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THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

Cutting-Edge, Practical Strategies to Successfully


Flip Your Classroom

Kevin M. Steele, Ed.S.

THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

2013 by Kevin M. Steele, Ed.S.


All material not specifically identified as being reprinted from another source is the
sole copyright of Kevin M. Steele, Ed.S. You have permission to make copies of pages
for your own classroom or school; but not to reproduce the book in its entirety. You
may not distribute, copy, or otherwise reproduce any of this handbook for sale, or
for commercial use without the expressed written permission from the author.
Permissions may be obtained for use of the materials under the copyright by
contacting the author at www.kevinmsteele.com.

THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

Table of Contents
What is the Flipped Classroom? ..................................................................................2
Working Definition ..................................................................................................................................................2

Types of Flipped Classrooms .......................................................................................2


Traditional Flipped ..................................................................................................................................................2
Flipped Mastery.........................................................................................................................................................2
Peer Instruction Flipped Classroom .................................................................................................................3
Problem-based Learning Flipped Classroom ................................................................................................4

Ideas for Bridging the Digital Divide ............................................................................4


Computers w/ High Speed Internet ..................................................................................................................4
Smartphones/Tablets .............................................................................................................................................5
iPods/iPads .................................................................................................................................................................5
After Hours Computer Access .............................................................................................................................5
DVD/Equipment Sign-out .....................................................................................................................................6

The Basics of Getting Started ......................................................................................6


Hardware .....................................................................................................................................................................6
Software........................................................................................................................................................................6
Knowledge ...................................................................................................................................................................7

Flipping Resources ......................................................................................................7


Software........................................................................................................................................................................7
Jing ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Camtasia .......................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Screenr .............................................................................................................................................................................. 7
iMovie ................................................................................................................................................................................ 8
Windows Movie Maker .............................................................................................................................................. 8
Quicktime ......................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Hardware Options ....................................................................................................................................................9
Camera .............................................................................................................................................................................. 9
Computer ......................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Microphones ................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Smartpen.......................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Repositories for Already Completed Videos ...................................................................................................10
Storage for your Videos...........................................................................................................................................11

Video Creation Basics ................................................................................................ 13


Learning Management Systems (LMS) ....................................................................... 16
Schoology .................................................................................................................................................................. 16

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) .......................................................................... 17


Struggles and Strategies ............................................................................................ 20
How Administrators Can Support Flipped Learning .................................................... 21
Sample Flipped Lessons............................................................................................. 22
English ........................................................................................................................................................................ 22
The 20 Percent Project ............................................................................................................................................22

THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

Arizona State University Faculty Readings ................................................................................................22


TED Videos on English .............................................................................................................................................22
English Teacher Emma ...........................................................................................................................................23
Mr. McGoughs Flipped English Classes ...........................................................................................................23
TedEds English Category .......................................................................................................................................23
Will Ferrell and Figurative Language ..............................................................................................................24
Math ............................................................................................................................................................................ 24
TedEds Math Category ...........................................................................................................................................24
Khan Academy .............................................................................................................................................................24
Middle School Math Lessons .................................................................................................................................25
Matts Math ...................................................................................................................................................................25
The Math Master ........................................................................................................................................................26
Mrs. Foxs Class ............................................................................................................................................................26
Byron High School Mathematics Department ..............................................................................................26
Flipping Math Blog....................................................................................................................................................27
Mr. Leckies AP Calculus Lessons.........................................................................................................................27
Science........................................................................................................................................................................ 27
TedEds Science & Technology Category .........................................................................................................27
Dance Your PhD ..........................................................................................................................................................28
Chemistry Lesson Playlist .......................................................................................................................................28
Earl Haig Physics........................................................................................................................................................28
CosmoLearning ...........................................................................................................................................................29
Khan Academy .............................................................................................................................................................29
Mr. Causeys World ....................................................................................................................................................29
Physics Education Research Interactive Online Lectures ....................................................................29
Social Studies ........................................................................................................................................................... 30
CosmoLearning ...........................................................................................................................................................30
Clintondale High School ..........................................................................................................................................30
TedEds Social Studies Category .........................................................................................................................30
Stanford History Education Group ....................................................................................................................31
Flipped Social Studies ..............................................................................................................................................31
Flipped History ............................................................................................................................................................31
Flipped History: Technology and Critical Thinking ...................................................................................32
Physical Education ................................................................................................................................................ 32
The Flipped Coach .....................................................................................................................................................32
Coachs Eye....................................................................................................................................................................32
Jason Hahnstadt PE Teacher.............................................................................................................................33
Self-Defense Training ...............................................................................................................................................33
Foreign Language .................................................................................................................................................. 33
Foreign Language Flipped Class Resources...................................................................................................33
SpanishDict ...................................................................................................................................................................34
LangMedia ....................................................................................................................................................................34
Art & Music ............................................................................................................................................................... 34
TedEds Arts Category..............................................................................................................................................34
Jerrys Artarama .........................................................................................................................................................35
The Virtual Instructor ..............................................................................................................................................35
Riffeo ................................................................................................................................................................................36
Michael New Music Theory Lessons...............................................................................................................36

THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

Action Plan ............................................................................................................... 37


Parent Letter Sample.............................................................................................. 38
Recommended Reading ............................................................................................ 41

Kevin M. Steele, Ed.S.


Instructional Technology Specialist
www.kevinmsteele.com

Dear Colleagues,
What are your students doing instead of doing their homework? They are utilizing
social media sites, instant messaging, talking on the phone, texting, surfing the web
for the latest celebrity gossip. The list is endless. What they are not doing as much
as we would like is engaging in academic activities. This seminar considers using a
practical, instructional model that can be more motivating for students and has the
potential to result in significantly increased student achievement.
The flipped classroom has been gaining interest and generating buzz the last few
years. I have designed this seminar to answer some of the basic questions many
teachers have about the flipped classroom. Questions such as:

What technology do I need to create a flipped lesson?


Where to I post my flipped lessons?
How to I make sure that all my students have access to the flipped lessons?
How many of my lessons should be flipped?

The goal of this seminar is to answer these compelling questions and look at ways to
design lessons that lend themselves to the flipped philosophy. We will discuss the
traditional lecture and how to make it an engaging video for your students to watch
on their own terms; but we will go further. I will show you examples of flipped
lessons and walk you through the process of creating your own flipped classroom.
Flipping is not just about watching videos of lectures? It is about how to best utilize
class time with students.
Today promises to be a day filled with practices, strategies and perspectives that
will empower you to flip your classroom and increase student contact, reach
students a their specific learning level, differentiate, and so much more! Once you
flip, you will likely never want to go back!
Sincerely,

Kevin M. Steele, Ed.S.

THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

What is the Flipped Classroom?


Working Definition
The use of multimedia elements and technology to
help time-shift direct instruction so students receive
the most support when they are working on the tasks
requiring additional cognitive load.

Types of Flipped Classrooms


Traditional Flipped
The traditional flipped classroom is the starter of the flips. This is the model where
most teachers who have never flipped start their experience.
Assessment of
understanding
is done in class
at the end of
the unit of
study

Students watch
video lessons at
home

Apply their
skills in
projects and
other
simulations in
class

Come to class to
engage in
related
activities and
homework

Flipped Mastery
This is usually an evolved version of the traditional flipped mastery, where all
students are working individually at his or her personal pace. The students grade is
based on how many objectives the students pass in the course.

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Next Lesson

Remediation of
previous lesson

Peer Instruction Flipped Classroom


Students learn the basic material outside of class using video lessons. In class they
answer some key conceptual questions individually. The teacher gathers their
answers and pairs them according to right and wrong matches. Then, they convince
their peers of their answer. It
Assessment of
is unlikely that a student with
understanding is
Students watch
video lessons at
done in class at
a wrong answer is able to
the end of the
home
unit of study
convince a student who had
the correct answer. Most of
the time a student with the
correct answer is able to
convince a peer of their correct
answer.
Secondary
Concept Quiz

Students then reassess and the


change is dramatic. Not only
that, they are engaging with
peers collaboratively and they
are justifying their responses.

Initial Concept
Quiz

Peer Convincing
and application
of learning
objectives to
solidify concepts.

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Problem-based Learning Flipped Classroom


In this model, students explore an issue and learn through the process. Students
may be building a bridge to support a certain weight over a specified span or
exploring an open-ended
research question. Over
EXPLORATION of problem or
RESEARCH of the problem occurs
the course of the
research question begins. This
and the students can use a
process can involve prescribed
multitude of prescribed and selfexploration, students
videos by the instructor.
found videos and resources.
watch related video
lessons that will clue
Research Question
them in on solving issues
or Problem
as they arise. In this
Statement
model, students work
through the system
EXPERIMENTATION with the given
EVALUATION of the student
topic to design or develop ideas to
progress and performance serves
using guidance from the
solve the problem. Students are
as the formative assessment model
instructor and do not
justifying their attempts for a
for the research and solutions
solution.
posed.
always follow a cycle
through the learning.

Ideas for Bridging the Digital Divide


Much criticism for the flipped model comes in the area of student access. Student
access is a critical point and must be addressed. There are several solutions to
bridging the access issue. Below is a brief list of ways to provide access to students
that dont have web access or have access to the Internet that supports video
streaming.

Computers w/ High Speed Internet


This, of course, is the first thing we consider when thinking about how our students
will access content. This method is the most widely
accepted and thought about. Students accessing
course content using this method will have full access
and will be able to further knowledge by creating
outlets for content that is learned. They will have
access to other software and resources for such
outlets. However, keep in mind that in a flipped
classroom, the students should be creating and building
knowledge in class. Additional homework should not be assigned other
than some basic note taking.
Internet services can be cost prohibitive for some families budgets. In some areas,
local cable providers offer steep discounts for students and their families that
participate in free or reduced lunch programs.

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Xfinity offers high-speed Internet service for families


whose students receive free or reduced lunch for
$9.99/month. Additionally, families can purchase a
refurbished computer for $149.00. Details are available
at: www.internetessentials.com

Smartphones/Tablets
Students can access much of the flipped content through
streaming video. Most smartphones and tablets have the
ability to stream video and audio. As you know, many students
have access to phones with streaming capabilities. If a student
can show you a video on YouTube, then they can stream a
lecture. We will further discuss where videos can be placed for
student access in a later section.

iPods/iPads
Many of my own students could not afford a hefty phone
charge each month for data, texting and voice
communication. However, many of them have iPods and
some even have iPads. These devices only require that
students have access to a wireless network for streaming
capabilities.
When students are out of school, they have
access to wireless networks in many places.
Fast food restaurants are starting to equip their
seating areas with Wi-Fi. Starbucks, Panera
Bread, colleges, universities and local libraries
all offer places where students can hop on the
web and get access to lessons.

EXPERIENTIAL VOICE
Our students have access to our
wireless network at school. They
are part of a separate wireless
network and user group that
applies all filter rules and
permissions.

After Hours Computer Access


Many schools have access to computer labs and media center labs before or after
school hours. Many public libraries also offer computer usage times for the public.
Our school was new and only employed a person in our library for 2-3 days a week
and never before or after school. In order to give students access, club sponsors
who used the media center agreed to let students come in and utilize the labs while
under their supervision.

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DVD/Equipment Sign-out
Teachers can always burn a couple of copies of a lesson to a DVD. In the early
attempts at making the model a reality, we utilized a checkout system with our
librarian. The students would checkout the DVDs if they needed
them. The librarian kept records of how many were checked out
and who was checking them out. It was the same students that
needed this service and we would have to burn 5 copies for our
sophomores. This was a little time consuming and it was a bit
pricey.
EXPERIENTIAL VOICE
After the first fall semester of
flipping, Christmas brought on a
new gift for many of our
studentsiPods and smartphones.
Parents recognized the need for
the technology and found the
investment paid off in the long
run.

We decided to ask the students to bring


us a flash drive and we would load the
videos on the flash drive for them. This
reduced cost, but still was a bit time
intensive. In the end, we still had two
students who needed the flash drives loaded.
We then started giving them time in their
technology course to download them straight
from a link that was provided. This then shifted
responsibility to the student and became cost
effective (free).

The Basics of Getting Started


So by now, you should be hooked! Right? Okay, but you have this looming question
hanging over your headI dont have the expertise or the tools to implement this
without going broke or going crazy?
Absolutely, wrong! You can do this with little or no investment to get started. I have
outlined the bare-minimum you need to get started in the sections below. It looks
like a lot, but I spelled it out for all you non-techieslike my mom.

Hardware
You will require a PC or a Mac.
A Web-Cam or a Digital Video Camera (better quality)
An internet connectionsomewheresteal it from your neighbors if you can!

Software
This one dependsyou can start simple or more advanced depending on your
technical knowledge and skill level.
To start, I would simply record my lecture over a PowerPoint (or Keynote for mac
users). You are not making blockbuster smash hits. You are simply conveying the
lesson to your students. If you already use presentation software like PowerPoint
or Keynote, you are already a step ahead. Later, in the tutorial section, I have
K. Steele, 2013
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THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

included some step-by-step instructions for doing the voiceovers and posting them
online.
Macs have iMovie already installed when you purchase the machine. You can edit
basic video if you are using the camera in this for free. This can be used to put your
titles on, some pictures and your video taped segments. I like doing this because I
can create a brand for my videos and give them a little more of a professional kick.
To record your screen while you narrate, use the free version of Jing. It limits your
recording time, but you can work quickly through your topic and break it down into
steps. Later, we will discuss their product Camtasia.

Knowledge
If you can prepare a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation, then you are almost there.
You already know how to teach. Now we just need to make your videos interesting
and your topics condensed.

Flipping Resources
Software
There are scores of software available for recording your lessons. The list below is
by no means a comprehensive list, but it is enough to get you started.
Jing
www.techsmith.com/jing
Jing is free screencast software that allows you to create small video
tutorials. It has limitations because it has newer siblings that have a
cost associated with them. This one allows you to get a taste of what
the other products have to offer, but leaves you craving more.
Camtasia
www.techsmith.com/Camtasia
Camtasia is screencast software that gives you tools you need to
customize and edit your videos. This is my recommended software.
It allows you to record your screen, edit the recordings and add
camera video (synchronously). The editing software reminds me of
a simplified version of iMovie. The cost is $99.00 per license.
There are license discounts for group purchasing if a group of
teachers or your IT department purchase for you.
Screenr
www.screenr.com

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Screenr is a web-based screen recorder. It is free and pretty easy to use. This is
perfect for creating screencasts without having to upload
them. They take care of all that in the background. The only
limitation is that they are limited to 5 minutes and the video
cannot go through post-production editing very easily.
The account will upload to your YouTube account very
easily. Additionally, it will generate embed codes that will
allow users to embed it directly in a web site if the learning
management system allows this type of activity.
However, videos are able to be downloaded, so you could put more than one
together and edit them in editing software. This would be for the more advanced
user.
iMovie
iMovie comes with the iLife package on the Mac. iMovie makes it easy
to turn your home videos into your all-time favorite films. If you know
how to drag and drop, you can make a movie in iMovie. Heres how easy
it is: Just drag your favorite clips into the project area and arrange them
however you like. Drag in titles and transitions. Drop in photos. Add a
song from iTunes or GarageBand for your soundtrack.
When your action flick has too much action, maybe its time for some stills. iMovie
imports your photos from iPhoto, Aperture, or Photo Booth. You can apply pan and
zoom motion effects to give it a documentary feel. iMovie even detects faces in your
photos to ensure that they remain in the frame.
Windows Movie Maker
Windows Essentials is a free download from Microsoft. When you download this
bundle from Microsoft it comes with a basic video editor that will allow you to edit
video footage. This is similar to iMovie with a few less frills.
Quicktime
For Mac users, Quicktime has a screen capture feature which
allows you to record longer segments than some of the free
versions. The screen capture feature will record what you are
doing on your computer and allow you to narrate it
simultaneously. It will then export the file as a Quicktime movie
file that can be uploaded to your video channel on YouTube or
any other system you choose. Unfortunately, Windows users do
not have this same feature.

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Hardware Options
Camera
To start, a basic web cam is recommended; but not necessary. The studies have
shown that students actually do want to see you while you are teaching the lesson.
Students surveys in recent studies have indicated that they enjoy the
personalization to see a real person in the videos at some point.
As you can imagine, there are several more expensive and professional setups that
you could purchase. If you are making a larger investment, a small HD camera with
flash memory may be recommended. Canon makes a great product in the Vixia line
of products.
Computer
Mac or PC is left to your preference. This handbook has been developed with
resources for either choice. Since you are working with video, you will want to
make sure the machine has a good amount of RAM. RAM is the memory part of the
computer that runs processes. The more RAM, the smoother your end product will
look. Four gigabytes (4GB) is the minimum recommendation where eight gigabytes
(8GB) is recommended.
Additionally, you will want to make sure that you have a good deal of hard drive or
network storage space. Videos require more space than documents and other files
on your machine.
Microphones
Staying close to your camera or computer and eliminating the background sounds
should allow you to operate your flipped classroom without any investment in
sound equipment. However, if you find that you experiencing sound issues, you may
want to investigate options in this area.
Smartpen
Livescribe makes a really slick tool to create
pencasts with narration. The pen memorizes
what you wrote while you narrate aloud. You then
plug the pen into your computer and download the
pencast. This pencast can then be uploaded to
your video streaming account or to your video
editing software for further editing around slides
and other items.
There is a related article, Error! Reference
source not found. on page Error! Bookmark not
defined. with further details on the use of pencasts.

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Repositories for Already Completed Videos


Why create videos that somebody else has already done? Dont reinvent the wheel.
The following sites are great places to start when looking for content videos that are
already created.
When getting started with the model, this is a perfectly great approach. In fact, as
more educators begin to enter into this educational model, the content library will
only continue to expand.
Teded.com
TED-Eds commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TEDs
mission of spreading great ideas. Within the growing TED-Ed video library, you will
find carefully curated educational videos,
many of which represent collaborations
between talented educators and animators
nominated through the TED-Ed platform.
This platform also allows users to take any
useful educational video, not just TED's, and
easily create a customized lesson around the
video. Users can distribute the lessons,
publicly or privately, and track their impact on the world, a class, or an individual
student.
YouTube allows for millions of people around the world to discover, watch, share
and learn from others and is committed to making educational content more easily
accessible through its YouTube for Schools Initiative. YouTube is supporting TED-Ed
as part of its YouTube Original Channels program. The best part of this partnership
is that you can take a YouTube video and place it into the Ted-Ed platform and then
create a lesson right in the platform. They have taken out the hard steps.
KhanAcademy.org
The Khan Academy is an organization on a mission. They are a
not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better
by providing a free world-class education for anyone anywhere.
The video library covers K-12 math, science topics such
as biology, chemistry, and physics, and even reaches into the
humanities with playlists on finance and history. Each video is a
digestible chunk, approximately 10 minutes long, and especially
purposed for viewing on the computer.
All of the site's resources are available to anyone. It doesn't
matter if you are a student, teacher, home-schooler, principal,
or an adult returning to the classroom after 20 years. The Khan Academy's materials
and resources are available to you completely free of charge.

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Storage for your Videos


YouTube.com
YouTube is a great service for storing and sharing your
videos. Many users are already aware of the process for
watching videos. The process is simple, create an account
and a channel. This channel will have a link. Provide the
link to your students. Thats all!
Now, lets make it more complicated with choices!
YouTube, by default, has a 15-minute time limit to all videos. This should work just
fine for flipped classroom lessons. However, there are ways to increase your time
limits.
By default, you can upload videos that are 15 minutes long. To upload longer videos,
follow these steps:

Visit the upload page at: www.youtube.com/my_videos_upload


Click Increase your limit at the bottom of the page
Follow the steps to verify your account with a mobile phone. Currently,
YouTube is not able to offer other ways to verify your account.

EXPERIENTIAL VOICE
Making your videos accessible and easy
to get to will be your best bet for
success. Students are visual learners.
Use the embed codes to place the
videos directly on your website.
Students will see the video thumbnail
and automatically know they have
landed on the right video.
Videos that are hard to locate, will not
get viewed. I also had a Twitter
account where I would post the links to
the videos for students to access using
their mobile phones. Many students
reported back that they would use the
bus ride, to or from school, to view
their videos for class.

11

Once you have increased your time limit,


you will be able to upload a maximum
files size of 20GB. Using the most up to
date version of Google Chrome, Firefox 4
or higher, or Internet Explorer (with
Silverlight enabled) grants you access to
powerful new uploading features:

Ability to upload large files, of up


to 20GB in size

Ability to resume or recover


stalled or cancelled uploads
If you have the ability to upload longer
length video, the most effective way to
upload large files is to simply use an up
to date version of one of these
browsers, visit the upload page, and
upload your file as usual. There is no
need to use the Java uploader for larger

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files or resumability. The processes outlined below are the best way to ensure your
upload is successful.
Using the embed codes provided by YouTube, you can simply embed your videos in
your Learning Management System or on your personal website. Google also offers
Google Sites if you dont have a web site. You can create a free website with a link to
your YouTube Channel for your students to easily access.
YouTube also allows users to directly record from their webcam or to record a
session in a Google Hangout. Google has done a great job of making tools for
educators to use. The possibilities are only limited by your imagination in most
cases.
Vimeo.com
Vimeo is a great place to host videos for the flipped classroom. Many teachers will
choose Vimeo because YouTube is blocked by their web filter at their school. Much
of the content on Vimeo is more artistic and less distracting
for students as well. However, they limit video sizes
differently. You can upgrade for a monthly fee. However,
most of our teachers were able to be successful with Vimeo.
The limits for Vimeo Basic (Free) are as follows:
500MB per week upload
Banner Ads
1 HD (High Definition) upload per week
1 Channel Limit
The benefit is that Vimeo is not as popular and the content is much less distracting
and tends to be more appropriate. Additionally, Vimeo is less likely to be filtered by
your school.

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Video Creation Basics


Being new to the basics of video production does not require us to evoke our inner
Stephen Spielberg, Spike Lee, Martin Scorsese, George Lucas, Cecil B. DeMille or the
Alfred Hitchcock (depending on what you are teaching). With todays high tech
cameras, they do most of the work for you. However, there are some very basic tips
that will have high impact in your productions.
1. Keep it short
Only shoot your video to cover one topic at a time. The goal should be
no more than 15 minutes at the high end. The ideal time maximum is
10 minutes.
Who are your students? Many of them cant make it a whole song
without fast forwarding to the nextsame with your videos. Keep
them bite-sized. They are used to the short segments found on
YouTube and that is about their attention span.
2. Lighting
Choose a location in a well-lit area. Keep the light in front of the
subject, not behind the subject (See Figure 1 & 2). Use a natural light
source if possible.
Try not to rely on only the overhead fluorescent fixtures as they will
cast shadows down the subjects face. This gives the appearance of
being drawn out. Use a lamp with a bright bulb and a bright shade set
just outside the shot a little in front of the subject and to the side. This
will eliminate those shadows.

Figure 2 Natural light


behind the subject allows
us to see facial features.

13

Figure 1- Light source behind


subject causes loss of facial
features.

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3. Sound
While the camera or computer has a built in
microphone, you must be careful to eliminate
as much of the ambient noise as possible.
The problem with ambient noise is that we
get very used to hearing it that we tune it out.
Try thissit in your area where you are going
to be filming your segments. Sit very still and
try to identify every sound you hear. Decide
if this sound will be distracting to your video.
Record a sample video and then watch it back
and try to identify if that sound is
overpowering your sound.

EXPERIENTIAL VOICE
I once filmed an entire
lesson in my classroom
and, while you could hear
me, I was being drowned
out a lot of the time by
the fans in the server
closet in my room. The
problem was that I was
so used to hearing them,
that I didnt notice them
until I watched the video
back.

SUCCESS TIP---dont try to get it perfect. If you stop the camera every time
there is an off camera noise, you will never publish any of your videos. This
is especially true if you are filming them in school. There is always sound in
a school. You just dont want the sound to be too distracting.

4. Be Animated
EXPERIENTIAL VOICE
I once took a distance
learning course back in
the day before the
Internet. The telecourse
consisted of videos you
checked out from the
library. It was roughly 36
hours of a Philosophy
professor standing at a
podium and reading the
course text. BORING
didnt even describe it!

14

Teach as you would with a room full of students.


They are still there, just not at the moment. Use
inflection, talk with your hands, do what is
natural. Remember that you are doing this in an
unnatural environment, but it will be natural to
the students when they watch.
If you are acting unnatural, they will sense it and it
will affect the overall quality of the video.
Remember to use eye-contact. The lens is your
eye. Look directly into the lens when you are
talking to the students. It is okay to look around
at different things, but make sure you continue
back to make eye contact.

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5. Mix it Up
These students are visual learners. They not only learn from what
you are saying and doing, but from where you are and who you are
within your videos. Liven it up and throw them a curve ball every
once in a while. Here are some ideas:
-

Have a taped interview or discussion panel with local experts.


Change the location of your video to your home, office, car, or a
relevant place for the topic.
Use this as an experience to engage other colleagues and show
them the benefits of flipping.
Have an expert explain the lesson.
Host a video conference in real time with students and an expert,
tape it and have it available for those that couldnt attend.
Start with a joke, or story.
End with an extra credit question, a discussion topic or a brain
teaser.

6. Dont Waste Your Students Time


While you may start out with a story or a joke or something topical,
remember, you are shooting for 10 minutes or less. Stay on topic.
Talk about the football game when you are meeting with the students
in class for a short time. Remember, they are coming to you outside of
class in the videos and they are using their own timerespect it.
7. Add Callouts/Annotations
Using editing software (when you get better) you will find that adding
in text when a large topic or definition comes up will help your
students refocus on the topic. It gives them additional processing of
not only the verbal, but reading as well. It is important to add these in
for your students to see a diagram, text or other visual element other
than you for a few moments just as you do with a presentation in a
live lecture.
8. Watch your Copyrights

15

You will be posting your videos online. Therefore, your content will
be made public. Make sure that music, graphics and all content is
copyright free or you have permission. There are certain rights under
fair use for teaching, scholarship and research. However, it is not
clearly defined by amount of material or type of material. It is
suggested that when in doubtleave it out.
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Learning Management Systems (LMS)


Learning management systems will provide your class with a virtual space outside
of your classroom walls. This will be the
space that will house all of your classroom
resources for students to access when
class is not in session. Trust me when I
say that you and your students will be
glad you made this change if you have not
already done so. You will save time, cut
excuses and your students will be more
independent.
There are several to choose from and I
have listed a few with some summary
information and links. Some are paid,
some are enterprise specific and others are free and available to start today. I will of
course start with my favorites:

Schoology
www.schoology.com
Cost: Free
Enterprise systems are available for a fee and added management. However, it
works just fine in the free version.
With Schoology, educators can do things as simple as posting
assignments, quizzes and links to additional resources or as
sophisticated as conducting online courses, providing one-on-one
remediation, or hosting discussions. Videos can be uploaded
directly to their servers for playback on many devices.
The User Interface (UI) is very much like Facebook. Students and
teachers will already have a start on understanding its setup and
training will be limited. Additionally, they have an app in both the
Apple and Android Marketplace. The app has recently undergone some really great
upgrades to allow grading and class management directly.
Advanced users will be able to manipulate the pages and customize the placement of
information. The gradebook is fully integrated and you can grade where the
assignment has been placed or directly in the discussion board. One major feature
to the discussion board is the ability to filter by user. This feature saves a great deal
of time when trying to figure out if a student met all the requirements of the post
and responses to others.

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Universal Design for Learning (UDL)


Adapted from Center for Applied Special Technology CAST, 2012.
Please visit www.cast.org
TEACHING REALITY
Heres the reality, we care
that a student learned the
material; we dont care
how they show they
learned it. Students able
to demonstrate knowledge
are also able to utilize
multiple means of
accessing information,
multiple means of
organizing and planning
how they will demonstrate
knowledge and they show
high levels of engagement
because they are at the
center of their learning
design and assessment.
Learners in flipped
environments are able to
access content in multiple
ways with more direction
from the instructor and
are able to guide their
learning utilizing a variety
of other sources and
experiences when lecture
is removed and
reformatted.

17

Architects and building designers have been utilizing the


term Universal Design for some time, now. With the
creation Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA),
buildings need access for the needs of all who may enter.
For example, there may be steps in the front of the
building and a ramp for wheelchair access. The ramp
and steps become part of the overall design process.
Universal Design for Learning is a set of principles for
curriculum development that give all individuals equal
opportunities to learn. It is the design of the lesson to
incorporate all methods and means of instruction into
the overall design. Very much like that of the building
example above.
UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional
goals, methods, materials and assessment that work for
everyonenot a single, one-size-fits-all solution but
rather flexible approaches that can be customized and
adjusted for individual needs.
Flipped teaching strategies compliment and provide the
universal access for learners. Learners will have
multiple means of access to information and the video
lecture provides many other opportunities for them to
access and plan their learning. The learners are
provided with a bit more control over the lecture than
they have had in the past. Additionally, getting them
access will allow them additional opportunities to
explore additional related content.
Individuals bring a huge variety of skills, needs, and
interests to learning. Neuroscience reveals that these
differences are as varied and unique as our DNA or
fingerprints. These primary brain networks come into
play:

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Recognition Networks the what of learning


How we gather facts and categorize what we see,
hear, and read. Identifying letters, words, or an
authors style are recognition tasks.
UDL Teaching Strategy: Provide multiple means of
expression

Flipped Classroom Connection


Providing lecture if video addresses the needs of diverse learners. They can slow it down,
speed it up, explore other related content, pause, stop and rewind.

Strategic Networks the how of learning


Planning and performing tasks. How we organize
and express our ideas. Writing an essay or solving
a math problem are strategic tasks.
UDL Teaching Strategy: Provide multiple means of
action and expression

Flipped Classroom Connection


Students are in control of when and how they access the content. Written text and practice
are provided in class, but lecture access is planned by the student.

Affective Networks How learners get engaged and


stay motivated. How they are challenged, excited, or
interested.
UDL Teaching Strategy: Stimulate interest and
motivation for learning.

Flipped Classroom Connection


Mixing up and creating innovative, fun and informative videos provide additional
opportunities for students to find their motivation, challenge and interest in the course and
material. This also allows for us to bring in other learning opportunities that the traditional
classroom did not allow.

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Flipped
classrooms
address access to
educational
content in a
number of ways.
While an
instructor is
designing the
instruction for
the flipped
classroom, you
are providing for
the learners
needs in a variety
of ways. The
graphic to the
right provides
several ways to
expand the
flipped classroom
and provide different ways to expand on planning UDL lessons.
The short story of UDL is that we care that a student learned the material; we dont
care how they show they learned it. If they can demonstrate learning in their own
way, they get the multiple means of accessing information, planning the showing of
information and engaging in the content.

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Struggles and Strategies


As many of you can guess, the biggest struggle you will have with the flipped
classroom is getting students to watch the videos. While there is not a magic wand
in flipping that will make all of your students 100% engaged and attentive, there are
several tools we can use to motivate them to watch the videos. You will notice the
list is strikingly similar to methods you may have used in the traditional classroom.
1. THE IMPENDING QUIZ

Quiz students on the video using a few basic recall


questions. Remember, your students have not had time to
work with the content, only have it presented one time.
The quiz should be on the key points of the lecture. It
should be easy for anybody that watched and difficult for
those that did not. Also note, the element of surprise is in
your favordont give one each time.

2. PERSONAL CONFERENCING

Meet with random students to go over the content of the


video personally with a few students each day. While the
class is working on the in-class assignments, meet with two
different students each day. Keep track of who you have
met with so you dont repeat. Randomize your pattern so
students dont know when they will be next.

3. PERSONALIZED TIME MANAGEMENT


Read this one as isolationusing this strategy, you isolate
those that did not watch the video. They are sent away
from the class activity to watch the video. Once that is
complete, they come back to the class and begin the in-class
assignment. Point out to them, privately while they are
working, that they would be much further along if they had
watched the video at the time it was assigned.
4. ONLINE DISCUSSION BOARDS
Have students watch the videos and then respond to a
prompt that makes them think deeper. Then, they must
respond to two of their classmates with a probing question,
or a related story to further learning. In this method,
students who have not watched the video may still absorb
content by reading through the posts and engaging with
others. Its a dirty little trickjust like those cheat cards
that my Biology teacher used to allow for the final exams.

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How Administrators Can Support Flipped Learning


Tips from Jon Bergmann and Brian Bennett
Used with permission from Flipped Learning Network (www.flippedlearning.org) and Schoolwires
(www.schoolwires.com)

Tip #1
Give teachers time to adjust; roll out changes slowly
and create an implementation plan.
Tip #2
Make student engagement part of your evaluation
process. Look for kids asking questions, talking with
one another, and problem solving.
Tip #3
Promote team work for better results; find time for
teachers to collaborate during the day on the changes
youre looking for.
Tip #4
Help find your teachers a coach and consider using a
strength/weakness survey to help pair people
effectively.
Tip #5
Give your staff permission to fail. Turn your efforts
into a learning experience and understand what you
can do differently next time.
Tip #6
Be a buffer. Field phone calls from parents who may
not understand what is happening and are upset
because their child is finally being challenged in school
Tip #7
Involve IT in the conversation to support teachers who
need help with technology integration
Tip #8
Be a sounding board for your teachers and offer
constructive feedback to help them become agents of
change.
Tip #9
Hire teachers who understand student needs and how
to support them.
Tip #10
Model Flipped Learning mindset and use meetings for
collaboration. Send supporting information ahead of
time in a newsletter, email or video.
Tip #11
Create open and collaborative learning spaces where
kids can work together to solve problems using digital
devices.
Tip #12
Allow teachers to choose what they need to learn and
help them feel in control of their own development

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Sample Flipped Lessons


English
The 20 Percent Project
http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip1
The author of this blog posted her project for all of us to
use. She uses the recent research to use intrinsic
motivators to create and innovate within her English
project. Students devote 20% of their time (Fridays) to
their projects that inspire them. The best part is she has
an Evernote link published to the bottom of her blog that
directs you to all her resources and videos that she uses
with her students to make this project a success.
Arizona State University Faculty Readings
http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip2
This website features already prepared readings by ASU
faculty and other guests. These are recorded on Vimeo
for you and embeded directly on their web site. If you
are reading something similar, this would be a great
place to have students listen to a reading and then come
to class prepared to draw parrallels, or contrasts,
between characters, content, plot, setting, literary
elements, etc.
TED Videos on English
http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip3
Language is the stuff of thoughtthe more we know about it, the better we will
understand ourselves. These speakers are trying to crack the mystery.
Linguist Steven Pinker inspects the structure of
sentencesand discovers insithgt inot human nature.
Susan Savage-Rumbaugh finds a key to human language
in the behavior or bonobo apesjust as
paleoanthropologist Zeresenay Alemseged shows us a
set of 3.3-million-year-old hominid fossils that offer
clues to the origins of speech. Erin McKean, meanwhile,
gleefully collects and catalogs the products of modern
wordmakers into a dictionary without limits.

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English Teacher Emma


http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip4
Learning a different language can be hard, but it
can also be a fun and rewarding experience.
Emma is TESOL-certified and has taught
students from various backgrounds, ages, and
levels. Her video channel offers some really
great grammar lessons on tricky word usage in
the English language. Her content would be
appropriate for inclusion in an ESL/ELL classroom or in a regular grammar lesson
to address student misconceptions or lazy
grammar.
Mr. McGoughs Flipped English Classes
http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip5
This YouTube Channel offers several already
prepared lessons on topics such as The Art of
Literary Setting, The Sudden Light and the
Trees, Tweeting to Comprehension, and
many others. Videos on this channel are a mixture
of lessons for both teachers and students. At the time of this publication, it appears
that this new channel is continuing to expand in topic and scope. All lessons are tied
to the Common Core standards.
TedEds English Category
http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip6
TedEds platform works on the following
progression: Watch, Think, Dig Deeper.
Students watch the video, then take a
personal assessment and then they have
extensions to the learning. My favorite from
this list is Beware of Nominalizations (AKA
Zombie Nouns).
The videos on the TedEd side are highly
engaging and professional looking. Finding lessons that are already created from
others or taking videos and creating your own lessons on this platform will yield
high results.

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Will Ferrell and Figurative Language


http://tinyurl.com/EngFlip7
This is a great example of a way to utilize other clips
and edit them into a lesson. This also allows you to
reach into the students real-world, remove the
inappropriateness and make it classroom ready. The
creator of this video moves through different clips
that use Will Ferrell movies and lines to illustrate
personification, alliteration, hyperbole and other
figurative language techniques. You must watch the
whole thing and see her wrap-upit is priceless!
This is a perfect flipped lesson where students may
watch the video and create their own examples from
other films. This would be a great in-class lesson as a follow-up where the teacher
could assist them in making the correct connections.

Math
TedEds Math Category
http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip1
TedEds platform works on the following
progression: Watch, Think, Dig Deeper.
Students watch the video, then take a
personal assessment and then they have
extensions to the learning. My favorite
from this list is How Taking A Bath Led
to Archimedes Principle
The videos on the TedEd side are highly
engaging and professional looking. Finding lessons that are already created from
others or taking videos and creating your own lessons on this platform will yield
high results.
Khan Academy
www.khanacademy.org

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The video library covers a great deal of topics, including K-12 math,
where Sal Khan started his video lessons. Each video is a digestible
chunk, approximately 10 minutes long, and especially purposed for
viewing on the computer.
The conversational tone of each video is engaging and focused on the
specific topic you choose. You can link directly from your site; or embed
the video directly onto your site. All his videos are hosted on YouTube,
so you may run into filter issues at school.
Middle School Math Lessons
http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip2
This YouTube channel features several videos which
offer some great opportunities for application and
relevance fo the topic. They start the lesson with a realworld problem and how the concept is used to solve the
problem.
The graphical representation of the concept is excellent
and really provides a strong visual of the concept for
students to relate the relevance and provides that
concrete visualization that many middle school students
need to further understand abstract concepts.
Matts Math
http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip3
Matts Math features over 36 lessons on
middle school math concepts all related to
real-world examples and correlated to the
Common Core. Some lessons also relate back
to video game functionality and strategy!
At the time of publication, this channel was
continuing to grow with content.

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The Math Master


http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip4
This channel is focused on College Algebra
concepts. The concepts are simply taught using a
teacher and a whiteboard. The channel is a great
example of organization of topics. This is also a
great example of simplicity when starting out. I
also love the introduction video that plays when
you arrive at this channel.
Mrs. Foxs Class
http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip5
This site belongs to an elementary math
teacher that utilizes flipped lessons. By
navigating to YouTube from her site, you
will be able to better see her lesson topics.
I included this link to her site so that you
could get an example of how to setup a
free Google Site for your class if you dont
have access to a Learning Management
System or you choose to use this option
instead of the free LMS options.
You can see that Mrs. Fox is creating her own videos on the topics and she is
organizing them based on her textbooks already established organization patterns
to create consistency with the students.
Byron High School Mathematics Department
http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip6
This link is a resources to five different math
teachers who use the flipped videos and create
content for their students. Each teacher presents
their lessons in a unique style and topics range
from Pre-Algebra to Advanced Calculus.
The other links on this site support a good deal of the information that is contained
in this book and provide great resource information.

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Flipping Math Blog


http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip7
This blog is excellently written by Graham
Johnson. He outlines his thoughts and reflections
on why the flipped classroom has been an
outstanding success in his math classroom. Be
sure to check out his post about the flipped
classroom. He has really gone above and beyond
using the Camtasia products to make his video
interactive.
Mr. Leckies AP Calculus Lessons
http://tinyurl.com/MathFlip8
The web site for Mr. Leckie (although it does
not offer his first name) offers lessons and
note sheets for each of the topics that he
covers in the vodcasts. (Non-techies
vodcasts are the same as videosthey are
podcasts with videosthus the name
vodcasts.)
If you notice he is using a whiteboard and
embedding himself in using a webcam with camstasia software.

Science
TedEds Science & Technology Category
http://tinyurl.com/SCIFlip1
TedEds platform works on the following
progression: Watch, Think, Dig Deeper.
Students watch the video, then take a
personal assessment and then they have
extensions to the learning. My favorite
from this list is Dance vs. PowerPoint, a
modest proposal
The videos on the TedEd side are highly
engaging and professional looking. Finding
lessons that are already created from others or taking videos and creating your own
lessons on this platform will yield high results.

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Dance Your PhD


http://tinyurl.com/SCIFlip2
This site is would be used for advanced high school
science students. Here, PhD students create an
explanation of their advanced research using dance
and video. They also post a description of their
dance and their explanation of how it is
represented.
A fun activity using this site may involve selecting a
topical video for your students and having them
provide the critique of whether they accurately
represented their research or if they could have improved something. Then have
the students develop their own videos using dance to illustrate a concept they are
learning in class.
Chemistry Lesson Playlist
http://tinyurl.com/SCIFlip3
This YouTube playlist is loaded with several
Chemstry topics originally created by Jonathan
Bergmann and Aaron Sams. It seems that they
are beginning to monetize their resources by
selling the entire set; but at the time of
publication, there is only a title screen with a
website to purchase the set of videos.
Earl Haig Physics
http://tinyurl.com/SCIFlip5
A wonderfully organized site by topic and
subtopic in the area of physics. The creators of
this site have outdone themselves organizing
their videos. I only wish that I could diagram my
board half as good as they do. They are doing
things simply, too! All links go directly out to
their YouTube channel.

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CosmoLearning
www.cosmolearning.com
This is a great resources site for many
areas, even those outside of the sciences.
There are thousands of videos on science
topics alone. There are several videos
created by educators, but they also have
segmented documentaries and full-length
topical videos.
Khan Academy
www.khanacademy.org
The video library covers a great deal of topics, including K-12
science. Each video is a digestible chunk, approximately 10
minutes long, and especially purposed for viewing on the
computer.
The conversational tone of each video is engaging and focused on
the specific topic you choose. You can link directly from your
site; or embed the video directly onto your site.
Mr. Causeys World
www.mrcauseysworld.com
This site contains a great deal of articles and topics
including Physics, Chemistry and Algebra. His YouTube
channel is linked through for easy location of topics.
He has also arranged his YouTube channel by topic
with playlists. The videos are top quality with practice
embedded in the videos.
Physics Education Research Interactive Online
Lectures
http://tinyurl.com/SCIFlip6
A full library of introductory pre-college and
college level physics lesson are posted through a
development consortium between 7 different
large universities. The lessons are interactive and
are meant to supplement and strengthen the
physics students classroom lessons and
investigations.

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Social Studies
CosmoLearning
http://tinyurl.com/SSFlip1
This is a great resources site for many
areas, even those outside of the social
sciences. There are thousands of videos on
American History alone. There are several
videos created by educators, but they also
have segmented documentaries and fulllength topical videos.
Clintondale High School
www.flippedhighschool.com
Clintondale High School features videos in
many different subject areas, but their Social
Studies Department was able to reduce their
28% failure rate to 9% using their flipped
model. The best partthey have all their
videos available through their web site. They
range the subject areas from Government,
Economics to History. Use the subject bar at
the top under the header to navigate.
TedEds Social Studies Category
http://tinyurl.com/SSFlip2
TedEds platform works on the following
progression: Watch, Think, Dig Deeper.
Students watch the video, then take a
personal assessment and then they have
extensions to the learning. My favorite from
this list is Why do Americans Vote On
Tuesdays?
The videos on the TedEd side are highly
engaging and professional looking. Finding
lessons that are already created from others or taking videos and creating your own
lessons on this platform will yield high results.

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Stanford History Education Group


sheg.stanford.edu
The Reading Like a Historian curriculum
engages students in historical inquiry.
Each
lesson revolves around a central
historical question and features sets of
primary documents modified for groups
of students with diverse reading skills
and abilities.
This curriculum teaches students how to
investigate historical questions employing
reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close
reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the
trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip's War to the
Montgomery Bus Boycott, and make historical claims backed by documentary
evidence.
Flipped Social Studies
http://tinyurl.com/SSFlip3
This site features links to two courses, one
on World History and the other on AP
European History. This does require a login
for joining the courses. In addition, there is
a Video Production course listed, as well.
The site does require registration in the
class.
Flipped History
www.flipped-history.com

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This site is a blog hosted by Tom Driscoll. He


offers up some very great discussion points
and shares some great opportunities for
flipped educators to engage. In addition, he
has links to videos created by other social
studies teachers and a community board and
resource wiki. This is a great resource for
any social studies teacher.
Flipped History: Technology and Critical
Thinking
historywithls.blogspot.com
The blog of Karl Lindgren-Streicher offers many
compelling stories of success in the flippedmastery model. Karl is a history teacher in San
Mateo, California. He offers some great
suggestions and links to resources for history
teachers.

Physical Education
The Flipped Coach
www.flippedcoach.com
This blog features resources and already
complete video collections for the PE teacher and
coach. The blog also reviews apps and other
technology tools for integrating technology into
the PE curriculum.
Another great feature that seems to be growing
is the PE Educator Connect. This is a bulletin
board where coaches and PE teachers can post
their information and develop collaborative
distance connections.
Coachs Eye
www.coachseye.com

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There are some great how-to videos in all


sports on this site. Some are better than others,
but there is also an app that you can purchase to
create your own videos for only $4.99 on the
iPhone or Google Play. One of their touted
features includes slow-motion review, drawing
tools and simple sharing for game improvement
and video analysis.
Jason Hahnstadt PE Teacher
http://tinyurl.com/PEFlip1
Mr. Hahnstadts YouTube channel has a plethora
of videos related to sports, fitness
and different skill games to play in the PE class.
One aspect that catches the eye is that his channel
offers up some great suggestions for different
skill games to play in the PE class. This is a great
way to have the students come in already
knowing what the game objective is and how to
execute. Now there is more time to be physically
active.
Self-Defense Training
http://tinyurl.com/PEFlip2
This YouTube channel is full of different drills
and practice moves in several martial
arts areas. This would be a great place for
students in a self-defense unit to learn the
techniques of the moves before arriving to class.
Additionally, this may be a great place for
students to remediate lessons learned in class for
practice outside of class.

Foreign Language
Foreign Language Flipped Class Resources
http://tinyurl.com/FLFlip1

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This page is a list of resources and lessons that


every foreign language teacher would want to
have at their disposal. Even if you are not
flipping your class, this list of article, links,
videos etc. is a great resource to have when
planning new and exciting lessons for your
students. The flipped classroom instructor will
find it all the more appealing. It almost makes
listing anything more on this page
unnecessary!
SpanishDict
http://tinyurl.com/FLFlip2
This YouTube channel hosts a great deal of
Spanish tutorials with strong visuals for
students who need both visual and auditory
channels linked together for memory and
pronounciation. While I would love to tell
you about the lessons, they are all written in
Spanish and I cannot read them!
LangMedia
This is an app that provides resources for learning languages less-commonly offered
by high school and colleges in the US. Some of the
languages for which LangMedia offers educational
resources are Arabic, Bulgarian, Persian, Thai, and
Urdu. For these languages LangMedia provides
course outlines, practice dialogues, and lists of
resources necessary for completing the
requirements of each course. There is also a
collection of video clips of interviews and discussions with people from different
coutnries, of different ages and from different walks of life.

Art & Music


TedEds Arts Category
http://tinyurl.com/ArtFlip1

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TedEds platform works on the following


progression: Watch, Think, Dig Deeper.
Students watch the video, then take a
personal assessment and then they have
extensions to the learning.
The videos on the TedEd side are highly
engaging and professional looking. Finding
lessons that are already created from
others or taking videos and creating your
own lessons on this platform will yield high
results.
Jerrys Artarama
http://tinyurl.com/ArtFlip2
Jerrys Artarama, besides its alluring and creative
name, offers some very well done techniques in
drawing and painting. There is a a great deal of
technique that is easily explained and
demonstrated up close for the students. Not only
a great resource for students new to the field, but
a great brush-up (get it?) for skills that may have
been forgotten.
The Virtual Instructor
thevirtualinstructor.com
This is a library of drawing, painting, Photoshop,
Flash and Illustrator lessons. Not
only that, but they also have some fundamental art
lessons posted on the page. Imagine freeing up
your art class to have students actually creating
works of art and not just watching you do it!

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Riffeo
www.riffeo.com/clip
This music site offers tutorial videos for
different songs at different levels for guitar,
bass, keyboard, drums and even DJ beats. It
also allows users to upload their own
content to give back. This may be a great
way for the students to create content and
become a member of the community.
Michael New Music Theory Lessons
http://tinyurl.com/MusFlip1
In these video tutorials, Mr. New
introduces users to the basics of music
theory. His lessons build on each other and
he provides some really great examples
with three points of view in the cameras.
He also has a few playlists on the side of
the channel that offer lessons in writing
music and featuring some music that he
has written himself.

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Action Plan
This worksheet will assist in developing a lesson in a flipped classroom. It is not a
lesson plan template, but an action plan for implementing the flipped classroom
when you return to your classrooms tomorrow!
List a colleague or two that you know would be interested in working together on
this new endeavor.
5. __________________________________________________________
6. __________________________________________________________
List four technology resources to which you already have access. This could be
software, hardware, online resources, etc. Basically, anything that will help you get
started.
1. __________________________________________________________
2. __________________________________________________________
3. __________________________________________________________
4. __________________________________________________________
If you were to remove lecture and direct instruction from your classroom, what
would you like to put in its place?

What is stopping you from giving this a try? List anything that is perceived as a
problem and try to brainstorm solutions to these roadblocks.

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Parent Letter Sample


Dear Parents,
Starting soon, things will be a little different in your students math class than you
may be accustomed. We will be fully implementing a teaching model known widely
as the flipped classroom.
In short, a flipped classroom switches around the traditional order of teaching
with the purpose of creating a more in depth and supportive environment in the
classroom when the teacher is present and able to help students. It allows for
students to receive a more individualized instruction, thus resulting in higher and
deeper level of understanding. In addition, it challenges students to learn how to
take charge of their learning, becoming resourceful learners. Lastly, it provides time
for more discussion and questioning during class time, helping students to become
reflective communicators and to think more deeply about the subject.
For homework, students will be required to watch an instructional video, where the
lesson and examples are the same as they would receive in class. However, because
the students are watching the lessons on video, they can pause, rewind, or re-watch
any segments of the video at any time. This allows students to learn at his or her
personal pace and become more self-directed. Each lesson is specifically designed to
be around 8 to 15 minutes long.
These videos can be accessed at YouTube, or students can get the videos on a flash
drive in order to watch them without internet access through the library. All direct
links are also accessible at the class website. Because the videos are online, they can
be accessed on any internet-capable device, such as a cell phone or iPod.
Students will be required to take Cornell style notes and write a summary at the end
of the notes on the concept being taught. The quality and depth of the summary
provides me with an assessment of understanding. The notes and summary will be
used in class for a discussion to follow each lesson.
The flipped classroom enables you as a parent to be more involved in your
students education. Most parents tend to agree that they do not remember much
from their high school classes and do not feel they can support their student when
they are doing homework. However, with the flipped classroom, there are several
very easy ways you can help your student:
7. Provide your student with a quiet place to watch the lecture video
(preferably with headphones to limit distractions) each night. If internet
access is not available at your house, provide your student with the time to
stay after school or visit the public library to watch the videos.

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8. Ask your student questions about what they watched and have them read
their summary out loud to you.
9. Read their summary yourself to make sure it sounds complete and makes
sense.
10. Encourage them to take their time while watching the videos, which means
they pause, rewind, or re-watch portions of the video when the teaching is
going too fast or when students need a minute to make sense of what was
taught.
11. Watch the videos with them so you can learn along with them and help them
when it comes to doing regular practice at home the night before the test!
Students are expected to come prepared to class each day with the background
knowledge of each concept, ready to learn it better, deeper, and faster. Students are
not expected to have full mastery of the content before they arrive in class, although
many students will be at that level.
The flipped classroom requires your student to take responsibility for their
learning in several ways:
1. Students must plan time to watch the video when they are still fully awake
and able to make connections between content. (Before 10pm is highly
suggested).
2. Students must take initiative to re-watch videos they need to see again.
3. Students must make sure that if they are absent, they still watch the required
videos and come to class prepared.
4. Students must make sure that they take initiative to communicate with me
either online or in person if there are issues with watching the videos.
Please return third page of this letter, in full, filled out and signed by both the
parent/guardian and the student. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate
to contact me.
Sincerely yours,
Kevin M. Steele

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STUDENT NAME: ___________________________________________ PERIOD: _________

I understand the changes that will be taking place and the expectations for
my student. We have internet access at home and watching the videos nightly
should not be a problem.

I understand the changes that will be taking place and the expectations for
my student. We do have a computer at home; however, we do not have
consistent internet access at home, so my student will be working with you
to discuss options for accessing content.

I understand the changes that will be taking place and the expectations for
my student. We do not have a computer at home, so my student will be
working with you to discuss options for accessing the content.

Parent/Guardian Name: ________________________ Relationship to Student: ____________


Parent Signature: ___________________________________________
Student Signature: ___________________________________________
Best way to contact me from 8am-2pm during the week
Email: ____________________________________________________________
Phone: ____________________________________________________________
Please list any comments, questions or concerns and I will contact you back using
your contact information listed above:

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Recommended Reading
Bergmann, J., & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: reach every student in every
class every day. Eugene, Or.: International Society for Technology in Education;.
Boss, S., & Krauss, J. (2007). Reinventing project-based learning: your field guide to
real-world projects in the digital age. Eugene, Or.: International Society for
Technology in Education.
Johnson, S. (2011). Digital tools for teaching: 30 e-tools for collaborating, creating, and
publishing across the curriculum. Gainesville, FL: Maupin House Pub..
Pitler, H., & Hubbell, E. R. (2012). Using technology with classroom instruction that
works (2nd ed.). Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development.
Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the Digital Age: universal
design for learning. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.
Tomlinson, C. A., & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating differentiated instruction &
understanding by design: connecting content and kids. Alexandria, Va.:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Tucker, C. R. (2012). Blended learning in grades 4-12: leveraging the power of
technology to create student-centered classrooms. Thousand Oaks, Calif.:
Corwin.
Wagner, T., & Compton, R. A. (2012). Creating innovators: the making of young people
who will change the world. New York: Scribner.

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