Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 26

Kent State Universitys Office of Global Education

Team AALANA
Travel is an expense that makes you richer

Public Relations Case Studies


Professor Stephanie Smith

Table of Contents
I. Executive Summary..3
II. Research Activities..4
A. Primary Research....4
B. Secondary Research....4
C. Formal Research Recommendations.......6
III. Situational Analysis...6
A. Problem Statement..8
B. Internal and External factors...8
C. Historical Information...10
D. Environmental factors...11
IV. Publics..12
A. Primary..12
B. Secondary..14
V. Objectives..15
VI. Key Messages and Theme...15
VII. Strategies and Tactics by Objectives..15
A. Recruitment and Training of AALANA student ambassadors.15
B. Increase AALANA student awareness of short-term study abroad programs..16
C. Increase parental acceptance and awareness of studying abroad..17
D. Increase AALANA student participation..18
VIII. Budget...22
IX. Campaign Schedule.25

I. Executive Summary
2

The Office of Global Education (OGE) has been a long-standing organization within
Kent State University for decades. Since its inception, OGE has been solely responsible for
managing the universitys international affairs. OGE recruits international students interested in
pursuing an education in the United States to take part in Kent States exchange programs. It also
assists current Kent State students who are considering study abroad in finding the specific
program most suitable for them. OGE strives to give students the opportunity to gain experience
abroad and offers a wide variety of study abroad options in countries around the world.
Although OGE offers a diverse range of study abroad programs, it has experienced a lack
of participation among African American, Latin American and Native American, or AALANA,
students. This nationwide problem can be attributed to three main factors. First, AALANA
families historically have a lower average income, which causes them to view study abroad as an
unrealistic option. Second, the fear of encountering racism overseas is unique to AALANA
students. This fear of experiencing discrimination in an unfamiliar place draws AALANA
students away from committing to study abroad. Lastly, many AALANA students are firstgeneration college students so their parents are likely just as new to the college experience as
them. As a result, their parents are usually unaware of the benefits of studying abroad and can be
apprehensive in sending their child abroad.
The problems OGE is facing can be best addressed by developing a tailored
communication plan that targets the previously mentioned issues. Strategies such as training
AALANA student ambassadors, using face-to-face communication, establishing partnerships
with other on campus organizations, hosting special events and increasing awareness through
OGEs social media will help reach OGEs ultimate goal of increasing AALANA student
participation in study abroad.

II. Research Activities:


A. Primary Research
1. Conducted informal face-to-face interviews with AALANA Kent State students and advisors
to clarify issues.
a. 11 African-American students
Two male and nine females.
b. Six Latin-American students
One male and five females.
c. Two academic advisors
One from the College of Business Administration and one from the College of
Communication and Information.
Findings: These quick, informal interviews conducted during a multicultural fair held in
the Kent State University ballroom gauged AALANA students perceptions of study
abroad and the Office of Global Education (OGE). The interviews found AALANA
students dont feel as though OGE makes any specific effort to communicate with them
about studying abroad. The students also had very little knowledge of OGE and how to
contact it.
2. Conducted face-to-face interviews with Kent State students at the Student Recreation and
Wellness Center.
a. 25 Kent State students of mixed ethnicity and gender
Findings: Out of 25 students only two were able to recognize the name Office of Global
Education. None of the students were aware of OGEs purpose, that it is connected to
study or where to find it. On the contrary, all 25 students knew about the semester long
Florence program.
3. Conducted face-to-face interviews with Kent State AALANA opinion leaders.
a. Victoria Humphreys: President of Native American Student Association
Findings: Native American students experience a huge amount of culture shock when
coming from the reservation to college, so the added shock of going abroad seems even
more challenging. Also, unlike African Americans, Native American students are not as
worried with racism abroad because they believe that they can easily blend in with
Caucasians.
b. Federico Subervi: Professor, researcher and scholar on Latin media and audiences.
Findings: Professor Subervi expressed Latin Americans have a strong family connection
and may have trouble leaving their families for an extended period of time.
c. Traci Easley-Williams: Pan-African Studies professor
Findings: Professor Easley-Williams believes African American students may not
consider study abroad because they dont see people who look like them in study
abroad materials. She also made clear that finances were a huge factor in determining a
students ability to study abroad.
B. Secondary Research
1.Conducted library and online research.

a. Reviewed an article created by the Office of International Programs at Ithaca


College about issues of racism and ethnicity in studying abroad for Latin
Americans.
http://www.ithaca.edu/oip/docs/diversity/race_and_ethnicity.pdf
b. Reviewed a presentation given at the Pim Capstone Seminar discussing reasons
for and against Latino American participation in study abroad.
http://www.slideshare.net/amydooleybello/latinoa-students-in-study-abroadreasons-for-and-against-participation
c. Reviewed a case study which detailed Native American participation in study
abroad programs.
http://aisc.metapress.com/content/08707161x6235611/fulltext.pdf
d. Reviewed a comprehensive list of reasons why Native Americans should study
abroad, as well as contact points for them to gain more information.
http://ip.wsu.edu/global-learning/files/StudyAbroad-Top10ReasonsNativeAmericans.pdf
e. Reviewed an article about overall study abroad demographics from the
International Institute of Education that gives various statistics on study abroad
among groups nationwide.
www.iie.org/~/media/Files/Corporate/.../StudyAbroad_WhitePaper1.ashx
f. Provides information about what motivates Native Americans to study abroad.
http://ip.wsu.edu/global-learning/files/StudyAbroad-Top10ReasonsNativeAmericans.pdf
g. Reviewed a blog post written by Buster, a graduate student living in Moscow,
advising African American students not to visit there.
http://matadornetwork.com/abroad/should-people-of-color-go-to-russia/
h. Reviewed an article discussing how racism is getting worse against African
Americans in Europe.
http://imdiversity.com/villages/global/racism-against-blacks-is-a-growing-trendin-europe/
i. Reviewed an article by Elizabeth Redden which goes over statistics of minority
students studying abroad and failed tactics in improving study abroad diversity.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/06/11/diversity
j. Reviewed an article written by Janel Martinez that explains why studying
abroad is an important opportunity for college students of color.
http://www.blackenterprise.com/career/studying-abroad/
k. Reviewed an article written by Tamerra Griffin about the low numbers of
African Americans studying abroad and Starlett Craigs research which covers
African American students misconceptions about overseas experiences.
http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2013/aug/22/black-students-embrace-educationabroad/
2 .Reviewed the Office of Global Communications website along with websites of
competitor schools such as Miami of Ohio.
http://www.kent.edu/globaleducation/index.cfm
http://www.studyabroad.miamioh.edu/
3. Reviewed literature online provided by the Kent State Office of Global Education
(OGE).
5

a. Reviewed a presentation given at the NAFSA 2013 Annual Conference


discussing the challenges of handholding and the one-size-fits-all approach to
advising students.
http://www.nafsa.org/Find_Resources/Supporting_Study_Abroad/Proven_Approa
ches_to_Handholding_When_Advising_FirstGeneration_Study_Abroad_Students/b. Reviewed a NAFSA Collegial
Conversation presentation covering barriers that underrepresented students face
when trying to finance their study abroad trips.
http://www.nafsa.org/Connect_and_Network/Join_a_Conversation/Live_Collegial
_Conversation_-_Financing_Education_Abroad_for_Underrepresented_Students/
C. Recommendations for formal research
1. Awareness survey
a. Recognizes OGEs short-term study abroad options are best suited to AALANA
undergraduate students. Assesses AALANA undergraduate students knowledge
of short-term study abroad programs, the benefits of studying abroad and how to
apply.
Targeted at Kent State undergraduate AALANA students
Sample size: 100
AALANA student ambassadors and Multicultural Center staff will
distribute hard copies to undergraduate AALANA students.
Created and paid for by OGE
Example:
- Have you heard about Kent States study abroad programs?
-If so, what short-term programs are you aware of?
-Where would you go to find information on study abroad programs?
-Do you think studying abroad will help you get an internship or job in
your field?
-Do you think its possible for a college student to finance study abroad?
2. Four parent focus groups, two before presentation and two after.
a. Pinpoint AALANA parents perceptions toward the idea of their child studying
abroad.
Target AALANA parents whose children have never studied abroad
Sample size: 10 participants per group
Provide participant incentive
III. Situation Analysis
Kent State Universitys Office of Global Education is the universitys primary conduit
between the student body and its international constituents. It provides information for
international students interested in attending Kent State University. It also assists current Kent
6

State students wishing to study abroad to discover if education abroad is the right decision for
them. OGE plays an integral part in managing global partnerships, exchange programs and
support services for all students involved in education abroad.
OGEs ultimate goal is to help prepare students, both domestic and international, to enter
a workforce that is becoming increasingly global. Through international student admissions,
recruitment and education abroad programs for domestic students, OGE gives students an
opportunity to experience different cultures, ideas and belief systems to make them more
marketable upon graduation.
The Office of Global Education serves a wide range of publics that can be filtered down
to three broad groups: international students, domestic students and international partners. OGE
reaches out to international students to encourage them to study abroad at Kent State. Once these
students have enrolled, it helps them adjust to life in the United States. OGE provides many
programs and events that give international students the opportunity to acclimate themselves to
U.S. culture and network with other students. For domestic students, the Office of Global
Education provides a variety of study abroad opportunities including exchanges, long-term
programs, short-term programs and faculty-led trips. The Office of Global Education also
maintains many different partnerships with universities, governmental agencies and nongovernmental agencies around the globe.
At universities across the United States, the average number of students studying abroad
is approximately one to two percent of the student body. Kent State mirrors the national average,
with about 800 of its 41,819 students, or two percent of its student population taking part in
study abroad programs. However, like most universities, OGE struggles with its ability to

increase study abroad participation among AALANA (African American, Latin American, Native
American) student populations.
Out of 273,996 American students who studied abroad between 2010 and 2011, only 12
percent were AALANA students. This lack of participation can be attributed to a heightened fear
of racism abroad, limited financial resources and uninformed parents who are unaware of the
practical benefits of studying abroad.
A. Problem Statement: Kent State Universitys Office of Global Education is
experiencing a lack of participation in its study abroad programs from the growing population of
AALANA undergraduate students. This nationwide problem stems in part from negative familial
perceptions of study abroad, fear of racism and financial restrictions among AALANA students.
A tailored, highly personal communication and outreach plan aimed at AALANA students, their
parents and Kent State Multicultural Center staff will help OGE address these issues,
demonstrate the tangible value of study abroad and attract more AALANA students to
participate.
B. Analysis of Internal and External Factors:
1. Internal Factors:

Strengths of management and staff of the Office of Global Education include their
dedication to enriching students through study abroad and motivation toward
increasing participation in their programs. Assistant Director of Education Abroad,
Ediz Kaykayoglu, is of Turkish descent and is currently studying abroad at Kent State
University. He offers an informed opinion on the benefits of studying abroad and can
serve as a role model for prospective AALANA study abroad participants. As the
Associate Provost for OGE, Dr. Marcello Fantoni serves as a passionate advocate on

behalf of international education. Fantoni, an Italian native, served as the director of


Kent State in Florence from 2005-2012. He was able to increase enrollment by 50
percent, create new curricula and develop new summer programs. Other staff
members devoted to promoting education abroad include Director of International
Programs and Service, Dr. David Di Maria and Director of Academic Relations,
Deborah Davis. Although these professionals work for OGE, they are not solely
responsible for increasing participation in study abroad. Currently, there are only two
professionals dedicated to advancing Kent State student participation in study abroad.
Additionally, OGE lacks a development officer to pursue the necessary funding from
private donors to provide students with study abroad scholarships.
2. External Factors:

Communication between the Office of Global Education and its key publics is
inconsistent and often insufficient. Interviews conducted with random students found
that they are unfamiliar with the duties of OGE and dont connect it with study abroad
programs. They also expressed that materials given to them by OGE representatives
were cluttered with information, making it difficult for them to find out more about
the specific programs they were interested in. Its normal approach to advertising and
promotion is uneven, usually consisting of various fliers. Some are so overloaded
with information that they can intimidate students. OGE hosts study abroad fairs, but
the students who attend appear to already be motivated to go abroad and do not
represent the AALANA population it is trying to reach. Communication is largely
one-way in relation to prospective students. OGE disseminates information but
provides little follow-up, leaving students who were somewhat interested with no

proper contact information. At events held by OGE, students are often times given an
overwhelming amount of fliers, pamphlets and packets with an excess amount of
information. The process of applying to study abroad is tedious and many students
may not pursue it without knowing where to find guidance from the Office of Global
Education. Study abroad advising hours and locations are not posted clearly,
frequently or on any materials provided by the office. The Office of Global Education
has two main social media platforms: Facebook and Twitter. Their Facebook page has
a substantial following at 2,062 likes, posting on average twice a week. The posts
contain mostly informational links or questions asking for student engagement. Even
though the page has many likes, they rarely get a response from students. OGEs
Twitter account, which was created in September, only has 39 followers and has
tweeted 28 times since its creation. Its tweets are mainly just restating content from
the Facebook page and get little engagement from students.

Supporters of OGE include students who previously studied abroad who had a
positive experience as well as academic advisors who believe that it is a worthwhile
opportunity. Others include Kent State faculty and students who hold leadership
positions and encourage studying abroad.

OGEs opponents of study abroad include faculty members who have a negative
attitude toward traveling abroad and discourage their students from doing so.

C. Historical Information

OGE has met national standards regarding the amount of students it sends abroad, but
like most universities, it struggles with its ability to reach and motivate AALANA
students. Historically, many AALANA students face greater challenges than

10

traditional study abroad students when it comes to participation. Many AALANA


students in the U.S. are first generation college students whose families are usually
unaware of the value in an international education. According to research, this
population needs to understand the potential return on investment study abroad can
provide for their education. For African Americans, the fear of racism, harassment
and violence overseas is a main barrier preventing them from studying abroad. Latin
Americans tend to place more value on their parents perceptions of studying abroad.
They are usually more emotionally place bound, meaning they are not willing to
travel far from their families for extended periods. Many Native Americans rely on
tribal scholarships to attend college. These scholarships are often funded through the
Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, which prohibits government bodies from touching
money received from Native American owned casinos. These scholarships can only
be applied to study abroad if the study abroad program is required for graduation
because tribes funds are so scarce. Within the Native American population, many
tribes exist. Each tribe has different values that affect its attitude toward international
education. University and OGE outreach programs have not put enough resources
toward addressing these concerns and demonstrating to students the tangible and
intangible benefits of study abroad to the AALANA population.
D. Analysis of Environmental Factors:

There are a variety of key issues affecting OGE's ability to increase study abroad
programs. In general, many Kent State University students are more susceptible to
culture shock because they live in a less globally diverse community than students
living in more international cities. AALANA students specifically face greater

11

financial inequality, with the average income for a Caucasian family totaling $57,009,
while African American families average $33,321 and Latin American families
$39,500. This income gap creates uncertainty among AALANA students, particularly
African American, on how to finance a trip abroad. Along with this monetary
disparity, Latin Americans specifically face a lack of parental and peer support. The
Office of Global Educations communication tactics dont feature AALANA students.
This makes it challenging for prospective AALANA students to see themselves
participating in study abroad programs.
IV. Publics: The publics listed below have been identified as those among the AALANA
population we seek to motivate to participate in study abroad programs or who have influence
over AALANA students decisions. The number of undergraduate AALANA students enrolling
in college is increasing each year. Since 1976, enrollment among Latin Americans has increased
from three to 13 percent; African American enrollment from nine to 14 percent; and Native
Americans from less than one percent to almost two percent. In general, Kent States AALANA
enrollment has risen to approximately seven percent of the undergraduate student body. This
increase in the AALANA undergraduate population presents an opportunity to instill the benefits
of studying abroad in each race represented. These students parents are a main source of
encouragement and financial support, often playing a key role in deciding whether or not the
student will study abroad. Lastly, the Kent State Multicultural Center, located in Oscar Ritchie
Hall, provides AALANA students with resources to succeed in their college careers and acts as a
support structure for these often underrepresented students.
A. Primary publics
1. African-American undergraduate students

12

a. Approximately 10 percent of Kent State undergraduates are African Americans. One of


the main deterrents to African Americans studying abroad is the potential financial
burden it may place on the individual or their family. By disseminating the proper
information about the actual costs of studying abroad and the potential return on
investment, their negative perceptions will be minimized. African Americans also already
feel as though they have had a multicultural experience everyday because they are a
minority. Another barrier that significantly affects African Americans is the fear of
experiencing racism abroad while they are away from their major support system of
family and friends. Increasing their interactions with AALANA student study abroad
ambassadors will be a main way OGE can calm their fears.
2. Latin-American undergraduate students
a. Approximately four percent of Kent State undergraduates are Latin Americans.
Although the percentage is smaller than compared to African Americans, Latin
Americans are a rapidly growing population. They have increasingly shown outstanding
drive in pursuing a more well-rounded and fulfilling education. Their biggest barrier to
studying abroad is that they do not feel comfortable leaving their families for an extended
period of time.
3. Native-American undergraduate students
a. Although Native Americans represent less than one percent of the population at Kent
State, they remain a significant public who should be targeted to experience study abroad.
Communication between this public and OGE will be easy and efficient because of its
small size. Tribal impediments are a primary reason many Native American students
decide against participating in a study abroad program. Native American students already

13

have to transition from reservation life to college, which can be difficult for some, so
studying abroad seems like even more of a challenge. Also, many Native American
scholarships will not apply to study abroad.
4. Kent State Multicultural Center
a. The university's multicultural center is located on the second floor of the Student
Center. It serves as an advocate to help underrepresented students embrace diversity
through educational and cultural programs. OGE has not yet established a partnership
with them; such a partnership could encourage many AALANA students to investigate its
study abroad programs.
5. Parents of AALANA Kent State Students
a. Many AALANA students are first-generation college students, so their parents are just
as new to the college atmosphere as they are. Their unfamiliarity with college, the costs
and what is expected of and possible for students, leads to a general disregard of studying
abroad as a legitimate option. By providing parents with information on their benefits of
studying abroad, their disapproval of international education can be eased.
B. Secondary publics

Returning AALANA students who have previously studied abroad.


o These students are major opinion leaders, influencers and ambassadors to other
AALANA students. With the support of the OGE, returning AALANA students
will become OGEs student ambassadors. These ambassadors can give informed
advice, promote positive attitudes and explain the benefits of studying abroad.
They can connect with AALANA students on a personal level through face-to-

14

face communication that other representatives from the Office of Global


Education and Kent State cannot.
V. Objectives: Research found that AALANA students limitations can be best addressed by
encouraging them to participate in short-term study abroad programs, which range from two
weeks to a month in duration. Short-term programs are less expensive and do not require
students to spend an extended period of time away from home. The following objectives are
tailored to promote short-term programs to AALANA students.
A. To increase the recruitment, training and deployment of AALANA student ambassadors by 25
percent by the end of spring semester 2015.
B. To increase AALANA undergraduate students awareness of the Office of Global Educations
short-term study abroad programs by 25 percent by the end of spring semester 2015.
C. To increase parental acceptance and awareness of study abroad by 25 percent each year by the
end of spring semester 2017.
D. To increase participation in study abroad programs by AALANA undergraduate students
annually by the end of spring semester 2017.
African American: 10 percent
Latin American: 5 percent
Native American: 5 percent
VI. Key messages and Theme
Study abroad is affordable with planning.
There are resources to guide you through this process.
While studying abroad, you will have a support system.
Study abroad has a significant return on investment.
Theme: Travel is an expense that makes you richer.
VII. Strategies and Tactics by Objective
Objective 1: To increase the recruitment, training and deployment of AALANA student
ambassadors by 25 percent by the end of spring semester 2015.
1. Strategy: Reach AALANA students who have studied abroad in an informative and
empowering way so they can repeat key messages and information as well as dispel
misconceptions about study abroad.
a. Tactic: Recruit six AALANA students who have studied abroad by offering
paid AALANA student ambassador positions with OGE.
Use the Student Multicultural Center listserv to send out an email
informing AALANA students about the available position.
To apply, the students must be African American, Latin American or
Native American and have previously studied abroad.
15

Interested AALANA students who meet the qualifications can send in their
resume to be reviewed by OGE.
b. Tactic: Create a training program for newly recruited AALANA student
ambassadors.
Educate newly recruited AALANA student ambassadors by providing
specific programs, costs, scholarship information and tactics in use by
OGE to increase participation among AALANA undergraduate students.
Instruct newly recruited AALANA student ambassadors on how to
effectively disseminate information and benefits regarding study abroad,
specifically catering to AALANA undergraduate student populations.
Provide information on how to obtain passports and visas.
Empower each AALANA student ambassador to confidently answer any
questions a prospective student may have about study abroad.
2. Strategy: Create a positive, engaging identity for AALANA student ambassadors.
a. Tactic: Establish Travel is an expense that makes you richer as the tagline for
AALANA study abroad students.
Each AALANA student ambassador will receive a T-shirt with the tagline
printed across the back so they can be easily identified.
Evaluation Methods:
Survey student ambassadors to assess their knowledge of specific programs, costs,
scholarship information and tactics in use by OGE after they have received training.
Objective 2: To increase AALANA undergraduate students awareness of the Office of Global
Educations short-term study abroad programs by 25 percent by the end of spring semester 2015.
1. Strategy: Use AALANA ambassadors and Multicultural Center staff to raise
awareness of study abroad opportunities in fun, inspiring and interpersonal ways.
a. Tactic: Host Picture Yourself There event at the Multicultural Center.
Rent two photo booths for students to use. The photo backgrounds will
feature different study abroad locations offered by OGE. Students will
receive one copy to keep and have the option to email a digital copy to
friends and family via the photo booths interactive screen.
-One photo booth will be Florence-themed and the other will be
Geneva-themed with appropriate backdrops for each. Both
Florence and Geneva are well-known short-term study abroad
programs.
-Photo strips will feature the program name and application
deadline at the bottom.
AALANA ambassadors and Multicultural Center staff will set up
interactive tables for each short-term study abroad program available.
-Application forms for Florence and Geneva will be provided.
-Passport application forms will also be available.

16

-Each table will feature information on a specific short-term study


abroad program along with hor doeuvres associated with that
country.
-Each table will also give the opportunity to write down their name
and contact information.
An area will be designated where students can get their official passport
photo taken free of charge, normally a $25 fee.

b. Tactic: OGE will co-sponsor ethnic food-theme nights with Dining Services
such as Soul Food and La Caliente Noche.
Eastway Cafe holds special themed food nights multiple times a semester
serving cuisine from a certain culture each night. For example, La Caliente
Noche features Mexican and Latin American foods.
A study abroad informational table will be present at these events.
-AALANA student ambassadors and Multicultural Center staff will
work an information table to hand out short-term program
brochures and promotional items.
-Students will be able to provide their email so they can receive
further updates on OGE short-term programs.
2. Strategy: Use controlled media to promote awareness of events, short-term programs
and deadlines.
a. Tactic: Display travel posters in locations AALANA undergraduate students
frequently visit, including the Multicultural Center on the second floor of the Kent
State Student Center and Oscar Ritchie Hall.
b. Tactic: Place an advertisement promoting short-term study abroad programs in
minority publications such as Uhuru Magazine.
The full-page, full-color advertisement will be featured in February and
October issues.
3. Strategy: Use OGEs social media assets to spread awareness of short-term programs
and increase engagement with Kent State ALANNA students.
a. Tactic: Create posts on OGEs Facebook and Twitter profiles.
b. Tactic: Develop a greater social media presence by creating OGE Instagram
and Vine accounts.
Instagram and Vine are more visual social media platforms. They can
show a students experience abroad from their point of view.
Evaluation Methods:
Record number of Picture Yourself There attendees.
Attendees will be asked to fill out a simple survey before they leave the event. Every
10th student who completes the survey will receive a free OGE sticker or T-shirt. The
survey will consist of questions regarding their awareness of short-term study abroad
programs. As part of the survey students will be asked to provide their email address.
These results will be compared to the baseline awareness survey.
Monitor social media engagement of OGEs profiles.
17

-Engagement will be evaluated by recording how many AALANA students are


commenting, posting, liking, sharing and otherwise interacting with OGEs social media
accounts.
Objective 3: To increase parental acceptance and awareness of study abroad by 25 percent each
year by the end of spring semester 2017.
1. Strategy: Use controlled media in a factual way to show parents the benefits of
studying abroad.
a. Tactic: Create a comprehensive brochure that highlights short-term programs,
affordability and return on investment.
Distribute at Destination Kent State via the OGE informational table.
2.Strategy: Build parental awareness of study abroad programs through concise,
informational face-to-face communication.
a. Tactic: Multicultural Center staff will have a study abroad informational table
present at Academic STARS parent information sessions.
Staff members will pass out short-term program brochures and answer
questions regarding study abroad.
b. Tactic: During the Academic STARS parent informational session, parents of
AALANA student ambassadors will introduce study abroad programs, why they
supported their childs interest in studying abroad, how they financed the trip and
how it has benefitted their child.
-After the session is over, parents will be asked to provide their contact
information.
-Recruitment for parents will begin shortly after the six AALANA student
ambassadors have been chosen and trained. OGE will mail a letter to
parents seeking their assistance in conducting the STARS parent
informational session.
Evaluation Method:
Conduct focus groups with parents of undergraduate AALANA students to assess the
effectiveness of face-to-face communications and controlled media in raising awareness
and acceptance of study abroad. These results would be compared to the baseline focus
groups.
Record number of parents of AALANA student ambassadors recruited to speak at the
Academic STARS parent informational session.
Following the session, parents will be sent a digital survey within two weeks regarding
their awareness and opinions of OGEs short-term study abroad programs.
Objective 4: To increase participation in study abroad programs by AALANA undergraduate
students annually by the end of spring semester 2017.
- African American: 10 percent each year for 3 years.
- Latin American: 5 percent each year for 3 years.
- Native American: 5 percent each year for 3 years.
1.Strategy: Use an informal, face-to-face informational communication with AALANA
student ambassadors and staff at the Multicultural Center.
18

a. Tactic: Destination Date: Students will have the opportunity to sign up for an
casual meeting with one of the student ambassadors after the ambassadors give
their presentations. These dates will take place at a local Kent restaurant. To
sign up, students will provide their email and what program(s) they are interested
in. Ambassadors will then email the students to set up a time and place for their
Destination Date.
Each meeting will take place at a local Kent restaurant that serves food
associated with the country the student is interested in. For example, a
student interested in the South Korea program would have their
Destination Date at Newdle Bar.
Destination Dates will give students a chance to speak with AALANA
study abroad ambassadors one-on-one about the specific program theyre
interested in and address any concerns they may have. Ambassadors will
also provide a study abroad application to the specific program the student
expresses interest in.
b. Tactic: AALANA student ambassadors will visit Pan-African Studies classes to
speak to students about their experiences studying abroad.
Ambassadors will promote affordability and return on investment.
Ambassadors will show a 5-minute presentation featuring pictures of them
during their time abroad.
Interested students will provide their contact information to the student
ambassadors to get sent further information and to set up Destination
Dates.
c. Tactic: AALANA student ambassadors and Multicultural Center staff will visit
Kent State Universitys African-American sororities (Delta Sigma Theta, Sigma
Gamma Rho and Zeta Phi Beta) and fraternities (Phi Beta Sigma and Omega Psi
Phi) chapter meetings.
Promote affordability and return on investment.
Distribute brochures featuring short-term program information.
Students will provide their contact information so follow up visits can be
conducted and to remind the chapter members of upcoming study abroad
events and application deadlines.
d. Tactic: Co-sponsor the Black United Students (BUS) annual Renaissance Ball.
OGE will work with BUS to create an overarching theme for the ball that
relates to travel.
Tickets for the event will be passport themed and will feature OGE contact
information on the back.
e. Tactic: AALANA student study abroad ambassadors and Multicultural Center
staff will visit Kent States Native American Student Association meetings.
19

Promote available scholarships.


Ambassadors will show a 5-minute presentation featuring pictures of them
during their time abroad.
Moderate an informal discussion regarding misconceptions of study
abroad.
Destination Date Students will have the opportunity to sign up for an
informal, informational meeting with one of the student ambassadors after
the ambassadors give their presentations. These dates will take place at a
local Kent restaurant. To sign up, students will provide their email and
what program(s) they are interested in. Ambassadors will then email the
students to set up a time and place for their Destination Date.
-Each meeting will take place at a local Kent restaurant that serves
food associated with the country the student is interested in. For
example, a student interested in the South Korea program would
have their Destination Date at Newdle Bar.
-Destination Dates will give students a chance to speak with
AALANA study abroad ambassadors one-on-one about the
specific program theyre interested in and address any concerns
they may have. Ambassadors will also provide a study abroad
application to the specific program the student expresses interest
in.
f. Tactic: AALANA student ambassadors will visit Kent States Latin-American
fraternity, Phi Iota Alpha, and Spanish and Latino Student Association (SALSA)
meetings and events.
Promote affordability and return on investment.
Distribute brochures featuring short-term study abroad program
information.
Ambassadors will show a 5-minute presentation featuring pictures of them
during their time abroad.
Destination Date Students will have the opportunity to sign up for an
informal, informational meeting with one of the student ambassadors after
the ambassadors give their presentations. The dates will take place at a
local Kent restaurant. To sign up, students will provide their email and
what program(s) they are interested in. Ambassadors will then email the
students to set up a time and place for their Destination Date.
-Each meeting will take place at a local Kent restaurant that serves
food associated with the country the student is interested in. For
example, a student interested in the South Korea program would
have their Destination Date at Newdle Bar.
-Destination Dates will give students a chance to speak with
AALANA study abroad ambassadors one-on-one about the
specific program theyre interested in and address any concerns
they may have. Ambassadors will also provide a study abroad
application to the specific program the student expresses interest
in.
20

g. Tactic: AALANA student ambassadors and Multicultural Center staff will hold
tables at every Kent State Universitys multicultural fairs.
Ambassadors and staff will hand out informational brochures and free
promotional items.
-T-shirts featuring the campaign theme Travel is an expense that
makes you richer, as well as a list of programs offered by OGE on
the back.
-Black and white oval stickers with OGE on them. The O in
OGE would be a globe.
Students will be able to provide their email addresses to
be sent study abroad information.
2. Strategy: Create a partnership between OGE and Kent State Career Services.
a. Tactic: Invite Career Services representatives to be present at OGE events,
such as study abroad fairs and tablings.
Representatives would promote on-campus job openings, highlighting the
potential earnings as a way to partially finance study abroad.
Representatives would hand out hot cards naming all the areas currently
hiring on campus and information on how to apply to the positions.
3. Strategy: Use controlled media to reach Kent State AALANA students in a
straightforward, yet inviting manner.
a. Tactic: Create a tailored e-blast campaign for AALANA student populations
through their separate student listservs, which can be accessed through the
Student Multicultural Center.
Create a Three Simple Ways to Save for Study Abroad campaign that
will be sent out at the beginning of the semester. Example:
-Give up a daily luxury.
-Save loose change for a year.
-Cut down on partying.
Create a follow-up e-blast: Three Simple Ways to Find Study Abroad
Financial Aid that will be sent out before application deadlines and
before the end of the semester.
-This e-blast will focus on how students can find financial aid
through Kent State University and other sources.
The e-blasts will also be sent to students who have given their emails to
OGE at events and at informational tables.
c. Tactic: Display posters and brochures in areas that AALANA students
frequently visit, including the Multicultural Center on the second floor of the Kent
State Student Center and Oscar Ritchie Hall.
4. Strategy: Use Twitter to generate excitement and awareness of short-term study
abroad programs.
a. Tactic: Create a contest through OGEs Twitter to have five passport fees paid
for.
To win, students must attend a study abroad event, snap a picture with an
AALANA student ambassador and post the picture, mentioning OGEs
Twitter along with #SendMeAbroad. The five students who accumulate
21

the most retweets within two weeks from the start date will have their
passport fees paid for by OGE.
To officially receive the financial award students must be in good
academic standing, with OGE reserving the right to select the final
winners.

Evaluation Methods:
Record number of African American, Native American and Latin American students who
studied abroad compared to the previous year.
Record number of students who attended Destination Dates.
Record and analyze the number of media impressions of OGE social media sites.
-Number of mentions, retweets and favorites by AALANA students.
VIII. Budget- listed below are estimated costs that cover Spring 2014-Spring 2015
implementation and are subject to change.
A. Picture Yourself There Event.
People
-Participants
-Multicultural Center staff will already be working from 6 p.m.-8 p.m., this is not an
added cost.
-AALANA student ambassadors
Money
-wage for AALANA student ambassadors (6 workers at $94.20)
-photo booths (2 at $998)
-props (costumes: $100)
-Hor doeuvres, silverware, drinks, napkins, cups ($700)
Resources
- http://www.photoboothroyale.com/
-Kent State Dining Services
-http://www.shindigz.com/
B. Ethnic food nights at Eastway Cafe (4:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m.)
People
-KSU students
-AALANA student ambassadors
-Dining Services student workers
Money
-co-sponsorship (2 events at $5,000)
-wages for AALANA student ambassadors (2 at $62.80)
Resources
-Eastway Cafe
C. Destination Date
People
22

-Undergraduate AALANA students


-AALANA student ambassadors
Money
-$30 meal for two (maximum dates=30 at $900)
Resources
-Local Kent restaurants

D. Visits and Informational Tables


People
-AALANA student ambassadors
-Multicultural Center staff
-AALANA student population
-Career Services representatives
Money
-Average wage per tabling for AALANA student ambassadors (3 hours, 2 ambassadors at
$7.85: $47.10)
-Average wage per visit for AALANA student ambassadors (1 hour, 2 ambassadors at
$7.85: $15.70)
-Wage for five minute AALANA student ambassador slideshow creation (2 hours, 6
ambassadors at $7.85: $94.20)
Resources
-Pan-African studies classes
-African-American sororities and fraternities
-Native American Student Association
-Latin-American fraternity
-Spanish and Latino Student Association
-projector, screen, USB port accessibility
-Oscar Ritchie Hall
-Kent State Multicultural Center
E. Merchandise
People
-AALANA undergraduate student population
-AALANA student ambassador
Money
-giveaways t-shirts (500 at $2,500)
-student ambassador t-shirts (6 at $60)
-stickers (2,000 at $400)
Resources
-Universitees
-4imprint.com
F. Twitter Contest
23

People
-OGE Staff
-AALANA student ambassadors
-AALANA student population
Money
-5 passport fees at ($825)
Resources
-OGE Twitter profile

G. Controlled Media
People
-AALANA student ambassadors
-AALANA student population
-Multicultural Center staff
-Parents of AALANA students
Money
-Brochures (5,000 at $700)
-Posters (500 at $75)
-Survey paper (400 copies at $.10 a copy: $40)
Resources
-Minuteman Press
-Office of Global Education
-Pan-African studies classes
-Eastway Cafe
-African-American sororities and fraternities
-Native American Student Association
-Latin American fraternity
-Spanish and Latino Student Association
-Oscar Ritchie Hall
-Multicultural Center
H. Research Recommendations
People
-AALANA student ambassadors
-Multicultural Center Staff
-AALANA undergraduate students.
Money
-Wage for AALANA student ambassador (2 hours, 6 ambassadors at $7.85: $94.20)
-Survey paper (100 copies at $.10 a copy: $10)
Resources
-Multicultural Center
-Minuteman Press
Total Budget per year: $12,717.20
Total Budget from spring 2014-spring 2017: $38,148.60

24

IX. Schedule- one year, repeated for three


-All social media profiles should be regularly updated throughout entire academic year.
-Invite Career Services representatives to attend all AALANA study abroad events.

January
Hang posters

Recruitment
and training of
student
ambassadors

Launch e-blast
campaign
number 1

Awareness
survey

Class visits

Greek life
visits

February
Picture
Yourself There

Twitter
Contest

Food themed
nights

Place Ad in
Uhuru

March

April
Hang posters

Multicultural
fair

Launch e-blast
campaign
number 2

May
June
Academic
STARS

Parent focus
group

July
Academic
STARS

Establish
relationship
between OGE
and Career
Services

Parent focus
group

Training
sessions

Create new
brochure

Hang posters

August
Launch e-blast
campaign
number 1

25

September
Class visits

Greek life
visits

Clubs/Organiza
tions visits

Food themed
nights

Hang posters

Place ad in
Uhuru

Multicultural
fairs

Launch e-blast
campaign
number 2

October

November

December

26