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2011

The Natural
Makeup Manual

s1000
OISE
1/1/2020

The Aroma Shoppe


www.janbenham.co.uk
janbenham@gmail.com

Preface to the First edition


This first edition....
Unveiled, the art of making your own makeup,
Just as my first two books The Creamy Craft of Cosmetic
Making; with Essential Oils and their Friends, and The Baby
Boomers Beauty Bible, arose in response to the many
requests by therapists in the healing profession, this book is a
natural expansion of the cream making books. My mission:
To bring the knowledge of how to make all natural and
holistic makeup to you.
The changing climate of the beauty field, and heightened
awareness of the types of harmful substances that may
appear in makeup, especially in lipsticks, has meant that
there is more desire for information regarding natural
products. Therefore, in this book, I have provided
information for therapists and interested home producers,
with explanation on ingredients used and instructions on how
to make makeup.
Furthermore, you will also realize huge monetary savings by
not purchasing expensive department store brands. There is
no way you can go wrong. The average woman in the UK
spends 250 a year buying makeup, 50% of those women
spend in the 1000s. This makes the business of supplying
customers with natural alternatives a sure success.
Natural makeup is not tested on animals; therefore, by using
natural makeup you do not support the testing on animals
that many pharmaceutical companies do.

You will read many conflicting write-ups about what should


and should not be in your makeup and you may find it very
confusing, it is a jungle out there. Learn about the
ingredients; essential oils, carrier oils, nut butters, colourants,
oxides and micas and be true to what feels best for you.

ii

Jan Benham

PART
ONE

The Mineral Makeup Manual

History and Fun Trivia


Since our history from Atlantis are still a little fizzy, ancient
Babylon figures as the beginning of our story about makeup.
The origin of our use of cosmetics can be traced back 5,000
years to ancient Babylon in which it seems that they
frequently painted their faces with lead, used henna to colour
their nails, and for lipstick used semi-precious stones that
were crushed and smeared on their lips.
The Romans and ancient Egyptians used cosmetics that
contained mercury and often lead. Cleopatra had lipstick
made from ground up cochineal beetles added to ants eggs
as a base. Also used by the Egyptians was a purple-red
colour that was squeezed from Iodine used to redden lips,
this eventually became known as the kiss of death.
When King Tuts tomb was opened in 1922, cosmetics were
found inside that were still fragrant and perfectly usable.
During the era of Queen Elizabeth 1st, it was popular to paint
the face white and the lips red. When acting in Shakespeares
plays no women were allowed to work as actors. Female
roles were taken by young lads who wore womens clothes
and elaborate makeup. The lead content in the white makeup
led to many early deaths by boy actors.
With the rise of Christianity, the heavy use of makeup
gradually diminished in many cultures. Eventually makeup
became seen as the art of the devil.

Jan Benham
In fact, in 1770, the English parliament passed a law stating
that any woman who seduced a man into marriage by
wearing makeup could be tried as witch!
In fact the use of makeup was frowned upon at many points
in western history. In the 19th century prostitutes were the
main users of makeup and Queen Victoria publically
declared makeup improper, vulgar and acceptable only for
use by actresses.
During the 1920s, the flapper style came into fashion, which
embraced dark eyes, red lipstick, red nail varnish and the
suntan by Coco Channel.
Makeup became very popular during world war 11 with the
popularity of its use in the movie industry. And by the
middle of the 20th century, cosmetics were wildly used by
women in nearly all industrial societies around the world.
In the 1950s colour films made an enormous impact on
cosmetics. The huge cinema screens illuminated the
unblemished appearance of stars and caused the makeup
artist Max Factor to invent the pan cake, which covered
any blemishes and evened out skin tone.
We still have to watch out for the detractors of makeup
though. For example: Adolf Hitler told women that face
painting was for clowns and not for women of the master
race.
In Islamic law, there is no prohibition on wearing cosmetics,
but they are not to disguise the real looks in order to mislead
or cause uncontrolled desire.

The Mineral Makeup Manual


More trivia:

In 1884, the first modern lipstick was introduced by


perfumers in Paris. It was wrapped in silk paper and
made with deer tallow, castor oil and beeswax.

In 1904, a perfumed lip salve would have cost you 25


cents.

By 1908, it was okay for women to apply lipstick at


the table during lunch at a restaurant. It was not okay
to apply lipstick at dinner.

Did you know that according to a 1996 survey by


Shiseido cosmetics; 87% of American women admit
to having left traces of lipstick in unwanted places.

The average woman uses 4 9 lb. of lipsticks in a


lifetime.

Guano (bat droppings) is used in some cosmetics


such as mascara.

Modern mascara was created in 1913 by


T.L.Williams. He mixed coal dust with petroleum
jelly for his sister Mabel, and later grew the invention
of Maybelline.

Jan Benham

PART
TWO

Carmine is used to colour Campari

The Mineral Makeup Manual

Making Natural Mineral Makeup


In this manual, we are going to show you how to make
natural makeup:
Lipstick, natural lip stains, lip gloss, eye and lip
pencils, Stimulash eye liner, mascara, liquid
foundation and concealers.
I teach the makeup making course on two separate days. One
of the days is about the making of pure mineral makeup such
as foundation, blushers and eye shadows, the other day is on
how to make lipsticks and cosmetic pencils etc. involving the
use of oils, waxes, butters and essential oils.
Before we start creating lets take a look at the ingredients
that we will be using.
The ingredients used in the formulation of natural makeup
includes: Base additives, colourants, waxes, carrier oils,
butters, essential oils and various botanicals.

Jan Benham

Ingredients
Powders used in Natural Makeup
Titanium dioxide
Titanium dioxide is naturally occurring from the mineral
ilmenite. It is a very bright and very refractive (only
surpassed by diamonds) powder. It is used to lighten colour,
so by adding titanium dioxide to carmine, you can change a
red lipstick to a pink. It is soothing to the skin as well as
being a great sun block. Has a high adhesion and coverage in
mineral makeup and lipsticks.
Zinc oxide
Zinc oxide naturally produced from zinc ore and has a
slightly sticky feel. Like titanium, zinc protects the skin
against sunburn. In addition zinc has anti-fungal properties,
calms irritated skin and helps with skin conditions such as
acne, roscaea and redness. Has a high adhesion and coverage
in mineral makeup and lipsticks.

Butters, Vegetable Oils and Waxes


Butters: Both shea butter and cocoa butters are useful in
lipsticks and add some protection against the sun as well as
adding healing properties.
Shea butter (Butyrospermum parkii)
Shea butter is derived from the pits of the fruit of the African
butter tree which also grows in central Africa. Shea butter
provides some skin protection against UV radiation, is antinflammatory and sooths and softens dry, chapped skin.
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The Mineral Makeup Manual


Cocoa butter (Theobroma cacao)
Cocoa butter is obtained from roasted cocoa beans and has a
distinct odour. It is soothing to the skin and is good for
wrinkles and furrows.
Oils: Any vegetable oil can be used in lipsticks; the ones I
like to use are castor and jojoba oils as they have a long shelf
life. Other oils, such as sesame, sweet almond and hemp seed
oil, can replace either castor oil or jojoba in the recipes, but
they do go rancid eventually. The shelf life of these oils can
be extended with the addition of vitamin E. For further
reading of carrier oils, please refer to the book, The Creamy
Craft of Cosmetic Making.
Castor oil (Ricinus communis)
Castor oil is the oil most often used in lipsticks and lip
glosses. It gives a nice shine, helps to disperse the pigments
and has an acceptable odour, taste, colour whilst being
inexpensive.
Jojoba oil (Simmondsia chinensis)
Jojoba oil is composed of different liquid wax esters similar
to human sebaceous glands. Jojoba oil is derived from jojoba
beans. However, it is technically not an oil, but a liquid wax,
which replaced sperm whale oil in the cosmetics industry
when the whale became an endangered species. As an added
bonus, it is an environmental aid, as planting it saves arid
land from becoming desert. The chemical structure not only
resembles sebum, but the latter can dissolve in it, which
makes it useful in the case of acne. The fact that it is also
indicated for dry skin, psoriasis and eczema shows it to be
balancing, useful for all skin types. One important quality of
jojoba oil is that it becomes firm at temperatures below 50oF.

Jan Benham
Creams containing jojoba oil become very firm in the
refrigerator. High quality jojoba oil is without colour or
odour, making it ideal for cosmetics. Another great quality is
that it does not become rancid.
Waxes and Gums
Beeswax
Beeswax is a glandular excretion product from bees.
Beeswax has one of the lowest melting points of natural
waxes 61 - 68 oC, and is less hard than the other waxes
which make the lipstick smooth and pleasant to apply. We
use the beeswax in lipsticks, eye and lip pencils and mascara.
Candelilla wax (Euphorbia antisyphilitica)
Candelilla wax is a natural plant wax extracted from the
leaves of the candelilla plant, with a melting point 69 - 73
oC, candelilla wax gives a nice gloss to lipsticks.
Carnauba wax (Copernicia cerifera)
Carnauba wax is a natural plant wax exuded by the leaves of
a palm tree (see Latin name) and is the hardest natural wax
available, providing hardness and rigidity to lipsticks, lip and
eye pencils. Carnauba wax has a melting point of 80 - 85 oC.
Ceteareth - 20
A non-ionic polyoxyethylene ether of saturated fatty alcohols
(cetyl stearyl alcohol). It is soluble in water and alcohol to
form a colloid solution. It is compatible with fats, oils and
active ingredients and is used for all kinds of emulsion-based
cosmetic products like creams, lotions hair conditioners and
sunscreen lotions.

The Mineral Makeup Manual


Gum Arabic
Gum Arabic is a natural dried exudate from the stems and
branches of the Acacia tree in Africa. Gum Arabic has
thickening, adhesive and film forming properties, and is used
for the making of mascara, brow and lash gels.
Stearic acid
Stearic acid is a fatty acid occurring naturally in vegetable
fats. Soluble in oils and alcohols, it has good emulsifying
and thickening properties (stabilizes emulsions). Stearic acid
is widely used in personal care products including soaps,
creams, lotions, and creams.
Xanthan Gum
A gum produced by a pure culture fermentation of a
carbohydrate with xanthomonas campestris, this is widely
used as a thickener in the cosmetic and food industries.
There are many grades of xanthan gum. The one I use is fine
meshed, which provides thickness without causing a lumpy
uneven texture.

Essential oils
The following essential oils can be safely used in liquid
foundations, lip sticks, Lip glosses and lip balms. For more
information on essential oils used in skin care; please refer to
The Creamy Craft of Cosmetic Making.
Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia)
The soothing, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties of
lavender make it valuable for many skin conditions, and its
well-loved aroma lends itself to blending in creams and
lotions. Lavender will also stimulate the growth of healthy
new cells making it effective for cracked skin, eczema, boils,

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Jan Benham
wounds and burns. It is helpful for acne as it inhibits the
bacteria which causes the skin infection while soothing the
skin, helping to balance the over secretion of sebum.
Lime (Citrus aurantifolia)
Lime is obtained by the cold expression of the peel and is a
refreshing tonic for the skin. It helps to stimulate the
lymphatic system helping conditions such as obesity,
cellulitis and water retention.
Mandarin (Citrus reticulata)
Mandarin improves the circulation of the blood and lymph
particularly below the skin which keeps the skin looking
young and vibrant. Promotes the growth of new cells thereby
the appearance of stretch marks and scars are diminished.
Because of its gentle and antispasmodic effects, it is widely
used in pregnancy and baby care
Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha)
Myrrh is extracted from a desert tree that grows in the
Middle East. Its thick reddish-brown oil is obtained through
extraction and distillation of its resin.
The three wise men knew a thing or two about myrrh as it
was widely used by the Egyptians in embalming. Myrrh oil
is rejuvenating, fungicidal, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic,
cooling and astringent.
Orange sweet (Citrus aurantium)
Orange is obtained by the cold expression of the peel of the
fruit and is effective for dull and oily skins as well as for
general skin care. It helps to stimulate the lymphatic system
which helps conditions such as obesity, cellulite, and water
retention.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual


Peppermint (Mentha piperita)
Lipstick as a study aid! Why not? Imagine wearing a lipstick
that not only makes you look good but improves your
concentration as well. Peppermint relieves anxiety and
depression, increases mental agility, helps with mental
fatigue, removes bad breath, relieves headaches, nausea,
sinus congestion and so much more.
Rose (Rosa damascena and Rosa Centifolia)
Here we have one of the most valuable commodities on the
perfume and essential oil market. Rose oil is extracted by
varying methods, depending on the country of origin. The
finest rose oil and the most costly is from Bulgaria known as
Bulgaria Rose Otto, extracted from the Damask rose.
Rose oil is a highly effective ingredient in natural skin care
products. It is anti-inflammatory, astringent, toning and
rejuvenating, helping most skin problems including: eczema,
dry, sensitive and mature skin.
Spearmint (Mentha Spicata)
Gentler than peppermint, spearmint has similar properties.
Good for the brain and helps with concentration, relieves
stress, helps with headache and migraines, sinus congestion
and dental care. Because of its gentle nature, spearmint can
be safely used in childrens lip balms.

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Jan Benham

Botanicals
Marine algae extract and gel Red algae extracts
(Hypernea musciformis, Gellididela acerosa, Sargassum
filendula and sorbitol)
The seaweed extract and gels that I use dries quickly on the
skin and has lasting power. Great to use as a base ingredient
for making healthy lip stains and eye liners.
Seaweed is an anti-oxidant and is full of easy to absorb
proteins, vitamins, minerals and lipids. Repairing and
protecting the skin and hair, it reduces oiliness and sebum
over-production and strengthens against damage caused by
free radicals.

Colour Pigments
Basically three different types of colourants are used in the
making of natural makeup. These include inorganic mineral
pigments, micas, and carmine.
Inorganic mineral pigments include titanium dioxide, zinc
oxide, iron oxides, (yellow, red, brown and black),
ultramarines and micas.
In the making of lipstick, lip gloss and lip stains, the use of
oxides and micas can make many different shades of lip
colours. For true reds and pinks the only colourant that I
have found so far that doesnt involve the use of *FD&C and
D&C colourants is carmine.
*These artificial colours are made from petroleum and coal
tar, and are believed to be cancer causing agents. They
penetrate the skin, can cause allergies and are irritants to
the skin and eyes. They are found on labels as FD&C, or
D&C and are followed by a colour and a number.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual


Oxides
Oxides are non-toxic, naturally occurring from irons such as
hematite. In nature they are often combined with harmful
metals such as lead, and mercury, so they have to be
processed and refined before they can be used in cosmetics.
They are used in practically in all mineral makeup. The
colours come in many different shades with the most
common ones being; yellow, red, brown, black, ultra marine
blue and chromium green oxide.
Mica powder
Micas are non-toxic occurring naturally from the minerals
muscovite and silicate. Mica if smaller than 20 microns,
gives a satiny appearance while large micas provide a
sparkly effect. Micas are then coated with various oxides,
carmine and titanium dioxide to give a full range of colours.
Micas are used as a second colour to achieve different shades
and to add shimmer.
Carmine
Carmine is derived from the cochineal beetle. This colourant
was used by the ancient Aztecs and it is said that Cleopatras
lipstick was made from carmine. Carmine is considered safe
and as a natural red colour is used in alcoholic beverages and
food.

Carmine

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Jan Benham

Working with colours


Making makeup is all about working with colours. To get
your perfect shade you will need to be able to work with the
colours to re-create your favourite lipstick, eye shadow and
foundation etc.
Dont worry in this book; there are tons of recipes to get you
started. Once you are confident in working with the
pigments, then you can start creating your own shades.
So how does colour work?
Colour is a component of light. Light travels in different
waves, speed and length. If a light beam reaches our eye, we
experience the sensation of colour.
To work with colour we need to work with a colour wheel.

Here is an example of a colour wheel

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The Mineral Makeup Manual


To get a full spectrum of colours we start with the primary
colours of yellow, blue and red.
From these colours we get the secondary colours of orange,
green and purple.
Red and yellow create orange
Yellow and blue create green
Red and blue create purple
If you mix equal amounts of all three of the primary colours,
you get brown.
Titanium dioxide (white) lightens the shade, if you mix equal
amounts of carmine (red) and titanium dioxide, you will get
a pink.
White and black can be used in different measurements for
creating a variety of shades.
When I was in art school, the teacher had us make a colour
formulation starting with red, yellow and blue, then making
the secondary colours, going on to mixing red and purple,
green and red, yellow and purple etc.
We were allowed to use only the primary colours of red,
yellow and blue. We then added white or black to change the
shade.
I like to do the same thing when making makeup and have
had students create many different colours and shades for
eye shadows and lipsticks using the same formula.

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Jan Benham

PART
THREE

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Tools of the trade


To begin, you will need the following equipment.
Equipment needed for making lipstick, lip gloss, pencils
and mascaras:

18

Coffee grinder for grinding up micas and oxides etc. I


usually have at least three grinders: One for
red/orange/pink coloured pigments, one for
blue/green/black coloured pigments and one for the
white powders.
An electronic scale that measures both ounces and
milligrams.
Measuring spoons plus 0.15cc mini scoops.
Plastic or surgical gloves
Mask for during and after grinding. You can take it
off again once the particles have settled.
A double boiler (A heat resistant glass beaker that
fits into a saucepan).
Popsicle sticks
Packaging product such as empty lip balm and
mascara tubes and pencils etc. (If you wish to make
professional shop style lipsticks, then you will need a
lipstick mould and empty lipstick tubes).

Jan Benham

Setting up your work place

Good ventilation is a must, especially when using the


grinder.
Paper cover on your work surface makes for an easier
clean up.
Practice good hygiene; wipe the surfaces and tools
down with alcohol. I use vodka.
Wear an apron or some clothes designated for
making makeup.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

PART
FOUR

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Jan Benham

Lipsticks
Experimental lipsticks
Suggestion: Make small amounts of lipstick at the beginning
until you get your ideal colour. The following recipe makes 2
to 3 lipsticks.
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon Castor oil
1 teaspoon Jojoba oil
teaspoon. Beeswax
teaspoon Candelilla wax
teaspoon Shea butter
Method:
Pour everything into a glass container, heat until the wax and
oil has melted. Do not over heat. Stir with a disposable
plastic spatula or popsicle stick.
Add your pre blended (grinded in a coffee blender) colour
concentrate (begin with teaspoon you will want to work
quickly stirring this in until very well dispersed). Check the
colour by rubbing a bit on the back of your hand, if you need
more add in a very small amount at a time.
Fill your lip balm tube, let dry completely for at least 30
minutes. If the top of your lip balm shrinks, simply reheat the
left over and add a couple of drops to the top.
I make my lipstick base in advance and just take the amounts
needed for each batch.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual


The following batch will make x

Lipstick Recipe Base


Part one

22

Ingredients:
15gms Beeswax
30gms Candelilla wax
25gms Shea butter
120gms Castor oil
120gms Jojoba oil
2 capsules Vitamin E
10 15 drops Essential oil (optional)

Jan Benham

Method:
Sterilize all utensils, product containers, and
workshop surfaces. Wipe utensils down with alcohol.
Melt the waxes, butters and vegetable oils in a double
boiler.
While the waxes are melting, grind the pigments well
in either a mortal and pestle or a coffee grinder.
When the wax is almost melted, add the vitamin E.
When the waxes are completely melted, remove from
the heat and remove the beaker from the saucepan.
Add pigments see part two.
Blend in essential oils if desired.

Part two

Grind the pigments, micas and oxides together,


stirring in between with a popsicle stick.
Add the coloured pigments to the melted waxes and
stir well with a disposable spatula.
Immediately pour the mixture into the empty lip balm
tubes or lipstick moulds. Place in the refrigerator.
Remove hour later and, if using a professional
lipstick mould place in the lipstick tube.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Lipstick Recipe No 1
Bella rosa
Ingredients:
To 55gms of the lipstick base,
Add the following pigments:
1 teaspoon Carmine
1 teaspoon Titanium dioxide
teaspoon Pearl white mica

Method:
Follow the instructions on page 23.

The Bella rosa lipstick in a professional mould and


in the lipstick tube

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Jan Benham

Lipstick Recipe No 2
Spice
Ingredients:
To 55gms of the lipstick base,
Add the following pigments:
2 teaspoons Sienna mica
teaspoon Red oxide
teaspoon Zinc oxide

Method:
Follow the instructions on page 23.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Lipstick Recipe No 3
Coco La Crme
Ingredients:
To 55gms of the lipstick base,
Add the following pigments:
2 teaspoons Aruben Coral mica
teaspoon Red oxide
teaspoon Zinc oxide
Method:
Follow the instructions on page 23.

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Jan Benham

Lipstick Recipe No 4
Baby Pink
Ingredients:
To 55gms of the lipstick base,
Add the following pigments:
1 teaspoon Carmine
1 teaspoon Titanium dioxide

Method:
Follow the instructions on page 23.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Lipstick Recipe No 5
Ruby
Ingredients:
To 55gms of the lipstick base,
Add the following pigments:
1 teaspoon Carmine
teaspoon Zinc oxide

Method:
Follow the instructions on page 23.

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Jan Benham

Lipstick Recipe No 6
Chocolate Kisses
Ingredients:
To 55gms of the lipstick base,
Add the following pigments:
One piece of melted dark chocolate
2 teaspoons Aruben Coral mica
teaspoon Titanium dioxide
teaspoon Zinc oxide
Method:
Follow the instructions on page 23.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Lip gloss
Lip gloss Recipe No 1
Ingredients:
2.5gms Beeswax
2.5gms Candelilla wax
5gms Shea butter
70gms Castor oil
20gms Fractionated coconut oil
10gms Sesame oil
2 capsules Vitamin E
Part two
1 teaspoon Carrot root oil.
teaspoon Orange oxide mix (equal amounts of red
and yellow oxide ground together)
teaspoon Fine gold mica
20 drops Sweet orange or mandarin essential oil
Method:
Pour everything into a glass container, heat until the wax is
melted. Do not overheat. Stir with disposable spatulas,
popsicle sticks work well.
Add part two to the melted waxes and oils and mix well.
Fill empty lip gloss tubes with a syringe.

Recipe No 2
To part one when the waxes and oils have melted, add 1
teaspoon of hot pink mica, teaspoon Ultra shimmer mica
and 20 drops of essential oil of choice e.g. spearmint or lime.

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Jan Benham

Colourfast lip stain


This is a healthy alternative to the commercial long lasting
lip stains that are on the market.
Ingredients:
Seaweed extract
Pigment blends
Method:
To 1 teaspoon of seaweed extract, add teaspoon of
pigment blend/s, mix well and syringe into a lip gloss
vial/tube.

Suggested pigment blends


For a red stain; extract add teaspoon carmine to 1
teaspoon seaweed extract.
For a pink stain; add teaspoon carmine and teaspoon
titanium dioxide ground well together, to 1 teaspoon
seaweed extract.
For any other colours: Add teaspoon of any of the lipstick
pigment blends to 1 teaspoon of the seaweed extract.
Hint: Once I have my lipstick colours for the season; I make
larger batches of pigment blends and use as needed.
To use:
Apply in one go on the lower lip from one side to the other
side without stopping and do the same with the upper lip. Let
it dry for a few seconds keeping lips open, apply again.
Once dry you can then apply lip gloss or lipstick over the
colour fast stain.
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The Mineral Makeup Manual

PART
FIVE

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Jan Benham

Cosmetic Pencils
Cosmetic pencil pencils are used for lips, eyebrows and
eyeliners.
Lip liners should have high pigment coverage to accent the
line of the lip, and should be firm enough not to run into the
lines around the lip.
Eye brow liners are used to create the illusion of fuller brows
or to cover areas that have no hair. Brow liners should be
harder than lip or eyeliners.
Eyeliners should glide without tugging or pulling the skin on
the eyelid.
Cosmetic liners consist mainly of waxes, oils and pigments.
Good pigment coverage is necessary so the wax/pigment
level is high and the oil level is low, except for eye brow
liners which usually contain less pigment so as to tint rather
than colour.
The amount of waxes in pencils is in the range of 20-40%.
Stearic acid is added along with waxes to provide a firmer
structure. The amount of oils used is often as much as 25%
of the formula because pigments absorb oils and are used at
high concentrations.
The pigments used are iron oxides, carmine and micas.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Lip liner pencil


Recipe
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon Jojoba oil
1 teaspoon Castor oil
teaspoon Beeswax
teaspoon Stearic acid
teaspoon Carnauba wax
Method:
Pour everything into a glass container, place in a hot water
bath and heat until the wax is melted. Do not over heat, stir
with a disposable plastic spatula or popsicle stick.
Add your pre grounded colour concentrate to the above
melted waxes, see following recipes:
Coco La Crme: 1 teaspoon red oxide, 1 teaspoon zinc
oxide and teaspoon aruben coral mica.
Blazing gun: 1 teaspoon orange oxide, and teaspoon
umber mica.
Pink flamengo: 1 teaspoon carmine, teaspoon titanium
dioxide and teaspoon pearl white mica.
To fill your lip pencil, if you dont have a pencil mould!
Your pencil comes in three parts: the pencil, a metal end
piece and the plastic cover. Place the metal end piece on the
pencil, and aspirate the hot liquid with a syringe into the
other end of the pencil. It is important to have a syringe tip
that fits into the pencil. Place the lip liner in the refrigerator
for at least hour. Afterwards, it will be ready for
sharpening.
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Jan Benham

Eye liner pencil


Recipe
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon Jojoba oil
1 teaspoon Castor oil
teaspoon Beeswax
teaspoon Stearic acid
teaspoon Carnauba wax
Method:
Pour everything into a glass container, place in a hot water
bath and heat until the wax is melted. Do not over heat, stir
with a disposable plastic spatula or popsicle stick
Add your pre-grounded colour concentrate to the above
melted waxes, see following recipes:
White pencil: 1 teaspoon titanium dioxide and teaspoon
pearl white mica.
Cinnamon girl: 1 teaspoon brown oxide and teaspoon
fine gold mica.
Bedroom eyes: 1 teaspoon black oxide and 1 teaspoon
titanium dioxide.
Irish eyes: 1 teaspoon green oxide and teaspoon fine gold
mica.
To fill your lip pencil, if you dont have a pencil mould!
Your pencil comes in three parts: the pencil, a metal end
piece and the plastic cover. Place the metal end piece on the
pencil, and aspirate the hot liquid with a syringe into the
other end of the pencil. It is important to have a syringe tip
that fits into the pencil. Place the lip liner in the refrigerator
for at least hour. Afterwards, it will be ready for
sharpening.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Filling the pencil and taking it out of the mould.

Irish eyes eye pencil

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Jan Benham

PART
SIX

Concealer

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

More Recipes

Cover sticks
Cover stick No 1
Part one:
130gms Jojoba
17gms Beeswax
10gms Carnauba wax

Part two
130gms Foundation pigment blend
from the Mineral Makeup Manual
5 drops Lavender essential oil
10 drops Tea tree essential oil
Melt the waxes and oils in a heat resistant glass jar and when
melted add the pigment and essential oils. Pour into a lipstick
mould, jar or cosmetic pot.
Cover stick No 2
Melt 40gms of the lipstick base, when melted add 20gms of
the foundation pigment blend. Pour into a lipstick mould, jar
or cosmetic pot.

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Jan Benham

Liquid Foundation
Place 7 teaspoons of the white base powder number 3 from
the Mineral makeup manual and add - 1 teaspoon of your
choice of pigment concentrate. Grind, stir and grind again.
To make the foundation liquid, add teaspoon of the
above powder blend, (I would suggest either sunkissed or
terra cotta) to 20ml of the basic white lotion, the recipe is
available in the creamy craft of cosmetic making book.
If you want to make foundation that works for all skin
colours from Caucasian to Asian to African, the above
foundation works along with the following two:
Dark brown, add 1 teaspoon of brown or dark brown oxide
to 20ml of the basic white lotion.
White, add 1 teaspoon of titanium dioxide to 20ml of the
basic white lotion.
When mixing and matching skin tones, the above three
foundations can be blended to match any skin tone. This is
especially helpful when dealing with skins that have
irregular skin pigmentation.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

Eyeliner
Ingredients:
Seaweed extract
Pigment blends
Method:
To 1 teaspoon of seaweed extract add up to teaspoon of
pigment blend/s, mix well and put into an eyeliner container.
Some eyeliner suggestions:
Cleopatra eyes: Mix teaspoon black oxide in 1 teaspoon
seaweed extract.
Cinnamon girl: Mix teaspoon brown oxide in 1 teaspoon
seaweed extract.
Bedroom eyes: teaspoon black oxide and teaspoon
titanium dioxide ground well together, to 1 teaspoon
seaweed extract.

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Jan Benham

Mascara
Mascara consists of a blend of waxes, pigments, texturizers,
emulsifiers and solvents.
Part one
124gms Distilled water
teaspoon Xanthan gum
1 teaspoon Glycerin
teaspoon Gum arabic
1 big drop Provitamin B5
1 big drop Grapefruit seed extract
Part two
2 teaspoons Ceteareth 20
teaspoon Stearic acid
teaspoon Candelilla wax
1 teaspoon Carnauba wax
2 teaspoons Beeswax
Part three
4 teaspoons Black oxide.
1 or more teaspoon Mica of choice.
Melt part one in one heat resistant glass beaker and part two
in another glass beaker. When both are fully melted add part
one to part two and stir well. Add part three to the above and
fill the mascara containers using a syringe.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual


Stimulash eye liner
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon Seaweed extract
1 teaspoon Oxide/blend of choice
Method
Simply mix the colour pigments into the seaweed extract.
Package in a pot or if possible, an empty eyeliner tube using
a syringe.

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Jan Benham

Your notes and recipes

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Your notes and recipes

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Jan Benham

Your notes and recipes

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The Mineral Makeup Manual


If you enjoyed this manual, check books by the author.
The Creamy Craft of Cosmetic Making with essential oils
and their friends, 2011 as well as being another cream
making book, studies the use of essential oils and carrier oils
in skin, body and hair care products. Also included is
treatments for body care especially cellulite and fat
reduction, along with a diet and plan of action. Care of the
skin is covered including treatments for stretch marks,
varicose veins and aches and pains.
The Baby Boomers Beauty Bible, 2011 contains tips on
how to keep your skin looking healthy and youthful with
easy user-friendly recipes for various anti-ageing treatments
and skin problems.
Presented with straightforward advice for body care that
includes suggestions to soothe the soul and stimulate the
mind.
Included in this book are recipes for skin care, natural
deodorants, hair shampoos and conditioners.
Coming soon: The Mineral Makeup Maunal, 2012

46

Jan Benham

We offer Holistic Health Practitioner,


Aromatherapy and Aroma Cosmetology
courses.
We also carry supplies for making your own line of
cosmetics and custom make for companies
around the world.
Organic Skin, Hair, Body Care Products
Makeup natural lipsticks and mineral makeup
Natural cold pressed Soap

Canada
The Aroma shoppe Ltd.,
Toronto, Ontario
E-mail: janbenham@gmail.com
www.aromashoppe.com

Great Britain
The Aroma Shoppe
Tel: 01623 797100
E-mail: janbenham@gmail.com
www.janbenham.co.uk
Members of the International Federation of Professional
Aromatherapists, UK, The International Federation of
Holistic Therapists, UK, and the Canadian Examining Board
of Health Care Practitioners, Canada.

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The Mineral Makeup Manual

About the Author


Jan Benham is the President of the
Institute of Aromatherapy and Aroma
Shoppe. She has been a holistic therapist,
practicing and teaching for over twenty
years. Jan taught Aromatherapy for Shirley
Price in the early 80s, one of the pioneers
and founders of aromatherapy in the UK.
Jan is a fellow member of the Society of
Health and Beauty Therapists UK,
member of the International Federation of
Holistic Therapists UK, member of the
International Federation of Professional Aromatherapists, UK, a
Registered Aromatherapy Health Practitioner with the Canadian
Examining Board of Health Care Practitioners and past President
of the Canadian Federation of Aromatherapists.
Jan owns schools in Canada and the UK, and offers various
workshops including: cosmetic making, aromatherapy, and Aroma
Cosmetology - Holistic Skin Care. Her Certified Natural Health
Practitioner Courses are known all over the world.
Jan is also a tutor at the Shirley Price College in the UK and New
Directions Aromatics.
Jan is the author of books about all-natural and holistic cosmetics:
The Creamy Craft of Cosmetic Making, 2011, The Baby Boomers
Beauty Bible, 2011), The Little Book of Lipsticks, 2010 and is
currently working on her fourth book: The Mineral Makeup
Manual.
As well as being an author and a consultant, Jan regularly gives
press, TV and radio interviews, and contributes to journals and
magazines.

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