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Module Code: MU6004

Credits: 30

Level: 6

Jazz Studies

2014/5
PRE-REQUISITES: successful completion of level 5 modules or
equivalent
CO-REQUISITES: None
Module Leader: Meredith White (m.k.white@kingston.ac.uk)
Time and Location: Friday 1.00 3.00pm in Coombehurst Studio

MODULE SUMMARY (INDICATIVE):


Jazz harmony, rhythm and improvisation skills will be taught in this
year-long optional module, along with their practical application in
performance. The module will enable students to recognise features of
a range of jazz styles within a historical context and put them into
practice.
AIMS (DEFINITIVE):
to develop understanding of harmonic, melodic and rhythmic
practices in jazz;
to provide the opportunity to develop practical skills in
improvisation;
to develop an advanced understanding of compositional
practices in jazz;
to promote awareness of the stylistic features of a range of jazz
music within a historical context.
LEARNING OUTCOMES (DEFINITIVE):
demonstrate the ability to understand advanced harmonic,
melodic and rhythmic practices of jazz;
demonstrate an ability to perform fluently in a jazz style;
demonstrate an understanding of advanced compositional
practices in jazz;
demonstrate awareness of the stylistic features of a range of
jazz;
to understand the historical contexts of a range of jazz styles.
CURRICULUM CONTENT (INDICATIVE):
analysis of harmonic and motivic practices in the performance of
established practitioners;
rhythmic practices and procedures in jazz;
harmonic and scalic theories, chord extensions and substitutions;
composing jazz;
forming and shaping improvisation;
performance strategies for jazz musicians.
TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGY (INDICATIVE):
This module will be taught through lectures and workshops. All
students will engage with the music in theoretical and practical ways
and will develop a thorough knowledge of jazz techniques and ideas.
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Extensive formative feedback will be provided in workshops and


practical performance sessions.
BREAKDOWN OF TEACHING AND LEARNING HOURS:
DEFINITIVE KIS
CATEGORY
Scheduled learning and
teaching
Guided independent
study
TOTAL
(number of credits x 10)

INDICATIVE
DESCRIPTION
Lectures/workshops/se
minars

HOU
RS
44
256
300

ASSESSMENT STRATEGY (INDICATIVE):


The course will be assessed through: (1) a folio of jazz harmony and
theory exercises and compositions (30%); (2) transcription and analysis
of a recording of a solo by an experienced practitioner (20%); and (3) a
practical performance that is stylistically appropriate and includes
improvised solos (50%).
MAPPING OF LEARNING OUTCOMES TO ASSESSMENT STRATEGY
(INDICATIVE):
LEARNING OUTCOME
ASSESSMENT
On completion of the module, students will
STRATEGY
be able to:
1) demonstrate the ability to understand
Folio, Transcription and
advanced harmonic, melodic and rhythmic
Analysis and
practices of jazz;
Performance
2) demonstrate an ability to perform fluently
Performance
in a jazz style;
3) demonstrate an understanding of
Folio
advanced compositional practices in jazz;
Folio, Transcription and
4) demonstrate awareness of the stylistic
Analysis and
features of a range of jazz;
Performance
Folio, Transcription and
5) to understand the historical contexts of a
Analysis and
range of jazz styles.
Performance
BREAKDOWN OF MAJOR CATEGORIES OF ASSESSMENT:
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DEFINITIVE KIS
CATEGORY
Practical Exam
Coursework
Coursework
TOTAL
(to equal 100%)

INDICATIVE DESCRIPTION PERCENT


AGE
Performance
50%
Folio of exercises and
30%
compositions
Transcription and Analysis 20%
100%

ACHIEVING A PASS:
It IS NOT a requirement that any major assessment category is passed
separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module
BIBLIOGRAPHY (INDICATIVE)
CORE TEXT(S):
Levine M. (1995) The Jazz Theory Book. Petaluma, CA : Sher Music Co.
Gioia T. (1997) The History of Jazz. Oxford: Oxford University Press
RECOMMENDED READING:
Bailey D. (1983) Improvisation Its Nature and Practice in Music. New
York: Prentice-Hall
Berliner P. (1994) Thinking in Jazz: The Art of Improvisation. London:
University Of Chicago Press.
Coker J. (1987) Improvising Jazz. New York: Simon and Schuster
Levine M. (1995) The Jazz Theory Book. Petaluma, CA : Sher Music Co.
Ligon B. (2001) Jazz Theory Resources (Book 1). Houston: Houston
Publishing, Inc.
Also:
Dunlap L. (Ed) (2000) The New Real Book Volumes 1, 2 & 3.
Petaluma, CA : Sher Music Co.
Aebersold, J. (1997-2005) Play-Along CDs - Volumes 1 113. New
Albany: Jamey Aebersold Jazz
Burns, K. (2001) JAZZ - 8 DVD set; Florentine Films in assoc. with the
BBC
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ASSESSMENT DETAILS
1. Compose a melody over a standard chord progression
15% Due: Dec. 19th
Write an original melody over a standard 32-bar chord progression: an
original 32-bar head followed by a 32-bar variation 64 bars in total
melody and chord symbols.
Assessment criteria:
- Through conceptual and structural ideas, demonstrate an
understanding of the concepts involved.
- Level of originality brought to the task.
- Presentation and fulfilment of the brief.

2. Transcription and analysis 20%


Due: Feb. 20th 2015
(a) Transcribe a 32-bar passage from a recorded improvised solo of
your choice.
(b)Write an analysis of your transcription, approx. 800 words
Include:
I) the chord progressions used in the improvised passage
II) identifiable chord/scale relationships
III) any use of substitutions or reharmonisations
IV) rhythmic features
V) any other features observed (e.g. phrasing)
Assessment criteria:
-

Accuracy of the transcription


Demonstration of understanding of form and structure of the
transcribed improvisation through the analysis.
Presentation and fulfilment of the brief.

3. Portfolio of coursework - 15%


Due: March 27th 2015
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Throughout the year, keep an individual record of the following:


(a)
Harmony and theory exercise set in class
(b)
Your own practice (you might focus on
technical exercises, repertoire, vocabulary)
(c)
Recordings and live performances you have
listened to (with short review/evaluation of each)
(d)
A library of licks and phrases derived from your
own practice, as well as from transcription
(remember to acknowledge the source)
(e)
Any performances given by you (with brief
evaluation)
4. Performance - 50%
Date: (week of March 30th)
(a) Unaccompanied performance of your transcription (see above).
You may begin with the head if you wish, followed by the
transcribed solo.
(b) Accompanied performance of two jazz pieces (any jazz style)
which includes at least two choruses of improvisation
(approximately 64 bars in each piece). Apply what you have
learned in this subject to produce a fluent single line
improvisation. Make sure you are adequately rehearsed and
prepared. Any written work developed in the preparation of this
task should be presented at the time of the assessment.
Assessment criteria:
- Performance of own transcription: How accurate is it and is it
performed with appropriate rhythmic feel?
- Performance of two own choices: Do the improvised elements reflect
an understanding of the concepts involved?
- Does the performance as a whole demonstrate an awareness of
relevant stylistic considerations?
- Is the performance well presented?

Note: It is appreciated that the practical skills of musicianship involved in


jazz and improvisation may take longer than the duration of this module and
consideration will be given to this.

Weekly schedule (indicative)


Teaching Block One
Session 1, Oct. 3:
Introduction to the Module rhythm and groove - accents and articulation
approaches to developing jazz performance practice. (Song for My Father,
Perdido)
Session 2, Oct. 10:
Standard chord progressions major II V I modes of the major scale chord/scale relationships circle of fifths (My Little Suede Shoes, Take the A
Train)
Session 3, Oct. 17:
The transcription process more about major II V I cadences phrasing
analysis (consolidation of repertoire from sessions 1 and 2).
Session 4, Oct. 24:
The Blues blues vocabulary expanding the pentatonic scale composing
blues heads rhythmic displacement (Blue Monk, The Jody Grind)
Session 5, Oct. 31:
More Blues - expanding blues harmony and groove modal approaches (All
Blues, Blues for Alice)

Session 6, Nov. 14:


Rhythm Changes Turnarounds - cycles bebop - rhythmic placement (I
Got Rhythm, Anthropology)
Session 7, Nov. 21:
More Rhythm Changes reharmonisation - tritone substitutions
anticipating a chord with its V chord pedal points (Fungii Mama)
Session 8, Nov. 28:
Minor II V I - melodic minor scale harmony developing motivic ideas (What
is this Thing Called Love, You Dont Know What Love Is)
Session 9, Dec. 5:
Further exploration of minor II V I more detail melodic minor
vocabulary (repertoire as for last week)
Session 10, Dec. 12:
Latin Jazz Cuban Mambo - clave rhythms (A Night in Tunisia, Mambo Inn)
Session 11, Dec. 19:
Review and consolidation
Assignment 1: Composition and solo over standard chord
progression(15%) Deadline: Dec.19th
Teaching Block 2
Session 12, Jan. 9:
Transcription and analysis chord-scale relationships phrasing
rhythmic features (All the Things You Are, Alice in Wonderland)
Session 13, Jan 16:
Reharmonisation further approaches to reharmonisation - more about
phrasing and rhythmic features.
Session 14, Jan 23:
Modal Jazz Modal approaches to improvisation Modal structures sus
chords
(Maiden Voyage, Impressions)
Session15, Jan 30:
Consolidate strategies for improvisation and analysis.
four tunes above)

(review the

Session 16, Feb. 6:


Calypso and 12/8 grooves (St Thomas, Georgia)
Session 17, Feb 13:
More scales/modes diminished scales slash chords more chords
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Session 18, Feb 20:


Brazilian Jazz bossa nova, samba (How Insensitive, One Note Samba)
Assignment 2: Transcription and analysis of a jazz solo. (20%)
Deadline: February 20th
Session 19, Feb 27:
Coltrane changes (Giant Steps, Afro Blue, I Cant Help It)
Session 20, March 6:
Free Jazz time, no changes - changes, no time textural improvisation
exploring sonorities European jazz - Ornette Coleman, Coltrane, Kenny
Wheeler
Session 21, March 13:
Jazz/Rock Fusion grooves and styles reading and interpreting funk
rhythms changing time signatures - Miles Davis, Weather Report, Pat
Metheny (Chameleon, The Chicken, Celeste)
Session 22, March 20:
Review looking ahead strategies for further development of jazz
language.
Portfolio of coursework: ( 15%)
Deadline: March 27th
Practical assessments: (50%)
Date: w/c March 30th

Student Professionalism
In lectures, you are expected to:
1. Attend all lectures, seminars and rehearsals
2. Arrive on time coming in late is very disturbing
3. Take a pen and paper or your computer with you to lectures
4. Take notes during lectures
5. Leave the room you have been using clean take your rubbish
with you
Outside lectures, you are expected to be proactive and take
responsibility in your approach to learning. This includes the following
elements:
1. Read the module guide carefully
2. Read the allocated material for each lecture
3. Listen to the allocated music for each lecture
4. Practice your instrumental / singing / software / producing skills
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5. Spend extra time working on the areas that require your


attention (your lecturer will inform you about this)
6. Ask for help when you need it we provide individual tutorials
In emails, you are expected to:
1. Address your lecturers and associated KU staff with respect: start
your email with Dear [name]
2. Be precise - indicate who you are, which module your query is
about and which aspect of your work you are writing about.
3. Write in clear English using an appropriate vocabulary
4. Sign off with your first name and your last name
For assignment submissions, you are expected to:
1. Submit your work on time. One minute after the deadline, is one
minute after the deadline, i.e. your work is late
2. Submit work in the required format please read assignment
briefs carefully and be aware of exactly of what is being asked of
you. Work that is not submitted in the required format cannot be
taken into consideration

CASE (Centre for Academic Skills and

Employability)
CASE provides help for students at all levels in the Faculty of Arts and
Social Science with their studies in the following areas: Researching
and presenting, Structuring and editing traditional academic writing,
Structuring and editing multimedia texts, Referencing.
All students within the Faculty are encouraged to get as much help as
possible with their academic work from CASE. Results show that
students who use the centre are significantly more likely to complete
their degree. As they are better equipped to act on feedback, they also
tend to do better in their studies.
Further information about accessing CASE can be found at:
https://mykingston.kingston.ac.uk/myfaculty/fass/case/Pages/default.as
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Courses and Tutorials in Academic Writing,


Speaking, Language and Skills
Good written and spoken communication skills are essential to success
in your studies and in your future career! Also, you can gain points for
your Kingston Award.
This programme of courses and tutorials is OPEN TO EVERYONE. It
may be particularly suitable for the following students:
International and European students whose first language
is not English
Students who have not studied in the UK before
Home students who would like to improve their academic
writing and language
We offer three types of courses:
Open courses: These classes are open to students from any
faculty and they focus on particular skills or aspects of language.
In Penrhyn Road.
In your Faculty courses: These classes are open to students
from that faculty only. These classes are more specifically
focused on the requirements of academic assignments in your
faculty. On your campus.
Kingston Language Scheme English courses: These classes
are for students who would like to cover all skills, do regular
practice, be assessed and receive frequent feedback on their
progress. In Penrhyn Road.
Plus, we offer one-to-one drop-in tutorials in PR / KH / KP LRCs.
Course Details
If you would like to know more about our courses, there are course
descriptions online at:
My Kingston > My Support > English Language Development

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