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Lady Cats lose heart-breaker,

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Baby ducks and rhubarb,


p5

DELPHOS

HERALD

The

Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869

75 daily

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Vol. 145 No. 224

Delphos, Ohio

Delphos Herald to publish two days per week


Emphasis will be
on expanding
digital coverage

DELPHOS The Delphos


Herald will change frequency of
home delivery to two days per
week as it reorganizes operations
to emphasize online news. Print

Upfront
Registration
set for free
ABLE classes
Adult Basic and Literacy
Education (ABLE) classes are
offered through Vantage Career
Center. Many adults attend
ABLE classes to refresh basic
skills in reading, writing and
math, improve skills needed
for employment or further
education, or prepare for the
GED exam to obtain a high
school equivalency diploma.
ABLE classes are offered at
convenient times and locations
throughout the Vantage service
area, including Delphos, Van
Wert, Paulding and Celina.
The next registration date
for new students is Monday.
In Van Wert, registration
will be held at Vantage Career
Center, 818 N. Franklin St. from
9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. or
from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Regular
classes meet on Tuesdays and
Thursdays at the same times.
Delphos classes are located at the Public Library, 309
W. Second St. Class times
are 1-4 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday. Orientation is the
first Monday of the month.
Paulding classes are held at
the Paulding County Ohio Means
Jobs Center, 252 Dooley Dr.,
Suite B. Students may register
at the next orientation session
from noon to 3 p.m. Monday.
In Celina, classes are located at the Mercer County Ohio
Means Jobs Center, 220 W.
Livingston St. New students
may register from 9 a.m. until
noon on Monday. Classes in
Celina meet on Tuesday and
Thursday from 9a.m. to noon.
For additional information
regarding registration for ABLE/
GED classes, cost of the new
GED exam or participation in
the $80 Ohio voucher program
for first-time test-takers, please
contact the ABLE Coordinator at
419-238-5411 or 1-800-686-3944
ext. 2075; or visit the ABLE/
GED link on the Vantage Career
Center Adult Education website
at: www.vantagecareercenter.com

Forecast
Partly cloudy
today with
a 20 percent
chance of
showers.
Highs in
the lower
60s. Mostly cloudy with
a 40 percent chance of
Showers. Lows in the
mid 40s. See page 2.

Index

Obituaries
2
State/Local
3
The Next Generation
4
Community
5
Sports
6-7
Classifieds
8
Comics and Puzzles
9
Senior Lifestyle
10-13
World news
14

subscribers will receive the print


version for home delivery on
Wednesdays and Saturdays starting on Wednesday, May 6. The
Wednesday and Saturday editions
will feature increased local news
and sports. The newspaper will be
available for single-copy purchase
on Wednesdays and Saturdays as
well.
The new publishing schedule will
include separate Saturday products

for both the Delphos Herald and


the Van Wert Times Bulletin and a
re-launched total market coverage
product called The Dart, which was
formerly known as the Community
Connection. The Dart will be published on Saturday as well. A new
digital online e-newsletter, which
is free to subscribers, will be distributed daily and the newspapers
website, www.delphosherald.com,
will be updated on a daily basis.

The Delphos Heralds digital format


will enable 24/7 access for readers
on desktop computers, tablets and
mobile devices.
The Delphos Herald has made a
significant investment in expanding
its digital and mobile portfolio of
products. As it has since 1869, the
company intends to continue community journalism for its hometown
community.
Current prepaid subscribers

monies will be adjusted from the


five-day per week newspaper to the
two-day per week newspaper without any loss of monies per issues.
The Delphos Herald will offer
more in-depth local coverage in its
print version and breaking news,
video, e-newsletters and daily obituaries, as well as an e-edition for
subscribers on its website.

Delphos looking at
EMS-based service
from Fire and Rescue
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS Delphos administration and the fire department are exploring a change in standard operating procedure
at the fire department.
Fire Chief Kevin Streets was the featured speaker at a
Delphos City Safety Committee meeting Monday called by
Chairman Jim Fortener.
We have three firefighters laid off and we are having problems with coverage, Streets began. Recruitment is becoming
more difficult. We realize the city doesnt have $300,000
for three firefighters so I am proposing we use intermittent
employees to help us out and the cost will be lower to the city
and well have the coverage our citizens expect and deserve.
The department currently is a fire-based operation with
full-time firefighters manning the station and part-paid EMTs
on a per-call basis.
Our mutual aid calls to American Township have been
extremely high, Streets said. We only have three so far this
year because of what we are doing.
Committee member Joe Martz asked how there would be a
savings with more people on the payroll.
These would all be part-time people who only work up to
29 hours a week, Streets said. They will be fully trained and
they will be called to man the station when we are called out.
They wont go out unless there is a second run.
Streets said the extra manpower will also cut down
response time.
We dont have to wait on someone to get to the station; we
can just jump in an ambulance and go, Streets said.
The 2015 Fire and Rescue budget was approved at $343,311
and includes the proposed intermittent employees. The budge
is $16,000 less than 2014.
Martz was also concerned if the department could find the
personnel to fit its needs and how much it will cost to outfit
them.
We just put a little push out there for this and Ive already
got 12 applications, Streets said. I also have four part-time
firefighters who are willing to go to EMT training. They will
all sign a contract saying that if they dont stay with us for at
least two years, theyll have to pay us back for the training.
Ive already got money in my budget for new turnout gear and
we have some that can be used by the new guys. It lasts for
10 years.
Local 686 Union President Roy Hoehn also spoke to the
committee.
See EMS, page 14

Eric Siebeneck signs posters at the merchandise table during the Chicago premiere of
The Walkers Among Us documentary on Saturday. (Photo submitted)

Kalida artist collaborates on


Walking Dead documentary
BY ANNE COBURNGRIFFIS
DHI Media Editor
news@delphosherald.com
KALIDA First it
was a black-and-white
comic book series, then a
gory-iously colorful television series loosely-based
on the comic. Since 2003,
The Walking Dead has
grown in popularity among
would-be survivors of a
zombie apocalypse, sci-fi/
horror fans and even critics.

Putnam County Engineer Recker


resigns amid ethics violations
BY NANCY KLINE
DHI Media Staff Writer
news@delphosherald.com
PUTNAM COUNTY Even though
he is being forced to resign by the Ohio
Ethics Commission, Putnam County Engineer
Terrance Recker said he feels he can hold his
head high as he ends his position as Putnam
County Engineer.
Recker is resigning after being found guilty
of ethics violations.
Allegations were filed in 2013 against
Recker, stating that while serving as county
engineer he used his position to secure contracts and other things of value for family
members, in violation of ethics laws.
Following an investigation, Recker reached
a settlement agreement with the Ohio Ethics
Commission on April 6 that stated specifically
that he had hired his son Troy Recker on June
2, 1981, and his son Kelly Recker on June 4,
1984. Both became full-time employees in
1988.
Recker was found guilty of giving his
sons pay raises and advancements in their
position which, according to the Ohio Ethics
Commission, is against the law. The Ohio
Revised Code states no public official shall
knowingly authorize or employ or influence of
the public officials office to secure authoriza-

Putnam County Engineer Terrence


Recker has agreed to resign after being
found guilty of ethics violations. (Putnam
Sentinel/Nancy Kline)
tion of any public contract in which the public
official, a member of the public officials family
or any of the public officials business associates has an interest.
See RECKER, page 14

The Walking Dead is


so popular, in fact, that
a documentary about the
AMC television series
premiered on Saturday in
Woodbridge, Illinois, a
suburb of Chicago. Along
with Walking Dead cast
members, fans of the
series, directors and writers, a graphic artist from
Kalida strolled the red carpet outside the Hollywood
Boulevard Cinema to view
The Walkers Among Us
on the big screen.
Eric Siebeneck picked

up director Cris Machts


first documentary, a film
about Star Wars, in 2008.
He liked the piece so much
that he sent the director a
message. The two communicated off and on during
the succeeding years.
Then two years ago, when
Siebeneck was in Chicago
on a family vacation, he
found out that Macht was
also going to be working on
a project in the Windy City.
The two met up for a beer.
See DEAD, page 14

Business owner speaking out


on proposed street closing
BY NANCY KLINE
DHI Media Staff Writer
news@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE Jeff Basinger, owner of Bee Line Inc.,
a trucking company, plans to oppose a proposed street
closing in Ottoville during Mondays Village Council
meeting.
Basinger said his trucking firm has been located on
Dollar Street for 20 years. He said he received a letter
from the village with a proposed ordinance to close Dollar
Street. The reason given was to allow the neighboring
business, Main Street Deli, to build an outside deck reaching out onto the street.
The new owner of the business bought it 1 1/2 years
ago and knew where Dollar Street was located when he
bought it, Basinger said. It is my opinion that his is not
a viable reason to shut down a street that is needed by the
largest trucking company in Putnam County.
He said there are several reasons this would negatively impact
his business and other businesses with this street address.
Bee Line Inc has business contracts with Honda,
DEVA, DANA and P&G, all who recognize 101 Dollar
Street as our legal address, he said. To have to change
this would be a major problem.
Basinger said all of Bee Lines over 200 vendors recognize 101 Dollar Street as the physical address of the
business and over the past 12 years Bee Line has listed 101
Dollar Street as their address.
See STREET, page 14

2 The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

For The Record


OBITUARY

FROM THE ARCHIVES


one Year Ago
The Jefferson Middle School FCCLA
Chapter Service Portfolio team consisting of Samantha Kehres, Jason Ditto
and Jennifer Ditto received a gold rating
at FCCLA State Leadership Conference
Thursday. As the top scorer, they have
qualified to compete at the National
FCCLA Leadership Conference July
4-11 in San Antonio, Texas.
25 Years Ago 1990
Jeff Martin of Delphos received the
best of show and first place for a photo
of a caterpillar during the 1990 Johnny
Appleseed Park District nature photography contest. Martin won in the specific nature category. In second place was
Brenda Roberts, with Paula Millhoff
and Martin tying for third place.
Mike Gable, son of Melvin and June
Gable of Delphos, was the winner of the
third annual high school conservation
essay contest of the Allen Soil & Water
Conservation District. Gable, a sophomore at St. Johns High School, won the
contest competition competing against
14 of the county school districts.
Dana Martin of Fort Jennings took
first place in the Black Swamp Rifle/
Pistol Club Wednesday pistol league.
Fred Moreo of Delphos took second
and J.R. Schnipke placed third. The

Thursday match was cancelled because


adjacent fields were being prepared for
spring planting.

Today is Wednesday,
April 29, the 119th day of
2015. There are 246 days
left in the year.
Todays Highlights in
History:
On April 29, 1945,
during World War II,
American soldiers liberated the Dachau (DAHkhow)
concentration
camp. Adolf Hitler married Eva Braun inside his
Fuhrerbunker and designated Adm. Karl Doenitz
(DUHR-nihtz) president.
On this date:
In 1429, Joan of Arc
entered the besieged city
of Orleans to lead a French
victory over the English.
In 1798, Joseph Haydns
oratorio The Creation
was rehearsed in Vienna,
Austria, before an invited
audience.
In 1861, the Maryland
House of Delegates voted
53-13
against
seceding from the Union. In
Montgomery, Alabama,
President Jefferson Davis
asked the Confederate
Congress for the authority
to wage war.
In 1913, Swedish-born
engineer Gideon Sundback
of Hoboken, New Jersey,
received a U.S. patent for
a separable fastener
later known as the zipper.
In 1946, 28 former
Japanese officials went on
trial in Tokyo as war criminals; seven ended up being
sentenced to death.
In 1957, the SM-1,
the first military nuclear
power plant, was dedicated
at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

75 Years Ago 1940


A meeting of the managers of the
Delphos softball teams, or their representatives, and the softball commission
will be held Tuesday evening in the
council rooms at the city building. Five
Delphos business men have agreed to
serve on the softball commission. They
are Melvin Westrich, Harold Fosnaught,
Russell Critchett, Dr. R. N. Stippich and
Dr. L. W. Kohlhorst.
In an impressive service held
Sunday night, Rev. Mark L. Andrews
was installed as pastor of the First
Presbyterian Church of Delphos by the
Presbyterians of Lima. Following the
service, members of the congregation
met with the new pastor. At that time,
Rev. Andrews was presented with a
desk chair and lamp. E. W. Bell made
the presentation speech.
The Delphos Merchants won their
practice game at Ottoville Sunday afternoon by a score of 8-7. Clair Ditto
started on the mound for Delphos and
allowed four hits in the six innings he
pitched. Howdy Ditto, who hurled the
final three frames, gave up six hits. A.
Saunders and Leis were the Ottoville
pitchers.

50 Years Ago 1965


Explorers Post 007 returned Sunday
afternoon from a weekend trip to
Lockborne Air Base, Columbus. The
post is sponsored by the Delphos
Kiwanis Club. Boys attending were
Harry Flanagan, Drew Shenk, Bill
Wiesenberg, Dick Hayes, Bob Burger,
Chris Kundert and Jeff Moorman. Gene
Hayes is Kiwanis co-chairman of the
boys and girls committee and is the
immediate past president.
Do-Pass-Os will dance to the calling
of Wade Snow May 1 at the K of P Hall
in Delphos. Newly-elected officers of
the group are: presidents, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Calvelage; vice presidents, Mr.
and Mrs. Lee Miller; secretary-treasurer, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Warnecke; and
reporters, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Miller.
Ottovilles Future Farmers of
America will hold their annual ParentSon banquet April 29 with Dan Parrish,
state FFA treasurer, as the banquet
speaker. Ron Hilvers of Ottoville,
vice president, will give the welcome
and Keith Heitmeyer, president of the
Ottoville Chapter, will introduce the
guests. Roger Ruen will crown Ann

TODAY IN HISTORY
Associated Press

Knippen FFA Queen for 1965.

In 1968, the counterculture musical Hair opened


on Broadway following limited engagements
off-Broadway.
In 1974, President
Richard
M.
Nixon
announced he was releasing edited transcripts of
some secretly made White
House tape recordings
related to Watergate.
In
1983,
Harold
Washington was sworn in
as the first black mayor of
Chicago.
In 1992, rioting resulting in 55 deaths erupted
in Los Angeles after a jury
in Simi Valley, California,
acquitted four Los Angeles
police officers of almost
all state charges in the videotaped beating of Rodney
King.
In
1993,
Britains
Queen
Elizabeth
II
announced that for the first
time, Buckingham Palace
would be opened to tourists to help raise money
for repairs at fire-damaged
Windsor Castle.
In
2011,
Britains
Prince William and Kate
Middleton were married
in an opulent ceremony
at Londons Westminster
Abbey.
Te n
years
ago:
Insurgents unleashed a
series of car bombings
and other attacks across
Iraq, killing at least 41
people, including three
U.S. soldiers. NASA
again delayed the first
space shuttle launch since
the Columbia disaster,
worrying that ice falling
off fuel tank could doom
Discovery.

WEBB

County judge rejects new


Ohio rules on traffic cameras
TOLEDO (AP) A judge in northwest Ohio has made the
latest ruling rejecting the states new restrictions on traffic camera
enforcement.
Lucas County Judge Dean Mandros followed up his March 22
preliminary injunction against the law with a ruling Monday that
it violates home-rule powers given to local governments under
Ohios constitution. The Blade newspaper of Toledo reports
that Mandros said restrictions such as requiring a police officers
presence when cameras are in use are, in his words, an unconstitutional exercise of legislative power.
He said that the requirement would force communities to
divert precious and limited police resources from other important tasks and incur costs such as officer overtime. Mandros
called it arbitrary, unreasonable, and not rationally related to any
legitimate government purpose.
What it means for Toledo is that home rule is alive and well
in Toledo, said Adam Loukx, the citys law director.
Judges in Montgomery and Summit counties have made
similar rulings, allowing police in Dayton and Akron to continue
using camera systems to cite red-light and speeding violations
without the new requirements that also include safety studies and
public relations campaigns.
The Ohio attorney generals office says it is appealing the
rulings against the law passed late last year.
We will appeal this ruling as well, spokesman Dan Tierney
said.
The Ohio Supreme Court has twice upheld automated camera
enforcement, which draws criticism from opponents who say it
runs over motorists rights and is mainly used to raise revenue.
Legislators had said the law they passed allowed cameras, but just
added requirements for their use.
Local governments say camera use makes streets safer and
stretch police resources.
Legislators are taking another shot at cameras with a proposal
to reduce local government fund subsidies for cities for collecting
fines from camera use.
Toledo Mayor Paul Hicks-Hudson is trying to rally other mayors
against the legislation, saying in a letter that its a punitive measure
against cities simply for protecting their constitutional rights.

Sale starts Saturday!


WEATHER
WeAtHer ForeCAst
tri-County
Associated Press

showers. Highs in the upper


50s. North winds 5 to 15
mph.
thursday night through
Friday night: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs
in the mid 60s.Save up to $5.00 lb.

today: Partly cloudy with


a 20 percent chance of showers. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds around 10
Save up to $1.81
mph.
Arps or Deans
tonight: Mostly cloudy
Cottage
with
a 40 Cheese
percent chance of
selected varieties
showers. Lows in the mid
40s. North winds 5 to 10
mph.
thursday: Mostly cloudy
with a 40 percent chance of

USDA Choice

Beef
eXtenDeDBoneless
ForeCAst
Ribeye
saturday: MostlySteak
sunny.
Highs around Regular
70. or Thick Cut
saturday night and
sunday: Partly cloudy with
a 20 percent chance of showers. Lows around 50. Highs
in the lower 70s.
lb.

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The Delphos
Herald
Flavorite
419-695-0015
White Bread

FreshMarket

Sandwich Spread

In the Deli

12 pk.

Limit 4 - Additionals 2/$5

www.delphosherald.com

lb.

Limit 3 - Additionals $1.29

$ 28
Potato Chips
Seyferts

8.5-9 oz.

Angelfood
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$ 99
Monday-Friday

In the Bakery

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SSave $2
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i ti

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AngelfoodSaturday
Cake
& Sunday:
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1102 Elida Ave.


Delphos
419-692-5921
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
Great food. Good
neighbor.

www.Facebook.com/ChiefSupermarket

Prices good 8am Saturday, September 12 to midnight Sunday, September 13, 2009 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations.

Double Coupons Every Day www.ChiefSupermarkets.com

Nancy Spencer, editor


Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager

Mary Catherine
(Weichart) Kemper
March 4, 1930-Aprili 26,
2015
OTTOVILLE - Mary
Kemper, 85, of Ottoville
died 11:45 a.m. Sunday at
Vancrest Assisted Living of
Delphos.
She was born March
4, 1930, in Fort Jennings
to Alex and Florence
(Horstman) Weichart, who
preceded her in death.
On July 28, 1951, she
married Henry J. Kemper,
who died June 10, 1980.
Mary is survived by her
two sons, Henry Joe (Ruth)
Kemper and David (Judy)
Kemper both of Ottoville;
seven daughters, Jan (Bill)
VonLehmden of Ottoville,
Patty Romes of Ottawa,
Rita (Larry) Kreinbrink of
Leipsic, Diane (Tom) Verhoff
of Kalida, Marcia (Dave)
Herring of Leipsic, Karen
(Ron) Bonifas of Landeck
and Beth (Jeff) Clay of Fort
Jennings; 25 grandchildren
and 24 great-grandchildren;
a sister, Edna Wurth of
Kalida; six in-laws, Arnold
(Norma) Kemper, Isadore
(Leona) Kemper, Theresa
(Jim) Kramer, Agnes (Don)
Ostendorf, Lucille Lammers
and Ruth (Larry) Johnson.
She was also preceded in death by a grandchild, Wesley Bonifas; two
great-grandchildren: Blake
and Blaine Romes; a brother,
Norman (Helen) Weichart;
a nephew, Gary Weichart;
and 15 in-laws, Leo and
Angela Kemper, Lawrence
Kemper, Joe and Eileen
Kemper, Alphonse Kemper,
John Kemper, Richard
Wurth, Alex and Frances
Muzechuck, Amelia and
Frank Burdg, Bob Lammers,
Elmer Wittler and Alice
Kemper.
Mary was a member of
Immaculate
Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville
and its Altar Rosary Society,
Ottoville VFW Ladies
Auxiliary and the Ottoville
Mutual Telephone Company
Board. Mary formerly
worked as a cook at Sarah
Jane Nursing Home. She had
a lifetime love for children
and enjoyed babysitting.
Mary resided the last three
years at Vancest of Delphos
Assisted Living.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin 10:30 a.m.
Thursday at Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church,
Ottoville, the Rev. Jerome
Schetter officiating. Burial
will follow in St. Marys
Cemetery, Ottoville.
Visitation will be from
6-8 p.m. today and 2-8
p.m. Wednesday at LoveHeitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, where a
scripture service will be held
at 1:45 p.m. Wednesday.
Memorials may be given
to VanCrest, Hearts of
Ohio Hospice, Immaculate
Conception Cemetery, or
Kidney Services of West
Central Ohio.
Condolences may be
expressed to: www.lovefuneralhome.com.

The
Delphos
Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.82 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $117 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833

CorreCtions

The Delphos Herald wants


to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.

BIRTHS
ST. RITAS
A girl was born April
26 to Maria and Brenden
Mitchell of Delphos.
A boy was born April 27
to Julie and David Eickholt
of Fort Jennings.

LOTTERY
CLEVELAND (AP)
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
22-27-55-58-63, Mega
Ball: 11
Megaplier
5
Pick 3 Evening
1-2-5
Pick 3 Midday
2-5-6
Pick 4 Evening
0-9-9-3
Pick 4 Midday
1-3-2-9
Pick 5 Evening
4-9-6-7-0
Pick 5 Midday
2-7-6-6-9
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $60
million
Rolling Cash 5
09-10-13-26-34
Estimated
jackpot:
$120,000

GRAINS
Wheat
Corn
Soybeans

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Herald

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Accessory Avenue
Full Line Of Truck & Auto Accessories
Complete Auto Detailing Inside & Out
Window Tinting & Remote Car Starters Installed
Rhino Spray-In or Penda Drop-In Bed Liners
Ranch & Swiss Truck CapsWeatherTech Liners
B&W Gooseneck, DMI Cushion, & Drawtite
Receiver Hitches & Trailer Harnesses Installed
New, Reconditioned & Used Rims & Tires

602 W. ERVIN ROAD VAN WERT, OHIO

419-238-5902
Lift & Leveling Kits Available

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald 3

STATE/LOCAL

OSU Extension seeks input from residents


Information submitted

VAN WERT What will residents of Van


Wert County be wanting and needing in the
next 20 years? OSU Extension is hoping to
hear from county residents.
The Ohio State University Extension is
one of Ohios great resources with more than
600 faculty and staff and over 30,000 volunteers, serving as the front door to the immense
knowledge, expertise and resources of The
Ohio State University. In 2014, Ohio State
University celebrated the 100th year anniversary of the Smith Lever Act of 1914 which
created agricultural experiment stations and

a cooperative extension service for not only


Ohio State University but more than 70 other
land-grant universities in the United States.
By celebrating the 100-year anniversary of
one of the nations great legislative acts has
provided an excellent opportunity to recognize the historical accomplishments, and to
envision the exciting accomplishments that
will enable celebrating the next 100th years.
A significant component of Ohios celebration in 2014 was a year-long process
focused on the future. The primary work
was centered on futuring asking questions
about and envisioning the long term future of
OSU Extension as well as the role Extension

should play in shaping and positively impacting Ohio and Ohio residents. The goal of the
futuring was to engage broad participation
across the state to identity the most important
emerging issues and potential challenges likely to confront all Ohioans by the year 2035
and how the Extension might best meet those
challenges in the years ahead.
More than 500 people contributed
upwards of 1,200 ideas through a participatory approach which engaged a wide array
of stakeholders both internal and external
to OSU in discussions about the future. The
results of the process resulted in 17 descriptors of trends Ohioans will face by the year

Committee makes donation to school for Smart Boards


Landeck Community Committee member Catherine Heitz, left, presents a $1,000 check to Landeck Elementary
School teachers Christina Grothaus, second from left, Kathy Rostorfer, Brenda Gallmeier, Damon Ulm and Sue
Barclay to help fund Smart Boards for Landeck Elementary School. The Landeck Parents Club has also donated
to this project. The school is excited to have enough funds now to order and install Smart Boards in all Landeck
classrooms. Smart Boards will be demonstrated at a later date. The remainder of the proceeds from the Pork
Chop dinners will be used for the beautification of the Landeck community, according to Heitz. (Submitted photo)

Winners in the 2015 Organ Donor Dash held Sunday, Sara


Bayliff, left, and Anthony Hale, were congratulated by
Miss Portsmouth, Veronica Wende, center. (DHI Media/
Nancy Spencer)
Here are the results of the
2015 Organ Donor Dash:
Females
Age 1-19
Greta Fitch 30:04
Alaina Fitch 30:05
Abby Hensley 33:10
Haley Teman 39:56
Jill Gemmer 39:59
Ages 20-39
Sarah Bayliff 25:06
Julie Mischer 26:07
Shelia Pohlman 28:03
Katie Moots 28:38
Sarah
Hawkey-Wright
28:40

Your
Community
News Source.

Libby Henkener 28:49


Liz Wilson 29:34
Annette Venturella 29:37
Jackie Pachuta 31:36
Mary Kay Schwinnen 32:55
Elizabeth Beaubien 33:25
April Rowl 34:55
April Coulter 37:07
Tiffany Werling 37:32
Tabitha Hager 38:55
Trisha Metzger 40:25
Angela Morris 40:58
Cara
Stombaugh
42:55 In
You
Put Them
Michelle Helmig 42:56
Brooke Taviano 42:58
Carie Martz 43:00

Lindsay Hummer 43:02


Susan Bryan 43:04
Carla Stombaugh 43:06
Erika Blosser 43:08
Nikhil Khanna 43:10
Amanda Rose 43:11
Ages 40-49
Michelle Schick 28:01
Niki Lieurance 28:13
Kim Binkley 28:15
Tracy Sawmiller 28:50
Lisa Ulm 29:10
Lena Springer 33:03
Rose Hesseling 38:30
Angela Courtney 40:15
Lori Williams 40:20
Elizabeth Suever 41:00
Jodi German 42:45
Belinda Fitch 42:58
Rebecca Cooper 46:09
Niki Holcomb 46:11
Ages 50-59
Jackie Blosser 33:01
Terri Spenser 38:59
Ann Moreo 41:50
Deb Looser 43:11
Deb Kundert 46:01
Bonnie Knueve 46:03
Jackie Hines 46:30
Age 60+
Judy Fischer 39:16
www.edwardjones.com
Donna
Phillippe 41:05
Cindy Schwinnen 46:02
Sarinda Volante 46:10
Safe
Males Place.
Ages 0-13
Steven Williams 26:55

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From sports stats to


business news, the
Delphos Herald keeps
you in the local loop.

The Delphos Herald

advisor
today.
financial
financial
advisor
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today.
today.
419-695-0660
419-695-0660

Andy North

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Andy North
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Corey Corey
NortonNorton
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1122
Elida Avenue
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Elida Avenue
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1122Avenue
Elida Avenue
Delphos,
OHAvenue
45833
Delphos,
OH1122
45833
Delphos, OH 45833
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
419-695-0660
Delphos,
Delphos,
OH 45833
OH 45833
Delphos,
Delphos,
OH 45833
OH 45833
.

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www.delphosherald.com | 419-695-0015 ext. 122


405 N. Main St. | Delphos, OH 45833
OPR-1850-A

Cole Binkley 31:50


Noah Heiing 33:20
JT Taviano 33:45
Dylan Hummer 43:02
Landon Hummer 43:02
Ages 14-19
Anthony Hale 17:20
Grant Csukker 22:41
Connor Knippen 22:48
Lucas Metcalfe 26:59
Ages 20-29
Brandon Perrine 23:29
Dustin Walzol 26:36
Justin Werling 31:33
Jacob Hager 46:30
Andrew Rowe 46:30
Ages 30-39
Tom Pseekos 21:30
Brandon Schick 22:51
Matt Dillon 24:44
Nathan Bayliff 26:07
George Venturella 26:37
Ages 40-49
Dave German 20:41
Dave Stemen 21:28
Mike Blosser 26:40
Brian Helmig 28:02
Ages 50-59
Ron Bonifas 19:34
Ron Moots 27:22
Jim Drury 31:30
Richard Suever 37:29
Terry Knebel 39:29
Mark Hummer 43:02
60+
Kevin Dukes 20:59
Tom Brenneman 43:04

Member SIPC

00118201

Results from the 2015 Organ Donor Dash

2035. Industry experts studied and researched


these trends ultimately composing a series of
research summaries to further articulate the
identified trends and issues also addressing
the implications they have for the future.
Using the results from the state-wide initiative, the Van Wert County Extension office
is launching a county-wide needs assessment
to identify the top trends citizens of Van Wert
County feel they will be facing by the year
2035 and the role the local extension office
should play in shaping and positively impacting the residents of Van Wert County. To
complete the short survey, please visit http://
go.osu.edu/vanwertextension

4 The Herald

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

The Next Generation

Flying Squirrels take first at engineering showcase


INFORMATION SUBMITTED

teams, The Flying Squirrels,


placed first in the Best
Engineering and Innovation category out of 35 teams from the
Columbus and Lima campuses.
In the Best Performance division,
Team Ward made it to the final
round of 15 at the competition.
Both teams were chosen from
nine teams in Limas first-year
engineering courses to compete

Two teams of first year engineering students at The Ohio


State University at Lima competed in the Engineering Education
Innovation Centers Advanced
Energy Vehicle (AEV) Showcase
on Mon., April 20, 2015, on the
Columbus campus.
One of Ohio State-Limas

in the showcase. University-wide,


nearly 400 teams of students from
first-year sections competed to
enter the showcase. Each team
consisted of 3-4 students.
The goal of the project is to
develop a vehicle that minimizes
the amount of energy used, runs
autonomously and is aesthetically
pleasing. This year, students were
tasked with creating an AEV that

would be used at Jurassic Park as


part of a monorail transportation
system that moves visitors safely via a green, energy-efficient
and cost-effective system. Lima
students were able to test their
vehicles on a track that was set
up in the Physics Lab. The teams
developed their projects with two
categories in mind: best-performing and best-engineered vehicle.

Students on the Flying


Squirrels team include Jacob
Yahl,
Spencerville;
Peter
Seffernick, Celina; and Ryan
Svenson, North Lewisburg. Team
members on Team Ward were
William Metzger, Troy; Alex
Teffenhardt, Ottawa; Ryan Greve,
Wapakoneta; and Drew Netts, St.
Paris.

From the Vantage Point

Vantage SkillsUSA Medal Winners include, from left, Brandon Kimmet (Ottoville), Chris
Bauer (Paulding), Cole Ketchum (Parkway), Jeremiah Dealey (Crestview), and Nick
Grote (Ottoville). (Photo submitted)

St. Johns Elementary second-graders recently submitted poster designs for the
Allen County Engineers Poster Contest. The winners received various games as
prizes. Kierstin Jackson, front left, received first place, Isaiah Freewalt won second place and Kennedy Sterling placed third. They are shown with Allen County
Engineers Scott Little, back left, and Ron Meyer. (Submitted photo)
Columbus;Reliable Plumbing & Heating;A00238;3.42x7(15Sp-early)

Pathfinders to
make flower
pellets Thursday

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p-Early.indd 9

DELPHOS Pathfinders of
Delphos held a meeting on April
22 at the Delphos Coons Club.
After attendance was taken,
Marie Mueller did a Health
Report on Why should I stay
Active. Then Rebecca Violet
did a Safety Report on Nature
Safety.
With getting our projects
together we are now starting into
demonstrations. First to give a
demonstrations was Sophia
Wilson, Lucy Bonifas, Jordan
Miller, Derek Jewell, and Avery
Mercer.
Next we discussed our Service
Project: Making Flower Pellets at
6 p.m. Thursday at the Delphos
Area Art Guild if you are able to
make it, if it is not completed we
will meet again on May 7 same
time and place.
It is that time of year again to
start selling our Chicken BBQ
dinner tickets. If you are interested in selling or buying tickets
please let Sue Hempfling know. It
is from 3:30-7 p.m. June 9 at the
Van Wert County Fairgrounds.
Tickets are $8.50.

The Delphos
Herald ... Your
No. 1 source for
local news.

Vantage students medal in


SkillsUSA State competition
Information Submitted
VAN WERT The past few weeks have
been incredibly busy for Vantage students
competing in SkillsUSA. A big shout goes
out to all the competitors: Cole Ketchum
(Parkway) who placed second in the CNC
Turning contest, the senior Industrial
Mechanics team of Nick Grote (Ottoville) and
Jeremiah Dealey (Crestview) who took second
place in the Mechatronics contest, and to the
senior Electricity team of Brandon Kimmet
(Ottoville) and Chris Bauer (Paulding) who

Honor Roll

Ottoville High School

Information Submitted

Seniors
All As
Anna Bendele, Chelsey
Boecker, Megan Lambert,
Haley
Landwehr
and
Elizabeth Luersman.
Honor roll
Joel Beining, Morgan
Beining, Colin Bendele, Kyle
Bendele, Austin Honigford,
Ryan
Kimmet,
Brandt
Landin, Annie Lindeman,
Wesley Markward, Trent
Miller, Tyler Roby, Robyn
Turnwald, Joseph Van Oss,
Courtney Von Sossan and
Lyndsey Wannemacher.
Juniors
All As
Alena Horstman and
Nicole Kramer.
Honor Roll
Erica Brickner, Jennifer
Burgei, Madalyn Herman,
MaKayla Hoersten, Jasmine

Anytime,
Anywhere!
2/6/15 8:31 AM

Your 24/7 Access To The Local News You Want

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Delphos
The

placed second in Robotics and Automation.


Other contestants included Carpentry
junior Bradley Rice (Fort Jennings) who
placed fourth in the Cabinetmaking contest
and Health Technology junior Bianka Robach
(Continental) who competed in the Nurse
Assisting contest, Derek Schroeder (Kalida),
who placed 10th in the CNC Milling contest,
Corey Booher (Parkway), who placed fifth in
the Collision Repair Technology contest, and
Tyler Foust (Delphos Jefferson) who placed
15th in the Automotive Service Technology
contest.

heralD

Telling the Tri-Countys Story Since 1869

www.delphosherald.com

Jones, Carly Kortokrax,


Isaiah Miller, Nathaniel
Ricker, Brendon Schnipke
and Rudy Wenzlick.
Sophmores
All As
Maizee
Brinkman,
Madison Knodell, Brooke
Mangas, Alexis Thorbahn
and Rebecca Violet.
Honor roll
Michaela Byrne, Emitt
German, Bryce Hoehn, Alicia
Honigford, Cody Kemper,
Eric Von Sossan and Thomas
Waldick.
Freshmen
All As
Megan Burgei, Abigail
Hilvers, Emily Landin,
Bethany Maag, MaKayla
Miller, Brittany Schleeter,
Brendan Siefker
Honor roll
McKenna Byrne, April
Horstman, Katlyn Kelch,
Cassandra Kemper, Derek
Kemper, Jonathan Knippen,
Karie Ladd, Bridget Landin,
Kara Landin, Julia Langhals,
Zane
Martin,
Amber
Miller, Joshua Sarka, Andy
Schimmoeller,
Madicyn

Schnipke, Lindsay Schweller,


Brendon Stoner and Nicole
Williams.
Eighth grade
All As
Cameron
Calvelage,
Ethan Geise, Haley Hoersten,
Kasey Knippen and Quinley
Schlagbaum.
Honor roll
Madison
Averesch,
Hunter Boecker, Kambrie
Edelbrock, Olivia Gamble,
Brynlee Hanneman, Ashley
Herman, Dylan Kemper,
Zachary Knippen, Jonah
Mansfield, Chaz Spencer and
Carson Stoner.
Seventh grade
All As
Kylee Hoersten, Trevor
Horstman, Elijah Knodell,
Ashlee Landin, Halle Landin,
Brendan Niemeyer and Evan
Turnwald.
Honor Roll
Taylor Beining, Dylan
Byrne, Andrew Fisher, Nolan
German, Zachary Herman,
Hannah Hoehn, Kyle Looser
and Joseph Miller.

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Engineers visit second grade

www.delphosherald.com

LANDMARK

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

The Herald 5

COMMUNITY

Welcoming a late spring Blood drive nets 59 units


with baby ducks, rhubarb
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

BY LOVINA EICHER

Delphos Senior
Citizens Center

CALENDAR OF
EVENTS

TODAY
9 a.m. - noon Putnam
County Museum is open, 202 E.
Main St. Kalida.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
Noon Rotary Club meets
at The Grind.
6 p.m. Shepherds of Christ
Associates meet in the St. Johns
Chapel.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns
Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-In,
924 E. Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11 a.m.-4 p.m. Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the St.
Johns High School parking lot,
is open.

If we thought spring weather was here


to stay, we were wrong. Today the temperature is in the mid-30s, and we are having snow flurries all morning. The wind is
so cold.
All is quiet here
at the Eichers.
Everyone is gone
for the day. I did
the morning work,
mopped the floors
and am folding
laundry. Im hoping to make butter
yet before the girls
get home from
work. Susan wants
to bake sugar
cookies
when
she comes home.
These
cookies
have buttermilk as one of the ingredients,
so I thought Id make butter so we have
some.
Susans last day at the RV factory is
Friday. She wants to take cookies to work
to treat her co-workers. On Monday she
will start working for nephew Emanul. He
has a woodworking shop and has quite a
few employees.
Lovina and Kevin were really excited on Saturday. Daughter Susans friend
Mose bought them each a little baby duck.
They named them Donald and Daisy and
have had so much fun taking care of them.
They keep them in a box in front of the
coal stove in the basement. I hardly ever
hear them. They arent as noisy as the
little chicks that we have had in the house
already. This is the first time we have had
ducks, so the children are eager to see how
they will be for pets when they get older.
Once the weather warms up they can move
them out to the barn.
Congratulations to nephew Levi and
Barbara! We received an invitation to their
May 14 wedding. Levi is sister Leah and
Pauls son. I will be a cook at their wedding. They would like the cooks to wear
royal blue dresses. It looks like I will get
another new dress.
I really need to get to my sewing. Son
Benjamin could use more work pants. I
have several cut out for him but need to
sew them. Once I get started it wont take
long. Pants are easy to put together and

sew.
Everything has been so busy this spring
that my husband Joe hasnt had much time
for fishing. Son Benjamin went fishing
Friday evening with Mose and two of his
brothers. Saturday evening Benjamin and
Joseph went fishing for a few hours
after the work was
done for the day.
T i m o t h y
( d a u g h t e r
Elizabeths friend)
bought a bigger
place and is in the
process of selling his. He has a
bigger and newer
house and more
acreage on the new
place. He has some
woods on the property, and a river
runs behind it. We want to help him move
once hes ready.

DELPHOS A recent blood drive held at the Knights of


Columbus hall netted 59 units.
Those reaching milestone donations included: Mary Massa
five gallons; Chuck Shumaker 17 gallons; and James
Gable 19 gallons.
Canteen workers were Dianna Ireland, Eloise Shumaker,
Rita Wrasman, Sandy Talboon, Judy Williams and Marilyn
Sickels.
The next blood drive at the K of C hall is set for June 3.

April 29
Raymond Steven Zenz
Jim Hammons

Happy
Birthday

April 30
Samantha Vermule
Rachel Pohlman
Robin Hodgson
Jody Pfoff
Breanne Carder
Emily Ostendorf

See KITCHEN, page 14

THRIFT SHOP VOLUNTEERS


APRIL 30-MAY 2
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Doris Brotherwood, Sandy
Hahn, Joyce Day, Eloise Shumaker and Diane Kimmett.
FRIDAY: Diana Mullen, Doris Brotherwood, Eloise
Shumaker, Kay Meyer, Delores German and Dorothy Hedrick.
SATURDAY: Patti Thompson, Norma VonderEmbse, Joyce
Day and Helen Kimmet.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 3-7 p.m. Thursday; 11 a.m.-4
p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Barb Haggard
at the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

you want to see your kids read


more, let them see YOU read more.
If

Lovinas children were thrilled to welcome


two baby ducks to the household, their
first experience with ducklings. (Submitted
photo)

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6 The Herald

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

Bearcats win wild one Mikesell fans 11 as St. Henry downs Jays
versus Musketeers
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor

jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

FORT JENNINGS You


couldnt have asked for a better afternoon to play baseball
than Tuesdays brilliant and warm weather brought to wear.
That didnt mean it
wasnt a wild game
between Fort Jennings
and Spencerville at
Fort Jennings Village
Park.
The
visiting
Bearcats amassed 17 hits, 10
bases-on-balls and three hit
batters to pound the
Musketeers 21-8 in
non-league action.
It began in the top
of the first frame as
the Bearcats (8-8) send
11 batters to the dish,
chasing Musketeer
starter Alex Sealts
after nine of them and two
outs. They compiled two hits,
both for runs batted in: a single by Mitchell Youngpeter
that plated leadoff man Jaret
Montenery (hit by pitch) and
a double by Thad Ringwald
(Youngpeter). They added a
sacrifice fly by Luke Carpenter
(Ringwald) and four walks
one with the bases loaded
to David Wisher that scored
Nick Freewalt and a 2-base
error on a Montenery fly ball
that greeted reliever Connor
Stechschulte that plated Brady
Becker, Nolan and Wisher for
a 7-0 edge.
The Musketeers (3-12)
responded with five of their
own sending 10 to the dish
in the home half against
starter Freewalt. They had four
hits, including a 2-run double
by Austin Kehres (Connor
Stechschulte and Sam Vetter)
that made it 7-5 and run-scoring knocks by Brandon
Wehri (Kyle Hellman) and
Stechschulte (Mark Metzger).
An error in between allowed
Wehri to come home.
The Black Attack added
three more in the top of the
second on two walks (Freewalt
and Carpenter), a wild pitch
and three hits: RBI singles by
Becker (Freewalt) and Justin
Thierry (Becker). A Nolan
sac fly scored Carpenter for a
10-5 advantage.
Spencerville made it 11-5
in the upper fourth on a leadoff double to center by Becker,
a fielders-choice grounder to
third that saw Kehres catch
Becker too far off second for
the first out, a stolen base and
two wild pitches.
The visitors made it 12-5 in
the top of the fifth on a leadoff
single by Red Wood, a single
by Youngpeter, a forceout at
second by Ringwald and a sac
fly to right by Freewalt.
The Orange and Black
got three back in the home
half against reliever Nolan.
With one out, Ryan Hoersten
beat out an infield hit to the
hole at short and moved up
on a groundout by Austin
Luebrecht.
Back-to-back
errors on a Luke Trentman
pop-up and a Hellman grounder scored Hoersten and put
runners on the corners. After
a Hellman steal, Metzger
slapped a 2-run double to
left center for a 12-8 deficit.
However, he was picked off

base by Nolan for the third


out.
Spencerville sent 11
more to the dish in the sixth
against third Musketeer hurler
Trentman, scoring five: two
free passes, two hit batters
and four hits, including a 2-run single by
Becker (Youngpeter
and Ringwald) and
RBI knocks by Wood
(Carpenter)
and
Youngpeter (Wisher).
Another run came
home earlier on a wild
pitch (Wood) as the visitors built a 17-8 margin.
The guests had 10 more
bat in the top half
of the seventh,
plating four more.
They had a walk,
four hits, including
an RBI double by
Youngpeter (Wisher)
and after two
errors had allowed
Wood and Youngpeter to
score a run-scoring knock
by Thierry (Freewalt) that
made it 21-8.
Spencerville came ready
to play and we did not,
Musketeer head coach Eric
Schwab observed. They are
a good young team on the rise
and give them all the credit.
Fort
Jennings
visits
Jefferson tonight.
That first inning was
crazy; there were 12 runs
scored by both teams and that
is more than we usually have
in a game, Spencerville head
coach Troy Montenery said.
For us, we kept adding on.
We put the ball in play or
showed a lot of discipline at
the plate; we only struck out
four times. We ran the bases
with aggression and well; I
will take some mistakes there
if they are because of that
attitude. We got a good relief
performance from Nolan
tonight.
Spencerville is at Paulding
Thursday.

SPENCERVILLE (21)
Jaret Montenery cf 2-1-0-0, Red
Wood cf 3-3-2-1, Mitchell Youngpeter
c 6-3-4-3, Thad Ringwald rf 5-2-2-1,
Nick Freewalt p/2b 2-3-0-1, Brady Becker
1b 4-2-3-3, Luke Carpenter 3b 3-2-2-1,
Hunter French pr 0-1-0-0, Justin Thierry
cf 5-0-2-2, Brady Nolan 2b/p 2-1-0-1,
Logan Rex ph 2-0-0-0, David Wisher ss
3-3-2-1. Totals 37-21-17-14.
FORT JENNINGS (8)
Luke Trentman lf/p 3-1-0-0, Kyle
Hellman rf/cf 4-2-0-0, Mark Metzger c
4-1-4-2, Brandon Wehri ss 3-1-1-1, Alex
Sealts p/3b 1-0-0-0, Connor Stechschulte
p 2-1-1-1, Sam Vetter 1b 3-1-0-0, Aaron
Sealts 2b 3-0-0-0, Austin Kehres 3b 2-01-2, Ryan Hoersten ph/lf 2-1-1-0, Zach
Finn cf 0-0-0-0, Austin Luebrecht ph/rf
3-0-0-0, Collin Wieging ph 1-0-0-0. Totals
31-8-8-6.
Score by Innings:
Spencerville 7 3 0 1 1 5 4 - 21
Ft. Jennings 5 0 0 0 3 0 0 - 8
E: Youngpeter, Freewalt, Becker,
Carpenter, Wisher, Hellman, Hoersten,
Finn; DP: Spencerville 1; LOB:
Spencerville 11, Fort Jennings 9; 2B:
Metzger 3, Youngpeter, Ringwald,
Becker, Kehres; SB: Montenery,
Ringwald, French, Hellman, Wehri; POB:
Metzger (by Freewalt); SF: Freewalt,
Carpenter, Nolan.
IP H R ER BB SO
SPENCERVILLE
Freewalt (W, 2-1)
3.2 6 5 2 2 2
Nolan
3.1 2 3 0 2 3
FORT JENNINGS
Al. Sealts (L, 0-2)
0.2 2 7 4 4 1
Stechschulte
4.1 7 5 5 3 1
Trentman
2.0 8 9 5 3 2
WP: Stechschulte 3; HBP: Montenery
(by Al. Sealts), Wisher (by Trentman),
Carpenter (by Trentman), Vetter (by
Freewalt), Aa. Sealts (by Nolan); BB:
Freewalt 3, Becker 2, Trentman 2,
Ringwald, Carpenter, Thierry, Nolan,
Wisher, Wehri, Stechschulte; PitchesStrikes: Freewalt 83-55, Nolan 69-38;
Al. Sealts 36-14, Stechschulte 70-44,
Trentman 78-38.

By LARRY HEIING
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

ST. HENRY The St. Johns Blue


Jays traveled to Redskin country Tuesday
night for a Midwest Athletic
Conference showdown against St.
Henry.
Ryan Mikesell struck out 11 as
the Redskins scalped St. Johns
7-0.
The pre-game festivities had
the feel of a professional baseball
game as the Redskins wore 2003
throwback uniforms from their
state championship season.
In addition to the beautiful field at the
Wally Post Athletic Complex, St. Henry
had a ceremonial first pitch, a young fanbased national anthem and a bargain price
on peanuts.
Mikesell sent St. Johns down in order
in the first with one strikeout.
Blue Jay starter Eric Vogt retired the
first two batters and appeared to be out
of the inning when St. Johns committed
their first error of the game on a Andrew
Lundvall grounder. Lundvall stole second
base and came home on a single by Derek
Lange as
St. Henry drew first blood. Blue Jay
catcher Buddy Jackson threw out Lange
on a steal attempt for the third out of the
inning.
The St. Johns defense made its second
error in the next inning to put runners on
the corners with only one out. After Vogt
struck out Mitch Dorner, the Jays defense
notched the final out of inning with a
throw-out as second baseman Aaron
Reindel threw out the St. Henry base-run-

INFORMATION SUBMITTED
Lady Green win pitchers
duel with Jeffcats
OTTOVILLE Jefferson came within a whisker of knocking off Northwest
Conference foe Bluffton Monday night
on the road.
The Lady Wildcats had another chance
to grab a road win on a brilliant Tuesday
afternoon as they headed to Ottoville for
a non-league tussle with the Lady Big
Green.
Alas, for the second game in a row,
they lost a heart-breaker: 3-1.
Courtney Von Sossan outdueled Claire
Thompson in the matchup.
Thompson ceded only three hits but
of the three runs she gave up, none were
earned as the defense committed four miscues behind her.
Von Sossan gave up four hits; the
Green and Gold had one error.
Thompson was riding a 1-0 lead into
the bottom of the sixth inning when the
Lady Big Green put up three runs in the
fateful frame and Von Sossan shut the
guests down in the home seventh to get
the victory.
Jefferson returns to league action this
evening in a makeup game at Spencerville
(postponed from April 20), with first pitch
at 5 p.m.

OTTOVILLE 3, JEFFERSON 1
JEFFERSON (1)
ab r h rbi
Sarah Thitoff 3 0 0 0, Claire Thompson 2 0 0
1, Jessica Pimpas 3 0 1 0, Madison Jettinghoff 3
0 1 0, Kaylin Hartsock 3 0 0 0, Dani Harman 3 0
1 0, Sam Branham 3 0 1 0, Sophia Wilson 2 1 0
0. Totals 25 1 4 1.
OTTOVILLE (3)
ab r h rbi
T. Boecker 3 1 1 0, H. Landwehr 3 0 0 0 A.
Horstman 3 1 2 0, Shayla Rice 3 0 0 0 A. Hilvers
3 1 0 1, M. Brinkman 3 0 0 0, B. Scheeter 3 0 0
0, C. Von Sossan 2 0 0 0, R. Turnwald 2 0 0 0 J.
Burgei 2 0 0 0. Totals 24 3 3 1.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 - 1
Ottoville 0 0 0 0 0 3 x - 3
E: Hartsock 2, Rice, Wilson, Scheeter. LOB:
Jefferson 6, Ottoville 3. Sac: Thitoff, Thompson.
SB: Jettinghoff, Wilson, Pimpas, Horstman,
Boecker.
IP H R ER BB SO HR
JEFFERSON
Thompson (L)
6.00 3 3 0 0 7 0
OTTOVILLE
Von Sossan (W)
7.00 4 1 1 1 4
0
PB: Jettinghoff 2, Brinkman. SO: Brinkman 2,
Von Sossan 2, Rice, Wilson, Pimpas, Branham,
Burgei, Scheeter, Landwehr. BB: Wilson.
--------------

Ottoville pounds Spartans in baseball


LIMA Fresh off a riveting 3-2
10-inning triumph over archrival Fort

ner with a bullet to Jackson at the plate.


Meanwhile, Mikesell cruised through
the Blue Jay lineup as he retired all nine
batters he faced in the first three innings
with four punch-outs.
The Redskins added another run in the
third inning after Blake Hoying
walked and came around on a
2-out double by Lundvall to give
St. Henry a 2-0 lead.
St. Johns finally got a
base-runner in the fifth inning as
Vogt slapped a single to center
field. Mikesell went to work with
a strikeout and the St. Henry
defense ended the inning with a
double play to quiet the uprising by the
Jays.
Jackson has been making a lot of
noise at the plate lately with his bat but
he displayed his talents behind in the
plate in the fifth inning. Mitch Stammen
reached with a 1-out single to center and
was thrown out by Jackson attempting
to steal. Josh Osterholt walked and the
Redskins continued to run wild on the
basepaths even though Jackson already
recorded a pair of knockouts in the game.
The St. Johns catcher may have gotten
the Redskins to raise the white flag by
nailing Osterholt with his cannon of an
arm for the third out.
Jorden Boone led off the sixth inning
with a drive to right field that was hauled
in on a nice play by St. Henrys Lundvall.
Other than Vogts hit, this was the first
time that the Jays got the ball in the air to
the outfield so far against Mikesell. The
basketball
standout-turned-pitcher struck out the
next two St. Johns batters to end the
inning.

After a pitching duel for the first 5


innings, the Redskins stampeded with five
runs in the bottom of the inning to put the
game away.
Mikesell faced the minimum of 21 batters in the game and allowing only one hit
along with the 11 Ks. St. Henry (11-4) had
seven hits in the game, including three by
DJ Kunkler with three bunts.
The Jays were playing their sixth road
game in a row and fall to 7-10 on the
season.
St. Johns will face another conference
foe as they return home to Stadium Park
and welcome New Knoxville to town on
Thursday.

Jennings the night before, one might have


expected the Ottoville baseball team to be
a little down when they headed to Lima
Senior Tuesday afternoon for non-league
action.
The Big Green faithful neednt have
worried.
They rebounded quite nicely and
smacked the Spartans 13-2 in five innings.
The Big Green only had five hits but
they were the beneficiaries of five Spartan
errors.
Kyle Bendele tossed a 3-hitter, walking
three and fanning 11.
Ottoville hosts Wayne Trace today.

Trevor Anderson 4 0 1 0, Jake Sevitz 3 1 1


2, Blake Casady 4 0 2 0, Spencer Caudill 1 0 1
1, Chase Wilder 4 1 0 0, William Kleffner 2 0 2
1, Taylor Fickel 3 1 0 0, Tyler Hall 2 0 0 0, Jacob
Hixenbaugh 1 0 0 0, Justin Peake 2 2 0 0, Alex
Lehman 1 1 0 1, *Landon Demoss 0 1 0 0, *Kyle
Kaplan 0 1 0 0. Totals 27 8 7 5.
ELIDA (0)
Austin Morrison 2 0 1 0, Logan Alexander 3
0 0 0, Adam Purdy 3 0 0 0, Travis Watkins 3 0 0
0, Owen Anderson 2 0 0 0, Cam Moore 1 0 0 0,
Derek Snider 2 0 1 0, Patrick Brockert 1 0 0 0,
Jared Blymyer 3 0 0 0, Garrett Brinkman 2 0 1 0,
Josh Bull 2 0 0 0. Totals 24 0 3 0.
Score by Innings:
Shawnee 220 001 3 8
Elida
000 000 0 0
E: Bull, Holcomb. LOB: Shawnee 10, Elida 4.
2B: Kleffner. Sac: Lehman. SB: Lehman, Sevitz.
IP H R ER BB SO HR
SHAWNEE
Sevitz (W)
7.00 3 0 0 1 5 0
ELIDA
Bull (L)
6.00 6 5 4 4 2 0
Watkins
1.00 1 3 3 1 1 0
HBP: Kleffner 2, Lehman, Sevitz, Fickel,
AndersonPB: Alexander. WP: Sevitz, Bull. SO:
Hall, Casady, Fickel, Anderson, Alexander,
Bull, Brinkman. BB: Peake 2, Lehman, Sevitz,
Hixenbaugh, Morrison.

LOCAL ROUNDUP

OTTOVILLE 13, LIMA SENIOR 2 (5 innings)


Ottoville
ab r h rbi bb so lob
N Moorman 2 3 0 1 2 0 3, J Fanning 3 2 2 1 0
1 2, B Boecker 1 2 0 2 1 0 3, J Vanoss 2 1 0 0 2
0 2, T Miller 1 1 1 3 1 0 2, B Schnipke 3 1 1 2 0 0
3, B Seibert 3 1 0 1 1 1 4, J Beining 4 1 1 1 0 1 4,
K Bendele 1 1 0 0 3 1 1. Totals 20 13 5 11 10 4 8.
Lima Senior
ab r h rbi bb so lob
Morris 3 0 1 0 0 1 0, Burkholder 2 1 0 0 1
2 1, Shoemaker 3 0 0 0 0 2 2, Collins 2 1 2 1
0 0 0, Lutz 1 0 0 0 1 1 1, McDonald 2 0 0 0 0 1
2, Nuckles 1 0 0 0 1 1 0, Bolden 2 0 0 0 0 2 3,
Wilcutt 2 0 0 0 0 1 3. Totals 18 2 3 1 3 11 5.
Score by Innings:
Ottoville
2 4 0 1 6 - 13 5 1
Lima Senior 1 0 0 1 0 - 2 3 5
OTTOVILLE 1B: Fanning 2, Schnipke,
Beining. 2B: Miller. TB: Fanning 2, Miller 2,
Schnipke, Beining. SF: Boecker 2, Miller. SB:
Boecker 2, Schnipke 2, Fanning, Miller, Beining.
CS: Seibert.
LIMA SENIOR 1B: Collins 2, Morris. TB:
Collins 2, Morris. SB: Burkholder.
PITCHING
IP H R ER BB SO HR
Ottoville
K Bendele (W)
5.0 3 2 2 3 11 0
Lima Senior
Burkholder (L)
2.0 2 6 2 3 0 0
McDonald
2.2 3 7 6 7 3 0
Dudek
0.1 0 0 0 0 1 0
HBP: McDonald 2, Burkholder. P-S: Bendele
86-57, Burkholder 59-31, McDonald 83-35,
Dudek 3-3.

Sevitz twirls 3-hit shutout versus Elida


ELIDA Shawnees Jake Sevitz stifled Elida Tuesday afternoon, tossing a
3-hit shutout as the Indians rolled up an
8-0 Western Buckeye League baseball
triumph at Ed Sandy Memorial Field.
Sevitz walked one and fanned five.
He also helped his cause at the plate
with two runs batted in, while Blake
Casady and Williams Kleffner each had
a pair of hits. Kleffner was also hit by a
pitch twice.
Elida is at Kenton for another WBL
clash Friday.
SHAWNEE 8, ELIDA 0
SHAWNEE (8)
ab r h rbi

St. Johns (0)


ab-r-h-rbi
Austin Heiing cf 3-0-0-0, Seth Linder 3b
3-0-0-0, Jaret Jackson c 3-0-0-0, Eric Vogt
p 3-0-1-0, Jesse Ditto 1b 2-0-0-0, Jacob
Youngpeter 1f 2-0-0-0, Jorden Boone rf 2-0-00, Josh Warnecke ss 2-0-0-0, Aaron Reindel
2b 2-0-0-0. Totals: 21-0-1-0.
St. Henry (7)
ab-r-h-rbi
Mitch Stamman ss 4-0-1-0, Josh Overholt
cf 3-0-0-0, Andrew Lundvall rf 3-2-1-1, Derek
Lange 1b 2-1-1-1, DJ Kunkler 3b 3-1-3-0,
Ryan Mikesell p 2-1-0-0, Austin Clune c 2-10-0, Mitch Dorner 2b 3-0-1-2, Blake Hoying 1f
2-1-0-0. Totals: 24-7-7-4.
Score By Innings:
St. Johns 0-0-0-0-0-0-0-(0)
St. Henry 1-0-1-0-0-5-x-(7)
2B-Lundvall, Kunkler. CS-Stammen (by
Jackson), Osterholt (by Jackson), Lange (by
Jackson) SB- Hoying, Kunkler. Errors: St.
Johns 4, St. Henry 0. DP: St. Henry. LOB: St.
Johns 1, St. Henry 7.
Pitching
ip-h-r-er-bb-so
St. Johns
Vogt (L)
5.1 6 5 2 2 3
Slate
0.2 1 2 1 0 1
St. Henry
Mikesell (W)
7 1 0 0 0 11
BB-Hoying, Mikesell, Clune. Balk-Vogt,

Swift throws 1-hitter


LEIPSIC Kalida southpaw ace
Austin Swift tossed a 1-hitter against
Leipsic Tuesday and moved to 4-0 with
a 10-0 shutout (6 innings) of the Vikings
at Charles L. Bennett Park.
Swift walked three and fanned 14 in
his gem.
Kalida (13-3) visits Cory-Rawson
Thursday, while Leipsic is at Patrick
Henry Friday.
KALIDA 10, LEIPSIC 0 (6 innings)

Score by Innings:
Kalida: 061 201 = (10) (11) 0
Leipsic: 000 000 = 0 1 2
WP: Swift; LP: Selhorst.
Top hitters: Kalida: Brent Hovest 2-3 (RBI),
Trevor Maag 2-3 (2B, 2 RBI), Trent Gerding 1-2
(2 RBI)
-

Grove stays unbeaten in PCL softball


COLUMBUS GROVE Columbus
Grove improved to 3-0 in the Putnam
County League (13-5 overall) as the Lady
Bulldogs grabbed a 10-0 5-inning softball
victory over Leipsic Tuesday at home.
Hope Schroeder (9-4) tossed a complete-game 3-hitter for the victors.
Grove visits Jefferson Thursday.
COLUMBUS GROVE 10, LEIPSIC 0 (5 inns)
Score by Innings:
Leipsic
00000-031
Col. Grove 3 0 2 1 4 - 10 10 0
WP: Hope Schroeder (9-4; 5 IPs, 3 hits, 4
BBs, 4 Ks); LP: Steingass (4 2/3 IPs, 10 hits,
10 runs, 8 ER, 3 BB, 2 K). Leading Hitters:
Leipsic: Lopez 1-2, Lammers 1-2, Sickmiller 1-2;
Columbus Grove: Hope Schroeder 2-2 (2B),
Sammi Rosengarten 2-3, Brooke Hoffman 2-3.

Cueto dominates Brewers again, Royals score 6 in 7th to overtake Indians


Reds hit 3 homers in 4-2 win
CINCINNATI (AP)
Johnny Cueto gave up three
hits over eight innings during
his latest dominant performance against the Milwaukee
Brewers, and Brandon Phillips
had a two-run homer Tuesday
night, leading the Cincinnati
Reds to a 4-2 victory over the
worst team in the majors.
Joey Votto and Marlon
Byrd added solo homers off
Kyle Lohse (1-4) as the Reds
clinched the series. Half of
their 10 wins this season have
come against Milwaukee.
The Brewers fell to 4-17,
the worst start by a National
League team in 18 years,
according to STATS. The
1997 Cubs had an identical
record. The 2010 Orioles were
the last team in the majors to
open a season 4-17.
Cueto (2-2) gave up homers to Aramis Ramirez and
Ryan Braun as he got his
sixth straight win over the
Brewers. Hes 9-3 career
against Milwaukee, including

8-0 in 11 career starts at Great


American Ball Park.
Aroldis Chapman retired
the side in the ninth for his
fifth save in as many chances,
leaving the Brewers 1-7 on
the road.
Braun was back in right
field after getting the last two
days off as part of a lineup
shake-up. He hit his second
homer of the season, but it
didnt much matter.
Votto ended an 0-for-15
slump with his seventh homer
of the season.
Lohse had allowed a total
of five homers in his first four
starts.
Phillips hit a two-run
homer to center field in the
fourth, his first of the season.
Phillips first 18 hits were
singles, a streak he snapped
with a double on Monday
night during a 9-6 win over
the Brewers.
Four pitches later, Byrd
gave the Reds their first backto-back homers of the season

and a 4-0 lead.


Ramirez led off the fifth
inning with a homer into the
upper deck in left field, the
Brewers first hit off Cueto.
It was Ramirezs sixth career
homer off Cueto the most
by any batter and the first
homer on the road by the
Brewers this season.

TRAINERS ROOM
Brewers: 2B Scooter Gennett
expects to get the five stitches in his left
hand removed on today. He cut it by the
knuckle on a soap holder in the shower
at PNC Park and went on the 15-day DL
on April 21.
Reds: The club is exploring treatment
options, including surgery, for the damaged ligament in Homer Baileys pitching
elbow. He went on the DL on Monday
and will be sidelined for a significant time.
ON DECK
Brewers: Matt Garza (1-3) makes his
first start against the Reds this season.
He went 2-0 with a 0.82 ERA in three
starts against them last year.
Reds:
Right-hander
Michael
Lorenzen makes his major league debut,
filling in for Bailey. The 23-year-old has a
fastball that comes in at nearly 100 mph.
He also throws a slider and a change-up.

Follow Joe Kay on Twitter: http://


twitter.com/apjoekay

CLEVELAND (AP) Kendry Morales


three-run homer capped a six-run seventh
inning and the Kansas City Royals beat the
Cleveland Indians 11-5 on Tuesday night.
Kansas Citys big inning came after
Cleveland had taken a 5-3 lead on Brandon
Moss three-run homer in the sixth.
Alcides Escobars two-run double off
Scott Atchison (0-1) tied the game. Escobar
scored the go-ahead run from second on Mike
Moustakas infield hit and Morales later hit
his third homer of the season to dead center
off Bryan Shaw.
Brandon Finnegan (1-0) picked up his first
career win despite allowing Moss home run.
Alex Gordon homered and drove in two
runs for the Royals, who had a season-high
18 hits.
Cleveland manager Terry Francona
met with his team for a pep talk following
Mondays defeat, but the Indians lost for the
eighth time in 11 games. Cleveland (6-13)
has the worst record in the American League
and the worst home mark (1-6) in the majors.
Trevor Bauer, who missed his scheduled start Saturday because of food poisoning, allowed three runs in six innings, but
Clevelands bullpen gave up eight runs over
the final three innings.
Gordons leadoff homer in the second
gave Kansas City the lead. Michael Bourns
two-run single in the bottom of the inning put

Cleveland ahead. Omar Infantes single tied


the game in the fourth before Gordons single
in the sixth put the Royals ahead.
Kansas Citys go-ahead run in the seventh
came after Escobars double tied the game.
Moustakas high chopper was fielded by first
baseman Carlos Santana, but pitcher Mark
Rzepczynski missed the bag covering first.
Escobar kept running and slid home as catcher Brett Hayes failed to hold on to the ball.
Finnegan, who pitched well down the
stretch for the Royals last season after being
called up from the minors, allowed one run
in one inning. Chris Young, Jason Fraser and
Yohan Pino all worked a scoreless inning.
Royals starter Jeremy Guthrie allowed
four runs in five-plus innings.

TRAINERS ROOM
Royals: RHP Greg Holland (right pectoral strain)
could be activated off the DL when he is eligible on
May 3. The two-time All-Star closer threw 15 pitches
off a mound before the game. Holland played catch
Sunday and Monday with no pain.
Indians: Nick Swisher (surgery on both knees)
continued his minor league rehab at Triple-A
Columbus with two hits and two RBIs as the DH
on Tuesday. He could rejoin the Indians next week.
UP NEXT
Royals: RHP Yordano Ventura, who is appealing
his seven-game suspension for his involvement in a
brawl against the White Sox last week, makes his
fifth start of the season.
Indians: RHP Danny Salazar will try to match a
career-high three-game winning streak. He struck
out a career-best 11 and held Detroit to one run in
seven innings on Friday.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

MONDAY WRAPUP

INFORMATION SUBMITTED
Pirates sneak by Lady Wildcats in softball
BLUFFTON Bluffton scored a run in the bottom of the
sixth inning to sneak past Jefferson 3-2 in Northwest onference
softball action Monday afternoon at Bluffton Village Park.
That tally gave the Lady Pirate starter S. Fruchey the win and
handed Jefferson starter Claire Thompson (3-5) the loss.
Both pitchers went the distance. Thompson (6 innings) ceded
three hits and three runs (2 earned), walking four and whiffing
one.
Fruchey (7 IPs) also gave up three hits and a pair of runs (1
earned), walking none and fanning five.
Shayla Rice was 2-for-3 for the visitors.
We played a great game. Claire Thompson threw a good
game and Madison Jettinghoff had some key stops at third base,
Jefferson coach Josiah Stober observed. This was one of the
best defensive ball games we have played all year. We kept the
ball in front of us and made some really good plays. We didnt
hit the ball exceptionally well today but our defense kept us in
the game. We are improving overall as a team.
Jefferson visits Ottoville today.

JEFFERSON (2)
ab r h rbi
Claire Thompson 3 0 0 0, Madison Jettinghoff 3 0 0 0, Jessica Pimpas
3 0 0 0, Shayla Rice 3 1 2 0, Sam Branham 2 1 0 0, Dani Harman 2 0 0 0,
Kylee Haehn 2 0 1 1, Sarah Thitoff 3 0 0 1, Sophia Wilson 3 0 0 0. Totals
24 2 3 2.
BLUFFTON (3)
ab r h rbi
T. Monday 4 1 1 0, M. Willis 4 0 0 0, K. Barry 3 0 0 1, M. Wilson 2 0 0
0, J. Wilson 3 0 0 0, L. Parkins 2 2 1 0, S. Joseph 3 0 0 0, S. Fruchey 2 0 1
1, A. Parkins 0 0 0 1. Totals 23 3 3 3.
Score by Innings:
Jefferson 010 100 0 2
Bluffton 110 001 x 3
E: Thompson 2, A. Parkins 2, S. Wilson, Branham, Willis. LOB: Jefferson
4, Bluffton 8. 2B: Rice, Monday. Sac: Branham, A. Parkins, Fruchey. SBL.
Parkins 2, Fruchey.
IP H R ER BB SO HR
JEFFERSON
Claire Thompson (L, 3-5) 6.0 3 3 2 4 1 0
BLUFFTON
Fruchey (W) 7.00 3 2 1 0 5 0
HBP: Haehn, Harman. SO: Jettinghoff, S. Wilson, Thompson, Pimpas,
Harman, J. Wilson. BB: A. Parkins 2, M. Wilson, L. Parkins.

Ottoville scores in 10th to edge Fort Jennings in PCL


baseball
OTTOVILLE Ottoville scored a run in the bottom of the
10th frame to edge archrival Fort Jennings 3-2 in Putnam County
League baseball action Monday at Ottoville.
The Big Green scored with two outs in the last of the 10th to
get the win.
The Musketeers return to action tonight at home versus
Spencerville, while the Big Green host Wayne Trace Wednesday.
Fort Jennings
ab r h rbi bb so lob
Hoersten 4 0 0 0 0 1 3, Trentman 4 0 1 0 1 1 0, Metzger 5 1 1 0 0 0 4,
Wehri 4 1 0 0 0 1 2, Sealts 3 0 1 0 1 2 1, Vetter 4 0 2 1 0 1 2, Kehres 4 0
0 0 0 3 4, Stechschulte 4 0 0 0 0 1 2, Luebrecht 1 0 0 0 3 1 0. Totals 33 2
5 1 5 11 11.
Ottoville
ab r h rbi bb so lob
N Moorman 4 1 0 0 1 1 4, J Fanning 3 0 0 0 1 1 1, B Boecker 5 2 2 0 0
1 1, J Vanoss 5 0 0 0 0 1 3, B Schnipke 2 0 1 0 1 0 1, T Warnecke 0 0 0 0
1 0 0, T Miller 4 0 0 0 1 1 3, B Seibert 3 0 1 1 2 1 0, J Beining 3 0 1 0 0 0
1, K Bendele 3 0 0 0 1 1 1. Totals 32 3 5 1 8 7 8.
Score by Innings:
Ft. Jennings 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 - 2 5 3
Ottoville 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 - 3 5 4
FORT JENNINGS 1B: Vetter 2, Trentman, Metzger, Sealts. TB: Vetter
2, Trentman, Metzger, Sealts. SAC: Hoersten. SB: Metzger, Wehri.
OTTOVILLE 1B: Boecker, Schnipke, Seibert, Beining. 3B: Boecker.
TB: Boecker 4, Schnipke, Seibert, Beining. SAC: Fanning, Beining. SB:
Boecker, Schnipke, Warnecke.
PITCHING
IP H R ER BB SO HR
Fort Jennings
Wehri 8.0 4 2 1 6 6 0
Metzger (L) 1.2 1 1 0 2 1 0
Ottoville
J Beining 6.0 4 1 0 4 6 0
N Moorman (W) 4.0 1 1 0 1 5 0
HBP: Metzger, Beining. P-S: Wehri 122-70, Metzger 28-15 WP:
Moorman; Beining 108-57, Moorman 51-32.

Lady Bearcats win in 9th to down Lancers


SPENCERVILLE Spencerville needed nine innings to
down Lincolnview 5-4 in Northwest Conference softball action
Monday at Spencerville.
Spencerville improves to 7-4 (1-2 in the NWC) while
Lincolnview falls to 6-11 (1-3 in the NWC).
The game ended on a walk-off solo home run by Spencerville
freshman shortstop Kara May with two outs in the bottom of the
ninthth inning of a 4-4 tie ball game.
The Lady Bearcats visits Minster tonight, while the Lady
Lancers visit USV Wednesday.

Score by Innings: R H E LOB


Lincolnview 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 - 4 4 3 8
Spencerville 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 - 5 11 5 10
WP: Alex Shumate (5-4; 9 innings pitched, 4 runs-1 earned-4 hits,
9 strikeouts, 5 walks); LP: Makayla Ashbaugh (8 2/3 IPs, 5 R-3 ER-11
H, 4 Ks, o BBs). 2B: Julia Thatcher (L), Alix Hamrick 2 (S), Kara May
(S). HR: Megan Miller (S), Kara May (S).

Ragan to replace Vickers at


MWR for rest of the season
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
David Ragan will move to
Michael Waltrip Racing next
week and finish the season
as the replacement driver for
Brian Vickers.
Ragan has been filling in
at Joe Gibbs Racing for Kyle
Busch since the second week
of the season. Busch is expected to return soon and JGR
has wanted to give 18-yearold development driver Erik
Jones some seat time in a
Sprint Cup car before Busch
comes back.
That frees up Ragan, who
will take over the No. 55
Toyota at Kansas Speedway.
Team co-owner Michael
Waltrip will drive the car
Sunday at Talladega.
Vickers missed the first
two races of the season as he
recovered from heart surgery.
He returned for two races but
was sidelined again in March
with recurring blood clots.
No timetable has been set
for Vickers return.
Life has thrown a lot at
MWR the first part of this racing season but our team has
stood tall and worked through

it, Waltrip said.


He added that the decision
to use Ragan for the rest of
the year was to give the team
and sponsor Aarons some
stability.
Vickers must take blood
thinners and he cant race
while on them because of
the chance of uncontrollable internal bleeding if he
crashed.
Brett Moffitt has driven
six races in place of Vickers
this season. The 22-year-old
is a development driver with
MWR and the team likely
wants to see him in a steady
Truck Series or Xfinity Series
ride rather than rush him into
a Sprint Cup seat. Moffitts
best finish was eighth at
Atlanta in March.
Ragan, meanwhile, has a
fifth-place finish this year in
Buschs car and hell drive it
for a final time this weekend
at Talladega, where he won
in 2013.
Front Row Motorsports
will use Chris Buescher this
weekend at Talladega and
work on filling Ragans old
No. 34 Ford for the rest of the
season.

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^PSSTHPS[OLYZ[TLU[OH[YLZWVUK[V[OPZ
HKHMYLLJVW`VMOPZUL^IVVRSL[

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KSPUN0M[OLWVW\SHYWPSSZKVU[^VYRMVY`V\YLNHYKSLZZVM`V\YHNLVY
TLKPJHSOPZ[VY``V\V^LP[[V`V\YZLSMHUK`V\YSHK`[VYLHK[OPZIVVRSL[
OYZHUKSLH]L`V\YUHTLHUKHKKYLZZVUS`

The Herald 7

Mercers pitching keys


Jeffcats NWC baseball win
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

BLUFFTON Monday afternoon


was a dreary, cloudy day for baseball.
Jeffersons unit didnt mind.
The Wildcats rode a solid start from
Gage Mercer, good defense and a steady
offense to a 9-2 Northwest Conference
victory at Blufftons Village Park.
The visiting Wildcats (6-11, 3-2
NWC) got a 2-spot in the top of the
first against complete-game Pirate starter Matt Bowden. Leadoff batter Jace
Stockwell (3-for-4, HBP, 2 runs, 2 runs
batted in) started with a single and Gaige
Rassman walked. Two wild pitches plated Stockwell and put Rassman at third,
from where he scored on a sacrifice
fly to right by Jacob Pulford for a 2-0
margin.
Bluffton (6-8, 1-4) got those back
against Mercer in the home half with
two down. Austin Bricker singled and
two errors on a pickoff play put him at
third. After Dakota Bricker walked and
swiped second, a wild pitch plated the
former. A rip by Kyle Swank scored D.
Bricker from third for a 2-all tie.
The visitors took the lead for good in
the top of the second. Kurt Wollenhaupt
was hit by a pitch but was erased on
a 5-4-3 double-play grounder. Jacob
Boop walked, Stockwell singled to left
and Rassman got a free pass to load the
bases. Mercer helped his cause with a
sharp 2-run hit up the middle to score
Boop and Stockwell.
Mercer (98 pitches, 61 for strikes) set
down the Pirates in order in the home
half, the start of six in a row.
Nick Fitch was plunked with one
down in the Jefferson third but was
erased on a Wollenhaupt grounder.
Brandan Herron was robbed by a diving
catch in right center from Pirate centerfielder D. Bricker.
With one down in the Delphos fourth,
Stockwell was hit by a pitch and burgled
second. An out later, Mercer worked a
10-pitch base-on-balls but the Wildcats
couldnt score.
A walk to D. Bricker opened the
Bluffton fourth but a Swank line-out to
Stockwell at short doubled him up at
first. Mitchell Ault sharply singled to
left but he was forced for the third out.
Wollenhaupt was safe on a 2-base,
2-out error in the guest fifth and stole
third but remained there.
Bluffton threatened in the home

Jefferson pitcher Gage Mercer helps his cause, following through on his 2-run
single in the second inning Monday at Bluffton. The visiting Wildcats grabbed a
9-2 NWC baseball victory. (DHI Media/Jim Metcalfe)
sixth. James Harrod ripped a hit to left Theyre gaining confidence in what they
and swiped second. An out later, D. are doing.
Bluffton hosts rival Cory-Rawson
Bricker was safe on a dropped pop-up.
However, Mercer bore down and struck today.
Were a young team and weve been
out his sixth and seventh batter to end
up and down. We did answer in the botthe rebellion.
Jefferson broke it open in the visi- tom of the first but then their pitcher settor seventh, batting around. With one tled down, as did Matt, Bluffton coach
gone, Pulford beat out a slow roller to Sam Fruchey acknowledged. We didnt
short and Ryan Bullinger doubled to help ourselves in the seventh defensiveright center. After Fitch was intention- ly. Weve been inconsistent in our ability
ally walked, Wollenhaupt also walked to finish seven innings.
Jefferson hosts Fort Jennings 5 p.m.
to score Pulford. Herron flied out deep
enough to right to plate Bullinger and Wednesday.
move Fitch to third, from where he
JEFFERSON (9)
Jace Stockwell ss 4-2-3-2, Gaige Rassman lf 3-1-0scored on Boops misplayed ground
Gage Mercer p/3b 2-0-1-2, Jacob Pulford 1b 3-1-1-1,
ball; Wollenhaupt was running on the 0,
Ryan Bullinger cf 3-1-1-0, Nick Fitch c 2-1-0-0, Kurt
play and reached third. After Boops Wollenhaupt 3b/2b 2-1-0-1, Brandan Herron dh 3-0-0-1,
thievery put runners at second and third, Brett Mahlie 2b/p 0-0-0-0, Jacob Boop rf 3-2-0-0. Totals
Stockwell slap to left center got both 25-9-6-7.
BLUFFTON (2)
home for a 9-2 edge. Stockwell stole
Brett Rumer ss 3-0-0-0, James Harrod rf 3-0-1-0,
second but was left there.
Austin Bricker 2b 3-1-1-0, Dakota Bricker cf 1-1-0-0,
Reliever Brett Mahlie worked a Kyle Swank dh 3-0-1-1, Tyler McLaughlin 3b 0-0-0-0,
Mitchell Ault 1b 3-0-1-0, Brayden Skilliter lf 3-0-0-0,
2-strikeout seventh to close the game.
Jason Bracy c 3-0-0-0, Matt Bowden p 3-0-0-0. Totals
Gage bulldogged his way through 25-2-4-1.
Score by Innings:
the first two innings and then settled
Jefferson
220 0005-9
down; that is what he does. He began to
Bluffton
200 0000-2
really work his pitches well, Jefferson
E: Mercer, Pulford, Wollenhaupt, A. Bricker,
coach Doug Geary explained. He want- McLaughlin; DP: Jefferson 1, Bluffton 1; LOB: Jefferson
Bluffton 4; 2B: Bullinger; SB: Stockwell 2, Bullinger,
ed to go all seven but we had the oppor- 8,
Wollenhaupt, Boop, Harrod; SF: Pulford, Herron.
tunity to get Brett an inning; Jace was
IP H R ER BB SO
JEFFERSON
warmed up and ready to go just in case.
Mercer (W, 2-2)
6.0 4 2 1 2 7
We played good defense behind our
Mahlie
1.0 0 0 0 0 2
pitchers. At the plate, we added on late;
BLUFFTON
Bowden (L, 2-3) 7.0 6 9 6 7 5
that was good to see. Jacob (Pulford)
WP: Bowden 2, Mercer; HBP: Stockwell (by
isnt the fastest runner but he legged out
Bowden), Fitch (by Bowden), Wollenhaupt (by Bowden);
a hit and that got it started. I like what BB: Rassman 2, D. Bricker 2, Mercer, Bullinger, Fitch
I am seeing from these guys all-around. (intentional), Boop, Wollenhaupt.

Orioles to play White Sox today in closed stadium


Associated Press
BALTIMORE After a
pair of postponements caused
by rioting in Baltimore,
the Orioles and Chicago
White Sox will play today
at Camden Yards in what is
believed to be the first game
without fans in major-league
baseballs 145-season history.
Because of the unsettled
environment in Baltimore,
where rioters burned a drug
store and set police cars
ablaze on Monday night, officials moved the game up five
hours from its original 7:05
p.m. starting time and closed
it to the public.
In addition, Baltimores
Friday-to-Sunday
series
against Tampa Bay was
shifted from Camden Yards
to Tropicana Field in St.
Petersburg, Florida, with the
Orioles remaining the home
team and batting last.
All of the decisions in
Baltimore were driven first by
the desire to insure the safety
of fans, players, umpires and
stadium workers, Baseball
Commissioner Rob Manfred
wrote in an email to The
Associated Press. Only
after we were comfortable
that those concerns had been
addressed did we consider
competitive issues and the
integrity of the schedule.
Although the Orioles

wont be performing in front


of their fans today and will
lose three home games, they
understood the situation and
had no complaints.
Its all about whats best
for the city and the safety of
our people, Orioles manager Buck Showalter said in a
telephone interview with the
AP. The last thing you want
to do is put the fans in harms
way. You have to err on the
side of safety.
The looting and rioting
broke out Monday just hours
after the funeral of Freddie
Gray, a 25-year-old black
man who suffered a fatal spinal cord injury while in police
custody.
Schools were closed
Tuesday and the mayor
imposed a 10 p.m.-to-5 a.m.
curfew. The announcement of
the unique closed-doors game
came after the Orioles postponed games against Chicago
on Monday and Tuesday.
This was Chicagos only
scheduled visit to Camden
Yards. The first two games
will be made up as part of a
doubleheader on May 28.
The Baseball Hall of
Fame and John Thorn, Major
League Baseballs official
historian, said they did not
think there ever had been
a closed-doors big league
game, although there have

been instances in the minor


leagues.
Since 1987, the lowest
attendance has been 746
when the White Sox hosted
Toronto at Comiskey Park
on April 9, 1997, according
to STATS. The New York
Yankees home game against
the White Sox on Sept. 22,
1966, had a listed attendance
of 413.
And now, the White Sox
are on the verge of performing in front of no one.
By moving their week-

end series with the Rays to


Florida, the Orioles are poised
play 78 games at Camden
Yards and 84 on the road.
Tampa Bay, meanwhile,
will have the distinction of
being the visitor in its own
stadium.
Also
Tuesday,
the
Baltimore Ravens to cancel
an NFL draft party for fans
at M&T Bank Stadium on
Thursday night. The team
said the decision was made
out of respect to the curfew.

IF YOU USED THE BLOOD


THINNER XARELTO
and suffered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging,
required hospitalization or a loved one died while
taking Xarelto between 2011 and the present
time, you may be entitled to compensation.
Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

STOCKS

Quotes of local interest supplied by


EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 29, 2015
Description

Last Price

American Electric Power Co., Inc.


58.08
AutoZone, Inc.
693.05
Bunge Limited
86.66
BP p.l.c.
43.48
Citigroup Inc.
53.02
CenturyLink, Inc.
36.78
CVS Health Corporation
101.97
Dominion Resources, Inc.
72.74
Eaton Corporation plc
68.61
Ford Motor Co.
16.06
First Defiance Financial Corp.
34.25
First Financial Bancorp.
17.64
General Dynamics Corporation
133.48
General Motors Company
35.72
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 27.21
Huntington Bancshares Incorporated
10.79
Health Care REIT, Inc.
75.62
The Home Depot, Inc.
110.58
Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
33.76
Johnson & Johnson
100.74
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
62.76
Kohls Corp.
73.25
Lowes Companies Inc.
71.74
McDonalds Corp.
96.83
Microsoft Corporation
49.15
Pepsico, Inc.
94.42
The Procter & Gamble Company
80.42
Rite Aid Corporation
8.13
Sprint Corporation
5.29
Time Warner Inc.
84.98
United Bancshares Inc.
15.00
U.S. Bancorp
42.87
Verizon Communications Inc.
50.55
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
79.10
Dow Jones Industrial Average
18,110.14
S&P 500
2,114.76
NASDAQ Composite
5,055.42

Change

+0.37
+0.67
+0.34
+0.44
+0.22
+0.49
+0.75
+0.17
-0.77
+0.16
+0.25
+0.34
-0.08
-0.06
-0.39
+0.08
-0.10
-0.81
-2.46
+0.16
+0.42
+0.34
-0.10
+0.39
+1.12
-0.07
-0.18
+0.04
+0.03
+0.22
-0.05
+0.31
+0.47
-0.27
+72.17
+5.84
-4.82

8 The Herald

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

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240 Healthcare
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245
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SPENCER
TOWNSHIP
BOARD OF
TRUSTEES

is accepting resumes for the

Fiscal Officer
Position.

Mail resume to:


Allen McMichael
14040 Kolter Rd.
Spencerville, OH 45887
Or drop off at
Township House at:
13080 Kolter Rd.
Spencerville, OH
45887,
M-F, 8am-3pm
Resume deadline:
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interior paint, $68,000.


Call
419-692-8412
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Schrader
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228 N. Main Street, Delphos


Office: 419-692-2249

OPEN HOUSES
Thurs., April 30 6-7p.m.

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114 SUNSET Dr.,


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1243 ERIE, Delphos.
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570

LAWN AND
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Friedrich

Lawn Service
Specializing in

Weed Control & Fertilization


Lawn Fertilization &
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Lawn Mowing
Phone:

419-695-0328 or
419-235-3903

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POHLMAN
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Applications for

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Apply in person

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Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-1931

HELP WANTED

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Looking for a rewarding change in employment?


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will be accepted in person or by mail beginning


May 1st at the plant, 150 Fisher Ave. Van Wert, OH
45891. Pay for the Maintenance Technician starts
at $19.17/hr and the Production Technician starts
at $12.67/hr and will support production on any
of the 3 shifts. Comprehensive benefit package
offered including medical, dental, vision, short
term disability, 401k, vacation and holidays. This
work may include overtime and weekends. Those
interested must also apply online at:
www.federalmogul.com/careers.
High School Diploma or GED; or 10 years
manufacturing experience required.
Applicants will be required to pass a criminal
background check and drug test.
Equal Opportunity Employer Minorities/
Women/Veterans/Disabled
No telephone calls please

670 Miscellaneous
675 Pet Care
680 Snow Removal
685 Travel
690 Computer/Electric/Office
695 Electrical
700 Painting
705 Plumbing
710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding
715 Blacktop/Cement
720 Handyman
Elder
ABBY:725Im
a Care
17-year- me

Mom with secret addiction


is playing dangerous game

419-692-7261

670

MISCELLANEOUS

COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY

419-692-0032
Across from Arbys

r
rde

s Custom C
a

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460

Local primary care office is seeking


a Certified Medical Assistant.
Applicants must be energetic,
compassionate, flexible and like
working in a fast pace environment.
Position is full time with competitive
wages and benefits. Interested
candidates should send resumes to
Times Bulletin
Dept. 122 PO Box 271
Van Wert, Ohio 45891

460 E. Cleveland St., Nice Ranch style home


on corner lot in quiet neighborhood; 3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom, Sunroom and 1 car attached garage. Home includes Central Air,
Gas Fireplace, energy efficient windows and
dry crawl space. Also included are existing
Washer/Dryer, Refrigerator, Stove/Oven. Price
reduced - $76,000.00 Firm. 419-303-8019

EOE/DFWP

655

GESSNERS Mueller Tree


PRODUCE
Service

419-695-0015

FOR SALE BY OWNER

Geise

419-453-3620

Gardeners' Annual Plant


Sale, Saturday, May
2nd, 9am-Noon beside
the Eagle Print building
on Main St. Perennials,
Grasses and much
more. Come early for
best selection.

1340 ROSE Anna St.


Thursday, 5pm-8pm, Friday 9am-5pm, Saturday
8am-10am. Boys & girls 577 MISCELLANEOUS
clothes, newborn-5T.
Toys, bicycles, infant LAMP REPAIR, table or
gear, home decor, and floor. Come to our store.
much more!
Hohenbrink
TV.
419-695-1229
344 WALNUT St.,
O t t o v i l l e . T h u r s - S a t , NICE 2-seat wood swing
4/30-5/2. Clothes: Adult with frame, $25. Call
Women's Scrubs XL, 419-695-8830
Girls 4T-5T, Boys 2T,
Toys, Golf Equipment, 585 PRODUCE
Home Decor, Trailer

4095 DEFIANCE Trail,


Delphos. 4/30-5/1,
Thurs-Fri, 9am-5pm &
A M I S H C O U N T R Y Sat, 5/2, 8am-3pm. Baby
Roofing specializing in & Toddler clothes, baby
metal and shingle roof- items, women's clothes.
ing. Call Henry or Duane Multifamily garage sale.
at 330-473-8989.
6019 KIGGINS Rd., Sat,
5/2, 8am-4pm. MultiFamily Garage Sale.
HOUSE FOR
320
Brand name mens dress
RENT
and casual clothing; wo2 BEDROOM, 1 Bath, men and juniors clothing;
central A/C. 520 Har- misc. household items,
mon, Delphos. No Pets. including TV. Wedding
$445/month Ph. 419- decorations.
695-5006.
628 E. 5th St., Weds-Fri,
4/29-5/1, 10am-4pm,
SEVERAL MOBILE Sa t, 5 /2, 9a m - No o n.
Homes/House for rent. G a r d e n , c o o k w a r e ,
View homes online at h o u s e d e c o r , s m a l l
www.ulmshomes.com or fridge, bikes, Ram truck
inquire at 419-692-3951
side steps, video games.

275

Dear Abby

rts

240 HEALTHCARE

GARAGE SALES/
555
YARD SALES

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122

592 Want To Buy


LAWN, GARDEN,
593 Good Thing To Eat
LANDSCAPING
595 Hay

520 Building Materials

HERALD

Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869

665
AUTOMOTIVE
525 Computer/Electric/Office

Transmission, Inc.

FORT JENNINGS
Community
Garage Sales
Friday, 5/8, 5pm-9pm
Sat, 5/9, 9am-3pm

WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET

TRUCKING INDUSTRY
Lead Clerical
M-F Daytime, Full-time
w/benefits. Flexible duties depending on abilities. Looking for data
entry, D.O.T. Compliance, report generation,
invoicing, payables,
payroll, light accounting
skills. Dispatching considered a plus. Pay to
depend on skill set and
experience. If interested,
please e-mail resume to:
tricountyjobs15@gmail.c
om

345
Vacations
GARAGE
SALES/
350 Wanted To Rent
610
YARD
SALES For Rent
355 Farmhouses
360 Roommates Wanted

DELPHOS
THE

830 Boats/Motors/Equipment
835 Campers/Motor Homes
530 Events
840 Classic Cars
535 Farm Supplies and Equipment
845 Commercial
597 Storage Buildings
DELPHOS
540 Feed/Grain
850 Motorcycles/Mopeds
400 REAL ESTATE/FOR SALE 545 Firewood/Fuel
3838405
Southworth
Road
855 Off-Road Vehicles
600 SERVICES
Acreage and Lots
550
Flea
Markets/Bazaars
860 Recreational Vehicles
605 Auction
Thursday-Friday
410 Commercial8-5
555 Garage Sales
865 Rental and Leasing
610
Automotive
Saturday
8-12
415 Condos
560 Home Furnishings
870 Snowmobiles
615
Business
Services
FarmsNewbornGirls 420
Clothes;
565
Horses,
Tack
and
Equipment
automatic transmission
875 Storage
Childcare
Houses
570 Lawn and Garden Trimming Topping 620
5T, 425
Name
Brand and
Thinning
standard
transmission
880 SUVs
625
Construction
430 Mobile Homes/
575
Livestock
Shoes, Boys
Clothes;Homes differentials
Deadwooding
Trailers
630 Entertainment
DEAR
to be885
there
for me.
Manufactured
577 Miscellaneous
Stump, Shrub & Tree635
Removal
890 Trucks
Farm Services
Newborn-4T,
Musical Instruments
435 VacationName
Property
transfer580
case
old
girl
and
I
caught
my
mom
I
am
furious.
My sister-in-law
Since 1973640 Financial
895 Vans/Minivans
800 TRANSPORTATION
Pet in
Memoriam
Brand,
HighToChair,
440 Want
Buy
brakes 582
& wheel
bearings
butBuy
we have nevShe is a nice woman,
899 Want To
805 remover.
Auto
645 Hauling sniffing nail polish
583 Pets and Supplies
Stroller
with
Carseat
and
500 MERCHANDISE
2 miles north
of Ottoville
925 Legal
Notices
810 want
Auto Parts
andto
Accessories
650 Health/Beauty
585 Produce
er
been
close.
My
house
is a shamobviously
doesnt
me
Bases,
Lots of Toys
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
505 Antiques
and Collectibles
950 Seasonal
815 Automobile Loans
655 Home Repair/Remodeling
586 Sports and Recreation
know because she820
tries
to hideShows/Events
it.
bles (my953
husband
andPriced
I are both
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
510 Appliances
Free & Low
Automobile
588 Tickets
660 Home Service
D E L P515
HO
S MASTER
Auctions
590 Tool and Machinery
825 Aviations
665 Lawn, Garden,
Landscaping
I dont
know what
to do. I dont disabled, he with peripheral artery

555

Ca

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
105
235Announcements
HELP WANTED
110 Card Of Thanks
115 Entertainment
120 APPLY
In Memoriam
TODAY!
125 Lost
And Found is acR&R
Employment
130
Prayers
cepting
applications for
135 School/Instructions
Sanitation,
140 Happy AdsJanitorial,
Machine
Operators and
145 Ride Share

www.delphosherald.com

Specializing in Stock and


Custom Golf Carts
Tim Carder

567-204-3055
Delphos, Ohio

SAFE &
SOUND

DELPHOS

SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?

419-692-6336

Quality

Fabrication & Welding Inc.

419-339-0110

GENERAL REPAIR
SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS

TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM

Larry McClure

5745 Redd Rd., Delphos

930 LEGALS
DELPHOS CITY
Schools
School Bus Bid for
Two (2) 2015, 66-Passenger Conventional
School Bus
Bids Due: May 20, 2015
@ 12:00pm
Office of the Treasurer
Delphos City Schools
Board of Education
234 North Jefferson St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
Phone: Treasurer
419-692-2509

Do just
one thing

by Danny Seo
Does your dog or his
bed have fleas? If you
want to find out naturally, try this trick before going to bed. Fill a
shallow baking dish with
water and a few squirts
of dishwashing soap.
Place the tray near your
dogs bed. Plug in an
LED nightlight and focus the light so its shining right onto the tray of
soapy water. Turn off the
overhead lights and let
the fleas natural instinct
to go toward the light
take over. In the morning, youll know if there
are fleas in your home
if there are dead bugs
floating in the water. The
soapy water coats and
kills them naturally.

know why she would want to do


this. Its something people MY
age would do. I know better than
to do that.
Should I talk to her about it?
Shell probably make up some excuse like she likes the smell. She
sometimes tells me I need to grow
up because I can act silly. But honestly, SHE is the one who needs to
grow up.
I want to help her because I
know what shes doing is not good
for her. But how? -- KNOWS
HER SECRET IN NORTH CAROLINA
DEAR KNOWS: Your mother may have an acetone addiction.
Because you cant convince her to
take your concerns seriously, tell
another adult ASAP whats going
on -- a relative, your father if hes
in the picture, a teacher or counselor at school.
This kind of inhalant addiction
is serious because in high concentrations acetone is a nervous system depressant. This means it can
slow a persons heartbeat, respiration and metabolism, causing a
person to become dizzy, confused
and pass out. It can also damage
the vital organs -- the heart, liver,
kidneys and the bone marrow -and cause cardiac arrest and death.
A support group for the children of addicts such as Alateen
could give you emotional support.
To find one, visit al-anon.org.
DEAR ABBY: My husband
had a heart attack a week ago and
is still in the ICU. I visit him every
day. Yesterday I found out that he
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
had asked his sister to stay with

disease and me after having been


run over by a car) because housework is painful for me. So now,
in addition to the stress of taking
cabs to see him, I have the additional stress and pain of trying to
make the house presentable.
I know my husband meant well,
but I dont want to go through this
in front of an audience. I feel angry and also guilty for being angry. Can you help me put all this
into perspective? -- STRESSED
IN NEW JERSEY
DEAR STRESSED: After
spending a week in an ICU, your
husband may be having concerns
about ever emerging. He may
have suggested his sister come because he was worried about how
you would handle being alone.
That you might be upset because
your home isnt ready to be featured in House Beautiful probably
didnt enter his mind.
However, now that shes coming, be smart. Ask her to help you
with the deferred housework so
the place will be shipshape when
your husband is discharged. If, as
you say, you and your sister-inlaw arent close, her stay with you
may be shorter than planned.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact
Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
COPYRIGHT 2015 UNIVERSAL UCLICK

$156 million for your thoughts

Im sure youve
heard the argument
that if we raise the
minimum wage, the
cost of that raise will
just get passed along
to you, the paying
customer. Youll have
to pay more for your
hamburger,
more
for your clean hotel
room, more for your
convenience at the
convenience store.
I bring this up
because recently, it
was reported that a
television executive
got paid $156 million in 2014. He runs
the company that
owns the Discovery
Channel. Lets call
him David Zaslav.
Lets call him David
Zaslav because thats
his name. And my
question would be,
isnt his salary passed
along to the consumer? Where does that
$156 million come
from, if not from Discoverys advertisers,
who pass along their
rising costs to us?
Why is it OK for
one employee to
pass his salary along
to the consumer, but
not all of them? If
the argument for paying CEOs so well is
that its an incentive,
why is it so good for
CEOs, but not so
good for the rest of
us?
And that, my
friend, is why you

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will never be a CEO.


You obviously havent been to business
school. Because then
you would know
that if the company
didnt pay him so
much, he might quit.
And where on Earth
are they gonna find
somebody else who
would work for $156
million a year, even
if its mostly in stock
options? Oh, yeah -just about anywhere.
Would
David
have quit working
at Discovery Communications, the TV
conglomerate
he
runs, if he only got
paid, say, $75 million a year? Would
he have stomped out
in a snit? Would he
have left for some
other company that
would pay him $156
million? Whoops! I
forgot: There is no
other company that
would pay him $156
million.
Do you think hed
walk away if they
had only offered $35
million a year? Maybe. After all, he does
preside over Shark
Week, and Nik Wallenda walking over
the Grand Canyon
without a net. Show
biz is wacky that way.
But the CEO of Bank
of America, which is
a much, much bigger company than
Discovery,
made
only $14.5 million
last year. The CEO
of Chrysler made
only $38 million. Yet
they bit the bullet
and stayed with their
companies in spite of
the low, low, low pay.
Why, you might
ask, is David getting
paid so much? Im
sure he works hard,
but dont we all? Did
he invent television?
Does he write the
shows? Film them?
Direct them? Did the
guy who runs Bank of
America invent banking? Did the guy who
runs Chrysler invent
the automobile?
Henry Ford actually did invent a car,
and he became fabulously wealthy. You
would hardly call
him a communist.
Yet when other car

Jim Mullen

Mullin

The Village
Idiot

companies were paying their workers a


dollar a day, Ford
raised his workers
pay to $5 a day. Not
only did it keep turnover way down, but
his workers could
suddenly afford to
buy Ford cars.
When the chairman of Starbucks
was on 60 Minutes,
they asked him how
his fast-food company could pay a living
wage to its coffee
pickers, contribute to
its employees health
care costs and chip
in for their college
tuition. His answer
was, basically, Why
do you think a cup of
our coffee costs three
dollars?
This is not communism -- the chairman of Starbucks is
a very wealthy guy
-- and Im not a communist. I think CEOs
should earn as much
as they possibly can;
Id enjoy being fabulously wealthy as
much as the next
guy. But if it makes
sense for the CEO
to be paid well, why
doesnt it make sense
for everyone in the
company to be paid
well -- as much as
possible, rather than
the current trend of
as little as possible?
If the CEO can get
a big raise and stock
options, why cant
everyone?
A rising
tide
should lift all boats,
not just the yachts.
(Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.)
DISTRIBUTED
BY
UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Comics & Puzzles


Zits

Blondie

For Better or Worse

Beetle Bailey

Pickles

Garfield

Born Loser

Hagar the Horrible

Barney Google & Snuffy Smith

Todays
Horoscope
By Eugenia Last

Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS
1 Elegance
6 Like Batman
11 Playground
gear
12 Be unsteady
13 Like some
chats
14 Brisbane
native
15 Fertile soils
16 Dog chow
brand
17 Belafontes
holler (hyph.)
18 Be billed
19 Fair offering
23 Former
Chevy
25 Air rifle (2
wds.)
26 Nurse a
drink
29 Piece of
cake
31 Peculiar
32 Tribute in
verse
33 Flower
segment
34 Legal matter
35 Strapped
for cash
37 Persia,
today
39 Fundraiser,
often
40 Wabash
loc.
41 Possesses
45 -- -ho (avid)
47 Hone a
razor
48 Evens up
51 Lounge
chair
52 Trickery
53 Prepared
the laundry
54 Apply, as
pressure
55 Fiddled idly

2 Race leg
3 Isaac of scifi
4 Paint containers
5 Wool producer
6 Sudden
ouster
7 Take in
8 Sesame
Street channel
9 Cotton gin
name
10 Billy -- Williams
11 Hawked
12 Corduroy rib
16 In the wings
18 Gawk at
20 Mr. Sikorsky
21 Type of
ranch
22 Draws to a
close
24 Catch sight
of
25 Lugosi of
film
26 Ballad
27 Notion

Wednesday,
April 29, 2015
Mondays answers
Deal with unresolved issues swiftly. Dont waste time
28 Flake off
44 Went fast
hemming and hawing. Take
30 Natural
46 Troop
the time necessary to concencomedian
group
trate on whats most important
36 Mac47 Go away!
beths weap48 Lemon
to you. Getting ahead should
on
cooler
be your intent, and learning
38 Person
49 Law, to
to say no to demanding indiwith a seal
Caesar
viduals will be part of the pro40 Meet Me 50 Road
-- -- Louis
hazard
cess. Put your needs first.
42 Jot down
51 MilwauTAURUS (April 20-May
43 Pushed
kee hrs.
20) -- Turn up the heat. If you
ahead
have been waiting for someone else to take the lead, you
will fall short of your goal.
The time is ripe for you to take
control and move forward.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- A relationship with a
new acquaintance will make a
close friend jealous. Dont let
anyone bully you into making
a donation or commitment
that you have doubts about.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Dont be too timid to
ask for help. If you are experiencing a roadblock, make
your difficulties known and
you will receive the help you
need.
DOWN
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- 1 Columbus
Dont sign on the dotted line port
before doing the necessary
research. Giving in to someones manipulative tactics
will have expensive repercussions. An older relative will
shed light on your current dilemma.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- Deal with whatever is
troubling you. The outcome
will not be as negative as you
fear. Get in touch with someone from your past who you
feel can contribute to your
future.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- Get involved in issues that
are important to you. Volunteering your time or knowledge to a worthy cause will
give you a sense of pride and
satisfaction. Valuable connections will result.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Recent changes at home
will come to an amicable conclusion. Your mercurial mood
will throw your rivals offcourse and help you come out
on top.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) -- You have a lot on
your plate, but theres nothing
you cant handle if you work
hard. Romance is highlight- Marmaduke
ed, making this an ideal time
to get together with someone
special.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) -- Make the most
of a good thing. An original
plan has fabulous fiscal possibilities. This is a good time
to close a deal or forge a partnership.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Be open to new possibilities. There is no need to
stay stuck in a rut. Broaden
your scope to include other
areas of interest. Love is on
the rise.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Anxiety will lead to
uncertainty. Concentrate on
your emotional, mental and
physical health, and dont allow anyone to make you feel
guilty for the choices you
make.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- Now is the time to take
action. Make the best choice The Family Circus By Bil Keane
for you. Dont let anyone talk
you out of doing what makes
you feel most comfortable.
Looking out for your interests
will pay off.
.DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR UFS

Answer to Sudoku
Hi and Lois

The Herald 9

10 The Delphos Herald

Wednesday, April 28, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

SENIOR
LIFESTYLES

Senior living campuses raising the bar


BY STEPHANIE GROVES
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com

As the senior population grows


older and wiser, they understand the
realities of aging and have began taking control of their own futures and
by relocating into a Continuing Care
Retirement Community (CCRC) or senior living community.
Rather than staying in their homes,
seniors realize the benefits of moving
into a CCRC while they are still active
and independent and able to take advantage of lifestyle programs. CCRCs
offer social, recreational and educational activities including travel clubs,
garden clubs and health and wellness
programs. As residents age and require
more care and assistance, they stay within the CCRC community and transition through different levels
of care.
Adding to residents peace of mind is the CCRCs offering of short-term rehab services and specialized
Alzheimers care.
Today, senior living communities assisted and independent are similar to CCRCs and offer
adaptive programs and amenities to customize each residents experience to attract the ever growing senior population. Senior living communities are also raising the bar by offering wellness programs, which
serve as a vehicle for social experiences and healthy lifestyle discussions, exercise classes, fitness rooms

and/or pools. Some of the same amenities and services found while vacationing at a resort or while on a
cruise ship.
For example, these campus-oriented communities offer three meals prepared daily by an in-house
chef, golf courses, other outdoor activities and housekeeping and laundry services. These types of amenities and the choice of apartment sizes and features have all contributed to the high demand in large assisted
living communities.
Technology and the use of social networking sites to stay connected with family, friends and former
colleagues is huge for residents in a senior living community, especially the baby boomer generation.
Senior living communities are offering residents computer labs and classes so they can stay connected and
apprised of technology advancements.

ADULT DAY
SERVICES
CAREGIVERS
PROGRAM
CHORE
Allen County Council On Aging, Inc.
INFORMATION
215 N. Central Ave. (419) 228-5135
& REFERRAL
Lima, OH 45801 Fax (419) 228-3812 OUTREACH
E-MAIL: accoa@accoa.org TRANSPORTATION
SENIOR SERVICES
WEBSITE: www.accoa.org RESOURCE
SPECIALISTS
Serving Allen County Seniors since 1976

y
p
p
a
p
d
n
a
r
G
r
u
Yo
e
r
e
H
e
t
A

SINCE 1928
Hamburg Pickle On Top!
Makes Your

Go

Flippity Flop!
Burgers - Pies - Chili - Malts

STOP IN AT ONE OF OUR 3 LOCATIONS

Elizabeth at Market Allentown at Cable Bellefontaine at Kibby

SENIOR LIFESTYLES

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, April 28, 2015

The Herald11

Eye Health and Aging

Important information for baby boomers


(Family Features) As you age, your body goes through many changes, including differences in eyesight
which can negatively affect day-to-day activities.
You may have noticed these differences while trying to read the morning paper or getting dressed for
the day. While this change - also known as presbyopia - is normal (even for individuals who have always
had perfect vision), it can disrupt the lives of those affected. Luckily there are ways to make these vision
changes less noticeable and less impactful on daily life.
Its important for people to understand that what happens between 40 and 50 years old to our eyes
up close is completely normal, said Howard Purcell, O.D. and senior vice president of customer development for Essilor of America, the creators of Varilux lenses, the leading progressive lens solution for
presbyopia patients.
While presbyopia affects most people over the age of 45, more than half of those with it dont receive
adequate correction. In fact, its estimated that by 2020, 2.3 billion people will have this condition and
will require some type of correction.
Understanding the eyes
According to Dr. Purcell, understanding this typical anatomical change in aging eyes is simple. The
lens inside the eye needs to change shape to allow focus on objects, whether they are near or far. This lens
grows throughout human life; but around 40 years of age, it isnt as flexible as it was in younger years.
This is around the time when the common issues associated with presbyopia begin to appear.
Dr. Purcell emphasizes the importance of routine eye exams, not only to evaluate the condition of the
eyes, but to ensure systemic health is on point as well. Your optometrist can determine early warning
signs of hypertension, diabetes and more - just by looking at your eyes.
A progressive approach
While many individuals with deteriorating eyesight turn to bifocals for their vision needs, progressive
lenses may be a better solution. Progressive lenses transition from distance vision to near vision without
the visible line associated with bifocal lenses. The use of high quality progressive lenses has been known
to ease eye strain and provide natural vision correction.
Many patients believe there is only one progressive lens product available, which is not the case. In
fact, those who have tried progressive lenses in the past without success should know that new, innovative options are available. Varilux progressive lenses, the first ever and still the leading progressive lens
product and only provider of W.A.V.E. Technology: Wavefront Advanced Vision Enhancement, offers the

Photo courtesy of Getty Images


wearer sharpness of vision and smooth viewing transitions at every distance.
It is important to speak to your doctor about your own individual visual needs, and it is equally vital
to know you have a choice in the lenses you wear every day. For more information about presbyopia and
Varilux lenses, visit www.varilux.com.

Heart health should be a concern for people of all ages, but especially so for men and women over 50.
Thats because, according to the American Heart Association, even men and women who are free of cardiovascular disease at age 50 are at a significant lifetime risk of developing the disease.
But heart disease does not have to be an accepted byproduct of aging. For example, a 2014 study published in the AHA journal Circulation found that maintaining or increasing physical activity after age 65
can improve the hearts well-being and lower risk of heart attack.
In addition to increasing physical activity as they age, older men and women who understand heart
disease and learn to recognize its symptoms have a greater chance of minimizing its affects and lowering
their risk of having a heart attack.
What are the symptoms of heart disease?
Heart disease is a blanket term used to describe a host of conditions, so symptoms vary depending on
each individual condition. The following are some of the more widely known conditions and their symptoms:
Hypertension: Also known as high blood pressure, hypertension is a largely symptomless form of
heart disease. The AHA notes that the idea that hypertension produces symptoms such as difficulty sleeping, facial flushing, nervousness, and sweating is a misconception. Symptoms typically do not alert men
and women to the presence of hypertension, highlighting the emphasis men and women should place on
routine visits to the doctors office, where their blood pressure can be taken.
Heart attack: The symptoms of a heart attack are different than the symptoms of heart disease that may
lead to heart attack. The former can be found by visiting www.heart.org. Signs that you may be heading
toward a heart attack include undue fatigue, palpitations (the sensation that your heart is skipping a beat
or beating too rapidly), dyspnea (difficulty or labored breathing), chest pain or discomfort from increased
activity.

Arrhythmia: Arrhythmia means your heartbeat is irregular, and men and women often mistakenly
believe arrhythmia only afflicts those who already have been diagnosed with heart disease or have had a
heart attack. But arrhythmia can affect even those men and women who have healthy hearts and no history
of cardiovascular disease. Symptoms of arrhythmia can vary greatly, from a single premature beat to a
series of premature beats that occur in rapid succession. Arrhythmia that lasts long enough to affect heart
function may include symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, fatigue, dizziness, lightheadedness, shortness of
breath, and chest pain.
How can I protect my heart?
Heart healthy habits take some effort, but men and women can protect their hearts regardless of their ages.
Get sufficient exercise. At least 30 minutes of exercise per day can protect against disease.
Quit smoking. Smoking increases your risk for a host of ailments, including heart disease. Quitting is
a great way to start getting your heart and other parts of your body back on track.
Include heart-healthy foods in your diet. A diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables and low in cholesterol, salt and saturated fat promotes heart health.
Dont drink alcohol to excess. Like smoking, drinking alcohol to excess can lead to a host of problems,
such as high blood pressure, arrhythmia and high cholesterol, each of which increases your risk of heart
disease.
Lose weight. Being overweight or obese is a major risk factor for heart disease. If you have already
started to exercise daily and eat a more heart-healthy diet, then youre on your way to losing weight. Consult your physician if diet and exercise dont seem to be helping you to shed pounds.
Heart disease kills millions of people across the globe each year, many of whom are over 50. But men
and women who learn about heart disease and how to reduce their risk stand a far greater chance of fighting the disease.

Keep your heart running strong into your golden years

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12 The Delphos Herald

Wednesday, April 28, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

How to eat after 50


As people age, their dietary needs begin to change. Foods that
were once staples of your diet as a youth may be restricted
once you hit a certain age, while other foods you may have
always avoided may now be necessary to fuel and support a
healthy body.
Eating healthy foods and exercising may not be enough to sustain health, as hormonal changes and other health effects as
a person reaches age 50 can have a profound impact on his
or her nutritional requirements. The following are a few things
men and women over 50 may want to consider as they look to
eat a healthy diet for years to come.

Vitamin D
Both men and women age 50 and up have a reduced ability to
produce vitamin D through exposure to the sun. Extra vitamin D
will be needed from foods and supplements. Everyone over the
age of 50 should take a daily vitamin D supplement of 400 IU
(10 g), according to Canadas Food Guide. Without adequate
vitamin D, bone strength and health can deteriorate because
vitamin D promotes calcium absorption. Vitamin D also has other roles, including helping neuromuscular and immune function
and reducing inflammation.
Friendly fats
People over age 50 should increase their intake of unsaturated fats and reduce consumption of saturated fats. Nutrient-rich
unsaturated fats can guard against heart conditions, protect
against stroke, keep skin supple, and even help men and wom-

en maintain good neurological health. Omega-3 fatty acids can


be found in nuts, olives, seeds, and fatty fishes.
Increase protein
According to Christine Gerbstadt, MD, RD, a spokesperson for
the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, as they age, men and
women need more protein in their diets to maintain their muscle mass. The amount of protein needed at a younger age no
longer may be adequate. Look for lean sources of protein from
fish and poultry. Beans are also a low-fat source of protein that
can help fulfill daily protein requirements.
More fiber
Eating more fiber can help with digestive and intestinal problems, such as constipation. Constipation can occur when fiber
intake is not enough, coupled with a more sedentary lifestyle.
The best way to get fiber is through diet. Leave the skins on fruit
and vegetables and choose whole fruits over juices. Wholegrain breads and cereals also are good sources of fiber. Dry
beans and lentils can add a fiber boost. Always increase fiber
slowly to determine your tolerance.
Fewer calories
The National Institute on Aging says women over the age of
50 need between 1,600 and 2,000 calories, depending on how
physically active they are. Men need between 2,000 and 2,400
calories per day. With each passing year there is a decrease in
the energy required to maintain body weight, so caloric intake
should be adjusted accordingly.

Dietary recommendations change for


people age 50 and older.
More water
As a person ages, his or her body may not signal it is thirsty
as well as it once did, so its possible that you may not recognize when you are thirsty or dehydrated. The Mayo Clinic
recommends around nine to 10 cups of beverages per day to
remain hydrated.
Eating healthy and changing ones diet is important as a person ages, as dietary needs at age 50 may be quite different
from what they were at age 30.

How to avoid growing bored in retirement

From the moment young men and women


first walk into the office for their first day as a
working professional until the day they officially retire, the notion of planning for retirement is
never far from their minds. But when the day to
hang up the briefcase and donate all those business suits arrives, some retirees wonder what to
do next. Some retirees know exactly how they
will spend their days when they no longer have
to work, while others who decide to play it by ear
may find themselves battling boredom.
For those among the latter group, its important to understand that many retirees find themselves bored once they no longer have to focus
on a career. Jobs keep men and women busy
and provide a sense of purpose in their lives, so
its understandable that retirees feel bored once
those jobs are no longer a part of their lives. But
just because you no longer have an office to go
to every day does not mean life cannot be as
fulfilling or even more fulfilling than it was when
you were still working. You just need to find
something to avoid succumbing to retirement
boredom.

Embracing a new hobby is one way


for recently retired men and women to
avoid growing bored during retirement.

PARK Program

Developed in 1988 by Licensed Physical Therapist, Bob Kann,


the Parkinsons Activity and Rehabilitation Klinic (PARK) is a
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people at every stage of Parkinsons disease preserve mobility and
independence to enjoy better quality of life for both patients and
their families.

The PARK Program

Use It or Lose It
Some people with Parkinsons reduce their
physical activities after their diagnosis.
This only increases the diseases effects.
With simple exercises and activities, the
PARK program keeps participants more
mobile ad better able to enjoy life with
the people they care about.

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www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, April 28, 2015

The Herald13

Tips for grandparents helping to raise children


Grandparents should resist the temptation to use old items
they may have kept in storage, as such items may no longer be safe and could put grandchildren at risk for injury.
Gather important documents. Grandparents should
keep pertinent documents in one easily accessible place
in their homes should an emergency arise. These include
birth certificates, health immunization records, death certificates (if the childs parents are deceased), dental records,
school papers, citizenship papers, and proof of income and
assets.
Speak with an attorney. Lawyers can help grandparents wade through legal arrangements, such as filing for
custody, guardianship or adoption. Options vary depending
on where petitioners live, but lawyers can provide peace
of mind to grandparents concerned about their grandkids
futures.
Investigate financial assistance. Seniors may not earn
the income they once did and may be on assistance programs or living off of retirement savings. Grandparents who
find themselves caring for a child may be eligible for financial assistance. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families is a joint federal and state program that can provide
need-based financial assistance. The AARP or the organization GrandFamilies may be able to put grandparents in

The workout that works for


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may feel working out is beyond their abilities. Sixty-three
percent of people 60 and older dont engage in daily exercise, according to the National Council on Agings The
United States of Aging Survey.
But resistance training can help seniors who fear falling or damaging aging muscles and bones while exercising. For seniors with health issues that might make
strenuous exercise difficult, resistance training can be an
accessible, healthful option that provides both physical
and mental benefits, a new study indicates.
Resistance training - also called strength training - is
an especially safe, valuable mode of exercise for seniors,
says Dr. Kevin ONeil, chief medical officer for Brookdale
senior living. As you age, you lose muscle mass, bone
density, strength, balance, coordination and flexibility - all
of which can result in higher risk of falls and increased
difficulty in performing daily tasks. Resistance training allows seniors to exercise in their own home. They can use
items found in their house and they can even exercise
while sitting down.
As the name implies, resistance training relies on the
use of resistance to build muscle strength. Slow, measured movements are easier and more stable for seniors
to perform than the strenuous activity of many types of
aerobic exercise. Smooth, controlled movement gives
seniors the benefits of the specific exercise with less risk
of injuries or falls, says Nicholas Swanner, a licensed
physical therapist, geriatric clinical specialist and healthcare services manager for Brookdales healthcare services division.
Before starting any kind of exercise program, seniors
should talk to their doctors. Once they have the go-ahead
to begin resistance training, many forms can be beneficial
to seniors, Swanner says.
Resistance training can include using resistance
bands, lifting weights or objects around your home, or using exercise equipment. Some of the exercises included
in aquatics, Pilates, tai chi and yoga are types of resistance training, and those activities have the added bonus of social interaction when done in groups, he says.
Seniors can benefit from any type of resistance training
as long as its done safely and is part of a regular routine.
Pushing up and down from a chair, opening and closing
a door, lifting a can of soup or a 1-pound weight are all
types of resistance exercises that seniors can easily do in
their own homes.
Swanner recommends that seniors start slow with lower-resistance exercises and listen to their bodies. As you
age, your body changes and this will impact how and what
types of exercises you will be able to do safely. There are
many ways to modify exercises, routines and individual
styles of training to fit a seniors specific needs.
Resistance training offers many benefits for seniors,
including improved strength, balance, coordination and
posture, better bone density, plus lower risks of heart
disease, arthritis, osteoporosis and other chronic illnesses, as well as improved cognitive function and mood. A
recent study published in the Journal of the American
Medical Directors Association also found that resistance
training can positively affect cognitive abilities of seniors
with dementia and Alzheimers.
Engaging in exercise for 150 minutes a week can allow
seniors to maximize the health benefits. Seniors can exercise in one 30-minute session three or four days a week
if theyre able, or if that intensity is too strenuous, they can
break their workouts into 10-minute intervals throughout
the week and still reap the benefits.
We always tell our seniors, start low and go slow
when theyre beginning an exercise program, ONeil
says. Just 10 minutes a day provides health benefits and
can feel much more achievable for seniors. Exercise duration can then be increased as endurance improves.
Resistance exercises should be done two to three
days per week for each muscle group with a day of rest
in between. This does not mean that other types of exercise, such as aerobic or flexibility exercises, should not
be done on rest days. People who exercise daily might do
resistance exercises for the upper body on one day and
for the lower body on the next day.
Even if a senior has mobility or health issues that
hinder aerobic exercise, he or she can still do resistance
training, Swanner says. Talk to your physician and physical therapist to design a program thats right for you.

touch with financial advisors in their areas.


Contact schools and daycare centers. School-aged
children will need to be enrolled in school. Grandparents
should contact the department of education where they live
to learn about local school systems, especially when grandkids are moving in with their grandparents. Some grandparents can qualify for free or low-cost daycare, and such programs can be discussed with local Social Services offices.
Enrollment in school or daycare can provide grandparents
with much-needed free time during the day.
Find emotional support. Taking care of grandchildren
is a full-time job. At times, grandparents may feel stressed
or out of sorts. Having a strong support system available
can help grandparents work through the peaks and valleys
of this new and unexpected stage in life. Church- or community center-based counseling services may be available.
Grandparents also can check with their healthcare providers to determine if counseling or therapy sessions are covered under their plans.
Caring for grandchildren is a life-changing event. Although it can be fulfilling, it also requires a lot of energy and
commitment. But grandparents neednt go it alone, as there
are numerous resources available to seniors who suddenly
find themselves caring for their grandchildren.

CI

As retirement age approaches, many older adults envision


themselves downsizing and moving to a quaint community to
enjoy their golden years in as relaxing a fashion as possible.
However, for a growing number of seniors, their retirement
years are being spent helping to raise grandchildren.
United States Census data from 2010 indicates 4.9
million American children are being raised solely by their
grandparents. CanGrads, a National Kinship Support organization, says approximately 62,500 children are being
raised by grandparents and other family in Canada. Many
grandparents provide part-time care when their older children have to move back home with their families, as roughly 13 million children are now living in homes with their
grandparents.
Although being raised by grandparents may not be the
ideal situation for all parties involved, such situations are
a necessity for many families. Seniors who are once again
thrown into the caregiver arena may need a crash course in
childcare or a few pointers on parenting in the modern age.
Get the right equipment. Children certainly require a lot
of gear, more than grandparents likely used when raising
their own children. Certain safety requirements are in place
to safeguard young children, and that often means investing in new cribs, car seats, high chairs, and other items.

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14 The Herald

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Recker

Baltimore on edge

(Continued from page 1)


On Dec. 2, 1985, the Ethics Commission
issued an advisory opinion interpreting the
Revised Code to prohibit a public official
from hiring a family member. The opinion
was not applied retroactively. However,
the prohibitions outlined continued after
an officials family member was employed.
The settlement agreement includes the
specific dates when the sons received raises or promotions.
It includes five pay raises and a promotion that have been given to Troy Recker
since 1981 and six pay raises and a promotion given to his son Kelly Recker.
Recker agreed to resign the position as
county engineer within 40 days of signing
the agreement. His last official day is May
15.
Julie Korte, chief investigating attorney
with the Ohio Ethics Commission, said
most often an investigation is initiated
when someone files an allegation.
If the person filing the complaint provides supporting evidence for their allegation, the commission will do a special
investigation to determine if there is a
violation, Korte said. She said confidentiality rules do not allow her to reveal who
filed the complaint.
Recker said he became aware of the
allegations in 2013, when officials from
the Ohio Ethics Commission came to his
office and interviewed employees. He then
went to the Ohio Ethics Commission in
Columbus to answer questions.
They asked me why I didnt have an
attorney present, Recker said. I told
them I had nothing to hide.
Recker said the settlement only includes
his agreement to resign as engineer and
does not include any monetary agreement
or anything that affects his sons current
employment.
He said he only became aware of the
Ohio Ethics Commission opinion regarding hiring family members in 1988 when
he hired his daughter. He was informed

by the Putnam County Auditor about the


opinion. As a result, Recker removed his
daughter from the position.
I never received anything else from the
Ohio Ethics Commission regarding raises
and salaries for family members since
then, Recker said.
He said he was audited by the Ohio
Auditors Office every year and they never
raised the ethics violation in their reports.
It would have been better if they had
notified public officials about this opinion, he stated.
Recker said the pay raises his sons
received were standard across-the-board
raises given to all the employees.
He said Troy Recker received the promotion in 2001 after working with the
now-retired road and bridge chairman for
several years.
He basically took over two jobs when
that happened, Recker explained.
He said Kelly Reckers salary increases
were also standard. His promotion at the
county garage in 2009 was the natural
progression of promotions at that location
and was under the recommendation of the
county garage superintendent.
Of course, the final approval comes
back to me, so I am the one who is considered to have made the promotions, he
said.
Recker said he is committed to help the
next Putnam County Engineer, if necessary,
to acclimate this person to the procedures
and policies that are not in place. He said
he is proud of his accomplishments while
serving as engineer, including reducing
the number of bridges with reduced load
limits from 70 to three, overseeing nearly
2,000 miles of roads in the county that
have been either reconstructed, resurfaced
of maintained and securing tens of millions
of grant dollars for Putnam County infrastructure projects.
I am not certain of what the future
holds, he said, but I do know when one
door shuts, God will open another.

Dead
(Continued from page 1)
About
six
months
after that, Macht contacted Siebeneck, telling the
Kalida resident that he had
been following his work.
The director asked the artist if he would apply his
talents to Machts third
documentary, which was
to focus on The Walking
Dead phenomenon.
Siebeneck himself is not
a Walking Dead fan but
once he got the job he
researched his subject, just
as he does for any project.
At the Chicago Theater on
Saturday, he found himself
signing his name to prints
that featured his work as
The Walkers Among Us
was shown on two of the
theaters 12 screens.
Siebeneck said the
experience was kind of
overwhelming.
I got out of the limo
and this woman ran up to
me and asked, OK, who
are you? She wrote my
name down, he laughed.
Then they said I had to go
in and talk to the media.
But every now and then
you have to do this, a little
face time.
For those who couldnt
make it to Chicago but
wish to see the documentary, it is available online
as a DVD.
Macht is now shooting footage for his fourth
project, another Star Warsbased film that focuses on

fans of the saga. Siebeneck


has already completed the
logo design for the piece.
The Kalida artist studied
graphic design at Bowling
Green State University,
graduating in 1998. In
addition to his independent
work, he has done graphics
and programming for companies in Lima and, most
recently, in Findlay.
Ive always had an
8-to-5 job. The projects
I get are a lot of fun and
I enjoy the sci-fi and
comic industry, he said.
However, living in a
major market was never a
goal of mine. Through my
years of working in website design/development,
Ive learned how to network and market myself a
little.
He said much of his
communication with clients is done online. For
this reason, Siebeneck
encourages young people
to go into the arts.
It doesnt matter where
you live, he said. If you
want to go to school for
graphic arts, go for it.
Siebenck is happy to
talk with anyone interested
in a pursuing a career in art
or design. He said the best
place to reach him is during
the monthly Blanchard
River Arts Guild meeting at Ottawas Schroeder
Center for the Arts on the
second Thursday of the
month at 7 p.m.

Kitchen
My rhubarbs are really growing. I am hoping Ill have
some to use in a week or so. Try this rhubarb coffee cake
when your rhubarbs are ready.
Rhubarb Coffee Cake
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
1/2 cup shortening
1 egg
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup sour cream
1 1/2 cups rhubarb, diced
Topping:
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup pecans
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon cinnamon
In a large bowl, cream sugar and shortening. Add egg. Add
dry ingredients alternately with sour cream. Fold in rhubarb.
Spread in greased 9x13-inch pan.
Combine topping ingredients; sprinkle over batter. Bake at
350 degrees for 4550 minutes.
Lovina Eicher is an Old Order Amish writer, cook, wife
and mother of eight. Formerly writing as The Amish Cook,
Eicher inherited that column from her mother, Elizabeth
Coblentz, who wrote from 1991 to 2002. Readers can contact
Eicher at PO Box 1689, South Holland, IL 60473 (please
include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a reply) or at
LovinasAmishKitchen@MennoMedia.org.

National Guardsmen
take up positions
BALTIMORE (AP)
Baltimore was a city on
edge Tuesday as hundreds
of National Guardsmen
patrolled the streets against
unrest for the first time since
1968, hoping to prevent
another outbreak of rioting.
Marylands governor said
2,000 Guardsmen and 1,000
law officers would be in place
overnight to try to head off a
repeat of the racially charged
violence set off Monday by
the case of Freddie Gray, a
25-year-old black man who
died of a spinal-cord injury under mysterious circumstances while in police custody.
This combined force
will not tolerate violence or
looting, Gov. Larry Hogan
warned.
In a measure of how tense
things were, Baltimore was
under a citywide 10 p.m.-to-5
a.m. emergency curfew. All
public schools were closed.
And the Baltimore Orioles
canceled Tuesday nights
game at Camden Yards and
in what may be a first
in baseballs 145-year history announced that todays
game will be closed to the
public.
The streets were largely
calm all day and into the
evening, with only a few scattered arrests. The real test

was expected after dark.


As the 10 p.m. curfew
went into effect, several hundred protesters remained in
the street in the citys Penn
North section near where a
CVS pharmacy was looted.
Standing shoulder to shoulder, police in helmets and
riot shields began advancing
toward the demonstrators in
an effort to push them back.
Some protesters lay in the
street or hurled bottles toward
the police.
As the hour drew near,
a local pastor used a loudspeaker to urge the demonstrators to go home, saying: Lets show the world,
because the eyes of the world
are on Baltimore right now.
Around the same time and
in a different neighborhood,
Baltimore police tweeted that
they were making arrests in
South Baltimore after people
started attacking officers with
rocks and bricks. At least one
officer was reported injured.
Mondays looting, arson
and rock- and bottle-throwing
by mostly black rioters broke
out just hours after Grays
funeral. It was the worst such
violence in the U.S. since the
unrest that erupted last year
over the death of Michael
Brown, the unarmed black
18-year-old shot by a white
police officer in Ferguson,

Missouri.
Political leaders and residents called the violence
a tragedy for the city and
lamented the damage done
by the rioters to their own
neighborhoods.
I had officers come up to me
and say, I was born and raised
in this city. This makes me cry,
Baltimore Police Commissioner
Anthony Batts said.
Haywood
McMorris,
manager of the wrecked CVS
store, said the destruction
didnt make sense: We work
here, man. This is where we
stand, and this is where people actually make a living.
But the rioting also brought
out a sense of civic pride
and responsibility in many
Baltimore residents, with
hundreds of volunteers turning out to sweep the streets
of glass and other debris with
brooms and trash bags donated by hardware stores.
Blanca
Tapahuasco
brought her three sons, ages
2 to 8, from another part of
the city to help clean up the
brick-and-pavement courtyard outside the looted CVS.
Were helping the neighborhood build back up, she
said. This is an encouragement to them to know the rest
of the city is not just looking
on and wondering what to
do.

Choppers ferry injured in Nepal;


new mudslide hits village
GORKHA, Nepal (AP) Helicopters
crisscrossed the mountains above a
remote district Tuesday near the epicenter
of the weekend earthquake in Nepal that
killed more than 4,600 people, ferrying
the injured and delivering emergency
supplies. Officials said 250 villagers were
feared missing in a new mudslide.
Two helicopters brought in eight
women from Ranachour village, two of
them clutching babies and a third heavily
pregnant.
There are many more injured people
in my village, said Sangita Shrestha,
who was pregnant and visibly downcast
as she got off the helicopter. She was
quickly surrounded by Nepalese soldiers
and policemen and ushered into a waiting
van to be taken to a hospital.
The little town of Gorkha, the districts administrative and trading center,
is being used as a staging post to get rescuers and supplies to those remote communities after Saturdays magnitude-7.8
earthquake.
Not far from the quakes epicenter,
250 people were feared missing after a
mudslide and avalanche on Tuesday, district official Gautam Rimal said.
Heavy snow had been falling near the
village, Ghodatabela, and the ground may
have been loosened by the quake. Rimal

EMS

said officials received initial reports of


the disaster by phone but then lost contact.
The village, about a 12-hour walk
from the nearest town, is along a popular
trekking route, but it was not clear if the
missing included trekkers.
Across central Nepal, including the
capital of Kathmandu, hundreds of thousands of people were still living in the
open without clean water or sanitation
more than three days after the quake. It
rained heavily in the city Tuesday, forcing people to find shelter wherever they
could.
On Tuesday night, French rescuers
freed a man from the ruins of a three-story Kathmandu hotel, one of a cluster near
the main bus station. The man, identified
as Rishi Khanal, was conscious and taken
to a hospital, but no other information
about him was released.
In Gorkha, some women who came
off the helicopters on Tuesday were grimacing and crying in pain and unable to
walk or speak, in agony three days after
being injured in the quake.
Sita Karki winced when soldiers lifted
her. Her broken and swollen legs had
been tied together with crude wisps of
hay twisted into a makeshift splint.
When the earthquake hit, a wall fell

(Continued from page 1)


The union is behind an agreement with between the firefighters and the city to have intermittent employees, Hoehn
said. The current system is not working as it should because
of the reduced staffing. We have an obligation to provide the
quickest response time we can to save lives.
Streets agreed.
This will get us to the person quicker and get them to the
hospital quicker, he said. If were already out on a run and
we get a second one, we have problems.
Delphos City Council will hear the legislation on first reading at 7 p.m. on Monday.

Street

on me and knocked me down, she said.


My legs are broken.
After an hour of dark clouds gathering, the wind kicked up in Gorkha and
sheets of rain began to pour down.
Geoff Pinnock of the U.N.s World
Food Program was leading a convoy of
trucks north toward the worst-affected
areas when the rain began to pound, leaving them stuck.
This rain has caused a landslide that
has blocked my trucks. I can maybe get
one truck through and take a risk driving
on the dirt, but I think well have to hold
the materials back to try to get them out
tomorrow by helicopter, he said.
Aid workers who had reached the
edges of the epicenter described entire
villages reduced to rubble.
In some villages, about 90 percent
of the houses have collapsed. Theyre
just flattened, said Rebecca McAteer,
an American physician who rushed to the
quake zone from the distant Nepal hospital where she works.
And yet, the timing of the earthquake
near midday, when most rural people
are working in the fields meant most
villagers were spared injuries when buildings collapsed, she said. So far, police
say they have 373 confirmed deaths in
Gorkha district.

(Continued from page 1)


Basinger also said closing
this street would mean Bee
Line would no longer have
access to a building located
on one of their parcels of
land without crossing another
parcel of land.
This limits what can
be done with this building
and the other parcels to the
future, he said.
Basinger acknowledged

Trivia

Answers to Mondays questions:


Every 10 years the entire adult human skeleton is
replaced thanks to a cell renewal process known as remodeling that removes and replaces approximately 10 percent
of an individuals bone mass annually.
In Nigeria, the film industry is referred to as Nollywood.
Its film industry is ranked third in the world after Hollywood
and Bollywood (India).
Todays questions:
What prompted famous orchestra leader Fred Waring
to finance development of the blender that bears his name?
What two National Football League teams have mascots
named for foods associated with their hometowns?
Answers in Thursdays Herald.
Todays joke:
A husband, the owner of a new car, was somewhat
reluctant to allow his wife to drive his prize possession,
even to the supermarket which was a few blocks from the
house.
After she insisted, he finally relented, cautioning her
as she departed, Remember, if you have an accident, the
newspaper will print your age!

that Ottoville Mayor Ron


Miller had visited the site and
looked at it but the issue has
not been resolved.
I feel they should have
come to the other business
owners with the idea before
any ordinance was written,
Basinger said. Now it is
after the fact.
The village council will
be addressing the proposal
during the 7 p.m. Monday
council meeting.

Call Now For


Your Spring

Air Conditioning
Delphos
419-692-8901

Service Special
Ayersville
419-395-1610

Minster
419-628-2310

Clean coil with coil cleaner


Inspect indoor coil
(if accessible, meaning if you can get a door off to see it)
Check the charge
(put gauges on & check superheat and subcooling)
Check contactor points
Check fan amps
Check compressor amps
Look for anything out of the normal...
rusted pans, burnt wires, etc.
Clean condensate drain
Check temperature drop across the coil
NOT INCLUDED
Leak check if low on refrigerant
Any Freon added

99

All for only

Monday-Friday 8-5 On Call 24-7

207 N. State St. Delphos, OH 45833 Ohio License #45757