

Average Household Size

WFPR

34.36%

Work force in tertiary sector

46%

Developed Area

7%

Undeveloped area

93%

Urban growth is envisaged along the major corridor and towards Rewa city on NH
7, towards Sidhi on Hamunama-Sidhhi road.

The town has growth potential as it connects Sidhi and Rewa and Allahabad.

Landuse

Area in Hectare

Percentage

Residential
Commercial
Industrial
Public/Semi public and Public
Utilities
Recreational
Transportation
Water Body
Total Developed Area
Undeveloped Area/ Agricultural Land

182.18
3.43
0.00
2.55

87.76
1.65
0.00
1.23

0.00
12.08
7.39
207.59
2828.01

0.00
5.82
3.56
6.84
93.18

Total Municipal Area

3035.60

100

Remarks
%age out of the Total
Developed Area

%age out of the Total


Municipal Area

Future Growth Potential, Hanumana,M.P.

STRENGTH
Hanumana lies in geologically safe seismic zone.

Organic growth along the roads results better


connectivity will all the parts of the town like NH-7 from
NE to SW connecting wards 1,3,4,6,7,8,9,10 and road to
Sidhi towards SE connects wards 10, 12,13,14 and 15
and road to Shahpura towards NW connects wards 2,6,9
etc.
Presence of water bodies in wards 4,6 and 13 acting as
the major sources of water.

Availability of the agricultural land around the town


specially in wards 1,2,7,8,9,11,12,14
OPPORTUNITY
The development is happening radial and concentrated
in the centre which provides an opportunity for better
planning approach.
Development of agro-based industries and inviting
private developers can create housing demand,
specially in wards 3,4,5,10,11,12 and 13.
Better quality housing demand and cheap land values
can attract real estate developers for development of
new townships in peripheral areas specially in wards
12,13,14,15

WEAKNESS
High population density in core area
(wards 3,4,5,6,9 and 10) along the NH-7
causing congestion and pressure on
existing infrastructure.
Only 6.84% of the total area is developed
and 32% of the built houses are permanent
and 66.91% are semi-permanent and
0.44% are temporary.
Location of the industrial area in ward no.
5 and 6 which is surrounded by the
residential area is not preferable.
THREAT
The locations of the urban poor are in
prime areas like in wards 1,5,6 which
diminish the value of development in these
areas.
Encroachment and congestion along the
major roads like NH-7 through the wards
4,5,6,9 and 10.

Issues, strategies and priority projects


Sr. No.
1.

Aspects
Spatial
Growth

Issues

2.

Landuse
Distribution

3.

Housing

Strategies and Action Plan

Linear growth All residential


and commercial development is
concentrated along the NH 7 and
along Sahpura and Sidhi road.
New development is taking place
within the high density area like
in wards 5,6,9,10 etc. further
causing congestion.

Development of more growth/


commercial centres in the
town, promoting equitable
growth throughout the town.

The urban poor/ slums are


mainly concentrated in the core
area (ward no. 5,6,12) along
major roads
Low and slow growth pattern.

Large percentage of land


(wards
1,2,7,8,9,11,12,13,14,15) is still
not developed, real estate
developers can play important
role in development of
potential areas within the
municipal limit.
As
per
the
demand
construction of houses under
LIG, MIG and HIG schemes
should be planned may be in
wards 11,12,13,14 etc.

Average household size (6) is


higher than the national urban
average i.e. (5.12)
The demand for housing is high
in the core city areas.

The water distribution arrangement includes - two OHTs in ward no 7 and 11. The
capacity of the OHTs is 45,000 litres each.

The water supply system in Hanumana Nagar Parishad is predominantly depending on


ground water and the level is at 200 ft.

The water lines are connected to 470 households.- along the roads

0%

3%
2%
1%
20%

20%

54%

Hand pump: Major source


of water, ward no. 5

Bore-well near Nagar


Narishad ward no. 3

0%
Tap
Tubewell
Tank, Pond, Lake
Spring

Handpump
Well
River, Canal
Any other

Over Head
Tank, ward no. 7

Water Tanker
ward no. 3

Well: Major source


of water
supply, ward no. 9

Issues, strategies and priority projects


Sector

Problems / Requirements in 2035 Proposed Projects


- Water supply in Hanumana is - Distribution of water supply
primary based on hand pumps
through pipeline inside all
(60% household).
the wards of the town.
-

Water Supply

Water distribution system is old and has limited coverage, only


along the major roads like NH-7
and from 7,8 to 1,11 and along
Sidhi road from ward 4 to 12,13.
All the existing two OHTs in
wards 7 and 11 are not utilised
properly.
Lack of technical/ skilled man
power to handle the system.

Construction of over head


tank distributing in all
direction could be in wards
5,6 and 10,13
Low cost water
treatment facility.

water

Employing skilled man power


for the water supply and
maintenance works.
Preparation of fresh DPR for
Water Supply System for the
town.

STRENGTH
Ground water level is high at 200 ft and
the average annual rainfall (950 1100
mm) is also good.

Presence of water bodies 4 ponds are


located at wards 4,5,10 and 13.

WEAKNESS
Present water supply is 0.19 MLD while
required unit is 2.31 MLD.

Presence of natural slope towards SW


will be responsible for the reduction in
efforts and cost in water supply.

Existing development of the settlement is


scattered like in wards 1,2,11,12,13,14 and
15 which reduces the rate of development.

OPPORTUNITY

Water revenue demand can be


enhanced through drive of new house
connection, and discourage limited stand
post installation.

Annual average rainfall that is 950 1100


mm is good, so there is a scope of
introducing water shade management to
collect the surface runoff water.

Detailed layout plans and drawings of


water supply distribution lines are not
available, making future planning difficult.

THREAT
The town dont have any perennial source
of water, so there is water problem
during the summer season.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies


Code No.

Projects proposed

WS 1

Preparation of DPR for Water Supply


System for the entire town.
Construction of 2 OHT each of
capacity 4 MLD
Construction of intake well, pump
house with pumping machinery
electrical
Replacement of present pipe line
system in the town. (2.8 km) 150 dia
(cost @ Rs1471)
Extension of present distribution line
to cover the whole of the city (2.1KM)
150MM Dia (cost @ Rs1471)

WS 2
WS 3

WS 4

WS 5

Sub Total
Cost (A)

Project Cost
(in Lakh)
-

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

300.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

2.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

41.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

31.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

374.00

Department

25% of households have in-house toilet facility. But only 56.66% households have
water closet latrines connected to septic tank, 17.23% pit toilet and 26.11% has
other toilet facility.

No sewerage network.

Sewerage disposal through the septic tanks.

Issues, strategies and priority projects


Sector

Problems / Requirements in 2035


- No proper sewerage system.
-

Sewerage and
Sanitation

Proposed Projects
- 100
%
coverage
of
households by toilets.
Individual septic tanks used by
most of the households for - Community septic tanks can
disposal.
be created to utilize the
waste for biogas generation
and community lighting.
-

Public
toilets
in
the
commercial areas and near
the bus stands/stops.

STRENGTH
Since settlements are scattered and land
resource is available to develop in every
possible way to enhance the quality of the
town. Like settlements in wards
1,2,11,12,13,14 etc.

WEAKNESS
There is no treatment plant for treating the
sewerage generated.

OPPORTUNITY
There are substantial number of urban
poor in wards 1,5,6,7,12,14 and 15, who
have land titles and houses without
toilets.

THREAT
Almost in all wards like in 5,6,9,10,13 etc

There is scope for development of low cost


sanitation projects.

New sewerage schemes to increase the


sewerage coverage to 100 %.

Only 25% of households have in-house toilet


facility.
Low levels of income prohibits urban poor
to make capital expenditure on development
of toilet units and their maintenance.

the pour flush latrines and toilets


blocks are usually connected to a septic
tank and then connected to drains
which is open and it results poor
environment and hazardous to health.

Root Zone Treatment System

Root Zone Systems are artificially prepared wetlands comprising of clay or plastic lined
excavation and emergent vegetation growing on gravel/sand mixtures and is also known as
constructed wetland.

This method combines mechanical filtration, chemical precipitation and biological


degradation in one step for the treatment of wastewater.

A number of factors like low operating cost, less energy requirement and ease of
maintenance attribute to making root zone system an attractive alternative for wastewater
management.

low cost sanitation


Pour flush single pit and twin pit toilet
The squatting slab can then be sited a meter or two away from the pit to which it drains via a
communication pipe.
Depending on the economy and requirement the single or twin pit latrine can be adopted.

low cost sanitation


Septic Tanks
Septic tanks comprises of a sealed tank having both an inlet and an outlet into which excreta
are flushed from a conventional cistern flush toilet or a pour-flush toilet.
The solids undergo a process of anaerobic decomposition which results in the production of
water, gases, sludge and a layer of floating scum.
The use of this system has the requirement for an in-house connection of water supply for
the system to operate.
Properly designed and installed septic tanks can function for many years.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies


Code
No.

Projects proposed

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)

SS 1

Construction of DEWATS in each wards


Rs 2000 per sq m of land underwet
land. Each plant need around 500 sp.
m
Construction of treatment plant
support electrical, mechanical
equipments
Construction of eco-toilets in slum
areas and public place. (Rs 15000 per
toilet)
Construction of 20 public urinals (@
Rs5000)

150.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P

100.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P

93.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

1.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

SS 2

SS 3

SS 4

Sub Total Cost (B)

344.00

Department

STRENGTH
The slope (Towards SW) can be utilized for
developing a drainage system.
Existing drainage system along the NH-7
covering the wards 7,8 to 4,10 and along the
local road from ward 6 to ward 9.

OPPORTUNITY
Provision of adopting rain water harvesting
due to sufficient rain (950 1100
mm/Annum) in wards 7,8,9 and 15 due to
slope.

WEAKNESS
Absence of proper drainage system inside the
wards 5,6,3,4,12,13 etc which are identified
as dense locality.
Reduction in flow capacity of existing drains
due to dumping of solid waste and presence
of gray matter due to poor maintenance
specially in wards 4,6 and 15
THREAT
Flooding and spill-over of waste water during
the monsoon season in internal areas and
major market areas of the town in wards 7,8
to 4,10 along the NH-7.

Rehabilitation of primary drain, nallah and


water bodies in all the wards.

Issues, strategies and priority projects


Sector

Problems / Requirements in 2035


-

Drainage
-

Proposed Projects

No proper drainage system. The present drainage systems basically


open type specially in wards 4,5,6 and 15 which are highly populated areas.

Converting the Kucha Nallahs to


pucca one

Disposal of solid waste in drains has reduced the flow capacity of drains.

Interceptors to channelize waste


water to a low cost treatment
facility.

Construction of new
where ever needed.

drains

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies


Code No.

Projects proposed

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)
-

Department

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

D1

Preparation of DPR for Storm Water


Drainage System for entire town

D2

Construction of new storm water


drainage network to cover the whole
town (3 kms.) (@Rs44 lakh/km)

120.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P

D3

Converting the to pucca one by Desilting, lining and constructing side


walls. 3.5km ((@Rs20 lakh/km)

70.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P

Sub Total Cost (D)

190.00

S. No.

Indicators

1.

Waste Generation per Capita per day

2.
3.

Waste Collection Efficiency


Percent
Door-to-Door
Waste
Collection Percent
Efficiency
% capacity of fleet vehicle to waste Percent
generated

4.

S. No.
1

2
3

Units
Grams

Current
Status
59.22

250

25
Nil

100
100

Nil

Vehicle and Equipment


Tractor
Trolley
Hand-pull Cart

Normative Standard

Numbers
1
2
4

Lack of bins for storage of waste at primary level. Limited no. of bins is provided at some places.

Solid Waste Dumping in ward 11.

STRENGTH
Major portion of solid waste generated is
bio-degradable waste which can be used for
vermi -composting.
Availability of land for development of
sanitary land fill site of MSW specially in
wards 2,7,8,11,12 and 14, major portion of
which are in agricultural use.

WEAKNESS
Nagar Parishad has limited no. Of
vehicles 1 tractor, 2 trolleys and one
hand pull cart results low Solid waste
collection efficiency (25%).
Door-to-Door waste collection system is
not practiced in town.

No dedicated dumping site in the town.

Segregation of waste is not in practice,


neither at primary collection level nor at
final disposal level.
THREAT

To generate revenue by imposing levy on


waste generators specially in most
populated wards (4,6 and 15).

Identifying a dumping site to dispose all the


waste generated and suitable lands are in
least populated wards i.e. 3,7 and 12

Existing behavior of dumping wastes


along the roads specially in ward no.
4,5,6,9,10 and 15 along NH-7 and Sidhi
road leading an unwanted unhygienic
and hazardous condition in these areas.

OPPORTUNITY

IMPROVED SANITARY LANDFILL METHOD

Method of controlled disposal of municipal solid waste (refuse) on land.


Waste is deposited in thin layers (up to 1 m) and promptly compacted by
heavy machinery (e.g., bulldozers);
Several layers are placed and compacted on top of each other to form a refuse
cell (up to 3 m thick).

At the end of each day the compacted refuse cell is covered with a layer of
compacted soil to prevent odours and windblown debris.

When the landfill is completed, it is capped with a layer of clay or a synthetic liner
in order to prevent water from entering.

A final topsoil cover is placed, compacted, and graded, and various forms of
vegetation may be planted in order to reclaim otherwise useless lande.g., to fill
to levels convenient for building parks, golf courses, or other suitable public
projects

In the improved version of the sanitary landfill, bio-gas can be tapped for energy
generation

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies

Code No.
SWM 1

Projects proposed

Preparation of Detailed Project


Report for Municipal Solid Waste
Management for entire town.
SWM 2 Construction maintainance of Sanitary
Landfill Site with other infrastructure
facility in ward no. 1 (@Rs1000/ton of
waste) exclusive of land cost
SWM 3 Providing equipments and machines
to support the SWM system
SWM 4 Enhancing the capacity of
municipality by providing
Transportation vehicles (1) ,
Container (30) and & Handcart (10)
Sub Total Cost (C)

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)
-

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

136

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

30.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

60.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

226.00

Department

Town is well connected with other places like Rewa to Mirzapur with NH-7 through wards
7,8 to 1,11 and with Sidhi arterial road through wards 10,12,13,14,15, shahpura with local
road through wards 5 and 6.

At present the total road length in Hanumana Nagar is 21.77 Kilometres. The roads in the
Paraded can be categorised into three types:
Sr. No.
1
2
4

Type of Roads
Pucca Road (NH -7)
Pucca Road (Major District Road)
Kutcha Road (Local Roads within Wards)
TOTAL

Length of Road (Km)


7.45
8.89
5.43
21.77

Source: Hanumana Nagar Parishad

The predominant mode of travel in town is cycles followed by motorized vehicles such as
two- wheeler (Scooter & Motorcycle) and private transport which includes Three
Wheelers , four wheelers (Tempo, Jeeps, cars etc.)
Sr. No.

Mode Type

No. of Vehicles

Cycle

1000

Two Wheeler

400

3
Four Wheeler
100 - 150
Source: Reference Rewa district s vehicle registration and estimated through DMG Assessment

STRENGTH
Hanumana is located along the major roads like
NH-7 connecting Rewa with Mirzapur and arterial
road connecting Sidhi and Shahpura.
Connectivity with all the wards through NH-7 and
other local and collector roads as wards
1,4,5,6,7,8,9 and 10 through NH-7 and wards
12,13,14,15 with arterial road towards Sidhi in SE
direction and Shahpura and other local roads with
ward 2.

OPPORTUNITY
Land availability for major projects like
development of Bus Terminal, Transport Nagar for
goods carriers and parking facilities in ward no. 7
and 8.
Widening of major important roads and
improvement of major junctions and accident
prone areas (wards 4,5,6 and13 along NH-7 and
Sidhi road) for better traffic condition are also
considered in future demand.

WEAKNESS
Narrow and poor conditions of roads causes
Traffic problem which is more prominent on
the weekly market day i.e. on Tuesday and
Friday in ward no. 4 and 10 along NH-7.
Encroachment of roads - reduced road width
in commercial area of wards 4,10 and 13.

No designated parking is there in commercial


areas of wards 4,10 and 13. On street parking
causes congestion during peak hours specially
on Tuesday and Friday.
THREAT
Highly dense development along the major
connectivity in wards 4,10 and 13 resulting
permanent encroachment which can create
difficulties for the redevelopment of the town.

Issues, strategies and priority projects


Sector

Problems / Requirements in 2035

Roads

The junctions on national Highway


7 are the most prominent accident
zones specially in wards 6,10 and 4
due to the heavy and speedy traffic
flow.
Congestion in commercial/ market
areas due to rampant encroachment,
on-street parking in wards 4 & 10
along NH-7 and in ward 13 along Sidhi
road.
Existing bus stand not well planned
and maintained.
Lack of designated and organized
on-street parking in town street
furniture along the major roads NH-7
and Sidhi road.

And
Transportation

Proposed Projects

Establishment of Traffic
Police Station and Traffic
Management Center.

Construction of new bus


stand on BOOT basis and
improvement of the existing
one in ward no. 8 along NH-7.

Removal of encroachment,
Road Widening & Junction
improvement specially in
4,10 and 13.

Development
of
footpath/pedestrian
and
parking along the NH-7 in
wards 4,5,,10 and along Sidhi
road in ward no. 13.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies

Code No.
TT 1

Projects proposed

Development of new Bus Stand on BOOT


basis IN WARD NO. 8
TT 2
Upgradation of katcha road to pacca
(5.43km)
TT 3
Construction of new roads for total length
of 15 km by 2035 in different areas of
town.
TT 4
Development of footpath/pedestrian along
the major roads. (for 5 km)
TT 5
Road Widening (major district roads.)
(apprx 10km)
TT 6
Improvement of traffic junctions( 5),
rotary development including installation
of traffic light/signals.
Sub Total Cost (D)

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)
500.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

270.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

750.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

50.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

150.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

50.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

1770.00

Department

Sr. No.
1
2
3
4
5

Equipment
Poles with Tube Lights
Poles with CFL Bulb
Poles with Incandescent bulbs
Poles with LED
Poles with LPS
Total

Total Number
250
150
30
0
0
430

Percentage to Total
58.14%
34.88%
6.98%
0.00%
0.00%
100.00%

Other sources of energy


Total
households

Sources of Lighting
Electricity

Kerosene

Solar
Energy

Other Oil

Any Other

No Lighting

2527

1867

649

Inappropriate maintenance and functioning of lights. Around 7% of the street lights are
not functioning along the NH-7 and Sidhi road.

There are around 300 street light posts in the town. 150 among them are energy saver
and the rest has sodium vapour lamp. Street light is deficient in the ward nos 2, 3, 14
and 15.

Lack of fire fighting service facilities and staff.

STRENGTH

WEAKNESS

Town has all kinds of roads NH-7, arterial


road towards sidhi and Shahpura and other
local and collector roads of total length of
21.77 Kms.

132 kv power substation.

Irregular spacing of street light poles


within the wards or residential areas of
town like in wards 3,4,5,6,10 and 13.

Non-availability of vehicles for street


lighting and fire fighting.

OPPORTUNITY

Lack of skilled staff/manpower for street


light and fire fighting services.

THREAT

Presence of NH-7 which caters traffic 24 hrs


demands widening of the road and proper
terminals in ward no. 8 and street furniture.

Power thefts through street lights in


wards with dense populated are specially
in wards 4,6,10 and 13.

Implementing the energy efficient approach


as demand of consuming energy is more
than the availability.

Lack of monitoring and regularization by


the Nagar Parishad.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies


Project
Cost (in
Lakh)

Code No.

Projects proposed

SL 1

Installation of 1040 nos. of street lights at


an interval of 40m. within the
wards/residential area (25,000/- pole)

260.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

SL 2

High mast lights at major junctions (5)(Rs


15lakh/unit)

75.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

SL 3

Procurement of 1 electric pole vehicle

25.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

SL 4

Establishment of Manpower and their


training & capacity building

5.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

Sub Total Cost (E)

365.00

Department

Around 23% (3400) of total population are urban poor, squatter and other poor
population .There are seven notified slum areas in the town. The ward no 1, 5, 6, 7, 12,
14 and 15.

Ward no 7 is a fully slum ward and the remaining ward no 1, 5, 12, 14 and 15 have
partial slum population.

Katcha houses of Urban poor in ward no. 1.

STRENGTH
23% of the total population around 3400
resides in slums and are associated with
informal sector contributing their role in
the economic structure of the town mainly
as agricultural labors, vendors, workshops

(Cycle/bike) etc.

WEAKNESS
Urban poor resides in almost all the wards
like in 1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15. which is
responsible for the degradation of the
aesthetic sense of the residential area.

Lack of basic amenities and services in


above mentioned wards.

OPPORTUNITY
Land availability in the wards 1,2,7.8.12,14
etc generates the scope of relocation of the
slum area.

THREAT
Due to lack of proper utilities and services
the slums specially in wards 6,7 and 15
faces the worst impacts of unhygienic and
hazardous health issues due water logging
and dumping waste on the streets.

Distribution of the slums evenly in all


wards arise an opportunity to introduce the
scheme of providing LIG/EWS housing in
the wards 1,5,6,7,12,14 and 15.

The Kutcha houses and thatched roofs limit


scope of housing transformation.

Issues, strategies and priority projects


Sector

Urban Poor

Problems / Requirements in 2035 Proposed Projects


- Presently slum population is - Slum Improvement and
around 30.04% of the total
relocation Programmes.
population.
- Provision of security of
- Lack of physical as well as social
tenure.
infrastructure and Degraded
environmental
conditions
in - Skill up gradation and
economic
up-liftment
wards 1, 5, 6, 7, 12, 14 and 15.
schemes like encouraging
- Poor housing condition and
small
scale
industries
unhygienic
environmental
specially in cultivated lands
condition.
of wards 1,7,11,12,14 etc.
-

Improvement of shelter

Development of EWS and LIG


colonies by MPHB with a
focus or poverty eradication
in identified sectoral zones
especially for urban poor
under IHSDP in wards
1,2,7.8.12,14

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies

Code No.

Projects proposed

Construction of houses for poor in to


solve the housing problems in the slums
UP 1
under IHSDP as per the availability of
suitable Govt. Land (for 619 urban poor
HH) (at 3.5lakh/unit)
Sub Total Cost (F)

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)

Department

11900.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

2166.5

One Community Health Centre (CHC) with 30 beds at ward no. 8.


Two ambulance provided in the town.
Town has no intermediate/specialty hospital and specialized health care facilities for
which it depends on nearest town Rewa.
There are 9 schools in Hanumana. Out of this, 7 are primary, 2 higher secondary school
provided by government in wards 2,4,9 and 14.
No designated or organized parks & playground, in the town as recreational facilities for
the citizens.

Health Centre, ward no. 9


Secondary School, ward no. 4

Primary School, ward no. 1

Hanuman Mandir, ward no.


10 near pond.

STRENGTH
Health

WEAKNESS
Health

There is a Community Health Centre in


Hanumana which serves as a referral
health centre in ward no.9

There is a lack of specialty/Intermediate hospital


and poly-clinic in the town only one community
health centre is there with 30 beds in ward no. 9.

Indian System of Medicine are also in


practice and popularly used by local
population.

Poor people have limited affordability to pay for


health services.

Education

Private medical clinics are also limited.

Education

Hanumana has high literacy rate of


64.54%.

Sufficient no. of primary (7) and higher


secondary school (2) in wards 2,4,9 and
14

Schools are not having proper basic requirement


of drinking water and sanitation facilities for
students, except private school.
There is a lack of integrated school with hostel
facility and technical institute ITI in town.

Recreation and Entertainment


Recreation and Entertainment
Plenty of land is available for the Town does not have any designated place as park
development of recreational area such as
or playground as recreational area for the citizens.
park and playground in the town specially
in wards 4,5,10 and 14 due to presence of
water bodies.

Sector

Social
Facilities

Problems / Requirements in 2035

Proposed Projects

Lack of enough beds and regular doctor in the hospital in ward no,
9.

Town has no intermediate


specialty hospital and specialized
health care facilities for which it
depends on nearest town Rewa.
planned

recreational

Development of 1 no. of
Integrated School with Hostel
Facility in ward 12 due to
land availability and better
connectivity.

Reconstruction
and
renovation of school building
which are in bad condition.

Provision
of
necessary
infrastructure like toilets, safe
drinking water, kitchen shed
and electricity etc.

Lack of
facilities.

Infrastructures in the schools are


not well maintained, like parks
and play grounds and buildings in
wards 1, 2,4 and 9.
-

Upgradation
facilities.

of

health

Provision of planned parks


and playgrounds in wards
4.5.10 and 14.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies

Code No.

Projects proposed

Extension of hospital situated in the


premise of health centre by constructing
H1
multi storied building thereby extending
the health facilities
Construction of 1 Poly-clinic @10 no. of
H2
beds for 2035 in ward no. 14
Sub Total Cost (H)

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)

Department

150.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

50.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

200.00

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies


Code No.

Projects proposed

Project Cost
(in Lakh)

Department

E1

Establishment of 1 no. of Integrated School with


Hostel Facility in ward no. 6

500.00

ULB's, Govt.
of M.P.

E2

Establishment of 2 nos. of Informal and adult


literacy centers, Anganwadi centers in ward no 5
& 10(@5 lakh each)

10.00

ULB's, Govt.
of M.P.

E3

Construction of Polytechnic college/ Vocational


Training Institutes and ITIs in ward no. 1

100.00

ULB's, Govt.
of M.P.

E4

Renovation of school buildings which are in bad


condition

50.00

ULB's, Govt.
of M.P.

10.00

ULB's, Govt.
of M.P.

Provision of equipments and necessary


infrastructure like provision of toilets, safe
E5
drinking water, kitchen shed and electricity etc. in
education institutions.
Establishment of Public Library (1 in no.) in ward
E6
no. 4
Sub Total Cost (I)

70.00
740.00

There is no monitoring facility for pollution level in Hanumana.


Nearest water pollution monitoring centre is in Rewa but the monitoring of
pollution level is done by Pollution Control Board located in Rewa the District
Headquarter.
Located at the centre of the town, ponds are the major source of water
supply in the town. Apart from the pond, there are two nallahs Amaiya
Nallah and Naiya Nallah in wards 2,4,5,10 and 13
No environmental compliance system from urban local body, people dumps
their generated waste in the catchment area of the ponds in wards 4,5 and 10

The Hanuman Mandir and the Lakshmi Mandir is the only place in the city which generates
attraction.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies


Sector

Heritage
and
Tourism

Problems / Requirements in 2035 Proposed Projects


- Lack of infrastructure support - Development, beautification,
for tourism development
plantations along the ponds
and temples in wards 4,5,10
and 14.
-

Provision of the supporting


infrastructure to promote local
tourism specially in ward no.
10 due to presence of famous
Hanuman Temple and ponds.

STRENGTH

WEAKNESS

The town falls under Khajuraho Panna- Satna-


Rewa- Mirzapur circuit.

Presence of hanumana temple in ward no. 10


near pond.

OPPORTUNITY

Hanuman temple can be developed as a tourist


destination in ward no.

Improvement of the major corridore for better


connection with other towns like NH-7 and
other arterial roads.

Beautification of the ponds by developng


gardens and parks along it in wards 4,5,10 and
14.

Absence of Heritage Structure.

Lack of
tourism.

Infrastructure

for

Lack of efficient mode of


transport.
No rail connectivity.
THREAT
Lack of maintenance of the
ponds and temples in wards
4,5,10 and 14.

Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies

Code No.

Projects proposed

T1

Development, beautification, plantations


along the pond in ward no. 4, 10 & 13.

Sub Total Cost (I)

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)

Department

150.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

150.00

Other Proposed Projects, their Costs and implementing Agencies

Code No.

Projects proposed

Development of Entrance Gates to town


(2 in Nos.) one towards north side and
other towards south on NH-75.(@5
lakh/unit)
Development of hawker zone in ward no
O2
10.
Construction of one Community Hall and
O3
two Rooms in ward no. 6 and 13
respectively(community hall @ 35 lakh
and Community rooms @15 lakh)
Sub Total Cost (K)

O1

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)
10.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

5.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

50.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

65.00

Department

Urban Reform and Capacity Building

Code No.

Projects proposed

Project
Cost (in
Lakh)

UR 1

Computerization of property tax & other


assets

20.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

UR 2

Billing s/w & collection systems;


hardware & software

5.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

UR 3

Training/Manpower Assistance

5.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

UR 4

Strengthening Engineering (MIS,


AUTOCAD, all h/w & s/w)

5.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

UR 5

Other Management Supports training for


supervisory & staff

5.00

ULB's, Govt. of M.P.

Sub Total Cost (L)

40.00

Department

Year

Tax

Non-Tax

Transfer inc. grants

Total

2008-09

173292

12088447

4398355

16660094

2009-10

152447

15998035

1724900

18112722

2010-11

600016

5046287

16995941

26411140

Year

(Wage & salary)


Establishment

Operation and
Maintenance

Payment
Interest

Others

Total

2008-09

2626914

8093999

226950

7212038

18159901

2009-10

4204984

6043405

1399337

4882212

16529938

2010-11

5561437

3536482

3330931

9759670

22188520

Sector Wise Total Cost


Code No.

Sectors

Project Cost (in


Lakh)

Physical Infrastructure
Sub Total Cost (A)

Water Supply

374

Sub Total Cost (B)

Sewerage and Sanitation

344

Sub- Total Cost (C)

Storm Water Drainage

190

Sub Total Cost (D)

Solid Waste Management

226

Sub Total Cost (E)

Traffic and Transportation

1770

Sub Total Cost (F)

Street Lighting and Fire Fighting

365

Sub Total Cost (G)

Urban Poor

2166.5

Sub Total Cost (H)

Health Facilities

200

Sub Total Cost (I)

Educational Facilities

740

Sub Total Cost (J)

Tourism

150

Sub Total Cost (J)

Other Components

65

Sub Total Cost (K)

Urban Reforms & Capacity Building

40

Social Infrastructure

Sub Total Cost (L)

6630.5