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Accredited by The Institution of Engineers (India)

Affiliated with University of Calicut & Approved by AICTE


ISO 9001 : 2008 Certified
The Vision: To train the youth to be the leaders of tomorrow with apt skills, deep rooted sense of social
responsibility, strong ethical values and with a global outlook to face the challenges of the changing world.
The Mission: With a high caliber faculty and an excellent infrastructure, we promote academic excellence, absolute
discipline and sound practical exposure.

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING


Hand Book cum Question Bank
FOR III SEMESTER
ACADEMIC YEAR

2014-2015

CONTENTS
1. Calicut University rules and course regulations for the
B Tech Engineering degree course 2013 admission
2. Scheme & Syllabus of B Tech degree programme
3. Lesson Plan
4. Class note preparation plan
5. Question Bank

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Course Regulations
of
B.Tech. Engineering Degree Courses
(With effect from 2009 admissions)
1.

Conditions for Admissions

Candidates for admission to the B.Tech. Engineering degree course shall be required to have
passed the Higher Secondary Examination of State Board of Kerala or examinations recognized
equivalent by any Universities of Kerala, with 50% marks in Mathematics and 50% marks
in Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics put together. Candidates, belonging to Socially
and Educationally Backwards classes with a total family annual income not exceeding the
limit notified by the Government of Kerala from time to time, need only 45% marks in
Mathematics and 45% marks in Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics put together. Candidates
belonging to scheduled caste and scheduled tribe need only a pass in the qualifying
examination.
Candidates have to qualify the State Level Entrance examination conducted by the
Commissioner of Entrance Examinations or State level/National level Entrance
Examination approved by the Government of Kerala as equivalent. They shall also satisfy
the conditions regarding age and physical fitness as prescribed by the University of Calicut.
Criteria for selection and method of admission to merit/management seats for Engineering
degree courses conducted by Government/Aided/Self-financing colleges affiliated to University
of Calicut shall be governed by the rules/regulations framed by the Commissioner of
Entrance Examinations or other competent authority appointed by the Government of Kerala,
in consultation with the University and without contravening with the stipulation of the All
India Council for Technical Education (AICTE). In all matters related to selection and
admission, the decisions of the University shall be final. The students admitted by affiliated
colleges violating the above regulations will not be eligible for registration to University
Examinations and contravention of the regulations shall lead to withdrawal/suspension of
affiliation.

2.

Admission to Diploma Holders

A candidate who has a diploma in engineering awarded by the State Board of


Technical Examination or an examination recognized equivalent by the State Board of Technical
Education after undergoing regular course of 3 years in an institute approved by AICTE,
securing a cumulative minimum of 50% marks in the second and third years diploma
examination shall be eligible to be admitted to the first year B.Tech. programme of the
University of Calicut (hereafter, the University, unless otherwise specified) if he/she has
qualified the entrance examination conducted by the Commissioner of Entrance
Examinations or State level/National level Entrance Examination approved by the Government
of Kerala as equivalent.
Diploma holders with 60% marks (50% in case of SC/ST) are also eligible for admission to the
3rd semester (regular full-time batch) engineering degree course (B.Tech.) under the lateral

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

entry scheme provided they qualify the Entrance Examination conducted for the lateral entry
scheme by the state Government. These students are not required to study any deficiency papers
of the combined first and second semesters.
Admission of all candidates under the lateral entry scheme shall be completed latest by
31st May.
Part-time Degree Courses are offered for students possessing diploma in
Engineering/Technology awarded by the State Board of Technical Education or
equivalent to acquire B-Tech Degree. The Courses extend over a period of four years. The
classes will be conducted normally in the evening in all working days and on holidays, if
necessary, in accordance with the syllabi of the University. Criteria for selection and
method of admission shall be governed by the rules and regulations framed by the competent
authority appointed by the Government of Kerala. Candidates should be admitted only to the
branch of Engineering in which they have obtained the diploma. However certain branches of
diploma courses are considered equivalent to certain branches for admission to the part-time
B-Tech Courses. The details of which are given in Annexure.

3.

Subjects of Study

The subjects of study, both theory and practical, shall be in accordance with the
prescribed scheme and syllabi of each branch of study.

4.

Duration of the Course

The course for the B.Tech degree shall extend over a period of four academic years
comprising of eight semesters. The first and second semesters shall be combined; the scheme
and syllabi for combined first and second semesters (S1S2) will be common for all branches
of study. The maximum duration permissible for taking the B.Tech. degree course is fixed
as 8 years.
Classes of combined first and second semesters shall be started latest by 1st August
in all affiliated engineering colleges of University of Calicut; however admission to first year
shall be completed by 31st August.
The minimum number of working days in combined first and second semesters shall
be 150 days. In 3rd to 8th semesters, there shall be minimum 90 working days.

5.

Branches of Study
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Civil Engineering (CE)


Mechanical Engineering (ME)
Electrical and Electronics Engineering (EE)
Chemical Engineering (CH)
Production Engineering (PE)
Electronics and Communication Engineering (EC)
Instrumentation and Control Engineering (IC)
Applied Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering (AI)
Biotechnology (BT)

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

10. Biomedical Engineering (BM)


11. Computer Science and Engineering (CS)
12. Information Technology (IT)
13. Printing Technology (PT)
14. Automobile Engineering (AM)
15. Aeronautical Engineering (AN)

6.

Course Calendar

The course calendar, published by the University, shall be followed by all affiliated
engineering colleges. Within a week after the commencement of classes of each semester, Head
of each Institution should forward the list of faculty members working in the college along
with their qualification and years of teaching experience, to the University. This is a
mandatory requirement which should be strictly followed by Head of each Institution. Head
of each Institution shall ensure the availability of sufficient number of regular faculty
members having experience and qualifications (as per AICTE guidelines) in the institution.

7.

Assessment of Students

Assessment of students for each subject will be done by internal continuous assessment and
Semester-End examinations. Internal assessment shall be conducted throughout the semester. It
shall be based on internal examinations, assignments (such as home work, problem solving,
group discussions, quiz, literature survey, seminar, term- project, software exercises, etc.) as
decided by the faculty handling the course, and regularity in the class. Assignments of every
semester shall preferably be submitted in Assignment Book, which is a bound book similar to
laboratory record.
Semester-End examinations of theory and practical subjects will be conducted by the
University. Semester-End examinations of combined first and second semesters and
3rd to 6th semesters will be conducted only once in a year; failed or improvement
candidates will have to appear for the Semester-End examinations along with regular
students. However, Semester-End examinations of 7th and 8th semesters will be
conducted once in every semester. Head of institution should take necessary steps to
prevent any malpractices in the Semester-End examinations. If any such instances are
detected, they should be reported to the University without any delay.
Internal assessment marks of each theory subject should have a class average limited
to 80%. If the class average of internal assessment marks of any theory subjects is greater than
80%, existing normalization procedure should be applied to limit it to 80%. If the class average
is not greater than 80%, absolute marks should be given.
For practical subjects, internal assessment marks and Semester-End examination marks
individually should have a class average limited to 75%. If the class average of internal
assessment marks or Semester-End examination marks of practical subjects is greater than
75%, the existing normalization procedure should be applied to limit the class average to
75%. If it is not greater than 75%, absolute marks should be given.
All the students in the nominal roll of the class on the closing day of semester
should be considered for normalization of internal marks. All the students who have passed

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

the Semester-End practical examination should be considered for normalisation of marks of


Semester-End practical examinations.
Internal assessment marks of theory and practical subjects, both absolute and normalised, should be
published in the college 10 days before sending it to the University so as to enable the students to
report any corrections.
(a) Assessment in Theory Subjects
The marks allotted for internal continuous assessment and Semester-End university
examinations shall be 30 marks and 70 marks respectively with a maximum of 100 marks
for each theory subject.
The weightage to award internal continuous assessment marks should be as follows: Test
papers (minimum two)

60%

Assignments (minimum two) such as home work,


problem solving, group discussions, quiz, literature
survey, seminar, term-project,
software exercises, etc.

30%

Regularity in the class

10%

Full credit for regularity in the class can be given only if the candidate has secured
minimum 90% attendance in the subject.
(b) Assessment in Practical Subjects
Internal continuous assessment and Semester-End practical examinations will have
1:1 weightage in the students performance of practical subjects, with 50 marks allotted for
internal continuous assessment and 50 marks for Semester-End examinations.
An external examiner and an internal examiner, appointed by the University, shall
conduct the Semester-End examinations of practical subjects. These examiners should
necessarily have minimum two years industrial experience/teaching experience at engineering
degree level.
Award of marks in the Semester-End practical examinations (except Project)
should be as follows:
Fair record
10%
Viva voce
20%
Procedure and tabulation form,
Conducting experiment, results and inference
70%
No candidate will be permitted to attend the Semester-End practical examinations unless
he/she produces certified record of the laboratory.
Strict measures will be taken by the University to monitor the laboratory facilities,
laboratory experiments conducted, standard of Semester-End practical examinations, etc. in

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

every affiliated engineering college. In this regard, an expert team comprising of at


least three subject experts from government/government-aided engineering colleges from
within/outside the University shall be formulated to assess these aspects in affiliated
engineering colleges. This expert team should visit each engineering college at least once in
a semester and submit a detailed report to the University regarding the laboratory
facilities, laboratory experiments conducted, and standard of Semester-End practical
examinations in each college.

8.

Pattern of Questions for Semester-End Examinations of Theory


Subjects

The question papers of Semester-End examinations of theory subjects shall be able to


perform achievement testing of the students in an effective manner. The question paper
shall be prepared
(a) covering all sections of the course syllabus
(b) unambiguous and free from any defects/errors
(c) emphasizing knowledge testing, problem solving & quantitative methods
(d) containing adequate data/other information on the problems assigned
(e) having clear and complete instructions to the candidates.
Duration of Semester-End examinations will be 3 hours. The pattern of questions for
theory subjects shall be as follows:
PART A: Short answer questions (one/two sentences)
5 x 2 marks=10 marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one
question from each module and not more than two questions
from any module.
PART B: Analytical/Problem solving questions
4 x 5 marks=20 marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six.
There should be at least one question from each
module and not more than two questions from any module.
PART C: Descriptive/Analytical/Problem solving questions
4 x 10 marks=40 marks
Two questions from each module with choice to
answer one question.
Maximum Total Marks: 70
Weightage for categories such as problem solving, descriptive, drawing, or diagrammatic
questions shall be specified along with the syllabus of any subject, if necessary. Model
question paper shall be prepared for each subject at the time of framing the syllabus. This same
model question paper along with the syllabus must be sent to the question-paper setter
every time for framing the questions. The model question paper shall be made available
to students.

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

It is permitted to have an entirely different pattern of questions especially for


subjects involving drawing, design, etc. However, the modified pattern to be followed shall
be clearly specified along with the syllabus of the particular subject. All question paper
setters should supplement the scheme and key for the evaluation

9.

Minimum for Pass

(a) A candidate who secures not less than 40% marks in a subject at the Semester- End
examinations and (b) not less than 50% of the total marks assigned to the subject, shall be
declared to have passed the examination in that subject.

OR

(c) A candidate who secures in Semester-End examination itself, 40% of the total marks
assigned to a subject shall also be declared to have passed the examination in that subject.
The total marks assigned to a subject in the above calculations is the sum of
maximum marks assigned to the Semester-End examination and maximum internal assessment
marks of that subject. Candidates will be assigned grades according to the marks scored.
For Seminar, Project, and Viva Voce (in 8th semester), the minimum for a pass
shall be 50% of the total marks assigned to the respective examination. A student who does
not secure this pass marks in a subject will have to repeat the respective subject.
If a candidate has passed all examinations of B.Tech. course (at the time of
publication of results of eighth semester) except Viva-Voce in the eighth semester, a reexamination for the Viva-Voce should be conducted within one month after the
publication of results. Each candidate should apply for this Save A Semester examination within
one week after the publication of eighth semester results.

10. Credit System


Each subject shall have a certain number of credits assigned to it depending upon the
academic load and the nature and importance of the subject. The credit associated with each
subject will be shown in the prescribed scheme and syllabi. Each course shall have an integer
number of credits, which reflects its weightage.

11. Grading
The university shall award the letter grade to students based on the marks secured by
them in both internal assessment and Semester-End examinations taken together in the subjects
registered. Each letter grade indicates a qualitative assessment of the students performance and
is associated with a specified number of grade points. The grading system along with the
grade points for each grade, applicable to passed candidates is shown below. All passed
candidate will be allotted a grade S, A, B, C, D, or E according to the total marks scored by
him/her.
If a candidate does not a pass a subject as per the conditions given in Section (9), he/she
will be assigned an Unsatisfactory grade U irrespective of his/her total marks. If a student
does not pass a subject in two attempts, the maximum grade he/she can get is
C when he/she passes the subject in any subsequent examination, whatever be the marks
scored by him/her.

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

A student is considered to have completed a subject successfully and earned the credits if
he/she secures a letter grade other than U in that course. Letter grade U has zero grade
point and the candidate has to write the examination again to improve the grade. A
student's performance is measured by the number of credits that he/she has
earned and by the cumulative grade point average (CGPA) maintained by him/her..
Total marks scored by the
passed candidate

Corresponding
Grade allotted

Grade Points

86- 100
76-85
66-75
56-65
46-55
40-45

S
A
B
C
D
E

10
8.5
7.5
6.5
5.5
4.5

12. Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) and Cumulative Grade


Point Average (CGPA)
(a) A Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) shall be computed for all the students for
each semester, as follows:
n

SGPA =

Ci G i
i=1
n

Ci
i=1

where, n is the number of subjects registered during the semester, Ci is the


number of credits allotted to ith subject as per the scheme, and Gi is the grade points
corresponding to the grade awarded to the student for the subject.
(b)

A Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) shall be computed for all the
students at the end of each semester by taking into consideration their
performance in the present and the past semesters as follows:
m

CGPA =

Ci G i
i=1
m

Ci
i=1

where, m is the number of courses registered up to that semester, Ci is the


number of credits allotted to ith subject as per the scheme, and Gi is the grade points

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

corresponding to the grade awarded to the student for the subject.


An up-to-date assessment of overall performance of a student is obtained by
calculating CGPA. CGPA is weighted average of the grade points obtained in all the
subjects registered by the students since he entered the B.Tech. course.
(c) Both the SGPA and CGPA shall be rounded off to the second place of decimal and
recorded as such for ease of presentation. Whenever the CGPAs are to be used for
the purpose of determining the merit ranking in a group of students, only the
rounded off values shall be made use of.

13. Improvement
Candidates shall be allowed to improve the grade of any two theory subjects. This can
be done only in the immediate subsequent chance. If the candidate gets more marks in the
improvement chance, marks scored in the improvement chance will be considered for grading
in the subject; otherwise marks scored in the first attempt will be retained. No candidate shall be
permitted to improve the marks scored in practical examinations and internal continuous
assessment.

14. Attendance
A candidate shall be permitted to appear for the Semester-End examinations only if
he/she satisfies the following requirements:
(a) He/she must secure not less than 75% attendance in the total number of working hours
in each semester.
(b) He/she must earn a progress certificate from the head of the institution stating that
he/she has satisfactorily completed the course of study prescribed in the semester as
required by these regulations.
(c) His/her conduct must be satisfactory
It shall be open to the Vice Chancellor to grant condonation of shortage of attendance on the
recommendation of the head of the institution in accordance with the following
norms.
The shortage shall not be more than 10%
Shortage upto 20% shall be condoned once during the entire course
provided such shortage is caused by continuous absence on genuine medical
grounds.
Shortage shall not be condoned more than twice during the entire
course.
Candidate who is not eligible for condonation of shortage of
attendance shall repeat the semester.

15. Registration for each Semester

Every candidate should register for all subjects of the Semester-End examinations
of each semester. A candidate who does not register will not be permitted to attend the
Semester-End examinations; he/she shall not be permitted to attend the next semester.

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

A candidate shall be eligible to register for any higher semester (i.e. 3rd semester
onwards) if he/she has satisfactorily completed the course of study and registered for the
examination of the combined first and second semesters. A candidate shall be eligible to register
for the fourth to eighth semester if he/she has satisfactorily completed the course of study and
registered for the examination of the immediate previous semester. He/she should register for the
semester at the start of the semester before the stipulated date. University will notify the starting
and closing dates for each semester.
A candidate will not be permitted to register for the 5th semester class if at the
time of registration of 5th semester he/she has not secured a minimum CGPA of 2.5,
considering the marks of combined first and second semesters. Similarly, a candidate will not be
permitted to register for the 7th semester class if at the time of registration of 7th semester
he/she has not secured a minimum CGPA of 2.5, considering the marks upto
fourth semester. He/she can be permitted to register with the subsequent batch as and when
he/she satisfies the eligibility condition.
As this rule for promotion is an academic prerequisite, no exemption should be granted
in this case, whatever the causes. Head of institution should take necessary measures to
implement this rule strictly.

16. Additional Requirements for the degree


In addition to the requirement prescribed for the award of B.Tech. degree, each
student must complete compulsory social service for a total duration of 15 days during
3rd to 7th semesters of the course, A record is to be kept showing the details of social
service activities undertaken and it should be approved by the Staff Advisor. Head of Institution
should verify this compulsory requirement before permitting the student to register for the
eighth semester.
Students are expected to undertake industrial training(s) of total 10 days minimum duration
or industrial visits (to minimum 3 industries) for studying about the industries of importance to
the branch concerned during 4th to 7th semester. Students may also undertake an
educational tour of maximum two weeks duration between 5th and 8th semesters for visiting
industries (at least three) of importance to the branch concerned. Faculty members shall
accompany the students for the industrial visits/educational tour. Each student shall submit
detailed bound report(s) of the training/visit/tour to the Head of Department within two weeks
after the programme. These bound report(s), signed by the
staff advisor or faculty in charge of tour/training/visit and by the head of department, shall
also be brought during the final Viva-Voce.

17. Examination Monitoring Cell


Head of the each institution should formulate an Examination Monitoring Cell at the
institution for supervising all examinations, especially the internal examinations. This cell, with
a senior staff member as Convener, shall consist of minimum three members
(one shall be a lady). A clerical staff having computer skills shall also be assigned for the
examination monitoring cell.
The collective responsibilities of the examination monitoring cell are

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Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

(a) officiate as the examination squad to keep a vigil on all Semester-End


examinations.
If any malpractices are found/reported by invigilators, inform these to the Head of
Institution along with a report about the incident. Head of Institution shall forward all
such complaints to the University.
(b) schedule all examinations conducted as part of internal assessment of students.
(c) to receive any complaint from students regarding issues like out-of-syllabus
questions, printing mistakes, etc. of Semester-End examinations of theory and practical
subjects. The cell shall investigate these complaints and if necessary forward it to
university with specific comments.
(d) to receive any complaints from students regarding internal examinations, enquire such
incidents, and give a report to the Head of Institution for necessary action.

To conduct all the theory examinations, a Chief Superintendent and an Assistant Chief
Superintendent should be appointed internally by the Head of Institution. At least two external
Additional Chief Superintendents should be appointed by the University as Observers for
conducting theory examinations in all affiliated Engineering Colleges.

18. Electives
All students shall choose five elective subjects, one in the sixth and two each in the seventh
and eighth semesters from a set of elective subjects prescribed in the syllabus and offered by
the institution. There should be at least 25% students of the class for an elective subject to be
offered. However, any student having a CGPA of not less than 7.5 shall be permitted to select
an elective of his/her choice and register under a faculty subject to the permission from the
faculty and Head of Department. The student will have to study this subject on his own (selfstudy mode) or the classes of this subject shall be taken during off-hours.
Any student having a CGPA of not less than 8.0 shall also be permitted to take additional
elective subjects if permitted by the Head of Department. This may enable him/her to
register for less number of elective courses in the next semester if applicable. When the candidate
registers for these extra electives, recommendation from the Head of Institution is to be attached.
However, no student will be permitted to register for more than 5 electives during his course of
study.
A student has the option of taking less number of electives in any semester so as to
suitably adjust his/her pace of study. Eg. A student can opt for studying only one elective
in 7th semester, instead of two electives specified in the scheme. He/she will have to complete
the sufficient number of electives in later semesters.
A student can opt for interdisciplinary electives, termed as global electives in the
syllabus, maximum one each during 7th and 8th semesters subject to the permission from both
Heads of Departments and the faculty handling the elective subject. Minimum number of
students for a global elective shall be 15 and maximum 60.
New electives may be introduced according to the needs of emerging fields in
technology. The name of the elective and its syllabus should be approved by the
university before the subject is offered as an elective.

11

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

19. Class Committee


Head of institution shall take necessary steps to form a class committee for each class at the
start of classes of each semester. This class committee shall be in existence for the semester
concerned. The class committee shall consist of the Head of Department, Staff Advisor of the
class, a senior faculty member of the department, a faculty member from another department,
and three student representatives (one of them should be a girl). There should be at least
two meetings of the class committee every semester; it shall be the responsibility of the Head
of Department to convene these meetings. The decisions of the Class Committee shall be
recorded in a register for further reference. Each class committee will communicate its
recommendations to the Head of Institution.
The responsibilities of the class committee are:
(a) to review periodically the progress and conduct of students in the class.
(b) to discuss any problems concerning any subjects in the semester concerned.
(c) to identify weaker students of the class and suggest remedial measures.
(d) to review teaching effectiveness and coverage of syllabus.
(e) discuss any other issue related to the students of the class.

20. Eligibility for the Degree


No candidate shall be eligible for the B.Tech. degree unless he has undergone the prescribed
course of study for a period of not less than four academic years in an institution
affiliated to the University of Calicut and has passed all subjects as per the prescribed syllabus.
No candidate under lateral entry scheme shall be eligible for the B.Tech. degree unless
he has undergone the prescribed course of study for a period of not less than three academic
years in an institution affiliated to the University of Calicut and has passed all subjects of 3rd to
8th semesters as per the prescribed syllabus.

21. Classification of Successful Candidates


(a) A candidate who qualifies for the degree, passing all the subjects of the eight
semesters within 5 academic years after the commencement of his course of study and
secures not less than a CGPA of 8.00 of all the semesters shall be declared to have
passed the B.Tech. degree examination in First Class with Honours.
(b) A candidate who qualifies for the degree, passing all the subjects of the eight
semesters within 5 academic years after the commencement of his course of study and
secures not less than a CGPA of 6.00 of all the semesters shall be declared to have
passed the B.Tech. degree examination in First Class.
(c) All other candidates who qualify for the degree passing all the subjects of the eight
semesters and not covered as per Sections 21 (a) and (b) shall be declared to have passed
the B.Tech. degree examination in second class.
(d) Classification of the lateral entry student can be given based on the CGPA of 3rd to
8th semesters. The final mark-list of lateral entry students should indicate that (i)

12

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

the student was admitted through lateral entry scheme (ii) classification is based on CGPA
of 3rd to 8th semesters. He/she should have passed all the subjects of the 3rd to 8th
semesters within 4 academic years after the commencement of the course of study.
It may be indicated in each mark-list that the internal assessment marks and Semester- End
examination marks of practical subjects are normalised.

22. Grievance Cell


Each college should setup a Grievance Cell with at least four faculty members to look
into grievances of the students, if any.

23. Anti-Ragging Cell


Head of Institution shall take necessary steps to constitute anti-ragging committee and
squad at the commencement of each academic year. The committee and the squad shall take
effective steps as specified by the Honorable Supreme Court of India, to prevent ragging.
Notwithstanding all that has been stated above, the University has right to modify any of the
above regulations from time to time as per University rules.

13

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

14

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT
CIVIL ENGINEERING
SCHEME OF STUDIES AND EXAMINATION AND SYLLABUS FOR
B. TECH DEGREE (FULL-TIME)
III SEMESTER 2009 SCHEME

15

Sl.
No

Code

Subject

Hours / week
L
T P/D

EN09 301

EN09 302

3
4
5
6
7
8

CE09 303
CE09 304
CE09 305
CE09 306

Engineering Mathematics
III
Humanities and
Communication Skills
Mechanics of Solids
Building Technology I
Surveying I
Engineering Geology
Surveying Lab I
Materials Testing Lab I
Total

4
3
3
3
18

CE09 307(P)
CE09 308(P)

Marks
Inte- Semrnal
end
30
70

Sem-end
Duration
Hours
3

Credits

30

70

1
1
1
1
6

3
3
6

30
30
30
30
50
50

70
70
70
70
50
50

3
3
3
3
3
3

5
4
4
4
2
2
28

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

EN09 301: Engineering Mathematics III


(Common for all branches)

Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objective
This course provides a quick overview of the concepts and results in complex analysis
that may be useful in engineering. Also it gives an introduction to linear algebra and Fourier
transform which are wealth of ideas and results with wide area of application.
Module I: Functions of a Complex Variable (13 hours)
Functions of a Complex Variable Limit Continuity Derivative of a Complex function
Analytic functions Cauchy-Riemann Equations Laplace equation Harmonic Functions
Conformal Mapping Examples: Zn, sinz, cosz, sinhz, coshz, (z+1/Z
) Mobius
Transformation.
Module II: Functions of a Complex Variable (14 hours)
Definition of Line integral in the complex plane Cauchys integral theorem (Proof of
existence of indefinite integral to be omitted) Independence of path Cauchys integral
formula Derivatives of analytic functions (Proof not required) Taylor series Laurent
series Singularities and Zeros Residues Residue Integration method Residues and
Residue theorem Evaluation of real integrals.
Module III: Linear Algebra (13 hours) - Proofs not required
Vector spaces Definition, Examples Subspaces Linear Span Linear Independence
Linear Dependence Basis Dimension Ordered Basis Coordinate Vectors Transition
Matrix Orthogonal and Orthonormal Sets Orthogonal and Orthonormal Basis GramSchmidt orthogonolisation process Inner product spaces Examples.
Module IV: Fourier Transforms (14 hours)
Fourier Integral theorem (Proof not required) Fourier Sine and Cosine integral
representations Fourier Transforms Fourier Sine and Cosine Transforms Properties of
Fourier Transforms.
Text Books
Module I:
Erwin Kreysig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8e, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
Sections: 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.6, 12.7, 12.9
Module II:
Erwin Kreysig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8e, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
Sections: 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4, 14.4, 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4
Module III:
Bernaed Kolman, David R Hill, Introductory Linear Algebra, An Applied First Course, Pearson
Education.
Sections: 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.7, 6.8, Appendix.B.1
Module IV:
Wylie C.R and L.C. Barrett, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, McGraw Hill.
Sections: 9.1, 9.3, 9.5

16

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Reference books
1.
H S Kasana, Complex Variables, Theory and Applications, 2e, Prentice Hall of India.
2.
John M Howie, Complex Analysis, Springer International Edition.
3.
Shahnaz bathul, Text book of Engineering Mathematics, Special functions and Complex
Variables, Prentice Hall of India.
4.
Gerald Dennis Mahan, Applied mathematics, Springer International Edition.
5.
David Towers, Guide to Linear Algebra, MacMillan Mathematical Guides.
6.
Howard Anton, Chris Rorres, Elementary Linear Algebra, Applications Version, 9e, John Wiley and
Sons.
7.
Anthony Croft, Robert Davison, Martin Hargreaves, Engineering Mathematics, 3e, Pearson
Education.
8.
H Parthasarathy, Engineering Mathematics, A Project & Problem based approach, Ane Books
India.
9.
B V Ramana, Higher Engineering Mathematics, McGrawHill.
10.
Sarveswara Rao Koneru, Engineering Mathematics, Universities Press.
11.
J K Sharma, Business Mathematics, Theory and Applications, Ane Books India.
12.
John bird, Higher Engineering Mathematics, Elsevier, Newnes.
13.
M Chandra Mohan, Vargheese Philip, Engineering Mathematics-Vol. I, II, III & IV., Sanguine
Technical Publishers.
14.
N Bali, M Goyal, C Watkins, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, A Computer Approach, 7e,
Infinity Science Press, Fire Wall Media.
15.
V R Lakshmy Gorty, Advanced Engineering Mathematics-Vol. I, II., Ane Books India.
16.
Sastry S.S., Advanced Engineering Mathematics-Vol. I and II., Prentice Hall of India.
17.
Lary C Andrews, Bhimsen K Shivamoggi, Integral Transforms for Engineers, Prentice Hall of
India

Internal Continuous Assessment (Maximum Marks-30)


60% - Tests (minimum 2)
30% - Assignments (minimum 2) such as home work, problem solving, group discussions, quiz,
literature survey, seminar, term-project, software exercises, etc.
10% - Regularity in the class

University Examination Pattern


PART A:

Short answer questions (one/two sentences)


5 x 2 marks=10 marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one
question from each module and not more than two questions
from any module.

PART B:

Analytical/Problem solving questions


4 x 5 marks=20 marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six. There
should be at least one question from each module and not more
than two questions from any module.

PART C:

Descriptive/Analytical/Problem solving questions


4 x 10 marks=40 marks
Two questions from each module with choice to answer one
question.
Maximum Total Marks: 70

17

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

EN 09 302: Humanities and Communication Skills


(Common for all branches)

Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 3

Objectives
To identify the most critical issues that confronted particular periods and locations in
history
To identify stages in the development of science and technology
To understand the purpose and process of communication
To produce documents reflecting different types of communication such as technical
descriptions, proposals ,and reports
To develop a positive attitude and self-confidence in the workplace and
To develop appropriate social and business ethics.
Module I (14 hours)
Humanities, Science and Technology: Importance of humanities to technology, education and
society- Impact of science and technology on the development of modern civilization. Contributions
of ancient civilization: Chinese, Indian, Egyptian and Greek.
Cultural, Industrial, Transportation and Communication revolutions.
Advances in modern India: Achievements in information, communication and space
technologies.
Module II (16 hours)
Concept of communication: The speaker/writer and the listener/reader, medium of
communication, barriers to communication, accuracy, brevity, clarity and appropriateness
Reading comprehension: Reading at various speeds, different kinds of text for different
purposes, reading between lines.
Listening comprehension: Comprehending material delivered at fast speed and spoken
material, intelligent listening in interviews
Speaking: Achieving desired clarity and fluency, manipulating paralinguistic features of
speaking, task oriented, interpersonal, informal and semi formal speaking, making a short
classroom presentation.
Group discussion: Use of persuasive strategies, being polite and firm, handling questions and
taking in criticisms on self, turn-taking strategies and effective intervention, use of body
language.
Module III (16 hours)
Written Communication : Note making and taking, summarizing, notes and memos,
developing notes into text, organization of ideas, cohesion and coherence, paragraph writing,
ordering information in space and time, description and argument, comparison and contrast,
narrating events chronologically. Writing a rough draft, editing, proof reading, final draft and
styling text.
Technical report writing: Synopsis writing, formats for reports. Introductory report, Progress
report, Incident report, Feasibility report, Marketing report, Field report and Laboratory test
report
Project report: Reference work, General objective, specific objective, introduction, body,
illustrations using graphs, tables, charts, diagrams and flow charts. Conclusion and references
Preparation of leaflets, brochure and C.V.

18

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module IV (14 hours)


Human relations and Professional ethics: Art of dealing with people, empathy and sympathy,
hearing and listening. Tension and stress, Methods to handle stress
Responsibilities and rights of engineers- collegiality and loyalty Respect for authority
Confidentiality conflicts of interest Professional rights, Rights of information, Social
responsibility.
Senses of ethics variety of moral issues Moral dilemma Moral autonomy Attributes of an
ethical personality right action self interest
Reference Books
1. Meenakshi Raman and Sangeeta Sharma, Technical Communication- Principles and
Practice Oxford University press, 2006
2. Jayashree Suresh and B S Raghavan, Professional Ethics, S Chand and Company Ltd, 2005
3. Subrayappa, History of Science in India, National Academy of Science, India
4. R C Bhatia, Business Communication, Ane Books Pvt. Ltd, 2009
5. Sunita Mishra and C Muralikrishna, Communicatin Skils for Engineers, Pearson Education,
2007.
6. Jovan van Emden and Lucinda Becker, Effective Communication for Arts and Humanities
Students, Palgrave macmillam, 2009
7. W C Dampier, History of Science, Cambridge University Press
8. Vesilind, Engineering, Ethics and the Environment, Cambridge University Press
9. Larson E, History of Inventions, Thompson Press India Ltd.
10. Bernal J.D, Science in History, Penguin Books Ltd
11. Encyclopedia Britannica, History of Science, History of Technology
12. Brownoski J, Science and Human Values, Harper and Row
Internal Continuous Assessment (Maximum Marks-30)
60% - Tests (minimum 2)
30% - Assignments (minimum 2) such as home work, problem solving, group discussions, quiz,
literature survey, seminar, term-project, software exercises, etc.
10% - Regularity in the class
University Examination Pattern
PART A:

PART B:

PART C:

Short answer questions (one/two sentences)


5 x 2 marks=10 marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one
question from each module and not more than two questions from
any module.
Analytical/Problem solving questions
4 x 5 marks=20 marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six. There should
be at least one question from each module and not more than two
questions from any module.
Descriptive/Analytical/Problem solving questions
4 x 10 marks=40 marks
Two questions from each module with choice to answer one
question.
Maximum Total Marks: 70

19

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

CE09 303: MECHANICS OF SOLIDS


Teaching scheme
4 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 5

Objectives
To study the internal effects produced and deformations of bodies caused by externally applied
forces.
To understand the strength characteristics of different materials and structural members
subjected to shear, torsion and bending.
Module I (18 Hours)
Tension, compression & shear : Types of external loads - internal stresses - normal and shear stresses
- strain - Hookes law - Poissons ratio - relationship between elastic constants
working stress - stress strain diagrams - elongation of bars of constant and varying sections
statically indeterminate problems in tension and compression Temperature and Prestrain effects
strain energy and complementary energy-strain energy due to tension, compression and shear.
Analysis of stress and strain on oblique sections:
Stress on inclined planes for axial and biaxial stress fields - principal stresses - Mohrs circle of stress
- principal strains - strain rosette
Module II (20 Hours)
Bending Moment & Shear force: Different types of beams- various types of loading Relationship
connecting intensity of loading , shearing force and bending moment- shear force and bending
moment diagrams for cantilever beams, Simply supported and overhanging beams for different types of
loading.
Stresses in beams of symmetrical cross sections:
Theory of simple bending assumptions and limitations Normal stresses in beams Stresses in
nonprismatic beams-moment of resistance - beams of uniform strength - beams of two
materials strain energy due to bending - shearing stresses in beams.
Unsymmetrical bending and shear centre .
Doubly symmetric beams with skew loads- pure bending of unsymmetrical beamsGeneralized theory of pure bending-Deflections in unsymmetrical bending-shear centre of
thin walled open cross sections.
Module III (16 hours)
Deflection of beams: Differential equation of the elastic curve - Method of successive integration,
Macaulays method, Method of superposition, moment area method ,conjugate beam method, strain
energy method, Castiglianos method, and unit load method.
Module IV (18 hours)
Theory of columns: Direct and bending stresses in short columns- Kern of a section. Buckling and
stability-Eulers buckling/crippling load for columns with different end conditionsRankines formula - Eccentric loads and the Secant formula-Imperfections in columns.
Torsion: Torsion of solid and hollow circular shafts.-Pure shear- strain energy in pure shear and
torsion.
Springs: Close coiled and open coiled helical springs.
Thin and Thick Cylinders: Stresses in thin cylinders thick cylinders - Lames equation
stresses in thick cylinders due to internal and external pressures - Wire wound pipes and
cylinders -compound cylinders - shrink fit.

20

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Text Books
1. Timoshenko , Strength of Materials Vol. I & Vol. II , CBS Publishers & Distributers, New
Delhi
2. James M Gere & Stephen P Timoshenko , Mechanics of Materials , CBS Publishers &
Distributers, New Delhi
3. Egor P Popov , Mechanics of solids, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
4. S.S Bhavikatti , Structural analysis Vol I , Vikas Publications (P) Ltd.
5. S.B Junnarkar & H.J Shah, Mechanics of Structures Vol II ,Charotar publishing House.

Reference books
1. Hearn E.J., Mechanics of Materials, Pergamon Press, Oxford
2. Warnock F.V., Strength of Materials, Isaac Pitman
3. Nash W.A., Strength of Materials, Schaums Outline Series, McGraw Hill
4. Wang C.K., Statically Intermediate Structures, McGraw Hill
5. D.K. Singh, Strength of Materials, Ane Books.

Internal work assessment ( Maximum Marks 30)


60%- Tests(minimum 2)
30%- Assignments (minimum2) such as home work, quiz, literature survey, seminar, termproject..
10%- Regularity in the class.

University Examination pattern


PART A: Short answer questions
52 marks=10 Marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one question from each module and not more
than two questions from any module.
PART B: Analytical / Problem solving questions
45 marks=20 Marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six. There should be at least one question from
each module and not more than two questions from any module.
PART C: Descriptive/Analytical / Problem solving questions.
410 marks= 40 Marks
Two questions from each module with choice to answer one question.
Maximum Total marks: 70

21

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

CE09 304: BUILDING TECHNOLOGY I


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives:
To study (i) Details regarding properties and testing of building materials, (ii) Details regarding the
construction of building components (iii) Properties of concrete and concrete mix design. (iv) Basic
concepts in planning of buildings
Module I (14 hours)
General Requirements of Construction Materials factors considered during selection. Building stones
Classification of rocks Quarrying of stones. Dressing Properties and uses of common stones Tests
conducted on stones. Timber Classification seasoning -defects in Timber decay preservation
Manufacture, properties and uses of plywood, fiber board, particle board. Clay products
Bricks and tiles manufacture BIS specifications properties and testing.
Lime BIS Classification manufacture properties and uses. Cement Manufacture types of cement
uses Properties and testing. Mortar Types Sand properties uses. Iron and Steel Reinforcing
steel types specifications. Structural steel specifications Miscellaneous materials (only
properties, classifications and their use in construction industry): Glass, Plastics, A.C.Sheets, Bitumen,
Adhesives, Aluminum
Module II (15 hours)
Concrete Aggregates Mechanical & Physical properties and tests Grading requirements
Water quality for concrete Admixtures types and uses plasticizers accelerators retarders
water reducing agents batching mixing types of mixers transportation placing compacting
curing.
Properties of concrete fresh concrete workability segregation and bleeding - factors affecting
workability & strength tests on workability tests for strength of concrete in compression, tension
&flexure stressstrain characteristics and elastic properties shrinkage and creep.
Durability of concrete permeability sulphate attack - alkali aggregate reaction exposure to marine
environment. Concrete quality control statistical analysis of results standard deviation acceptance
criteria mix proportioning (B.I.S method) nominal mixes.
Module III (16hours)
Building construction - Preliminary considerations site clearing and drainage Excavation Timbering
Function and requirements of foundations Bearing capacity of soils-methods of improving bearing
capacity Settlement of foundations and precautions shallow and deep foundations description of
spread, grillage, raft and pile foundation.
Masonry Types of stone masonry Bonds in brickwork advantages and limitations of masonry
construction - corbels, cornice and copings composite walls - cavity walls and partition walls
construction details and features scaffoldings.
Lintels and arches types and construction details. Floors and flooring different types of floors and
floor coverings. Roofs and roof coverings different types of roofs suitability types and uses of
roofing materials. Doors, windows and ventilators Types and construction details.
Stairs types - layout and planning. Finishing works Plastering, pointing, white washing, colour
washing, distempering, painting. Methods of providing DPC. Termite proofing.

22

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module IV (9 hours)
Functional planning of buildings - occupancy classification of buildings - building codes and rules functional requirements of residential and public buildings as per the relevant building rules and NBCPlanning principles - checking for circulation, ventilation, structural requirements and other constraints sketch plans, working drawings and site plan
Text books
1.Rangwala S C., Engineering Materialals, Charotar Publishers
2.Shetty M.S., Concrete Technology, S. Chand & company.
3.Arora and Bindra, Building construction, Dhanpath Rai and Sons.
Reference Books
1. Punmia B.C. Building Construction, Laxmi Publications.
2. Gambhir M L, Concrete Technology, Tata McGrawHill.
3. Krishna Raju N, Design of Concrete Mixes, CBS publishers.
4. Neville A.M.and Brooks.J.J, Concrete Technolgy, Pearson Education.
5. Akroyd T.N.W, Concrete: Properties & Manufacture, Pergamon Press.
6. Huntington W.C., Building Construction, John Wiley
7. National Building Code.
8. Kerala Building Rules
Internal work assessment ( Maximum Marks 30)
60%- Tests(minimum 2)
30%- Assignments (minimum2) such as home work, quiz, literature survey, seminar, term- project..
10%- Regularity in the class.

University Examination pattern


PART A: Short answer questions
52 marks=10 Marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one question from each module and not more
than two questions from any module.
PART B: Analytical / Problem solving questions
45 marks=20 Marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six. There should be at least one question from
each module and not more than two questions from any module.
PART C: Descriptive/Analytical / Problem solving questions.
410 marks= 40 Marks
Two questions from each module with choice to answer one question.
Maximum Total marks: 70

23

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

CE09 305: SURVEYING I


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objective: To acquaint with basic principles & basic instruments related with surveying & leveling.
Module I (13 hours)
Introduction - classification of surveys
- reconnaissance - principle of working from whole to
part - provision of control - conventional signs - chain survey - instruments - principles of chain
survey - field book - plotting - tie line and check line - chaining and ranging - obstacles chaining on sloping ground - errors in chain survey - uses of cross staff and optical square
Module II (12 hours)
Compass survey - prismatic compass - surveyors compass - whole circle and reduced bearing - true and
magnetic bearing - dip and declination - local attraction - traversing - plotting - error of closure graphical and analytical adjustments - plane table survey - instruments and accessories - different
methods - orientation - advantages and disadvantages of plane tabling - two point problem - three point
problem - errors in plane tabling
Module III (14 hours)
Levelling - definition of level surfaces - mean sea level - reduced level - bench marks - leveling
instruments temporary and permanent adjustments - fly leveling - booking - reduction of levels corrections for refraction and curvature - reciprocal leveling - longitudinal levelling and cross sectioning
- contour survey - definition - characteristics of contour - uses of contour - methods of contouring direct and indirect interpolation - plotting - areas and volumes - trapezoidal rule - simpsons rule - area
from latitude and departure - uses of planimeter - volumes - trapezoidal and prismoidal formula
Module IV (15 hours)
Minor instruments - hand levels - clinometer - ceylon ghat tracer - hypsometer - pantagraph ediograph - box sextant - telescopic alidade. Theodolite surveying - study of theodolite - temporary
and permanent adjustments - measurement of horizontal angles - method of repetition
and reiteration - measurement of vertical angles - theodolite traverse - calculation of co ordinates
- corrections - traverse table - omitted measurements.
Curves Types of curves elements of a curve simple curves diff:
methods of setting out compound curve reverse curves transition curves vertical curves
Text Book
Kanetkar T.P. & Kulkarni S.V., Surveying Vol. I &II, Vidyarthigriha Prakasan
Reference books
1. Punmia B.C., Surveying Vol. I &II, Laxmi Publishers
2. Arora K.R., Surveying Vol. I & II, Standard Book House

24

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Internal work assessment ( Maximum Marks 30)


60%- Tests(minimum 2)
30%- Assignments (minimum2) such as home work, quiz, literature survey, seminar, term- project..
10%- Regularity in the class.

University Examination pattern


PART A: Short answer questions
52 marks=10 Marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one question from each module and not more
than two questions from any module.
PART B: Analytical / Problem solving questions
45 marks=20 Marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six. There should be at least one question from
each module and not more than two questions from any module.
PART C: Descriptive/Analytical / Problem solving questions.
410 marks= 40 Marks
Two questions from each module with choice to answer one question.
Maximum Total marks: 70

25

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

CE09 306: ENGINEERING GEOLOGY


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives: To make the students familiar with physical and structural geology as well as the basics of
mineralogy and petrology.
Module I (18 hrs)
Physical Geology and Environmental Geology
The Earth Science and its sub divisions- scope of Engineering Geology
Geological works of rivers, oceans and wind
Weathering of rocks: products of weathering - influence of climate and lithology on weathering.
Volcanoes: types and causes of volcanism - volcanic products - types of volcanic eruptions and their
distribution.
Elements of Engineering Seismology:
Causes of earthquakes - plate tectonics - earthquake mechanism
Earthquake phenomenon focus, epicentre, seismic waves, magnitude, intensity, intensity scale, and its
correlation with ground acceleration - characteristics of strong ground motions
and attenuation
Earthquake recording instruments
Secondary effects land and rock slides, liquefaction, fires, tsunamis, floods, release of poisonous gases
and radiation.
Earthquake occurrence - seismic zoning map of India and its use case studies of important
Indian earthquakes major world earthquakes earthquake catalogue - assessment of damage measures for protection of life and property earthquake resistant structures Landslides : terminology classification - causes and controls of landslides
Geology and environment - Geology and health-geological factors in environmental health hazards
Module II (12 hrs)
Mineralogy and Petrology
Megascopic characters of the important rock forming mineral groups - quartz, feldspar, pyroxene,
amphibole, mica and carbonates only
Classification and distinguishing features of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks- brief
description of granite, basalt, dolerite, gabbro, sandstone, shale, limestone, slate,
phyllite, schist, gneiss, quartzite and marbles only
Engineering properties of rocks - rocks as construction materials qualities required for building,
dimensional and decorative/ ornamental stones.
Module III (12 hrs)
Structural Geology, Hydrogeology and Exploration Geology
Geological structures and their significance in Civil Engineering projects - folds, faults, joints and
unconformities
Origin and occurrence of groundwater geological formations as aquifer, aquicludes, aquitards and
aquifuges - artificial recharge of ground water - quality of ground water saline
water intrusion in coastal aquifers
Importance of ground water investigation in civil engineering projects ground water exploration
electrical, electromagnetic, gravimetric, radioactive and seismic exploration techniques.

26

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module IV (12 hrs)


Geoinformatics and Engineering Geology
Remote sensing: Basic principles - role of remote sensing in Civil Engineering - various interpretation
techniques in remote sensing
Geographical Information Systems.
Applications of geological knowledge in Civil Engineering projects - dams, bridges, roads, tunnels and
multi-storied buildings - geological factors in the design of buildings.
Text books:
1.
Kueffer and Lillesand : Remote sensing and Image interpretation
2.
Read H.H.
: Rutleys Elements of Mineralogy, CBS Publishers
3.
Singh. P
: Engineering and General Geology. S.K. Kataria
4.
Todd, D.K
: Ground water Hydrology. John Wiley
5.
Tyrrel .G.W.
: Petrology
6.
Understanding GIS
: ISRI Publications.
Reference books:
1. Billings.M.P.
: Structural Geology. Asia Publishing House.
2. Holmes, A :Principles of Physical Geology. Thomas Nelson
3. Judds, W.R : Principles of Engineering Geology and Geotechniques. Mc
Graw Hill
4. Keshavalu, C.N.
:Text book of Engineering Geology. Mc Millan India Ltd.
5. Pandey,S.N.:Principles and Applications of Photogeology Wiley Eastern
6. Reddy. V :Engineering Geology for Civil Engineers. Oxford &IBH
7. Sabins F.F. :Remote Sensing Principles and Interpretation.W Freeman
& Co., SanFranscisco
8. Sathya Narayanaswami.B.S: Engineering Geology, Dhanpat Rai & Co (P) Ltd
9. Strahler
:Environmental Geology
10. Valdiya K.S:Environmental Geology in Indian Context Tata Mc Graw
Hill
Internal work assessment ( Maximum Marks 30)
60%- Tests(minimum 2)
30%- Assignments (minimum2) such as home work, quiz, literature survey, seminar, term- project..
10%- Regularity in the class.
University Examination pattern
PART A: Short answer questions
52 marks=10 Marks
All questions are compulsory. There should be at least one question from each module and not more
than two questions from any module.
PART B: Analytical / Problem solving questions
45 marks=20 Marks
Candidates have to answer four questions out of six. There should be at least one question from
each module and not more than two questions from any module.
PART C: Descriptive/Analytical / Problem solving questions.
410 marks= 40 Marks
Two questions from each module with choice to answer one question.
Maximum Total marks: 70

27

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

CE09 307(P) SURVEYING LAB I


Teaching Scheme
2
3 hours practical per weak

Credits :

Objective: To impart training in Chain, Compass, Plane table surveying &


Leveling.
List of exercises
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

Chain Survey
Traversing and plotting of details
Compass Survey
Traversing with compass and plotting
Plane table Survey
Method of Radiation and intersection
Plane table Survey
Solving Two Point Problem
Plane table Survey
Solving Three Point Problem
Plane table Survey
Traverse
Leveling
Fly leveling- plane of collimation method
Leveling
Fly leveling- rise and fall method
Leveling
Longitudinal and cross sectioning
Leveling
Contour surveying
Setting out of building plans
Study of Minor instruments: Planimeter, pantagraph, clinometer, hand levels, Quick setting
level, Cylon Ghat Tracer, sextent
13. Theodolite : study of instrument, temporary adjustments, measurement of horizontal and
vertical angles.
Internal Continuous Assessment (Maximum Marks-50)
60%-Laboratory practical and record
30%- Test/s
10%- Regularity in the class
Semester End Examination (Maximum Marks-50)
70% - Procedure, conducting experiment, results, tabulation, and inference
20% - Viva voce
10% - Fair record

28

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

CE09 308(P): MATERIALS TESTING LAB I


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objective:
To study various properties of building materials
List of experiments
1.Tests on cement
a) Fineness b) Normal consistency and Setting time c) Soundness d) Compressive strength
2.Test on bricks a) Water absorption b) Efflorescence c) Compressive strength
3.Tests on aggregate for concrete
a) Physical Properties
i) Grain size distribution ii) Specific gravity iii) Density iv) Void ratio v)
Bulking of sand
b) Aggregate crushing value
4.Properties of fresh concrete workability tests
a) Flow & vee- bee tests
b)Slump & Compaction factor test
5.Tests on Timber
a) Compressive strength parallel to grain & perpendicular to grain b)
Bending tests
4.Test on tiles
(i) Transverse strength, (ii) Water Absorption of a)
Flooring tiles
b) Roofing tiles.
Internal Continuous Assessment (Maximum Marks-50)
60%-Laboratory practical and record
30%- Test/s
10%- Regularity in the class

Semester End Examination (Maximum Marks-50)


70% - Procedure, conducting experiment, results, tabulation, and inference
20% - Viva voce
10% - Fair record

29

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Dept. of Civil Engineering

THIRD SEMESTER

Lesson plan

30

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


LESSON PLAN
Department: CIVIL Engineering
Subject: EN09 301 Engineering Mathematics III
Name of Faculty: DHANYA JOBY

Year: 2014-2015

Topics

Semester: 3

No of
hours

Week

Date of
Completion
of the
module

Module I

Introduction(ppt)

Limit-continuity-derivative of a complex
function

Analytic functions, Singular functions,


Conjugate functions

Necessary & sufficient condition for f(z) to


be analytic (ppt)

31

Cauchy Riemann equations in Cartesian &


Polar co-ordinates

Milne Thomson method

Application to flow problems

Harmonic function (ppt)

Orthogonal system

Graphical representation (ppt)

Transformation or mapping

Standard transformations (ppt)

Elementary functions
Conformal transformation

Bilinear transformation (ppt)

Tutorial

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module II

Integration in the complex plane (ppt)

Line integral

Cauchys integral theorem (ppt)

Evaluation of integrals using Cauchys


theorem
Cauchys integral formula (ppt)
Evaluation of integrals using Cauchys
formula
Series of complex terms (ppt)
Taylors series
Laurents series
Singularities,poles and zeroes (ppt)
Residues and residue integration method
Residue theorem
Evaluation of real definite integrals (ppt)

Tutorial

Module III
Vector spaces (ppt)
Subspaces
Linear span (ppt)
Linear dependence and independence
Bases and dimension (ppt)
Ordered Basis,coordinate vectors
Transition matrix (ppt)
Orthogonal and orthonormal basis (ppt)
Gram Schmidt orthogonalisation process
Inner product spaces (ppt)

Tutorial

Module IV
Fourier integral theorem (ppt)
Fourier integral representation
Fourier Sine and Cosine integral
representation (ppt)
Fourier transforms
Fourier Sine and Cosine transforms (ppt)
Properties of Fourier transforms (ppt)

32

Tutorial

10

11

12

3
3

13

14

4
4

15
16

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Series Test

Portions to be
covered

Completed
Date

Test Date

Module 1
100%

07/07/14

Module 2
100%

04/08/14

Module 3
100%

29/08/14

Remarks

II

III

Prepared by: DHANYA JOBY


Verified that all the topics in the syllabus are covered in the lesson plan
Verified by:

33

Approved by: HOD

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


LESSON PLAN
Department:
Civil Engineering
Subject:
EN 09 302 HUMANITIES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Name of Faculty: Joseph Jestin/Vini Jose
Year: 2014
Semester: III
Topics

No .of
Hours

Week

Humanities, Science and Technology - Importance of


humanities to technology, education and Society

Week 1

Impact of science and technology on the development of


modern civilization

Week 2

TUTORIAL

Week 3

Contributions of ancient civilization: Chinese, Indian

Week 4

Contributions of ancient civilization: Egyptian and Greek

Week 5

TUTORIAL

Week 6

Cultural, Industrial, Transportation and Communication


revolutions

Week 7

Advances in modern India: Achievements in information,


communication and space technologies

Week 8

Week 1

Module 1

Module 2
Concept of communication: The speaker/writer and the
listener/reader, medium of communication. Barriers to
communication, accuracy, brevity, clarity and
appropriateness
TUTORIAL

34

Reading comprehension: Reading at various speeds

Different kinds of text for different purposes, reading


between lines.

TUTORIAL

Week 2
Week2
Week 3

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Listening comprehension: Comprehending material delivered


at fast speed and spoken material, intelligent listening in
interviews
TUTORIAL

Speaking: Achieving desired clarity and fluency,


manipulating paralinguistic features of speaking
Task oriented, interpersonal, informal and semi formal
speaking, making a short classroom presentation

TUTORIAL
Group discussion: Use of persuasive strategies, being polite
and firm, handling questions and taking in criticisms on self,
turn-taking strategies and effective intervention
TUTORIAL

Use of body language


Module 3

Written Communication : Note making and taking,


summarizing

2
1

TUTORIAL

Week 4
Week 5

Week 6

Week 7
Week 8

Week 9

Notes and Memos, developing notes into text, organization


of ideas, cohesion and coherence
TUTORIAL

Paragraph writing, ordering information in space and time,


description and argument, comparison and contrast, narrating
events chronologically
Writing a rough draft, editing, proof reading, final draft and
styling text

TUTORIAL

Technical report writing: Synopsis writing, formats for


reports. Introductory report, Progress report
TUTORIAL

Week 13

1
1

Week 14

Incident report, Feasibility report


Marketing report, Field report and Laboratory test report
TUTORIAL
Project report: Reference work, General objective, specific
objective, introduction, body, illustrations using graphs,
tables, charts, diagrams and flow charts. Conclusion and
references

35

1
1
2

Week 10
Week 11

Week 12

Week 15
Week 16

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

TUTORIAL

Preparation of leaflets, brochure and C.V


Module 4

Human relations and Professional ethics - Art of dealing with


people, empathy and sympathy, hearing and listening.

Week 9

Tension and stress, Methods to handle stress

Week 10

TUTORIAL

Week 11

Responsibilities and rights of engineers- collegiality and


loyalty

Week 12

Respect for authority Confidentiality conflicts of interest


Professional rights
TUTORIAL
Rights of information, Social responsibility, Senses of ethics
variety of moral issues

Week 17

Week 13

Week 14

Week 15

Moral dilemma Moral autonomy, Attributes of an ethical


personality right action self interest

Week 16

TUTORIAL

Week 17

Series Test

Portions to be
covered

Module 1
100%

II
III

Module 2
100%
Module 3
100%

Completed
Date

Test Date

Remarks

08/07/14
05/08/14
30/08/14

Prepared by: Joseph Jestin/Vini Jose


Verified that all the topics in the syllabus are covered in the lesson plan
Verified by:

36

Approved by: HOD

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


LESSON PLAN
Department: CIVIL ENGINEERING
Subject: CE09 303 MECHANICS OF SOLIDS
Name of Faculty: RESHMA ANTONY Year: 2014
No of
hours

Topics
Module I

Week

Introduction

Tension, compression & shear : Types of


external loads

internal stresses - normal and shear stresses strain - Hookes law

Poissons ratio - relationship between elastic


constants
working stress - stress strain diagrams elongation of bars of constant and varying
sections
statically indeterminate problems in
tension and compression
Temperature and Prestrain effects
strain energy and complementary energystrain energy due to tension, compression and
shear.

II

II

II

III

III

Analysis of stress and strain on oblique


sections:
Stress on inclined planes for axial and biaxial
stress fields - principal stresses -

Mohrs circle of stress - principal strains strain rosette

IV

Tutorial

IV

IV

IV

Module II
Introduction Bending Moment & Shear
force: Different types of beams- various types
of loading

Relationship connecting intensity of loading

Date of
Completio
n of the
module

37

Semester: III

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

, shearing force and bending moment

Shear force and bending moment diagrams


for cantilever beams, Simply supported and
overhanging beams for different types of
loading.

Stresses in beams of symmetrical cross


sections

Theory of simple bending assumptions and


limitations
Normal stresses in beams Stresses in
nonprismatic beams
Moment of resistance - beams of uniform
strength - beams of two materials
Strain energy due to bending
Shearing stresses in beams.
Unsymmetrical bending and shear centre.
Doubly symmetric beams with skew
loads-pure bending of unsymmetrical
beams - Generalized theory of pure bending
Deflections in unsymmetrical bending-shear
centre of thin walled open cross sections.
Tutorials

Module III
Introduction- Deflection of beams

VI

VI

1
1
1

VI
VII
VII

VII

VIII

VIII

VIII

Differential equation of the elastic curve


Method of successive integration
Macaulays method
Method of superposition

1
1
2
1

VIII
IX
IX
IX

Moment area method

Conjugate beam method


Strain energy method

2
1

X
X

Castiglianos method

XI

Unit load method

XI

Tutorial

XI

XI

XII

Module IV
Theory of columns: Direct and bending
stresses in short columns- Kern of a section.
Buckling and stability-Eulers
buckling/crippling load for columns with

38

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

different end conditions


Rankines formula - Eccentric loads and the
Secant formula-Imperfections in columns.
Torsion: Torsion of solid and hollow circular
shafts.
Pure shear- strain energy in pure shear and
torsion.
Springs: Close coiled and open coiled helical
springs.
Thin and Thick Cylinders: Stresses in thin
cylinders
Stresses in thick cylinders
Lames equation-stresses in thick cylinders
due to internal and external pressures
Wire wound pipes and cylinders
Compound cylinders - shrink fit.
Tutorial

Series Test
I

II

III

Portions to be
covered

Completed
Date

XII

XII

XIII

XIII

XIII

XIV

XIV

1
1
4

XIV
XV
XV

Test Date

I Module
100%

09/07/14

II Module
100%

06/08/14

Remarks

III Module
100%
02/09/14

Prepared by: RESHMA ANTONY


Verified that all the topics in the syllabus are covered in the lesson plan
Verified by:

39

Approved by: HOD

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


LESSON PLAN
Department: CIVIL ENGINEERING
Subject: CE09 304 BUILDING TECHNOLOGY I
Name of Faculty: AGNES ANTO C

Topics

Year: 2014

Semester: III

No of
hours

Week

II

II

II

II

1
1
1

III
III
III

III

VI

1
1

VI
VI

VI

Date of
Completion
of the
module

Module I

General requirements of construction


materials, factors considered during selection
Building stones-classification of rocks,
quarrying of stones
Dressing, properties, uses of common stones
and tests conducted on stones
Timber-classification, seasoning, defects,
decay, preservation
Manufacture, properties and uses of
plywood, fibre board, particle board
Manufacture, BIS specifications, properties
and testing of bricks ant tiles
Lime- BIS classification, manufacture,
properties and uses
Cement-manufacture, types, uses
Cement-properties and testing
Mortar-types, Sand-properties and uses
Iron and steel-types,specifications
(Reinforcing steel) and specifications
(Structural steel)
Properties, classifications and uses in
constructional industry-glass, plastics, A.C
sheets, bitumen, adhesives, aluminum
Tutorial

Module II
Mechanical, physical properties and tests of
concrete and aggregates
Grading requirements and concrete quality of
concrete
Admixtures-types and uses
Plasticizers, accelerators, retarders, water
reducing agents
Batching, mixing, types of mixers, Concretetransportation, placing, compacting, curing

40

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

of concrete
Properties of fresh concrete, workability,
segregation, bleeding of concrete
Factors affecting workability, strength and
test on workability
Test for strength of concrete in compression,
tension and flexure
Concrete-stress-strain characteristics, elastic
properties, shrinkage and creep
Concrete-durability and permeability
Sulphate attack, alkali aggregate reaction,
exposure to marine environment
Concrete quality control, statistical analysis
of results, standard deviation, acceptance
criteria
Mix proportioning (BIS method) and
nominal mixes
Tutorial

Module III
Building construction-preliminary
considerations, site clearing and drainage
Excavation and timbering
Function-functions, requirements Bearing
capacity of soil and its improvement
Settlement of foundation its precautions
Shallow and Deep foundations
Description of spread, grillage, raft, pile
foundations
Types of stone masonry, bonds in brickwork,
advantages and limitations of masonry
construction
Constructional details and features of
corbels, cornice, copings, composite walls,
cavity walls, partition walls, scaffoldings
Lintels and arches-types, constructional
details
Floors ,floorings and floor coverings-types
Roof, roof coverings-types, suitability,
materials
Doors, windows and ventilators-types,
constructional details
Stairs-types, layout, planning
Finishing works-plastering, white washing,
colour washing
Distempering painting,
Methods to
provide-DPC, termite proofing
Tutorial

41

VII

VII

1
1

VII
VIII

VIII

VIII

VIII

IX

IX

IX

XI,X

XI

XI

XI

XI

XII

XII

XII

XII

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module IV

Functional planning of buildings, occupancy


classification of buildings
Building codes and rules
Functional requirements of residential and
public buildings as per NBC and relevant
building rules
Planning principles-checking for circulation,
ventilation, structural requirements and other
constraints
Sketch plans, working drawings and site plan
Tutorial

Series Test
I

II

III

Portions to be
covered

Completed
Date

XIII

XIII

XIII

XIV

XIV,XV

Test Date

I Module
100%

10/07/14

II Module
100%

07/08/14

III Module
100%

Remarks

03/09/14

Prepared by: AGNES ANTO C


Verified that all the topics in the syllabus are covered in the lesson plan
Verified by:

42

Approved by: HOD

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


LESSON PLAN
Department: CIVIL ENGINEERING
Subject: CE09 305 SURVEYING I
Name of Faculty: SHINI SHANMUGHAN

Year: 2014
No of
hours

Topics

Semester: III
Date of
Completio
Week
n of the
module

Module I

Introduction

Reconnaissance - principle of
working from whole to part.
Chain survey - instruments - principles of
chain survey

Field book plotting

Chaining and ranging

II

Obstacles in chaining

II

Errors in chaining

II

Uses of cross staff and optical square

III

Problems in chain survey

III

Tutorial

IV

Module II
Introduction compass survey

IV

Bearings-types of bearings

IV

Errors in compass survey

Graphical & analytical adjustments

Plane table survey - instruments and


accessories
Methods of plane tabling
Two point problem
Three point problem
Errors in plane tabling
Tutorial

2
1
1
1
2

VI
VI
VI
VII
VII

43

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module III
Leveling-Introduction
Temporary & Permanent adjustments
Fly levelling
Corrections for refraction and curvature
Reciprocal leveling
Longitudinal levelling and
cross sectioning
Contour survey
Direct and indirect interpolation

VII

1
1
2
1

VIII
VIII
VIII
IX

IX

2
1

IX
X

Plotting - areas and volumes

Problems in area & volume calculation

Tutorial

XI

XI

XI

XII

1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1

XII
XII
XIII
XIII
XIII
XIV
XIV
XIV
XIV

Module IV
Minor instruments - hand levels - clinometer
- ceylon ghat tracer hypsometer - pantagraph -ediograph
box sextant - telescopic alidade.
Theodolite surveying
Temporary and permanent
adjustments
Measurement of horizontal angles
Measurement of vertical angles
theodolite traverse
Curves
Compound curve
Reverse curves
Transition curves
Vertical curves
Tutorial

44

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Series Test
I

II

III

Portions to be
covered

Completed
Date

Test Date

I Module
100%

11/07/14

II Module
100%

08/08/14

III Module
100%

Remarks

04/09/14

Prepared by: SHINI SHANMUGHAN


Verified that all the topics in the syllabus are covered in the lesson plan
Verified by:

45

Approved by: HOD

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


LESSON PLAN
Department: CIVIL ENGINEERING
Subject: CE09 306 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
Name of Faculty: REENU LISBETH
Year: 2013

Topics

Semester: III

No of
hours

Week

Module III
Introduction;earth science and its
subdivisions.scope of Engineering Geology
Geological formations-aquifer,aquiclude,aquifuge
and aquitard and source of ground water

Ground water occurrence and different types of


aquifers-Ground water zones

Salt water intrusion and artificial recharging

Geophysical methods -electrical

II

Seismic , gravity and magnetic methods

II

Joints and unconformity and its engineering


considerations
Geological work of groundwater
Fold and faults and its classification and its
engineering considerations

II

III

III

IV

Tutorial

Module I
Introduction rock cycle ,mineral and rock
formation

IV

Weathering , classification and its products

IV

Geological work of wind-sand dunes

David cycle of erosion -Geological work of


stream and land features
Structure of ocean floor, Geological work of
sea landforms and marine deposits
Earth quake and its terminology and
magnitude in ritcher and mercalli scaleseismograph, earthquake resistance structures
Earth quake Secondary effects -

VI

VI

46

Date of
Completio
n of the
module

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Landslide and its types


Volcano and its classification
Tutorial

Module III
Mineralogy -Introduction
Physical properties of minerals
Silicate structures of minerals

Physical properties of quarts and feldspars


Physical properties of carbonates and
amphiboles
Physical properties of pyroxenes and micas

1
1
1

VII
VII
VII

1
1

VII
VIII

1
2

VIII
VIII

IX

IX

Classification of rocks and identification


from its structure and texture
Description- some sedimentary rocks

Description- some metamorphic rocks

XI

Description- some igneous rocks and


engineering properties of rocks

XI

Tutorial

XII

XII

1
2
1
1

XII
XIII
XIII
XIII

XIV

1
1

XIV
XIV

Module IV
Introduction- gis
principles of GIS
Application of GIS
Remote sensing and its application
Application of geology in dam construction
Application of geology in road construction
in tunnel construction
Geological factors in designing buildings
Tutorial
Series Test
I
II
III

Portions to be
covered
I Module
100%
II Module
100%
III Module
100%

Completed
Date

Test Date

Remarks

14/07/14
11/08/14
05/09/14

Prepared by: REENU LISBETH


Verified that all the topics in the syllabus are covered in the lesson plan
Verified by:

47

Approved by: HOD

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Department of CIVIL ENGINEERING


CE09 307(P)
SURVEY LAB I
Name of the faculties: Ms. Shini Shanmughan & Ms. Lekshmi Ashok
Branch/ Semester: III sem CE
Batch
:A
Students Group details:
Group No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
Batch
:B
Students Group details:

Roll No of students
1-5
6-10
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30

Group No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

Roll No of students
31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
56-61

Page 1

48

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Cycle No.

Experiment No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Name of the experiment


Chain survey
Compass survey
Fly leveling -Plane of collimation
Fly leveling- Rise & fall method
Profile leveling & Cross sectioning
Contour surveying
Theodolite surveying Repition method
Theodolite surveying Reiteration method
Plane table Radiation
Plane table Intersection
Plane table Two point problem
Plane table Three point problem
Setting out of building plans
Study of minor instruments
Repeat class

Plan:

Date:
01/06/2014

Class No.

Experiments planned for each group

1-30 (Batch A)
31-61(Batch B)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Repeat class

Prepared by
Shini Shanmughan

Approved by
HOD CE
Page 2

49

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Department of CIVIL ENGINEERING


CE09 308(P)
MATERIAL TESTING LAB I
Name of the faculties: Ms. Remya P M & Ms. Reenu Lisbeth
Branch/ Semester: III sem CE
Batch
:A
Students Group details:
Group No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
Batch
:B
Students Group details:

Roll No of students
1-5
6-10
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30

Group No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

Roll No of students
31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
56-61

Page 1

50

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Cycle No.1

Cycle No.2

Experiment No
1
2
3
4
5
6

Name of the experiment


Bulking of sand
Tests on cement
Grain size distribution of Fine aggregate
Grain size distribution of Coarse aggregate
Physical properties of Fine aggregate
Physical properties of Coarse aggregate

Experiment No
1

Name of the experiment


Compressive strength of cement
Test on Bricks
Test on Timber beam
Aggregate crushing value
Workability of concrete: Slump test
Workability of concrete: Compaction factor test
Test on Roofing tiles & Flooring tiles
Workability of concrete: Veebee test
Compressive strength of timber beam

2
3
4
5
6
Plan:
Batch A

Experiments planned for each group


Class No.
I

II

III

IV

VI

1-5

6-10

11-15

16-20

21-25

26-30

Repeat Class

51

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Batch B
Experiments planned for each group
Class No.
I

II

III

IV

VI

31-35

36-40

41-45

46-50

51-55

56-61

Repeat Class

Date:
02/06/2014

Prepared by
Remya P M

Approved by
HOD CE

Page 2

52

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Dept. of Civil Engineering

THIRD SEMESTER

Class note preparation plan

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


CLASS NOTE PREPARATION PLAN
SUBJECT
:
EN09 301 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS III

53

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Faculty:

Ms. DHANYA JOBY


TOPIC
MODULE I
Complex variable
Functions of complex variable
Single valued & multivalued function

Limit, Continuity &Derivative of f(z)


Analytic function
Conjugate Functions
Singular points
Necessary& sufficient condition for
f(z) to be Analytic
Application to flow problems

C-R Equations in Cartesian & Polar


coordinates
Harmonic functions
Orthogonal system

54

Logarithmic function
Hyperbolic function
Exponential function
Circular function

Transformation or mapping
Graphical representation
Conformal transformation
Special conformal transformations

w=cz
w=z+c
w=1/z
w=z2 etc.

BOOK

PAGE

B1
B11
B9
B2
B3
B6
B10

615
941
664-665
425
354
26-27
1126

B1
B11
B9
B2
B3
B6
B10

630-631
942
665-667
426431,438
362367,374
55-56
1131

B1
B11
B9
B2
B3
B6
B10

631,634635
944-945
669-672
432-439
368-373
48-53
1134

B1
B9
B2
B3
B6
B10

616-624
679-684
444-445
355-356
65-85
1139

B1
B11
B9
B3
B6

645-649
956-958
674-676
380-383
28-31

B1
B11
B9
B3

641-642
958-960
675-677
386-390

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Bilinear Transformation

B1
B11
B3

642-644
960-961
384-385

B1
B11
B9
B2

652,654
970
704
449

MODULE II
Integration in the complex plane
Cauchys integral theorem
Evaluation of integrals using Cauchys
theorem

Cauchys integral formula


Evaluation of integrals using Cauchys
formula

Series of complex terms


Taylors series
Laurents series
Singularities,poles,Zeroes
Residue theorem

Evaluation of real definite integrals

MODULE III

B1
B11
B9
B2

B1
B11
B9
B2

660
986
751
465

B1
B11
B9
B2

615,671
997,941
664,787
425,483

B9
B10

Vector Spaces & Subspaces

655
977
664
457

P. 334,335
P. 858-873

Linear Dependence & Independence

B9
B10
B11

Bases & Dimensions


Linear span

B9
B10

P. 358-360
P. 879-885

B10

P. 885-895

B10

P. 895-900

Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization Process

Linear Transformations

P. 332
P. 873-879
P. 186,187

Sums, products & Inverse of

55

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Linear Transformation
Transition matrix
MODULE IV
Fourier Integral as the limit of a Fourier
series
Fourier transforms
Application of Fourier integrals and
transforms
Properties of Fourier transforms
Time sampling theorem
Fourier Integral approximations and Gibbs
phenomenon
Singularity functions and their Fourier
transforms
Fourier integral to the Laplace
transformation

B10

P. 900-908

B4

P.207

B9
B10
B12
B13

543
557-569
913-919

B9
B10
B12
B13

578-587
559
922
370

Reference:
B1: Higher Engineering Mathematics, Dr.B.S.Grewal, 36th ed.
B2: Engineering Mathematics, vol-2, S.S. Sastry, 2nd ed.
B3: Engineering Mathematics, vol-1, Debashis Dutta
B4: Linear Algebra-Third Edition,Seymour Lipschutz, Marc Lipson
B6: Complex Variables & Applications, Ruel V Churchill et.al. , 6th ed.
B9 :
Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Erwin Kreyszig,8 th ed.
B10 : Advanced Engineering Mathematics , C. Ray Wylie 6 th ed.
B11: Engineering Mathematics,Bali et al., 4th ed.
B12: Advanced Engineering Mathematics ,Michael D Greenberg
B13: The Fourier transforms and its applications ,Ronald n Bracewell

56

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


CLASS NOTES PREPARARION PLAN
Department:
CIVIL ENGINEERING
Subject:
EN 09 302 HUMANITIES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Name of Faculty:
JOSEPH JESTIN/VINI JOSE
Year: 2014
Semester: III
Topics & Main Points to be covered

References

Page No.

B6
B3
B4
B5
B13

175-176
32-42
440-473
1-6
3-4

Importance of humanities to technology, education and Society

B5
B13

246-260
4-5

Impact of science and technology on the development of modern


civilization.

B11
B13

15561565
27-47

Contributions of ancient civilization: Chinese, Indian

B6
B6
B5
B5

235-242
222-228
50-63
64-72

Contributions of ancient civilization: Egyptian and Greek.

B6
B6

229-234
245-249

Cultural, Industrial, Transportation and Communication


revolutions.

B6
B6
B6
B5

187-192
195-196
201-202
218-234

B6

209-211

C3

13-18

Module - 1
Humanities, Science and Technology

Advances in modern India: Achievements in information,


communication and space technologies.

Module - 2
Concept of communication: The speaker/writer and the
Listener/reader, medium of communication

57

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Barriers to communication, accuracy, brevity, clarity and


appropriateness

C1
C5

21-37
55-58

Reading comprehension: Reading at various speeds

C3

224-226

Different kinds of text for different purposes, Reading between


lines

C3

222-223

Listening comprehension: Comprehending material delivered at


fast speed and spoken material, intelligent listening in interviews

C1
C5

70-79
72-74

Speaking: Achieving desired clarity and fluency, manipulating


paralinguistic features of speaking

C2

35-36

Task oriented, interpersonal, informal and semi formal speaking,


making a short classroom presentation

C2
C3
C4

201-208
94-95
56-70

Group discussion: Use of persuasive strategies, being polite and


firm, handling questions and taking in criticisms on self, turntaking strategies and effective intervention

C1
C4
C5

135-146
73-76
97-106

Use of body language

C4
C5

18-32
107-110

Module - 3

C5

115-117

Notes and memos, developing notes into text, organization of


ideas, cohesion and coherence

C3
C5

273-286,
121-125

Paragraph writing, ordering information in space and time,


description and argument, comparison and contrast, narrating
events chronologically

C2
C5

105-106
127-132

Written Communication : Note making and taking, summarizing

58

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Writing a rough draft, editing, proof reading, final draft and


styling text

C1

414-431

Technical report writing: Synopsis writing

C5

141

formats for reports. Introductory report

C5

141

Progress report, Incident report, Feasibility report

C5

143-144

Marketing report, Field report and Laboratory test


Report

C5

149-152

Project report: Reference work, General objective, specific


objective, introduction, body, illustrations using graphs, tables,
charts, diagrams and flow charts. Conclusion and references

C5

153-154

Preparation of leaflets, brochure and C.V

C5

154-157

B1
B2
B7
B7
B13
B2
B7
B8
B6
B13
B9
B10
B10
B6
B2
B1
B7
B7
B7
B13
B12
B6

28-29
200-205
44-46
30-31
159-161
5-8
10-28
8-17
161-164
161-162
9-27
377-378
397-398
164-167
107-108
36-44
101-102
116-117
180-181
163-164
4.14-4.15
168-173

Module - 4
Human relations and Professional ethics

Art of dealing with people, empathy and sympathy, hearing and


listening.

Tension and stress, Methods to handle stress

Responsibilities and rights of engineers- collegiality and loyalty

59

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Respect for authority Confidentiality conflicts of interest


Professional rights

Rights of information, Social responsibility


Senses of ethics variety of moral issues Moral dilemma
Moral autonomy

Attributes of an ethical personality right action self interest

B2
B2
B7
B12
B13
B2
B7

109-112
125-128
127-128
4.16-4.31
164-165
52-60
159-169

B2
B7
B7
B7
B7
B13
B12
B2
B2
B7
B13

26-33
52-53
79
242-243
169-170
166-168
2.2-2.10
202-203
39
36-37
168-169

B1 : Engineering, Ethics, and the Environment, Vesilind, P Aarne, CUP


B2 : Human Values and Professional Ethics, Jayshree Suresh, S. Chand
B3 : History of Science, Encyclopedia Britannica, Vol. 27
B4 : History of Technology, Encyclopedia Britannica, Vol. 28
B5 : History of Science and Technology, R V G Menon, Calicut University
B6 : Humanities, Sabu M T (Ed.), Pearl Publishers
B7 : Professional Ethics and Human Values, Alavudeen A, Laxmi Pub.
B8 : Organizational Behaviour, John W N, Tata Mc Graw Hill
B9 : Total Stress Relief, Vera Peiffer, Piatkus
B 10: Organizational Behaviour, Fred Luthans, McGraw Hill
B 11: World Civilization Vol.C, Burns, Goyl SaaB
B 12: Professional Ethics and Human Values, M P Raghavan, Scitech Pub.
B 13: Humanities and Communication Skills, Darling Kindersley Pub.
C1: Technical Communication, Meenakshi Raman and Sangeeta Sharma
C2: Business Communication, R C Bhatia
C3: Effective Technical Communication, M Ashraf Rizvi
C4: Communication Skills for Engineers, Sunita Mishra and C Muralikrishna
C5: Humanities and Communication Skills, Pearson

60

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA

CLASS NOTES PREPARATION PLAN


SUBJECT: CE09 303

MECHANICS OF SOLIDS

Name of the faculty: Reshma Antony


Topic and main points to be covered
MODULE 1
Tension, compression & shear : Types of
external loads - internal stresses - normal
and shear stresses

Page no

R6

3-7

R6

7-13

strain - Hookes law - Poissons ratio

relationship between elastic constants

R6

58-59

working stress - stress strain diagrams

R6

13,8

elongation of bars of constant and


varying sections
statically indeterminate problems in
tension and compression

R6

21

R6

29

R6

43

R6

68

R6

69-71

R3

7.1-7.20

R3

7.21-7.30

R3

7.31-7.38

R3

7.39-7.44

Temperature and Prestrain effects

strain energy and complementary energy

strain energy due to tension, compression


and shear.

Analysis of stress and strain on oblique


sections:
Stress on inclined planes for axial and
biaxial stress fields
principal stresses

Mohrs circle of stress - principal strains

61

Reference

strain rosette

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

MODULE 2
Bending Moment & Shear force:
Different types of beams- various types of
loading
Relationship connecting intensity of
loading
shearing force and bending moment

shear force and bending moment


diagrams for cantilever beams

Simply supported and overhanging beams


for different types of loading.

Stresses in beams of symmetrical cross


sections: Theory of simple bendingassumptions and limitations

Normal stresses in beams Stresses in


nonprismatic beams

moment of resistance

beams of uniform strength - beams of two


materials
strain energy due to bending - shearing
stresses in beams.

Unsymmetrical bending and shear centre

R6

87-89

R6

90

R6

90

R6

91-92

R6

93-99

R6

123-126

R6

267

R6

127

R6

151-153

R6
R7

Doubly symmetric beams with skew


loads-

R7

62

pure bending of unsymmetrical beams


Generalized theory of pure bending

Deflections in unsymmetrical bending

shear centre of thin walled open cross


sections.

154
479-487
472

R7
353
R7

466

R7

489

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module 3

Deflection of beams: Differential equation


of the elastic curve
Method of successive integration
Macaulays method
Method of superposition

R7

679

R3
R6
R7

11.2-11.4
198
784

moment area method


conjugate beam method

T4

9-22

T4

23-40

T4

43-50

T4

69

T4

56-68

R3

17.1-17.2

R3

17.3-17.10

R3

17.11-17.34

R3

6.1-6.3

R3

6.3-6.5

R6

253

R3

8.1-8.21

R3

9.1-9.4

R3

9.4

strain energy method


Castiglianos method
unit load method.

Module 4
Theory of columns: Direct and bending
stresses in short columns
Kern of a section. Buckling and stabilityEulers buckling/crippling load for
columns with different end conditions
Rankines formula - Eccentric loads and
the Secant formula-Imperfections in
columns.

63

Torsion: Torsion of solid and hollow


circular shafts
Pure shear- strain energy in pure shear
and torsion.
Springs: Close coiled and open coiled
helical springs.

Thin and Thick Cylinders: Stresses in thin


cylinders thick cylinders
Lames equation stresses in thick
cylinders due to internal and external
pressures
Wire wound pipes and cylinders compound cylinders - shrink fit.

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Text Books
1. Timoshenko , Strength of Materials Vol. I & Vol. II , CBS Publishers & Distributers, New
Delhi
2. James M Gere & Stephen P Timoshenko , Mechanics of Materials , CBS Publishers &
Distributers, New Delhi
3. Egor P Popov , Mechanics of solids, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
4. S.S Bhavikatti , Structural analysis Vol I , Vikas Publications (P) Ltd.
5. S.B Junnarkar & H.J Shah, Mechanics of Structures Vol II ,Charotar publishing House.
Reference books
1. Hearn E.J., Mechanics of Materials, Pergamon Press, Oxford
2. Warnock F.V., Strength of Materials, Isaac Pitman
3. Nash W.A., Strength of Materials, Schaums Outline Series, McGraw Hill
4. Wang C.K., Statically Intermediate Structures, McGraw Hill
5. D.K. Singh, Strength of Materials, Ane Books.
6. S S Bhavikatti, Strength Of Materials
7. James Gere, Barry Goodno, Mechanics of Materials

64

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


CLASS NOTE PREPARATION PLAN
SUBJECT: CE09 304 BUILDING TECHNOLOGY I
FACULTY: AGNES ANTO C

TOPICS TO BE COVERED

BOOKS

PAGE
NO.

MODULE- I

65

General Requirements of Construction Materials factors


considered during selection

B1

1-8

Building stones Classification of rocks Quarrying of stones.


Dressing Properties and uses of common stones Tests
conducted on stones

B1

10-42

Timber Classification seasoning -defects in Timber


decay preservation.

B1

187-215

Manufacture, properties and uses of plywood, fibre board,


particle board

B1

215218,220

Clay products Bricks and tiles manufacture BIS


specifications properties and testing

B1

43-57

Lime BIS Classification manufacture properties and uses

B1

90-104

Cement Manufacture types of cement uses Properties


and testing

B1

105-137

Mortar Types Sand properties uses

B1

138-151

Iron and Steel Reinforcing steel types specifications,


Structural steel specifications

B1

250-269

Misc materials : Glass

B1

298-313

Misc materials: Plastics

B1

337-358

Misc materials: Plastics, A.C.Sheets, Bitumen, Adhesives,

B1

359-366

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Aluminium
MODULE II

Concrete Aggregates Mechanical & Physical properties and


tests Grading requirements

B2

66-118

Water quality for concrete

B2

119-123

Admixtures types and uses plasticizers accelerators


retarders water reducing agents

B2

124-217

Batching mixing types of mixers.

B2

238-247

Transportation placing compacting curing.

B2

247-291

Properties of concrete fresh concrete workability


segregation and bleeding, Factors affecting workability &
strength

B2

218-238

Tests on workability tests for strength of concrete in


compression, tension & flexure

B2

420-457

stress strain characteristics and elastic properties shrinkage


and creep

B2

325-348

Durability of concrete permeability sulphate attack - alkali


aggregate reaction exposure to marine environment

B2

349-419

Concrete quality control statistical analysis of results


standard deviation acceptance criteria mix proportioning
(B.I.S method) nominal mixes

B2

458-503

MODULE III

66

Building construction - Preliminary considerations site


clearing and drainage Excavation -Timbering

B3

95-110

Function and requirements of foundations

B3

63-64

Bearing capacity of soils-methods of improving bearing


capacity Settlement of foundations and precautions

B3

49-57

Shallow foundation description of spread, grillage, raft

B3

64-90

Deep foundation - pile foundation.

B3

111-166

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Masonry Types of stone masonry Bonds in brickwork


advantages and limitations of masonry construction

B3

237-266

corbels, cornice and copings

B3

214

Composite walls - cavity walls and partition walls


construction details and features

B3

279-295

Scaffoldings

B3

297-300

Lintels -types and construction details

B3

377-382

Arches types and construction details

B3

365-376

Floors and flooring different types of floors and floor


coverings

B3

471-488

Roofs and roof coverings different types of roofs


suitability types and uses of roofing materials

B3

489-512

Doors-Types and construction details

B3

421-439

Windows and ventilators Types and construction details

B3

439-452

Stairs types - layout and planning

B3

383-400

Finishing works Plastering, pointing

B3

513-526

White washing, Colour washing, Distempering, Painting

B3

527-548

Methods of providing DPC, Termite proofing

B3

309-324

MODULE IV

Functional planning of buildings - occupancy classification of


buildings

B3

1-16

Building codes and rules - functional requirements of


residential and public buildings as per the relevant building
rules and NBC, Sketch plans, working drawings and site plan

B3

17-30

Planning principles -checking for circulation, ventilation,


structural requirements and other constraints

B3

615-626

Text books

B1: Rangwala S C., Engineering Materials, Charotar Publishers


B2: Shetty M.S., Concrete Technology, S. Chand & company.
B3: Rangwala S C, Building construction, Charotar Publishers

67

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


CLASS NOTE PREPARATION PLAN
SUBJECT: CE09 305: SURVEYING I
FACULTY: SHINI SHANMUGHAN

TOPICS TO BE COVERED

BOOKS

Reconnaissance - principle of
working from whole to part.
Chain survey - instruments - principles of
chain survey

B1
B1
B1

PAGE
NO.
1-4
85-87
92-94

Field book plotting

Chaining and ranging

Obstacles in chaining

Errors in chaining

Uses of cross staff and optical square

B1

105-106

Problems in chain survey

B2

50-57

B1

109-110

B2
B1
B2

41-45
100-104
50-57

MODULE II

68

Introduction compass survey

Bearings-types of bearings

Errors in compass survey

Graphical & analytical adjustments

Plane table survey - instruments and accessories

B1
B1
B2
B2

110-115
133-136
115-116
141-144

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Methods of plane tabling

Two point problem

Three point problem

Errors in plane tabling

B2
B1
B3

146-156
285-286
279-284

B1

287-288

B1

195-196

B1
B1
B2
B1
B1

211-212
365-373
183-184
226-230
230-233

B1

233-238

B1
B1
B1
B1

257-263
264-265
291-292
315-318

MODULE III

Leveling-Introduction
Temporary adjustments
Permanent adjustments
Fly levelling
Corrections for refraction and curvature
Reciprocal leveling
Longitudinal leveling and
cross sectioning
Contour survey
Direct and indirect interpolation
Plotting - areas
Plotting- volumes

Problems in area calculation

B1

292-303

Problems in volume calculation

B1

319-326

B1

337-348

MODULE IV
Minor instruments - hand levels - clinometer - ceylon ghat
tracer hypsometer - pantagraph -ediograph
box sextant - telescopic alidade.

69

Theodolite surveying

B1

137-141

Temporary adjustments of a theodolite

B1

142-143

Permanebt adjustments of a theodolite

B1

385-390

Measurement of horizontal angles

B1

144-149

Measurement of vertical angles


Theodolite traverse

B1
B3

150-151
250-251

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Curves

Compound curve

Reverse curves

Transition curves

Vertical curves

B3
B3
B3
B3
B3

413-442
447-451
452-462
466-500
502-520

Text Books

B1: B.C.Punmia, Ashok K Jain, Arun K Jain, Surveying I, Lakshmi Publications


B2: S.S.Bhavikatti, Surveying : Theory & Practice, I.K. International Publishing House Pvt.Ltd.;

70

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


CLASS NOTE PREPARATION PLAN
SUBJECT: CE09 306 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
FACULTY: REENU LISBETH

TOPICS TO BE COVERED

BOOKS

PAGE
NO.

MODULE- I

Physical Geology and Environmental Geology

71

The Earth Science and its sub divisions- scope of Engineering


Geology

R14

Geological works of rivers, oceans and wind weathering. Volcanoes:


types and causes of volcanism - volcanic products - types of volcanic
eruptions and their distribution.

R14

Elements of Engineering Seismology:

R14

Earthquake phenomenon focus, epicentre, seismic waves,


magnitude, intensity, intensity scale, and its correlation with ground
acceleration - characteristics of strong ground motions and
attenuation -Earthquake recording instruments

R14

Secondary effects land and rock slides, liquefaction, fires, tsunamis,


floods, release of poisonous gases and radiation.

R14

Earthquake occurrence - seismic zoning map of India and its use


case studies of important Indian earthquakes - major world
earthquakes - earthquake catalogue

R14

- assessment of damage - measures for protection of life and property

R15

1-5

60-65

164

164-171

169-171

164-171
84-126

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

earthquake resistant structures


Landslides : terminology - classification - causes and controls of
landslides

R14
R15

Geology and environment - Geology and health-geological factors in


environmental health hazards

128-137
2-20

MODULE II
Mineralogy and Petrology

R11

7-10
261-279

Megascopic characters of the important rock forming mineral groups


- quartz, feldspar, pyroxene, amphibole, mica and carbonates only

R11

Classification and distinguishing features of igneous,

R11

sedimentary and

327-362

metamorphic rocks

363-397

Brief description of granite, basalt, dolerite, gabbro,

sandstone, shale, limestone, slate, phyllite, schist, gneiss,

327-362

quartzite and marbles only

363-397

Engineering properties of rocks - rocks as construction materials


qualities required for

115-120
290-300

R11

273-325

273-325

R11
269-272

building, dimensional and decorative/ ornamental stones


MODULE III
Structural Geology, Hydrogeology and Exploration Geology

72

Geological structures and their significance in Civil Engineering


projects - folds, faults, joints and unconformities

R12

39-46

Origin and occurrence of groundwater geological formations as


aquifer, aquicludes, aquitards and aquifuges

T4

23-50

- artificial recharge of ground water - quality of ground water saline


water intrusion in coastal aquifers

T4

267-310
494-500

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Importance of ground water investigation in civil engineering projects

ground water exploration electrical, electromagnetic, gravimetric,


radioactive and seismic explorationtechniques.

T4

1-7

T4

410-427

MODULE IV
Geoinformatics and Engineering Geology
Remote sensing: Basic principles - role of remote sensing in Civil
Engineering - various

R13

interpretation techniques in remote sensing

R13

1-17
135-153
297-315

Geographical Information Systems.

R14

69-100

Applications of geological knowledge in Civil Engineering projects dams, bridges, roads, tunnels and multi-storied buildings - geological
factors in the design of buildings.

R12

143-149
150-155

Text books:
1. Kueffer and Lillesand : Remote sensing and Image interpretation
2. Read H.H. : Rutleys Elements of Mineralogy, CBS Publishers
3. Singh. P : Engineering and General Geology. S.K. Kataria
4. Todd, D.K : Ground water Hydrology. John Wiley
5. Tyrrel .G.W. : Petrology
6. Understanding GIS : ISRI Publications.
Reference Books:
1. Billings.M.P. : Structural Geology. Asia Publishing House.
2. Holmes, A :Principles of Physical Geology. Thomas Nelson
3. Judds, W.R : Principles of Engineering Geology and Geotechniques. Mc Graw Hill
4. Keshavalu, C.N. :Text book of Engineering Geology. Mc Millan India Ltd.
5. Pandey,S.N. :Principles and Applications of Photogeology Wiley Eastern
6. Reddy. V :Engineering Geology for Civil Engineers. Oxford &IBH

73

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

7. Sabins F.F. :Remote Sensing Principles and Interpretation.W Freeman


& Co., SanFranscisco
8. Sathya Narayanaswami.B.S: Engineering Geology, Dhanpat Rai & Co (P) Ltd
9. Strahler :Environmental Geology
10. Valdiya K.S :Environmental Geology in Indian Context Tata Mc Graw Hill
11. A Handbook of Mineral Crystals, Rocks and Ores by Pramod O. Alexander.
12. Engineering Geology For Civil Engineers by P. C. Varghese.
13. Principles and Applications of Photogeology by Shiv N. Pandey.
14. Basics of Remote Sensing and GIS by S. Kumar.
15. Geology and the Environment By Bernard Pipkin, Dee Trent, Richard Hazlett, Paul Bierman.

74

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Dept. of Civil Engineering

THIRD SEMESTER

Question Bank

75

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


QUESTION BANK
Department:

GENERAL SCIENCE

Subject:

EN 09 301 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I

Name of Faculty:

Dhanya Joby

Year: 2014

Semester:

III

Module I
1) Find the image of | z | =2 under the transformation w=z+3+2i
2) Under the transformation w=z2 , obtain the map in the w-plane of the square with vertices
(0,0),(2,0),(2,2),(0,2)
3) Find the image of the semi infinite strip x > 0 , 0 < y < 2 under the transformation
iz + 1

w=

4) Show that the map of the real axis of the z-plane on the w - plane by the transformation
w = 1/(z + i ) is a circle and find its centre and radius

5) Find the fixed points of the mapping

3z 2
z 1

6) Show that a bilinear transformation maps onto circles. For the function f(z) = xy 2 + ix2y
,determine the points where the C R equations are not satisfied.
7) What is the region of the w plane into which the rectangular region in the z-plane bounded
by the lines x = 0 , y = 0 , x = 2 , y = 1is mapped under the transformation
w=z+3i
8) Define Harmonic function. Prove that u = x2 y2 2xy 2x + 3y is harmonic . Find a
function v such that f(z) = u + iv is analytic.
9) Define Bilinear transformation. Determine the bilinear transformation which sends the points
z = 1 i , -1 onto w = i , 0 , -i.
10) Discuss the mapping (i) w = 1 / z (ii) w = ez (iii) w = z + 1/ z (iv) w = sinz
11) State and prove C-R equations for an analytic function in Polar coordinates.
12) Show that f(z) = | z | is continous but not differentiable at the origin.
13) Show that under the transformation w = 1 / z circles alwaya maps onto circles.
14) If w = f(z) = u + iv is an analytic function , show that the curves u = constant and v = constant
represented on the plane intersect at right angles

76

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

15) If f(z) is a holomorphic function, show that


2


f
(
z
)

f
(
z
)

f
'
(
z
)

16) Determine the analytic function if v = log(x2 + y2) + x -If f(z) is analytic, show that f(z) is a
constant if its modulus is constant
17) Determine P such that f(z) = log(x2+y2) + itan-1(px/y)

be an analytic function

18) What is the region of the w-plane into which the triangular region in the z-plane bounded by
the lines x=0 , y = 0, x+y=1 is mapped under the transformation w =e i/4 z
19) Find the bilinear transformation which maps -2,0,2 into , 1/2, 3/4
20) Find an analytic function f(z) = u + iv where u v = ex(cosy siny)

1 iz
21) Find the invarient points of the transformation w = 1 iz

2
2
2 2 log | f ( z ) | 0
x
y
22) If f(z) is an analytic function ,prove that
and
2
2
2
2
2 2 | Rf ( z ) |2 2 | f 1 ( z ) |2
2 2 arg f ( z ) 0
y
y
x
x
and

3 z (1 i )
zi
23) Find the invariant points of the mapping w =
24) Show that under the transformation w = 1 / z the circle x 2 + y2 6x = 0 is transformed into a
straight line in the w - plane
25)State and prove C-R equations for an analytic function in Cartesian coordinates
26)Find an analytic function of which the real part is e -x[(x2 y2)cosy + 2xysiny]
27)Show that u = x3 3xy2 is harmonic and find the corresponding analytic function
28)Show that u = ex (x cosy y siny) satisfies Laplace equation and hence find corresponding
conjugate function.
29)If w = + i represents the complex potential for an electric field and = x2 y2 +

x
x2 y2

77

, determine .

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

30)Find the analytic function whose real part is given by

sin 2 x
cosh 2 y cos 2 x

31)Find the analytic function; where v(r,) = r2 cos2 - r cos + 2

32)If f(z) = u + iv is an analytic function,find f(z)

x
2
2
if u + v = x y

when f(1) = 1

33)If f(z) = u(r, ) + i v(r, ) is an analytic function, show that

34)

2 u 1 u 1 2 u

0
r 2 r r r 2 2

2
2
2
2 2 u p p( p 1)u p 2 f 1 ( z )
x
y
35)If f(z) = u + iv is an analytic function then show that

36)Define conformal mapping. Prove that the mapping defined by analytic function w = f(z) is conformal
at all points except where dw / dz = 0

x 3 (1 i ) y 3 (1 i )
, z 0, f (0) 0
x2 y2
37)Prove that the function defined by f(z) =
is continuous and the
C-R equations are satisfied at the origin yet f 1(0) does not exist.

sin 2 x
38)Find the analytic function whose real part is (cosh 2 y cos 2 x)
uv
39)If f(z)=u + iv is an analytic function of z,find f(z) if

78

x y
x 4 xy y 2
2

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Module II
2 i

2
( z ) dz

1. Evaluate

along (i) y = x / 2

(ii) the real axis to 2 and then vertically to 2 + i

1i

2. Evaluate

2
( x iy)dz

along the paths y = x and y = x2

2i

3. Evaluate

( 2 x iy 1) dz

1 i

along the path (i) x = t +1,y = 2t2-1 (ii) straight line joining 1-i & 2+i

2
( z z ) dz

4. Evaluate c
where C is the upper half of | z| = 1.What will be the value of the
integral if the C is lower half of | z | = 1
5. Evaluate

| z | dz

where C is the left half of the unit circle from z = -i to z = i

3 i

2
z dz

along (i) y = x / 3 (ii) x = 3y2 (iii)real axis to 3 and then vertically to 3+i

6. Evaluate

dz

n
z a 2 i (ii) (z - a) dz 0
c
7. Prove that (i) c
where C is the circle | z-a | = r

8. State and prove Cauchys integral theorem


9. State and prove Cauchys integral formula

10. Use Cauchys integral formula to evaluate

11. Evaluate

2z 1
z2 z

dz

13. Evaluate
complex plane.
c

79

dz

5z 2
z2 z

dz

where c is | z | =2

where C: | z | = 2

12. Using Cauchys integral formula evaluate


centre at z = 1.

z2 1
z2 1

dz
where C is the circle of unit radius with

where C is the straight line joining the origin to the point P(2,1) on the

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14. Evaluate

3
z z 1 dz whereC is the circle | z | 1
c

15. Using Cauchys integral formula evaluate

e 2z
dz

C ( z 1)( z 2 )

16. Using Cauchys integral formula evaluate c


i, -2 i

cos z
z

where C :| z | = 3

dz
around a rectangle with vertices 2

17. Using Cauchys integral formula evaluate the following :


(i )

(ii )

(iii )

(iv )
(v )

sin 2 z
( z / 6) 3
e 2z
( z 1) 4

dz , C : z 1

dz

ez
(z 2 2 ) 2
z
2

, C : | z | 2
dz , C : | z | 4
dz , C : | z 2 |

z 3z 2

z 3 2z 1
dz , C :| z | 2
( z i) 2

1
2

18. Evaluate f(2) and f(3) where f(a) =

2z 2 z 2
dz
za

where C :| z | 2 . 5

z sin z

19. Find the nature of the singularity for the function

20.Expand f(z) =

1
( z 1)( z 2 )

z2

in the region (i)|z|<1 (ii)1<|z|<2 (iii)|z|>2 (iv) 0<|z-1|<1

21.Find Taylors series expansion of

(i) f (z)

1
in the region | z |1 , | z | 4
(z 1)(z 4)

(ii) f (z)

1
about z 1
1 z

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22.Find the Laurents expansion of

z2
( z 1)( z 3)
1
(ii ) f ( z )
in
z (1 z 2 )
1
(iii ) f ( z ) 2
z 4z 3
z2 1
(iv ) f ( z )
( z 2)( z 3)
(i ) f ( z )

, 1 | z | 3
powers of z
for 1 | z | 3
in the region 2 | z | 3
1
2

4 z z

23.Prove that for 0 < | z | < 4

n 1

n 0

n 1

f ( z)
24.Find the residue of the pole z = 1 for the function
f ( z)

25.Obtain the expansions of

26.Using Residue theorem, evaluate

z3
2

z ( z z 2)

z2
( z 1) 2 ( z 2)

in the region 1 | z | 2

2z 2 1
( z 1) 2 ( z 2)

dz

, where c is the circle |z|=3

27.State and prove Cauchys Residue theorem


28.Find the residue of the following at their singularities:

z 1
z2(z 2)
29.(i)

(ii)

1
z(ez 1)

30.Find the possible expansion of

z 2 1
( z 2)( z 3)

with centre at z = 0

31.Find the poles and residues of

z2
( z 1) 2 ( z 2)
32.(i) f(z) =

81

z2
2
(ii) f(z) = ( z 1)( z 2)

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f ( )
33.If

4z 2 z 5
x2 y2
dz where C is the ellipse

1,
z
4
9
C

find f(1) , f(i) ,

f 11(-i) and f 11(3.5)

34.Use residue theorem to evaluate

3z 3 2
( z 1)( z 2 4)

dz
where C is | z - 2 | =2

dz

z a
35.Evaluate L

, where L represents a circle | z a | = r

1
36.Show that the value of the integral of f(z) = z along a semicircular arc | z | = 1 from -1 to 1 is -i

where the arc lies above the real axis.


2

,a b0

2
2
0 a b sin
a

b
37.Prove (i)

dx

4
4
38.Evaluate (i) x a

(a 0 )

39.Using the method of contour integration evaluate

(i )
40.Evaluate

cos 2 x

1 x

dx
2

( x 2 1)( x 2 4)

1 2 p sin p 2

(5 3 sin ) 2

42.By integrating around a unit circle, evaluate

82

x2

(ii )

41.Using contour integration, evaluate

dx

,0 p 1

cos 3

0 5 4 cos

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Module III

1. Determine whether the set of vectors (2,3,-1), (3,2,2, (4,4,-1) in R3 are linearly
dependent or linearly independent.
2.Prove that an orthogonal set of non-zero vectors is linearly independent. Is the converse
true? Justify.
3.

Determine whether u and v are linearly dependent if u = (1,2,3,4), v = (4,3,2,1).

4.Show that every set of n linearly independent vectors {v1, v2, ----, vn } of an
n-dimensional vector space V is a basis of V.
5.Given the transformation T : R2 R2, where T(x,y) = (ax+cy, cx+by), find
T2(x,y),
6.Find the subspace U of R3 spanned by the vectors v1 = (1,-2,1), v2 = (-2,0,3) and
v3 = (3,-2,-2). Are the vectors (4,-4,-1) and (6,-6,-2) in U ?
7.Prove that the Schwarz inequality is equivalent to the triangle inequality
|| u + v || || u || + || v ||.
1

8.The matrix A = 0

2 1
1 2
is a linear transformation from R3 into R2. What is the image

5
2

1
of under A ?

9.Define the term basis of a vector space. Show that any two basis of a finite dimensional
vector space have the same number of vectors.
10.Let T be the linear operator on R3 defined by T(x,y,z) = (2x, 4x-y, 2x+3y-z). Show that T
is invertible and find T-1 explicitly.
11.Using Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization method find an orthonormal basis of R 3 from the
basis u1 = (1,1,1), u2 = (-1,0,-1), u3 = (-1,2,3).
12.Prove that the linear transformation T : V W is one-one iff ker(T) consists only of the

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zero vector V.
Let f : R4 R3 be the linear mapping defined by

13.

F(x,y,s,t) = (x-y+s+t, x+2s-t, x+y+3s-3t). Find a basis and the dimension of the image
U and the kernel W of the map F.
14.
2x1+x2+x3). Prove that

If T is a linear operator on R3 defined by T(x1,x2,x3) = (3x1, x1-x2,

T is non-singular and find the explicit formula for T -1.


15.
u1 = (3,0,4),

Find an orthonormal basis of R3 by the Gram-Schmidt method given that

u2 = (-1,0,7) and u3 = (2,9,1) form a basis of R3.


16.

Let V and W be finite dimensional vector spaces over the field F and let T be a linear

transformation from V into W. Prove that rank(T) + nullity(T) = dim(V).


17.
y+z, x+y-2z). Find

Let T : R3 R3 be the linear mapping defined by T(x,y,z) = (x+2y-z,

a basis and dimension of the image u and kernel K of T.


18.
vectors of Rn.

Prove that every vector in Rn has unique representation in terms of basis

19.
singular? If not, find

Let G : R2 R2 be defined by G(x,y) = (2x-4y, 3x-6y). Is G is non-

v 0 such that G(v) = 0.


20.
y+z, x+y-2z). Find

Let T : R3 R3 be the linear mapping defined by T(x,y,z) = (x+2y-z,

a basis and dimension of the image U of T.


21.
basis of R3 from the

Using Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization method, find an orthonormal

basis u1 = (1,1,1), u2 = (0,1,1), u3 = (0,0,1).


22.

Let V be the vector space of real polynomials f(t) of degree ten or less. Define the linear

d4 f
T f (t ) 4
dt
map T : V V by

84

. What is the dimension of V? Find the dimension

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and a basis of ker(T).


23.

The linear map H : R3 R3 defined by H(x,y,z) = (x+y-2z, x+2y+z, 2x+2y-3z) is

non-singular. Verify it. Find a formula for H-1.


24.
vectors (4,-1,7),

Find a basis, and the dimension of the vectorspace V spanned by the


(3,3,4), (2,1,3), (1,-1,2).

25.Find the scalar component of v = (2,2,-1) in the dimension of u = (4,3,5)


26.Determine whether or not the set of vectors (9,0,13), (2,4,3), (-1,16,-1)in R3 is a basis.
27.Using the Gram-chmidt orthogonalization process find an orthonormal basis for the subspace of R3
spanned by (2,3,6) , (7,12,8).
28. If a linear transformation T:V W is an isomorphism, show that its inverse transform T -1 form W
onto V is linear.
29.Prove that a linear operator T : V V can be represented by a diagonal matrix iff V
has a basis consisting of eigenvectors of T.
30.Determine whether u and v are linearly dependent if u = (1,2,3,4), v = (4,3,2,1).
31.If A and B are conformable matrices, show that the i th row vector in the product AB is UiB where Ui is
the ith row vector of A. What is the j th column vector in the product AB?
32.Let A and be matrices conformable in the order AB. Prove that the rank of AB is equal to the rank of
B iff BX = 0 for every vector X such that ABX = 0
33.Classify the following quadratic form 8x2 + 7y2 + 3z2 + 12xy + 4xz 8yz

Module IV

f ( x) 1
2
x
e

1.Find the Fourier integral of the function


2.Find the Fourier transform of f ( x ) e

x2

for x 0
for x 0
for x 0

3.State and prove Fourier integral theorem.

85

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for 0 / x /

1
f ( x)
0
4.Express

1 cos

for / x /

as a Fourier sine integral and hence evaluate

sin x d
.

5.Using the Fourier integral representation, show that

sin x

d e x
2
2
0 1

6.Using the Fourier integral representation, show that


7.

, x>0.

cos x
ax
d
e
2
2
2a

a
0

Show that the Fourier transform of

for / x / a
a / x /
f ( x)
for / x / a
0

8.

sin t
2 1 cos as

dt

t
2

s2
. Hence show that 0
.

is

Find the Fourier transform of

1
f ( x)
0

for / x / 1
for / x / 1 . Hence

evaluate

sin t
dt
t
0

1 x 2
f ( x)
0
Find the Fourier transform of

9.
evaluate

x cos x sin x
x
cos dx
3
x
2

11.

Find the Fourier transform of f(x) defined by

for / x / a
for / x / a .
1
f ( x)
0
Express the function

integral. Hence

86

.Hence

10.

x
f ( x)
0

for / x / 1
for / x / 1

evaluate

cos x sin

for / x / 1
for / x / 1

as a Fourier

d
and also obtain the value of

sin

d
.

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

12.
evaluate for

s sin sx
0 s 2 a 2 ds

f ( x) e ax . Hence

Find the Fourier sine and cosine transform of

and

s cos sx
ds
s2 a2

f ( x ) 2 x
0

for 0 x 1
for 1 x 2
for x 2

13.

Find the Fourier sine transform of

14.

e ax
x .
Find the Fourier cosine transform of

15.

ex
Find the Fourier sine transform of x .

16.

Find the Fourier cosine transform of

17.

Find the Fourier cosine transform of f ( x ) e

18.

Find the Fourier sine and cosine transform of

19.

1
Find the Fourier sine transform of x .

20.

/x/
Find the Fourier sine transform of. e
, hence show that

f ( x) e ax cos ax .
x2

f ( x) x e ax .

x sin mx

dx e m
2
2
1 x

,m>o.
21 State and prove Convolution theorem .

87

22.

State and prove Parsevals Identity.

23.

a 2 x 2
f ( x)
0
Show that the Fourier transform of

for / x / a
for / x / a

is

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

sin t t cos t
dt
0 t 3
15

2 sin ( as ) as cos (as )

s3
. Using Parsevals identity show that

1 / x /
f ( x)
0
Find the Fourier transform of

24.
Hence

for / x / 1
for / x / 1 .

sin t
0 t dt 3
deduce that
.

25.

for / x / a . Hence

sin t
0 t dt 2
.

deduce that

26.

Evaluate

x
0

dx
a x2 b2
2

using Fourier transform.

27.
a >0.

Using Parsevals identity calculate

28.

Solve the integral equation

for / x / a

1
f ( x)
0
Find the Fourier transform of

f ( x) cos sx dx 0
0

x
0

dx
2

a2

and

x
0

x 2 dx
2

a2

, if

0 s 1
s 1
2

sin t
0 t dt 2
Hence show that
.
29.

0 f (x)sinsxdx2
0

Solve for f(x) the integral equation

0s1
1s2
s2

30.

State and prove Linearity property of Fourier transforms.

31.

If F{ f(x) }=F(s) , then prove that F{ f(x-a) } = eiasF(s) .

88

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32.
of f(x).

89

If F{ f(x) }= F(s) then obtain the Fourier transform of the nth derivative

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


QUESTION BANK
Department:

HUMANITIES

Subject:

EN 09 302 HUMANITIES AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Name of Faculty:

Joseph Jestin & Vini Jose

Year:

2014

Semester:

III

1. Importance of humanities to education, Technology & society?


2. Explain the impact of science and technology on the development of modern civilization?
3. Explain the contributions of Chinese & Greek civilizations to the world?
4. Explain the contributions of Indian & Egyptian civilizations to the world?
5. Write a note on the achievements of modern India in the field of information, communication &
space technology?
6. Analyze the contribution of Industrial revolution to science and technology
7. Indicate the major landmarks in the filed of transport and communication and the impact it has
made on society
8. Explain the art of dealing with people?
9.

Examine the various moral issues in the work place & how will you face these issues as an
engineer?

10. What do you mean by Moral Dilemma?


11. Distinguish between empathy & sympathy?
12. Write a note on the responsibilities & rights of an engineer?
13. Critically access the role of engineers in modern society?
14. What do you mean by stress? Explain the methods to handle stress?
15. Briefly explain the attributes of an ethical personality
16. Importance of Professional Ethics for Engineers?
17. What is code of ethics? Explain its importance
18. What is Cyber Crime? Explain with examples
19. Discuss Environmental Ethics
20. Explain the Corporate Social Responsibility

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21. Define Communication. What are the different forms of communication?


22. Distinguish between verbal and non-verbal communication.
23. What role do communication skills play in society? Illustrate your answer with suitable examples.
24. Explain barriers in Communication? How can we eliminate communication barriers so that we
can work and understand better?
25. What are the different reading skills?
26. List some elements of good listening. How important is good listening in interviews?
27. Write a short note on Classroom presentation?
28. Differentiate between formal and informal speaking?
29. What is a group discussion? Explain the Group Discussion Strategies?
30. Discuss role of body language in Group Discussion.
31. What is the difference between note making and note taking?
32. Write a Short note on Memos.
33. What do you mean by Technical Report Writing?
34. Make a report of an industrial accident or a natural disaster you are familiar with?
35. How to prepare a project report ? Explain the various steps?
36. Brief the Importance of a Resume for Engineers during Interview and explain the parts of a
Resume?
37. Write short notes on
a. Paragraph Writing
b. Cohesion and Coherence
38. Distinguish between Leaflets and Brochure?

91

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SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


QUESTION BANK
Department:
Subject:
Name of Faculty:
Two mark questions

CIVIL
CE 303 MECHANICS OF SOLIDS
Reshma Antony
Year: 2014
Module I

Semester:

III

1. Draw typical stress strain diagram for mild steel tested up to failure and explain the salient points.
2. Define and explain the principal strain and principal stresses.
3. Define strain energy
4. Discuss on strain rosette.
5. Define the terms (a)Poissons ratio (b)Proportional limit (c)Proof stress
6. State Hookes law.
7. Distinguish between stress and strain.
8. Distinguish between normal stress and shear stress; working stress and yield stress.
9. What do you understood by principal plane and principal stress?
10. Define three elastic constants and write the relation between them
11. Define longitudinal strain and lateral strain.
12. Write down the relation between modulus of elasticity and modulus of rigidity.
Five mark questions
1. A load of 10 kn is suddently applied on a metal bar of cross section dimension 50mmX 50mm.
Calculate the maximum stress in the material of the bar. Calculate also the stress induced if the
load is gradually applied.
2. Derive the expression for strain energy due to axial load.
3. State Hookes law. Sketch the stress- strain diagram for a ductile material like mild steel tested
under tension up to destruction, marking the salient points on it.
4. Explain the construction of Mohrs Circle to obtain principal stresses.
5. How do you find temperature stresses in case of a compound bar subjected to temperature rise?

92

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Ten mark questions


1. (a) A tensile test was conducted on a mild steel bar. The following data was
obtained from the test:
(i) Diameter of the steel bar = 3 cm
(ii) Gauge length of the bar = 20cm
(iii) Load at elastic limit = 250 kN
(iv) Extension at a load of 150 kN = 0.21 mm
(v) Maximum load = 380 kN
(vi) Total extension = 60 mm
(vii) Diameter of rod at failure = 2.25 cm
Determine:
(1) The Youngs modulus
(2) The stress at elastic limit
(3) The percentage of elongation
(4) The percentage decrease in area.
2. Three bars made of copper; zinc and aluminium are of equal length and
have cross section 500, 700, and 1000 sq.mm respectively. They are
rigidly connected at their ends. If this compound member is subjected to
a longitudinal pull of 250 kN, estimate the proportional of the load
carried on each rod and the induced stresses. Take the value of E for
copper =1.310 N/mm , for zinc =110 N/mm and for aluminium = 0.810 N/mm .
3. A rigid bar is supported by three rods, the outer one of steel and the central one of copper. The
cross sectional area of each steel rod is 300mm2. And of the copper rod is 1000mm2. The three
rods are equally spaced and the loads of 50 kN are each applied midway between the rods.
Determine the forces in each of the vertical bars if the rigid bar remains horizontal after the loads
have been applied. Neglect the weight of the rigid bar. Take Es= 205 kN/mm2. And Ec= 110
kN/mm2.
4. A metallic rod of 1cm diameter, when tested under an axial pull of 10KN was found to reduce its
diameter by 0.0003 cm. The modulus of rigidity for the rod is 51 kN/mm2. Find the Poissons
ratio, Modulus of elasticity and Bulk Modulus.
5. A rectangular block of material is subjected to a tensile stress of 100 N/mm2 on one plane and
tensile stress of 45 N/mm2 on a plane at right angles, together with a shear stresses of 65N/mm2
on the same planes. Find
(i)
The direction of the principal planes.
(ii)
Magnitudes of the principal stresses.
(iii)
The magnitudes of greatest shear stress.
6. A rigid body weighing 8000 N is suspended from an overhead support by three steel rods A, B
and C each initially 5m long and spaced 100mm apart. Area of A is 20mm2, B is 30mm2 and C is
45mm2. Determine the stresses in each bar.

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7. At a point in a strained material the resultant intensity of stress across a plane is 56.56 N/mm2,
tensile inclined at 45o to its normal. The normal component of the intensity across the plane at
right angles is 20 N/mm2 compressive. Find the position of the principal planes and stress across
them.
8. The modulus of rigidity of a material is 0.8X 10 5 N/mm2. When a 6mm X 6mm rod of this
material was subjected to an axial pull of 3600 N it was found that the lateral dimension of the
rod changed to 5.9991 mm X 5.9991 mm. find the Poissons ratio and the modulus of elasticity.

Module II
Two mark questions
1. What do you mean by Shear force and Bending moment?
2. Mention different types of loading
3. Mention different types of beams.
4. Draw BMD and SFD for cantilever beam carrying a concentrated load at its free end.
5. Differentiate between prismatic beams and non-prismatic beams.
Five mark questions
1. What is meant by pure bending? What are the assumptions made in the theory of simple bending?
2. Write short note on shear centre.
3. Distinguish clearly the difference between (i) overhanging and continuous beam (ii) simply
supported and rigidly fixed beam
4. Derive the relationship between slope deflection and radius of curvature of a simply supported
beam.
5. Derive the relationship between bending moment and shear force.
Ten mark questions

94

1.

A simply supported beam of span 8 m. is subjected to uniformly distribute load of 24kN/m. over
the left half of span. Draw shear force and bending moment diagrams.

2.

Draw SFD and BMD for the beam shown in figure below.

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3.

Define section modulus . Derive the section modulus for (i) rectangular section of width b and
depth d (ii) circular section of diameter d.

4.

An I section is having overall depth as 550 mm and overall width as 200 mm. The thickness of
the flanges is 25 mm where as the thickness of the web is 20 mm. If the section carries a shear
force of 45 kN, calculate the shear values at salient points and draw the sketch showing variation
of shear stress.

5.

A simply supported beam of rectangular section 150mm wide and 250 mm deep and 4m. span
carries a conetrated load inclined at 25 o to the vertical axis of the section at the midspan. If the
maximum tensile and compressive stresses are no to exceed 35 N/mm2 and 75 N/mm2
respectively, find the maximum load the beam can carry.

6.

Draw SFD and BMD of beam shown in fig. below

7. Draw SFD and BMD of beam shown in fig. below

Module III
Two mark questions
1.Define conjugate beam.
2.State Moment Area theorem I
3. State Castiglianos theorem
4. Write Differential equation of deflected curve.
Five mark questions
1. What is a conjugate beam? Give the conjugate beam for (i) cantilever beam (ii) simply supported
beam
2. Discuss on method of super position.

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3. Compare moment area method and conjugate beam method.


4. What is moment area method ?Explain two Mohrs theorem.
5. What are the rules to be followed in using successive integration method for more than one load
on the beam?
Ten mark questions
1.

A cantilever beam of span l is fixed at A and free and at B. At B, a point load of w is acting. Find
slope and deflection at free end B. Use Moment area Method.

2.

Using Conjugate beam method , find deflection at D of overhanging beam shown in figure
below. Use E = 2X 105 N/mm2 and I = 100X 106 N/mm2.

3.

Using Conjugate beam method , find deflection at D of overhanging beam shown in figure
below. Use E = 2X 105 N/mm2 and I = 100X 106 N/mm2.

4.

An overhanging beam of length 6m is supported at the left end and 1m from the right end. It
carries point loads of magnitudes 40kN and 20 kN at 2m and 6m. from the left end respectively.
Using conjugate beam method, determine:

5.

96

(i)
The slope at the free end.
(ii)
The deflection at 3m from the free end. Take EI = 3X10 12 N/mm2.
A cantilever of 3 m length and of uniform rectangular cross section 150 mm wide and 300 mm
deep is loaded with a 30 kN load at its free end. In addition to this it carries a uniformly
distributed load of 20kN /m over its entire length, Calculate:
(i)
The maximum slope and maximum deflection
(ii)
The slope and deflection at 2m from the fixed end

Sahrdaya College of Engineering & Technology

Module IV
Two mark questions

1.

Mention different types of springs.

2.

Define shrink fit.

3.

Write Secant Formula and explain the terms.

4.

What do you mean by Kern of a section?

5.

Write Rankines formula.

Five mark questions


1. Enumerate the assumptions made in Eulers theory of long column.
2. Discuss on slenderness ratio.
3. Compare thin and thick cylinders.
4. Discuss on Lames equation for the analyzing cylinders.
5. Derive the Eulers formula for a column hinged at both ends.
Ten mark questions
1. A spherical shell of 90 mm internal diameter has to with stand an internal pressure of 35N/mm2.
Find the thickness of shell required if the max. permissible tensile stress is 80 N/mm2.
2. A 1.5m long column has a circular cross section 50mm. diameter. Both ends of the columns are
fixed. Taking a factor of safety of 3, Calculate the safe load using Rankines formula and Eulers
formula. Take a = 1/1600 and fc = 560n/mm2 and E = 2X 10 5 N/mm2.
3. Find the thickness of metalnecessary for a steel cylindrical shell of internal diameter 150mm to
withstand an internal pressure of 50 N/mm2. The max. hoop stress in the section not to exceed
150 N/mm2.
4. A mild steel tube 8m long , 30 mm internal diameter and 4mm thick is used as strut with both
ends fixed. Find the collapsing load by Eulers formula. Assume E value.
5. A circular bar of length 1.2m is used as a strut with one end hinged and the other end free. The
same bar when freely supported at its ends gives the central deflection of 3mm. when a load of
0.1 kN is placed at its center. Find the Eulers load. Find also the safe load taking a factor of safety
of 3.

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SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


QUESTION BANK
Department:
Subject:
Name of Faculty:

CIVIL
CE 304 BUILDING TECHNOLOGY I
Agnes Anto C
Year: 2014
Semester:

III

Module 1
Two marks questions
1. Distinguish (i) English bond (ii) Flemish bond.
2. What is the chemical composition of cement.
3. Compare OPC and PPC.
Five marks questions
1. What are the various types of cements and their applications.
2. Explain different types of bonds in brick.
3. What are the different tests conducted on stones.
4. What are the tests conducted on aggregates.
5. How are the rocks physically and chemically classified.
Ten marks questions
1. Explain different methods to determine the field density of soil.
2. What is meant by seasoning of timber. Explain with neat sketches.
3. How is cement manufactured by wet process?
4. How is cement manufactured by dry process?
5. What are the different types of defects in timber, Explain with neat sketches.

Module 2
Two marks questions
1. What do you mean by shotcrete.
2. Define (i) plasticizers (ii) retarders (iii) accelerators.

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3. What is the stress-strain and elastic characteristics of a concrete.


4. What do you mean by batching in concrete.
5. What is meant by creep in concrete.
6. Why is sea water not used for concreting.
7. What do you mean by workability of concrete.
8. Compare nominal mix and design mix.
9. Expalin the frequency of concrete sampling in mix design.
Five marks questions
1. Explain alkali aggregate reaction and its effect on concrete.
2. Explain in detail about the admixtures used in concrete also list its properties and uses.
3. Explain durability of concrete and the factors affecting the durability of concrete.
4. What are the qualities of water used in the concrete.
5. Describe shrinkage and creep of concrete.
6. State the acceptance criteria of the concrete.
7. Explain the concept of prestressed concrete.
8. Write short notes on sulphate attack on concrete.
9. What are the factors affecting the strength of concrete.
10. What are the laboratory tests for cement.
11. Discuss on the exposure of concrete to marine environment.
12. Define target mean strength and how it is arrived.
Ten marks questions
1. Describe methods to determine the tensile strength, compressive strength and flexural strength of
concrete.
2. Explain the factors influencing mix design of concrete. Explain the steps involved in mix design as
per BIS method.
3. Describe compaction factor test and slump test of concrete.
4. Explain the ingredients, properties and applications of the polymer concrete.

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5. Mentions and explain factors affecting workability and strength of concrete.


6. How can concrete be made more durable and impermeable?

Module 3
Two marks questions
1. Explain methods of termite proofing.
2. Define (i) raft foundation (ii) pile foundation (ii) spread foundation.
3. Compare a flat roof and a pitched roof.
4. What is a cavity wall?
5. What is (i) corbel (ii) cornice (iii) coping.
6. What is plastering.
7. What is meant by mortar.
8. What is meant by pointing.
9. What are the features of a good plaster.
Five marks questions
1. Where do we provide lintels and arches and describe its types.
2. How tiled flooring is finished.
3. State advantages and disadvantages of masonry constructions.
4. Explain grillage foundation.
5. Explain types of construction of partition walls.
6. Explain different types of scaffolding.
7. State the functions and requirements of a foundation.
8. Write short notes on precast concrete stairs.
9. Briefly explain shallow foundation.
10. Differentiate between shallow and deep foundation.
11. What are the different types of roof.
12. Write notes on cavity walls.
13. Compare brick masonry and stone masonry.

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Ten marks questions


1. Define bearing capacity of soil and mention the methods to improve it.
2. Describe causes and effects of dampness in the building and its remedial measures.
3. Describe the methods of construction of RCC roof.
4. Explain the properties of fibre reinforced concrete.
5. Explain the types of doors and windows used in the building.
6. Explain different types of floor and floor coverings.
7. Elaborate on (i) Painting and (ii) Pointing.
8. Explain different types of roofings.
9. What is raft foundation. Explain in detail.
10. How do we select site for building construction.
11. What are the different types of stairs. Explain with neat sketches.

Module 4
Two marks questions
1. What are institutional buildings.
2. What is meant by public buildings.
3. What are building rules?
4. What are building codes?
Five marks questions
1. How do you classify buildings.
2. Explain (i) working drawings (ii) site plan (iii) sketch plan.
3. What do you mean by the functional planning of a building.
Ten marks questions
1. Explain occupational classification of buildings.
2. Write a note on the function requirements of residential and public buildings based on KBC and
NBC.
3. Explain the planning principles for a building.

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SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


QUESTION BANK
Department:
Subject:
Name of Faculty:

CIVIL
CE 305 SURVEYING I
Shini Shanmughan
Year: 2014

Semester:

III

Module 1
Two marks questions
1. What is meant by reconnaissance?
2. What is the difference between a plan and a map?
3. Explain the term surveying?
4. List out the errors in chain surveying?
Five marks questions
1. Differentiate between tie line and check line
2. Describe with a neat sketch, how it is possible to measure the distance between two points A and B
using chain/tape, if the region between A and B is obstructed by intervening high ground or small
hillocks . Mention the method used.
3. Explain the principle of surveying and also add a short note on field book.
4. List out and explain the various obstacles that are encountered in chaining.
Ten marks questions
1. Write short notes on:
a) Chaining and ranging
b) Working from whole to part
2. A 30 m tape was standardized at 200C under a pull of 100 N. The tape was used measuring a distance
AB when the temperature of 450 C and the pull was 150 N. The tape was supported at the ends only.
Find the correction per tape length, when the cross sectional area of the tape is 5 mm2. The unit
weight of the material is 0.0785 N/mm3 and the coefficient of expansion of tape is = 11.5 X 10 -6 /0C.
E = 2050000 KN/m3.
3. Explain the likely errors in chain surveying and the precautions that should be taken to eliminate
them.

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4. Explain at least one method each to continue and measure the distance between points on either side
of the obstacle in the case (a) Pond and (b) River.
5. Sketch the various conventional signs used in surveying and leveling and also add short notes on
cross staff and optical square.
6. A survey line BAC crosses a river A and C being on the near and distant banks respectively. Standing
at D and a point 50m measured perpendicularly to AB from A, the bearings of C and B are 320 0 and
2300 respectively, AB being 25m. Find the width of river.
7. Find the hypotenusal allowance per chain of 20m length if ,
i.The angle of slope is 100
ii.The ground rises by 4m in one chain length.
8. A steel tape 20 m long standardised at 550 F with a pull of 10 kg was used measuring a base line. Find
the correction per tape length, if the temperature at the time of measurement was 80 0 F and the pull
exerted was 16 kg. Weight of 1 cubic centimetre of steel= 7.86g.Weight of tape =0.8 kg. Modulus of
elasticity steel =2 x 106 kg/ cm-. Coefficient of expansion of tape per 10 F= 6.2 X 10-6

Module 2
Two marks questions
1. List out the errors in plane tabling
2. What is resection method in plane table surveying and how is it different from other methods?
3. List out the advantages of plane table surveying.
Five marks questions
1. Explain on two point problem
2. The bearing of the side AB of a regular pentagon ABCDE was found to be 540. Compute the
remaining sides of the pentagon if the pentagon in run clockwise.
3. Describe the trial and error method for determining the position of the instrument station.
4. Write short note on
a) True and magnetic bearing
b) Dip and declination
Ten marks questions
1. The following are the lengths and bearings of the sides of a closed traverse ABCD. Find the length
and bearing of the line DA:

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LINE

BEARING

LENGTH(m)

AB

1400 12

76.80

BC

360 24

195.60

CD

3380 48

37.20

DA

2. Write short notes on:


a) True and magnetic bearing
b) Whole circle and reduced bearing
3. The following bearings were observed in traversing with a compass in an area where local attraction
was suspected. Find the amounts of local attraction at different stations and correct the bearings of the
lines.
Line
F.B.
B.B.
AB

80030

260030

BC

351015

1730 00

CD

320 15

2080 00

DE

1060 15

2870 45

EF

990 00

2800 00

FA

2090 30

290 30

4. How do you obtain the position of the station occupied by plane table, given the plotted position of
two points? Describe the procedure in detail.
5. List out and explain the various errors in plane tabling and also add a short note on local attraction.
6. Explain in detail with the help of sketches the three point problem in plane table surveying.
7. Three ships A, B and C started sailing from Bombay at the same time. The speed of all the three ships
was the same at 30km/h. their bearings were measured and found to be N70 0E, S600E and S100E
respectively. After an hour the captain of ship B, determined the bearings of other ships with respect
of his own ship and calculated distances. Calculate the bearings and distances which might have been
determined by the captain of ship B.
8. The table below gives the lengths and bearings of the lines of a traverse ABCDE, the length and
bearing of EA having been omitted. Calculate the length and bearing of the line EA

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Module 3
Two marks questions
1. Explain on levelling
2. What is fly levelling?
3. Distinguish between Datum and Level surface.
4. Write short note on leveling.
Five marks questions
1. Write a short note on contour survey
2. Write a short note on Reciprocal levelling
3. The following staff readings were observed in sequence: 1.324, 2.605, 1.385, 0.638, 1.655, 1.085,
2.125 and 1.555. The instrument was shifted after the third and sixth readings. The third reading was
taken to an arbitrary bench mark of elevation 75.000. Find the reduced levels of all the other points
using Height of collimation method.
4. Explain the process of reciprocal leveling.
5. Write short notes on contour characteristics and uses of contour.
6. A level set up an extended line BA in a position 70 metres from A and 100 metres from B reads 1.684
on a staff held at A and 2.122 on a staff held at B, the bubble having been carefully brought to the
centre of its run before each reading. It is known that the reduced levels of the top of the pegs A and
Bare 89.620 and 89.222 respectively. Find (a) the collimation error and (b) The reading that would
have been obtained had there been no collimation error.
Ten marks questions
1. Explain in detail on temporary and permanent adjustments in a level
2. The following consecutive staff readings (all in m) were taken during a leveling operation.
0.894

105

1.643

2.896

3.016

0.954

0.692

0.528

0.251

1.532

0.996

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The instrument was shifted after 4th & 8th readings. Arrange the data in tabular form and find the reduced
levels of the points, if the 1st reading was taken on a bench mark of Reduced Level 820.765m, show the
usual check also.
3. A page of an old level book has been damaged by white ants and the readings marked x are
missing. Find the missing readings with the help of available readings

BS

IS

FS

X1

HI

RL

REMARKS

X2

209.150

B.M

1.675

X3

X4

210.425

3.355

209.080

0.840

X5

209.520

X6

X7

208.275

X8

210.635

X9

2.630

X10

Underside of bridge
girder

X11

X12

206.040

1.920

205.895
X13

C.P

205.690

4. Explain the direct method of contouring. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.
5. Explain in detail the temporary and permanent adjustments of a level.
6.

The following perpendicular offsets were taken at 10m interval from a survey line to an irregular
boundary line:

3.25,5.60,4.20,6.65,8.75,6.20,3.25,4.20,5.65m. Calculate the area enclosed between the survey line, the
irregular boundary line and the first and last offsets by the application of
a. Trapezoidal line
b. Simpsons rule

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7. The following perpendicular offsets were taken from a chain line to a hedge

Calculate the area between the survey line, the hedge and the end offsets by
a) Trapezoidal rule b) Simpson's rule

Module 4
Two marks questions
1. List out the elements of a curve.
2. What is the method adopted to determine high accuracy horizontal angle measurement using a
theodolite?
3. Distinguish between compound curve and reverse curve.
4. For what purpose we us pantagraph?
Five marks questions
1. Discuss on transition curves.
2. Differentiate between method of repetition and reiteration.
3. Explain the importance of Traversing in surveying and how is it done using a theodolite.
4. What are the elements of a simple curve; those are necessary for setting it on the ground? Explain
with a suitable diagram.
5. List out the various permanent adjustments of a theodolite and explain any one in detail.
Ten marks questions
1. Sketch and label a typical theodolite. Also add a short note on clinometers.
2. Write short notes on :
a) Hypsometer and ediograph
b) Methods of setting out compound curve.

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3. Find the lengths of lines RS and ST of a traverse PQRST from the data below:
Line

PQ

QR

RS

ST

TP

Length (m)

201.54

189.68

256.83

Bearing

620 42

1540 54

2020 32

2810 44

220

4. Two straights roads intersect at an angle of 60 0 30 at chainage 3030m. The maximum speed of
vehicles is 120kmph. The centrifugal ratio is and the rate of change of radial acceleration is to be
0.2m/sec3. Find the chainages of the points at the beginning and the end of the transition curves and
the junctions of transition curve and circular curve. Consider the transition curve to be True spiral.
5. Write short notes on
a) Elements of curve
b) Temporary adjustments of a theodolite
6. Two tangents intersect at chain age 59+60, the deflection angle being 50 030'.Calculate the necessary
data for setting out a curve of 15 chains radius to connect the two tangents if it is intended to set out
the curve by offset from chords. Take peg interval equals to 100 links, length of the chain being equal
to 20 metres (100 links)

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SAHRDAYA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, KODAKARA


QUESTION BANK
Department:
Subject:
Name of Faculty:

CIVIL
CE 306 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
Reenu Lisbeth
Year: 2014
Semester:

III

Module I
Two mark questions
1. Branch of Geology dealing with the study of earth quake waves---------2. Surface of erosion or non deposition are called-----3. Earthquakes induced by human activity are known as -------4. What are volcanoes?
5. Seismograph
Five mark questions
1. Explain :
a) Mercalli scale
2. Explain Elastic rebound theory.
3. Explain the different types of volcanoes.
4. What are sedimentary rocks?
5. Comment on geological work of glaciers.
6. Comment on seismic exploration techniques.
Ten mark questions
1. Describe the types and causes of volcanism.
2.

Comment on the product of volcanism.

3. What are earthquakes?


4. Comment on the methods of recording and prediction techniques of earth quakes.
5. Describe the various stages of volcanic activity and their distribution?
6. Describe building stones of Kerala.

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Module II
Two mark questions
1. A mineral exhibiting magnetic property---------2. Solid material accumulated at or near the earth surface in depositional basins-----3. Cleavage
4. Antifoam
5. Ranite petrography
Five mark questions
1. Geological factors in the design of building.
2. Explain :
a) Aquiclude
3. Explain the products of weathering.
4. Explain Geological Structures
5. What are the features of igneous rocks?
Ten mark questions
1. Comment on their distribution and engineering properties of sedimentary rocks.
2. Describe the process of metamorphism and various rocks formed. Comment on their varieties.
3. What are the geological characters of building and dimension stones?
4. Comment on the aquifer properties.
5. Describe the classification and varieties of sedimentary rocks.

Module III
Two mark questions
1. The strata in which older sequence of rocks in the core and are arched downwards------2. Rock texture in which size of minerals differs widely is known as ------3. Soil profile
4. Water table
5. Perched water table
Five mark questions
1. Geographical information system and its uses.
2. Barchans

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3. Describe the origin and occurrence of Ground water.


4. How ground water is superior to surface water?
Ten mark questions
1. Describe the various geological structures and their significance in civil engineering projects.
2. Describe electric and electromagnetic method of mineral exploration techniques.
3. What are faults?
4. Comment on the classification of faults and engineering significance.
5. Explain the principle of saline water intrusion in coastal aquifers. Comment on the remedial
measures.

Module IV
Two mark questions
1. A photograph taken with the optical axis of camera pointing vertically downwards-----2. Water bearing formation within the zone of unsaturation is called------3. Name a mineral characterized by cubic crystallization having chemical composition PbS.
4. Raster Model
Five mark questions
1. Mohrs scale of hardness
2. I R S satellites
3. Geological Factors in designing a building.
4. Explain about GIS.
Ten mark questions
1. Comment on the basic principles of remote sensing .
2. How remote sensing can be used for planning engineering projects?
3. Describe the geological factors concerned in the design of different types of dam.
4. Describe the uses of remote sensing in civil engineering project in structurally complex terrains.
5. Describe Geographical Information system. How it can be effectively used in processing spatial
data

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