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#lgbtsouth April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com
#lgbtsouth April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com
#lgbtsouth April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com

#lgbtsouth

April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com

#lgbtsouth April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com
#lgbtsouth April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com
#lgbtsouth April 17 & 18, 2015 Asheville, North Carolina lgbtinthesouth.com

#lgbtsouth

You’re here at the 2015 LGBT* in the South conference, joined by hundreds of organizers and practitioners working for equality in every Southern state. You’ve checked into your hotel, you’ve gotten your morning coffee and you’re ready to exchange ideas in our collective effort to advance LGBT* rights! But the conversations won’t end after Saturday. The Southern LGBT* rights movement lives online with the hashtag #lgbtsouth. We encourage you to use the hashtag both during the conference and beyond.

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Welcome from Advisory Committee Welcome from Asheville Mayor Esther Manheimer Conference Sponsors Keynote & Plenaries About Keynote Speaker Mandy Carter Conference Access Venue Locations Schedule Campaign Lab and Workshop Descriptions LGBT*-welcoming spaces in Asheville Next Steps

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welcome to the conference

Rev. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara Executive Director, Campaign for Southern Equality

Executive Director, Campaign for Southern Equality W elcome to Asheville and to the second annual LGBT*

Welcome to Asheville and to the second annual LGBT* in the South conference.

Our hope is that these next two days will be a time for learning, connecting, sharing ideas and strategies and, together, shaping the movement for equality in the South.

This is a dynamic moment in the South related to LGBT* equality, racial justice and economic justice – issues which cannot be separated and which also each have distinct contours. Through workshops on topics like LGBT* history and a structural analysis of injustice, this year’s conference will focus on the intersections and divergences between these issues.

Organizers across the South are working with great courage and resilience. But we also face the realities of limited financial resources, urgent needs in our community, robust opposition and isolation. This conference is meant to be a place where people and groups can connect and also explore effective models of collaboration.

With so much at stake, this is a time to act. That’s why we’re hosting two Campaign Labs focused on developing campaign skills and specific tactics you can implement in your hometown immediately.

I am more convinced than ever that the most vital work to be done in the South will be done by Southern leaders working in their hometowns to move the conversation and change policy in order to help transform our region. We are grateful for the work you do each day and grateful to be with you in Asheville for these next two days.

region. We are grateful for the work you do each day and grateful to be with
region. We are grateful for the work you do each day and grateful to be with
region. We are grateful for the work you do each day and grateful to be with

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building our movement

Conference Advisory Committee

We’d like to welcome each of you to the 2015 LGBT* in the South conference. It’s an exciting time for the Southern LGBT* movement: As we witness huge strides in our communities, we also live with sobering tragedies. It’s important in these moments that we stand together and work across our lines of difference to make the change that we wish to see.

Our committee, diverse in experience, geography, scope of work, race, ethnicity, gender identity and background, has had the privilege of working over the past year to build what we believe is a valuable and unique

resource for the Southern LGBT* community. Our vision was to create an experience that focuses on intersectional organizing and collaborative work, provide a space for connections and relationship-building, and to educate and empower Southern practitioners and service providers to better serve the LGBT* community.

We’d like to thank you for attending and for bringing your knowledge, skills and passion to this gathering. We hope you all will take advantage of the next two days to learn and grow together and that you will look to each other for ongoing support in the movement toward building a better South.

support in the movement toward building a better South. José Alegría Michael Crawford Mae Craedick Ivy
support in the movement toward building a better South. José Alegría Michael Crawford Mae Craedick Ivy
support in the movement toward building a better South. José Alegría Michael Crawford Mae Craedick Ivy
support in the movement toward building a better South. José Alegría Michael Crawford Mae Craedick Ivy
support in the movement toward building a better South. José Alegría Michael Crawford Mae Craedick Ivy

José Alegría

Michael Crawford

Mae Craedick

Ivy Hill

Maya Rupert

El Centro

Freedom to

Hart Law Group

Gender Benders

National Center

Hispano

Marry

Asheville, NC

Greenville, SC

for Lesbian Rights

Durham, NC

New York, NY

Washington, DC

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conference sponsors

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6 conference sponsors
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at

Center for Gender and Relationships

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Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at Trinity
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at Trinity
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at Trinity
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at Trinity
Center for Gender and Relationships 7 Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at Trinity

Meet the sponsors at the exhibit in Tuton at Trinity Episcopal Church.

Keynote Address: Our LGBT* Movement at a Crossroads?

Speaker: Mandy Carter, National Black Justice Coalition The U.S. Supreme Court is poised to deliver a historic ruling in June granting the constitutional right for same-sex couples to marry in all

50 states. In 2013, the Supreme Court ruled favorably for the LGBT* community on the Defense Of Marriage Act (DOMA) and Proposition 8 in California, while at the same time all but gutting the 1965 Voting Rights Act and giving unfavorable rulings on immigration and affirmative action. By 2050 this country will be majority people of color, and the state of California already is. Will our

LGBT* movement and LGBT* organizations reflect this ever-changing demographic not only in how it looks but the issues that we will be actively engaged in? Are we about justice or are we about just us? The keynote will address how to move forward together during a dynamic, charged time in our movement and the South. 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. Friday | Diana Wortham Theatre

plenaries

Transgender Advocacy, Justice & Leadership in the South

Panelists: Allister Styan, Western North Carolina Health Systems; Andrea Zekis, Human Rights Campaign; Kelly Durden, Legal Services of Southern Piedmont; Holiday Simmons, Lambda Legal Moderator: Meghann Burke, Campaign for Southern Equality This panel will focus on advocacy, legal, health and safety issues within the trans* community in the South. The panel will highlight organizing, leadership and service delivery models that are working effectively in the South. Federal legal protections for trans* Southerners as well as pressing needs within the community related to poverty, unemployment and bias-related violent crime will also be addressed. 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. Friday | Diana Wortham Theatre

Religious Freedom, Faith & LGBT* Issues in the South

Panelists: Bishop Tonyia Rawls, Freedom Center for Social Justice; Rabbi Joshua Lesser, Congregation Bet Haverim; Alex McNeill, More Light Presbyterians; Alba Onofrío, SoulForce Moderator: Rev. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara, Campaign for Southern Equality This panel will focus on the complex intersection of religious freedom, faith and the push for LGBT* equality in the South. Panelists will talk about the role of faith in advocacy efforts as well as spiritual issues and needs within the LGBT community. Panelists will also discuss religious freedom issues including the flood of religious exemption bills being introduced across the region. 8:30 - 9:30 a.m. Saturday | Diana Wortham Theatre

Next Steps

Campaign for Southern Equality staff Join us for a closing session where we’ll say goodbye (for now!), talk next steps in our shared work, and announce the first grant recipients of the Southern Equality Fund. 3:30 - 4:00 p.m. Saturday | Diana Wortham Theatre

about mandy carter

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about mandy carter 9 M andy Carter is a Southern activist who has organized for social,

Mandy Carter is a Southern activist who has organized for social, racial and LGBT* justice for the past 47 years. Carter was influenced at an early age by Quaker service and anti-war activism, and she attributes the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign, organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with inspiring her commitment to nonviolence.

Recently, Carter helped organize diverse broad- based participation in this year’s 50th Anniversary Selma-To-Montgomery Voting Rights March, commemorating the events that moved Congress to pass the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Carter is the coordinator of the Bayard Rustin Commemoration Project of the National Black Justice Coalition, an effort to acknowledge, honor and celebrate black gay civil rights activist Bayard Rustin.

Carter helped co-found two groundbreaking organizations: Southerners On New Ground (SONG) and the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC). Founded in 1993, SONG organizes for progressive policies across the South, connecting supporters

across race, class, culture, gender, sexual orientation and gender identity. SONG integrates work against homophobia into freedom struggles in the South. She served as its Executive Director from 2003-2005.

NBJC, founded in 2003, is a national civil rights organization dedicated to empowering Black LGBT* people. NBJC’s mission is to end racism and homophobia. NBJC provides leadership at the intersection of national civil rights organizations and LGBT* organizations. Advocating for the unique challenges and needs of the African-American LGBT* community that are often relegated to the sidelines. History was made at the 100th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP in 2009 when they rolled out their NAACP LGBT Equality Task Force, a new partnership of the NAACP and NBJC.

Carter was one of the five national co-chairs of Obama LGBT Pride, the national LGBT* infrastructure for Barack Obama’s historic 2008 presidential campaign. She is also a former member of the Democratic National Committee’s Black Caucus and LGBT Caucus.

In 2005, Carter was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize as part of the 1000 Women for the Nobel Peace Prize in order to recognize, make visible and celebrate the important, yet often invisible peace work of women around the world.

Carter lives in Durham, North Carolina.

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accessibility

If you have any questions about conference access, please ask a member of the conference team.

what the asterisk means

Identities within the trans* community are as diverse as each unique person. Because the term “trans*” is an umbrella term that describes multiple gender identities, we use the asterisk behind the “T” in LGBT* to acknowledge and respect each person’s gender identity. The asterisk delineates identities such as transgender, genderqueer, agender, non-binary, gender nonconforming, two-spirit, gender fluid, bi-gender and many more.

respecting pronouns

Pronoun pins are provided for each participant at check-in. Everyone will have the opportunity to choose the pin that corresponds with their pronouns. We ask that all conference participants be intentional about respecting the pronouns of other participants.

all gender restrooms

Select restrooms at Pack Place and all of the restrooms at Trinity Episcopal Church are designated for use by people of any or no gender, and are marked with all gender restroom signs. See the venue map or talk to a volunteer to locate the all gender restrooms.

language access

We are happy to offer Spanish and English simultaneous interpretation throughout the conference, as well as provide bilingual conference materials. All plenaries and select workshops will be offering simultaneous interpretation. Please refer to the conference schedule or visit the interpretation table in the Pack Place lobby to see which workshops will have English/Spanish interpretation. Attendees can find bilingual assistance from interpreters, staff and volunteers wearing green ribbons.

accessing conference locations

To locate accessible entrances and elevators, please refer to the maps provided at conference check-in or ask a volunteer for assistance. Pack Place is wheelchair accessible via all entrances and from the adjacent parking garage. All floors have elevator access. Trinity Episcopal Church is wheelchair accessible from the Church Street entrance and the courtyard entrance on Aston Street. All rooms are on one level, with the exception of the mini chapel, which has a ramp. Transport between venues via shuttle will be offered at all times during the conference. See the map on page 12 for shuttle locations.

The 2015 US Trans Survey is the new name of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, which is the largest survey ever devoted to the lives and experiences of trans people. As the community’s survey, it will reflect all trans identities and be used to educate the public about who we are.

The Survey launches in Summer 2015. Sign up and spread the word at USTransSurvey.org

S. Market St. 12 venue locations Patton Ave. Biltmore Ave. conference shuttle S. Lexington Ave.
S. Market St.
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venue locations
Patton Ave.
Biltmore Ave.
conference
shuttle
S. Lexington Ave.
parking
5 min
walk
Eagle St.
Colburn Earth
Science Museum
Church St.
Asheville Art
Aston St.
Museum
parking
Diana Wortham
Theatre
Trinity
Aloft
Episcopal
Hotel
Church
conference
shuttle
Growing Leaders to Build Change. Become a Tzedek Social Justice Resident. The Tzedek Social Justice

Growing Leaders to Build Change.

Become a Tzedek Social Justice Resident.

The Tzedek Social Justice Residency joins people of different backgrounds to work in common cause toward equality for all people. This yearlong residency was created to capture and uplift rising talent by developing essential organizing and leadership skills through social justice and community work. Each year beginning in August, a group of young adults selected as Tzedek Residents are paid to engage in full-time meaningful work within Asheville area non-profit organizations. Committed to developing strong and diverse future leaders, the Residency equips young adults with multiple transferable skills. Residents participate together in meetings, trainings, and conferences to explore and better understand the intersectionality of class, gender, sexuality, faith traditions, and ethnicity. The program provides residents and supervisors with orientation, trainings, and access to an outreach coordinator designed to strengthen the mentor-resident experience.

Contact TzedekResidency@gmail.com for information. Applications accepted beginning March 23 for the following host organizations:

• Center for Diversity Education at UNCA

• Center for Gender and Relationships at WWC

• Campaign for Southern Equality

• Spirit In Action

• Asheville Jewish Community Center

• Green Opportunities

for Southern Equality • Spirit In Action • Asheville Jewish Community Center • Green Opportunities 2014-15

2014-15 Residents

friday schedule 14 8:00 (all day) Check in   Diana Wortham Theatre Lobby 9:00 -
friday schedule 14 8:00 (all day) Check in   Diana Wortham Theatre Lobby 9:00 -
friday schedule
friday schedule

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8:00 (all day)

Check in

 

Diana Wortham Theatre Lobby

9:00 - 10:00

Welcome & Keynote Address

Diana Wortham Theatre

10:30- 11:30

Workshop Session 1

 
 

Criminalization of the Trans* Community and Get Yer Rights!

Undercroft (Trinity Episcopal)

 

How to Get Funding in the South

Forum (D. Wortham Theatre)

 

Love Has No Borders

Finally:

Perspectives

Mini Chapel (Trinity Episcopal)

on Equality and Immigration Law

11:30 - 1:00

Lunch

 

Box lunch pickup in Tuton

See page 18 for full descriptions of the workshops.

1:00 - 3:00

Workshop Session 2A

Hashtagging a New Story of the South

Film Screening Room (Art Museum)

Roots and Connections: Getting at the Structure of Justice and Injustice

Undercroft (Trinity Episcopal)

of Justice and Injustice Undercroft (Trinity Episcopal) 1:00 - 2:00 Workshop Session 2B   First Comes

1:00 - 2:00

Workshop Session 2B

 

First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage… Then What?

Diana Wortham Theatre

 

Trans* Intersectionality: Revealing the Layers

Science Classroom (Colburn Museum)

 

Black and Gay in the South: Navigating Intersectionality and Identities within the African American LGBTQ Community

Conference Room (Trinity Episcopal)

 

Fireside Chat: The Human Side of Impact Litigation

Diana Wortham Theatre

3:00 - 3:30

Break

5:00

Pack Place closes

Chat: The Human Side of Impact Litigation Diana Wortham Theatre 3:00 - 3:30 Break 5:00 Pack

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saturday schedule

8:00

Check in

Diana Wortham Theatre Lobby

8:30 - 9:30

Plenary: Religious Freedom, Faith and LGBT Issues in the South

Diana Wortham Theatre

9:30 - 10:00

Break

 

Campaign Lab: Marriage Equality in the South

Film Screening Room (Art Mus.)

 

Love & Support: Preventing Suicide Among Gender & Sexually Diverse Community Members

Forum (D. Wortham Theatre)

10:00 - 11:00

Workshop Session 1B

 

Listening Session: National LGBT* Organizations Connecting with Communities in the South

Diana Wortham Theatre

11:15 - 12:15

Workshop Session 1C

Wortham Theatre 11:15 - 12:15 Workshop Session 1C Trans* Advocacy in Health Care & the Need

Trans* Advocacy in Health Care & the Need to be Counted

Conference Room (Trinity Episcopal)

Care & the Need to be Counted Conference Room (Trinity Episcopal) 12:00 - 1:30 Lunch Box

1:30 - 3:00

Workshop Session 2

Advocating for Trans* Inclusion in Schools

Conference Room (Trinity Episcopal)

At the Intersection of Race, Poverty, LGBT Identities and the Law

Diana Wortham Theatre

Poverty, LGBT Identities and the Law Diana Wortham Theatre LGBT* Youth Resiliency in the South Film

LGBT* Youth Resiliency in the South

Film Screening Room (Art Mus.)

Youth Resiliency in the South Film Screening Room (Art Mus.) The Art of the Ask: Surefire

The Art of the Ask: Surefire Strategies for Effective Fundraising

Forum (D. Wortham Theatre)

for Effective Fundraising Forum (D. Wortham Theatre) Unlikely Alliances: Strategies for Engaging Social Service

Unlikely Alliances: Strategies for Engaging Social Service Organizations

Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.)

Social Service Organizations Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.) 3:30 - 4:00 Plenary: Next Steps Diana Wortham Theatre

3:30 - 4:00

Plenary: Next Steps

Diana Wortham Theatre

Social Service Organizations Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.) 3:30 - 4:00 Plenary: Next Steps Diana Wortham Theatre
Social Service Organizations Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.) 3:30 - 4:00 Plenary: Next Steps Diana Wortham Theatre
Social Service Organizations Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.) 3:30 - 4:00 Plenary: Next Steps Diana Wortham Theatre
Social Service Organizations Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.) 3:30 - 4:00 Plenary: Next Steps Diana Wortham Theatre
Social Service Organizations Science Classroom (Colburn Mus.) 3:30 - 4:00 Plenary: Next Steps Diana Wortham Theatre

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campaign labs

These highly interactive labs are designed to help organizers build skills and networks as they engage in real-time campaigns.

Organizing to Live Free from Fear in the South

Caitlin Breedlove, Kate Shapiro & Serena Sebring, Southerners on New Ground (SONG) SONG’s long background in building membership, connecting and organizing LGBTQ people in the South across race, class, culture, gender and sexuality has led to our recent launching of #freefromfear campaigns. These are local campaigns that work with communities to create and win demands that make LGBTQ people and people of color safer where they live. These campaigns seek to answer the question: What could change in our home towns if LGBTQ people and people of color felt safe? Our first campaign, in Durham, NC, seeks to pass an all- inclusive anti-profiling ordinance. The ‘Community Safety Act’ bans profiling based on race, immigration status, gender, gender identity, sexuality, and disability. Two more SONG campaigns are to follow in different cities this year. Join us for a hands-on discussion on the following: 1) How do we build a strong intersectional analysis and working teams across race, class, culture, gender and sexuality among LGBTQ people in the South? 2) How do we craft campaigns based on that analysis and those relationships? 3) What are the nuts and bolts of the frame and design of Free from Fear? How does

a multi-racial LGBTQ-led campaign team make it happen? 4) What is the transformative potential of LGBTQ organizing in our time? TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 5:30 - 7:30 FRIDAY

Marriage Equality in the South

Lindsey Simerly & Aaron Sarver, Campaign for Southern Equality; Adam Polaski & Amanda Snipes, Freedom to Marry; Ivy Hill, Gender Benders From small towns to big cities, we need to keep building support for marriage equality across the South as we prepare for a June ruling from the US Supreme Court. This high energy and interactive campaign lab will help organizers develop plans and skills to lead marriage equality events in their hometowns during this historic period in the push for marriage equality in all 50 states. You’ll also get to meet and connect with organizers from across the region to help build stronger networks. Specific topics will include: organizing vigils, planning for the first day of marriage in your community, using social media to organize more effectively, and learning how to get positive and strong local media coverage. FILM SCREENING ROOM (ART MUSEUM) 10:00 - 12:00 SATURDAY

workshops

Advocating for Trans Inclusion in Schools

Asaf Orr, National Center for Lesbian Rights & Andrea Graber-Bird, Transforming Family Schools are starting to realize that it is important, and their legal obligation, to affirm transgender youth. However, making this a reality on the ground requires local organizers and advocates who work with the schools to understand the needs of transgender youth and implement policies that appropriately address those needs. Drawing on the presenters’ experiences, this workshop will cover federal laws protecting transgender youth, best practices for trans-inclusive policies, responding to concerns from administrators and the community, and coordinating

a campaign to support/object to a school policy affecting transgender students. This workshop

is geared towards organizers and advocates who

work, or want to work, with transgender youth

around issues in school. Recognizing the expertise

of workshop participants, the majority of the time

will be used for an interactive discussion about this topic and an opportunity for skill sharing among all participants and presenters. CONFERENCE ROOM (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

At the Intersection of Race, Poverty, LGBT Identities and the Law (1.5 CLE credits)

Beth Littrell & Holiday Simmons, Lambda Legal; Mandy Carter, National Black Justice Coalition

A presentation about the ways in which LGBT

advocates and advocacy organizations should and

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can address the legal needs of LGBT people of color and LGBT people living in or near poverty. This workshop will seek to explore the ways in which race and religion influence politics in the South and to develop strategies to transform our historical and cultural knowledge into power. Advocates will learn how to identify the needs of members of the community who also face hurdles with respect to racial disparity and income disparity, and how to address those needs within the framework of legal advocacy. DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

Black and Gay in the South: Navigating Intersectionality of Identities within the African American LGBTQ Community

Anthony Beckett, South Carolina Black Pride This session is an interactive approach to understanding the intersectionality which African Americans in the LGBTQ community experience as it relates to the black church, family, culture/traditions, geographical location, sexuality and gender expression. The session will also address the stigmas and myths that contribute to the coming out process and struggle of African American LGBTQ individuals. Resources and support systems will also be provided. In addition we seek to assist peers and professionals in becoming more effective in identifying racially specific stigmas and myths that affect the African American LGBTQ community as well as gaining a greater knowledge of the intersectionality that

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workshops, cont.

accompanies this particular population. Facilitators will provide a proposed plan of action to assist in addressing the needs of this community. CONFERENCE ROOM (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 2:15 - 3:15 FRIDAY

Community Law Workshops: How Advocates Can Equip and Empower the LGBT Community

(1 CLE credit)

Denise Brogan-Kator, Family Equality Council; Meghann Burke, Diane Walton & Liz Vennum, Campaign for Southern Equality One way that lawyers can serve the LGBT community is by providing legal information and limited free legal services through Community Law Workshops. The Campaign for Southern Equality began holding Community Law Workshops in 2011, providing free health care powers of attorney at Blue Ridge Pride. Since then, we have expanded to holding these workshops at Pride festivals around the state, and have offered Community Law Workshops on estate planning and name changes as well as health care powers of attorney. Meghann Burke, Diane Walton, and Liz Vennum lead the legal team at the Campaign for Southern Equality, and together with Denise Brogan-Kator from the Family Equality Council, they will explain their model of Community Law Workshops and share their experience with organizing these workshops, coordinating with volunteer attorneys, promoting the events, and serving the community by providing free legal

information and legal services. DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

Criminalization of the Trans* Community and Get Yer Rights! (1 CLE credit)

Che Long, Solutions Not Punishment Coalition & Holiday Simmons, Lambda Legal Get Yer Rights is an interactive Know your Rights training designed by and for LGBT people of color and centers the experiences of transgender people of color. The training provides an introduction to state violence and utilizes role play, activities, and dynamic games to introduce tools for interacting with police in the streets or in a car. Through hands on practice, participants will try on strategies for encounters such as: warrants, stop/question/frisk including unlawful searches, profiling for prostitution-related offenses, and profiling for low level drug-related offenses. UNDERCROFT (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

Day One in North Carolina: How General Synod Brought Marriage Equality to North Carolina

(1 CLE credit)

Jake Sussman & Luke Largess, Tin Fulton Walker & Owen The past year has brought a landslide of victories in marriage equality litigation, with each case bringing the South closer to full marriage equality. Each of the lawsuits had its own legal strategies

and legal arguments, but General Synod of the UCC v. Reisinger, the case that brought marriage equality to North Carolina, was the only case to argue that discriminatory marriage laws violated the First Amendment. Jake Sussman and Luke Largess represented the plaintiffs in General Synod and were responsible for its groundbreaking legal strategy. Jake and Luke will discuss their legal strategy and how the case progressed, as well as discuss the marriage case before the Supreme Court this term and Campaign for Southern Equality’s contribution to the legal arguments in that case. DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE 11:15 - 12:15 SATURDAY

Earned Media 101

Casey Blake, Asheville Citizen-Times & Aaron Sarver, Campaign for Southern Equality Local media coverage of your event, action or press conference is critical to engaging your existing supporters and growing your base of advocates. This workshop will offer the perspective of a communications director for an advocacy organization and a reporter bringing a newsroom approach to advocacy organizations. We’ll get into the nuts and bolts of press releases, pitching, and efforts to drive your story national, so that you can walk away from this session with best practices for earned media. Significant time for a Q & A is included. CONFERENCE ROOM (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

Effective Advocacy for LGBT* Clients

(1 CLE credit)

Beth Littrell, Lambda Legal Providing professionals with the cultural competency needed to understand the unique needs of LGBT*

individuals and to treat them how they wish to be treated. Through this competency learning process, professionals will be better equipped to approach LGBT* client’s issues with sensitivity and be able to effectively advocate for their clients. FORUM (DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE) 1:00 - 2:00 FRIDAY

Ethically Engaging Youth in LGBTQ Activism in the South

Whitney Kelbaugh & Nick Buchser, LGBT Center of Raleigh This workshop provides an example of an innovative multi-tiered approach to LGBT youth leadership development and programming in the south. The intended audience for this workshop is adult leaders with a desire to more effectively engage youth in activism efforts in their own communities. Topics covered include: ethically engaging youth in activism efforts, best practices in developing youth programs that work, and addressing challenges and struggles in program development. The workshop will engage participants in interactive learning. Upon completion of this workshop participants will have the knowledge and skills necessary to assist youth in becoming the driving force in developing and sustaining effective LGBT serving programs in your community. FORUM (DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE) 2:15 - 3:15 FRIDAY

Fighting for Equality in K-12 Schools

Dr. Todd Rosendahl, Time Out Youth; Chris Brook, ACLU; Carol Williams-Swoope, PFLAG Salisbury/ Rowan This workshop examines a multifaceted approach to school organizing, including creating student-

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workshops, cont.

led clubs known as GSAs (gay-straight alliances, or gender and sexuality alliances), connecting GSAs through regional and statewide club networks, educating teachers, staff, and administrators on LGBTQ issues through trainings or workshops, and providing support for school boards and administrations on LGBTQ-inclusive policy writing. The diverse panel of adults and youth from North Carolina will offer their expertise on legal issues, K-12 school outreach initiatives, community organizing, and youth GSA organizing. Following the know your rights/school organizing discussion, attendees will work together to create action plans based on real life scenarios for LGBTQ youth in the South. UNDERCROFT (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 10:00 - 12:00 SATURDAY

Fireside Chat: The Human Side of Impact Litigation

(1 CLE credit)

Meghann Burke & Diane Walton, Campaign for Southern Equality; Alexia Koritz, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP In the flurry of marriage equality litigation, sometimes we forget that behind each landmark case is a brave group of plaintiffs who were willing to put themselves on the line to take a stand for equality. As attorneys, especially those who take civil rights cases, it is important to remember the humanity of these plaintiffs and the needs and perspectives that they bring to litigation. Each case has a story, and we believe these are some of the most compelling.

Meghann Burke and Diane “Dizy” Walton, who were involved in General Synod, the case that brought marriage equality to North Carolina, and Campaign for Southern Equality v. Bryant, the case that brought marriage equality to Mississippi, together with Alexia Koritz, who worked on Windsor share about their experiences working with civil rights plaintiffs and share their insights. DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE 2:15 - 3:15 FRIDAY

First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage…

Then What? (1 CLE credit)

Connie Vetter, Attorney at Law; Cathy Sakimura, National Center for Lesbian Rights; Kelly Durden, Legal Services of Southern Piedmont; Dr. Nancy Teaff, Reproductive Endocrinology Associates of Charlotte Now that many states in the South have marriage equality, family law attorneys will be faced with a host of new and confusing legal issues. What assisted reproduction options are available to LGBT prospective parents? How can both married and unmarried parents protect their parental rights? What issues will arise around surrogacy and adoption? How will divorce, equitable distribution, and alimony look? What kind of litigation and other advocacy strategies can best advance families rights? DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE 1:00 - 2:00 FRIDAY

Hashtagging a New Story of the South

Michael Crawford, Freedom to Marry &

Jen Jones, Equality NC This workshop will provide tips on using social media to tell and amplify the stories of Southerners taking strong stands in favor of LGBT equality. The presenters will use case studies of local and national social media campaigns including North Carolina’s fight against Amendment One and Southerners for the Freedom to Marry to equip you with the tools you need to reframe the narrative of LGBT activism in the South. We will include a practice session in which participants can brainstorm ideas for social media campaigns and get feedback. This session is intended organizers at all levels who want to gain fluency in using social and digital media in their work. FILM SCREENING ROOM (ART MUSEUM) 1:00 - 3:00 FRIDAY

HIV/AIDS Advocacy in the South

Lee Storrow, NC AIDS Action Network & Peggy Weil, Western NC AIDS Project This workshop will explore current trends in HIV/ AIDS, including a focus on racial disparities in the South. We will discuss the importance of expanding Medicaid to the HIV+ community. We will then use this information to practice real world skills in communicating with elected officials through skits and role plays. The intended audience is participants who would like to know more about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the south and would like to use this information to communicate with policy makers about the needs of those living with HIV and AIDS. CONFERENCE ROOM (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 10:00 - 11:00 SATURDAY

How to Get Funding in the South: Sharing Ideas, Experiences & Strategies

Ivy Hill, Gender Benders; Joey Lopez & Jasmine Beach-Ferrara, Campaign for Southern Equality With less than 4 percent of national LGBT funding going to the South, and even less funding directed to small towns, funding LGBT advocacy can be a major challenge. This interactive workshop will explore funding strategies that are actually working for grassroots groups across the South. Participants are encouraged to share lessons learned about the real-world challenges of funding their work, and offer both outside-the-box and traditional fundraising strategies that work. Presenters will answer questions about the Southern Equality Fund, CSE’s new funding initiative. All are welcome – whether you are a grassroots group, a 501(c)3 or launching a new initiative. FORUM (DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE) 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

Juntos: Collaborating to Create a Digital Health Intervention

Carla Mena, Emma Zhao, Jemi Galani & Morgan Barlow, Duke University; José Alegría & Alex Cordova, El Centro Hispano Juntos (together) was a one-year research project (2014), in which we conducted and analyzed a series of interviews and developed a basic online intervention. The program aims to leverage healthy behaviors, self-efficacy and a sense of belonging among Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW) by connecting people to local resources, accurate and relevant health information, community organizations and each other. This workshop is designed to engage a diverse audience. Those who may find it most helpful include: health care providers, Latino- and LGBTQ- serving organizations, researchers. We will present

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workshops, cont.

our research findings and process (including the use of interviews, mTurk and Qualtrics to collect data). The format will include a presentation, dialogue and an interactive exploration of the digital program. The workshop structure will be informed by empowerment education principles. CONFERENCE ROOM (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 1:00 - 2:00 FRIDAY

Language, Identity and Culture: A Deep Listening Session

Claudia Montesinos, Ekua Adisa, Ada Volkmer & Andrea Golden, Center for Participatory Change Language justice is not just about creating the bare minimum for communication through interpretation and translation, it’s about people bringing their full selves to the table. Some of us speak the same languages as our ancestors, others have had our languages stolen from us by migration, imperialism, colonialism, and slavery. This workshop holds as a central value that there is strength in communities preserving, reclaiming, and using their languages. Through storytelling and ceremony, we’ll explore how language is connected to our culture and identity and is vital to the resilience of our community. We also want to reflect on how language has been used against us and how we’ve created new language to express ourselves and tell our stories. This workshop is intended for queer and trans people of color. ART CLASSROOM (ART MUSEUM) 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

LGBT Rights in the Workplace: Are We Protected from Employment Discrimination?

(1 CLE credit)

Malissa Burnette, Callison Tighe; Rachel Blunk, Sharpless Stavola; Don Davis, The Noble Law Firm; Moderated by Ryan Wilson, Human Rights Campaign In North Carolina and other Southern states, you can legally marry a partner of the same sex, but be legally fired from your job for doing so. This panel discussion will cover topics ranging from recent employment discrimination litigation to EEOC policies and how to identify discrimination in the workplace. FILM SCREENING ROOM (ART MUSEUM) 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

LGBT* Youth Resiliency in the South

Dr. Todd Rosendahl, Time Out Youth; Samantha Ames, National Center for Lesbian Rights; Maliek Powell, Greater Than AIDS; Hannah Barker, WV Gay & Lesbian Community Center Southern LGBT* youth exhibit significant resiliency and also live with real risks. This workshop will highlight effective strategies and approaches for working with LGBT* youth and will also re-focus the conversation from struggle to resiliency. The panel will include direct service providers, advocates, and youth activists. Panelists will discuss their work, offer resources to implement throughout local communities and answer question related to the shifting conversation. FILM SCREENING ROOM (ART MUSEUM)

1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

LGBTQ Benchmarks for Inclusion in Higher Education

Shane Windmeyer & Rebby Kern, Campus Pride; Warren Radebe, Johnson C. Smith University Southern organizing at colleges and universities has long been a fertile ground for activism and culture change. However, there are still many Southern, rural campuses, HBCUs and religious-affiliated campuses who have been left behind and, or have limited resources to change the LGBTQ climate on campus. This workshop teaches organizers key LGBTQ campus benchmarks for policy, program and practice and shares the tools to change campus climate from the CampusPrideIndex.org and the new CampusPrideSportsIndex.org. Participants will leave with strategies to engage in an intersectional dialogue around recruitment and retention for LGBTQ youth and having the tools to be effective in furthering LGBTQ outreach to campuses who are not visible and present in Southern organizing. SCIENCE CLASSROOM (COLBURN MUSEUM) 10:00 - 11:00 SATURDAY

Lifeline: The Status of Social Security’s Basic Protections for Families and Individuals

(1 CLE credit)

Holly Fairbairn, Chitwood and Fairbairn, PA Social Security touches the lives of all Americans and highlights the confusion between conflicting state and federal policies about same-sex marriage. This CLE will explain government benefits and how advocates can best navigate the system to protect their clients’ right to social security in the context of disability, retirement, survivor benefits, and more.

SCIENCE CLASSROOM (COLBURN MUSEUM) 2:15 - 3:15 FRIDAY

Listening Session: National LGBT Organizations Connecting with Communities in the South

(1 CLE credit)

Cathy Sakimura, National Center for Lesbian Rights; Sarah Reece, The LGBTQ Task Force; Beth Littrell, Lambda Legal; Ria Tabacco Mar, American Civil Liberties Union; Facilitated by Ali Gorczynski, Texas Freedom Network We invite activists and organizers in the South to share with national organizations what work has had and will have positive impacts in the South, and what will be useful to local and regional work. Advocates can also ask questions and share ideas and knowledge about legislative and legal strategies, and how to promote accountability to our communities as we advocate for LGBT-inclusive policies at the federal, state, and local levels. DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE 10:00 - 11:00 SATURDAY

Love and Support: Preventing Suicide Among Gender & Sexually Diverse Community Members

Rebecca Stapel-Wax & Robbie Medwed, SOJOURN (Southern Jewish Resource Network for Gender & Sexual Diversity) The statistics surrounding GSD suicide and self- harm are both scary and shocking. Using elements of the award winning Sources of Strength curriculum and SOJOURN’s own expertise, participants will learn how to combat the challenges GSD people face every day. The purpose of this session is not crisis intervention, rather, it is prevention. This session focuses on the steps communities, schools,

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workshops, cont.

synagogues, and camps can take to ensure that they create a welcoming space wherein all people feel comfortable sharing their true feelings – even those that are challenging or difficult to discuss. FORUM (DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE) 10:00 - 12:00 SATURDAY

Love Has No Borders…Finally: Perspectives on Equality and Immigration Law (1 CLE credit)

Natalie Teague, Teague Immigration Law Immigration attorneys used to predict that comprehensive reform would assuredly come before equality in the immigration field. Whereas same-sex couples and the LGBT community were previously and essentially “left out” by US immigration law, the US Supreme Court changed everything on June 26, 2013 with its Windsor decision. Immigration agencies were among the first federal agencies to implement the decision, which has led to complete and total equality for same sex couples seeking immigration benefits. This presentation will discuss the opening of US immigration law to same-sex couples and provide a glimpse into asylum issues for the LGBT community. Executive action and its place with equality will also be discussed. MINI CHAPEL (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

Making Space: Adding the Q to POC Spaces

Ciera Williams & Kristina Agbebiyi, Georgia Southern University

This workshop will be in the form of presentation and discussion. We will explain the need for intersectionality and explain different ways to build movements across issues. We also want participants to offer their own suggestions. The intended audience is queer people of color (POC) and POC, as well as anyone interested in learning how to make groups and movements more diverse. MINI CHAPEL (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

Moral Freedom Summer: NAACP and LGBT Engagement in North Carolina

Crystal Richardson, Equality NC; Bishop Tonyia Rawls, Freedom Center for Social Justice; Laurel Ashton, NAACP NC; Serena Sebring, Southerners on New Ground Through this workshop attendees will be introduced to a unique collaboration in North Carolina between LGBT partner organizations and the NAACP. Attendees will get a behind the scenes look at the challenges of this intersectional work and hear about the rewards and successes of the project. Through a participatory discussion of lessons learned in North Carolina, attendees and panelists will develop a road map for how to replicate similar collaborations in their own states. SCIENCE CLASSROOM (COLBURN MUSEUM) 11:15-12:15 SATURDAY

Proud Shoes: Activating LGBTQ History for Social

Change

Barbara Lau, Pauli Murray Project We have always been here and we have a right to our history, our ancestors and leaders. We owe it to ourselves to bring back those that history has tried to erase and to prevent ourselves from being erased. We have to tell our own stories because if we don’t, someone else will. And they’ll tell it wrong. Join us and find yourself in our history. MINI CHAPEL (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 10:00 - 12:00 SATURDAY

Roots and Connections: Getting at the Structure of Justice and Injustice

Craig White, Craig White Consulting & T’Shana McClain, Campaign for Southern Equality This workshop is intended for volunteers, staff and board members of LGBT* and other social justice organizations. How do we see our organization’s work as a part of the larger LGBT* movement? Are we addressing root causes of injustice, or just chipping away at symptoms? How does our work intersect with worker justice, racial equity, immigrant rights, and other justice movements? While most of us have experienced some form of discrimination from biased individuals, we know the deeper truth is that privilege and oppression are built into the structure of our society. This hands-on workshop will present a clear and flexible model for a structural analysis of injustice, which participants can use to understand their own work better, strategize and collaborate more effectively, and determine how they want to fit into larger justice movements. UNDERCROFT (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 1:00 - 3:00 FRIDAY

The Art of the Ask: Surefire Strategies for Effective Fundraising

Ian Palmquist, Equality Federation This workshop is for anyone who wants to help bring in more money for their organizations. The presentation will include: Individual Fundraising Overview (why go for individual dollars). Overcoming Our Fear of Asking. Who to Ask. Making Your Case. Asking Face-to-Face. Making a Pitch at an Event. An interactive activity will help participants craft their own case statements, and, time allowing, to role-play a solicitation. Participants will work on their own skills and role play. FORUM (DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE) 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

The Other 50 Shades: Gay and Gray in the South, LGBT Aging and Inclusion

Bob Tomasulo & Rowan Lischerelli, LGBT Elder Advocates of WNC This workshop will engage you in a conversation about the journey of aging as an LGBT Elder and how providers, agencies, health care workers and community structures can include and support the LGBT Elders in their area. We will share the challenges we see our elders facing, many of whom feel that their only option is to go “back in the closet”, discuss why LGBT elders experience increased incidence of isolation and fear of aging, explore our curriculum that we’ve created to educate the public and discuss how you can work with development and programming in the South to include the unique needs of our Elders. The intended audience for this workshop will be all service providers and people who work within the field of active aging, as well as all people who are aging… that’s YOU! Participants

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workshops, cont.

will be given the knowledge and skills necessary to engage the LGBT Elders of their community, create a local LGBT Elders Organization, How to reach the elders in your area and what service providers and health care organizations need to include in their practices to be Elder-Kind. SCIENCE CLASSROOM (COLBURN MUSEUM) 10:30 - 11:30 FRIDAY

The Past, Present, and Future of LGBTQ Safe Spaces In Southern Schools

Marcos de R. Antuna, Dr. Roxanne Henkin & Dr. Zaid Haddad, University of Texas at San Antonio; Meg Goodhand & Omar Currie, Safe Schools NC This blended presentation is intended for a diverse audience of practitioners, activists, teachers or anyone interested in creating safe positive school cultures for all students. The hour-and-a-half workshop will incorporate both research findings and related practical activities meant to elicit audience participation.

The first component will reveal issues of hope, happiness, and leadership within LGBTQ youth. We will address the institutions and historical events which have led to the present-day LGBTQ academic experience. We will then present on the impact of narrativity in supporting positive LGBTQ identity and self-concept in students. Last but never least, we will highlight the ways in which schools and organizations affect the authenticity of gay teachers and their straight allies.

The second component will help participants identify and define terminology associated with the LGBTQ community. We will explore the manifestations of homophobia within the schools, share and reflect upon the barriers to disrupting heterosexism, and collaborate on ways school leaders and teachers can confront homophobic language/actions/ curricula within the schools. This component will share resources and statewide counterpublics that support LGBTQ youth and teachers. UNDERCROFT (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

The Spirituality of Sexuality

Bishop Donagrant L. McCluney, Affirming Pentecostal Church International & Rev. Joe Hoffman, First Congregational UCC in Asheville The workshop is important to LGBTQ Christian believers who think about and/or struggle with the resolution of their sexual and spiritual identities, especially for the children of the religious South. This workshop will engage participants to connect the two identities of their spirituality and sexuality through two different methodologies used by faith leaders today. Attendees will: 1) Learn from affirmative faith leaders’ about the struggle to resolve queer sexuality with Christian spirituality; 2) Discuss some of the real struggles of being LGBTQ identified in a Christian context; 3) Experience a personal demonstration of the Wesleyan Quadrilateral, a theological tool using scripture, tradition, reason and experience; 4)

Explore an alternative process that relies on the teachings from our own life experiences, outside of the frameworks provided in scripture; and 5) Leave this workshop knowing how to utilize both tools for personal examination and discernment—empowered to continue connecting and reconciling the two identities of spirituality and sexuality. MINI CHAPEL (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 1:00 - 3:00 FRIDAY

Trans* Advocacy in Health Care and the Need to be Counted

Andrea Zekis, Human Rights Campaign & Tommy Luckett, Arkansas HIV Planning Group Learn from the experiences of two transgender persons working on issues related to health care and the importance of having transgender representation at the table. Presenters will discuss the many layers of health care work in Arkansas including working with providers and the transgender community in building a health care provider database, the development of a hospital safe zone program and conducting a health care assessment of the state’s transgender population. The workshop will show data of HIV across the board in all races and illustrate how transgender people are not counted, and also illustrate the stigmatizing language associated with HIV. The discussion will touch on the intersection of health care issues and the other issues that transgender people face in relation to violence, poverty, etc. CONFERENCE ROOM (TRINITY EPISCOPAL) 11:15 - 12:15 SATURDAY

Trans* Intersectionality: Revealing the Layers

Li Hooper, Gender Re-visioning and Sexuality Pathways (Grasp); Z. Shane Zaldivar, TAG

(transgender allies group); HP Page – Gender Benders This workshop will discuss the layers of socio-cultural and socio-political factors which affect psycho-social political dynamics and daily living for transgender, transsexual, and gender-fluid/gender-variant persons for the purposes of advocacy, activism, support, and empowerment. From psycho-dynamic issues of depression, coping, and suicidality to immigrant rights, health care, systemic racism and workers rights, we will give attention to identifying and giving voice to the concerns facing trans-identified persons (and, really, for all of us as LGBT persons and allies). We will offer general information in a soft-lecture format, then utilize small group and whole-group discussion to process reactions and name possible ways forward for creating positive change. SCIENCE CLASSROOM (COLBURN MUSEUM) 1:00 - 2:00 FRIDAY

Unlikely Alliances: Strategies for engaging social service organizations in meeting the needs of LGBTQ clients in the South

Dafina Ward & Daroneshia Duncan, AIDS Alabama; Frank Matthews, One Roof AIDS Alabama staff will lead a workshop that explores strategies for working with mainstream social service organizations seeking to better serve LGBTQ clients. AIDS Alabama has worked collaboratively with housing, domestic violence and substance use providers to improve their competency to serve LGBTQ clients. The workshop will also include lessons learned and best practices from AIDS Alabama’s own experiences, as well as strategies for assessing an organization’s readiness to serve LGBTQ clients. SCIENCE CLASSROOM (COLBURN MUSEUM) 1:30 - 3:00 SATURDAY

30

around town

LGBT*-affirming places of worship

St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church (Congregational Catholic)

768 Asbury Rd.

Candler, NC 28715

Cathedral of All Souls (Episcopal)

9 Swan St. Biltmore Village Asheville, NC 28803

St. George’s (Episcopal) One School Rd. Asheville, NC 28806

St. John’s Episcopal Church

290 Old Haw Creek Rd.

Asheville, NC 28805

St. Mary’s Episcopal Church

337 Charlotte St.

Asheville, NC 28801

St. Matthias Episcopal Church

1 Dundee St.

Asheville, NC 28801

Congregation Beth Ha Tephila (Reform) 43 N Liberty St. Asheville, NC 28801

Congregation Beth Israel (Conservative)

229 Murdock Ave.

Asheville, NC 28804

Abiding Savior Lutheran Church

801 Charlotte Hwy.

Fairview, NC 28730

Haywood Street Congregation (United Methodist)

297 Haywood St.

Asheville, NC 28801 (worship is on Wednesdays)

Urban Dharma NC (Buddhist) 29 Page Ave. Asheville, NC 28801

Kadampa Buddhism

574 Haywood Rd.

Asheville, NC 28806

New Creation Church

In Abiding Savior Lutheran Church

801 Charlotte Hwy.

Fairview, NC 28730

Bahai Center

5 Ravenscroft Dr

Asheville, NC 28801

Center for Spiritual Living

2 Science of Mind Way Asheville NC 28806

Circle of Mercy Congregation (American Baptist, UCC)

1 School Rd.

Asheville, NC 28806

Jesus People Church

at Scandals Nightclub

11 Grove St.

Asheville, NC 28801

Jubilee

46 Wall St.

Asheville, NC 28801

Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville

1 Edwin Pl.

Asheville, NC 28801

Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Swannanoa Valley 500 Montreat Rd. Black Mountain, NC 28711

First Congregational United Church of Christ

20 Oak St.

Asheville, NC 28801

First Congregational UCC - Hendersonville 1735 5th Ave. W. Hendersonville, NC 28739

The Table UCC

980 Rabbit Skin Rd.

Waynesville, NC

Land of the Sky UCC

Meets at Kenilworth Presbyterian

123 Kenilworth Rd.

Asheville, NC 28803

First Presbyterian Church

40 Church St.

Asheville, NC 28801

Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church

789 Merrimon Ave.

Asheville, NC 28804

Kenilworth Presbyterian Church

123 Kenilworth Rd.

Asheville, NC 28803

Montreat Presbyterian Church

396 Geneva Pl.

Montreat, NC 28757

New Hope Presbyterian Church 3070 Sweeten Creek Rd. Asheville, NC 28803

Warren Wilson Presbyterian Church

701 Warren Wilson Rd.

Swannanoa, NC 28778

Westminster Presbyterian Church 15 Overbrook Pl. Asheville, NC 28805

Asheville Friends (Quaker)

227 Edgewood Rd.

Asheville, NC 28804

Swannanoa Valley Friends (Quaker)

137 Center Ave.

Black Mountain, NC

MCC Sacred Journey at 1st Congregational Church Felix Building 1735 5th Ave. W. Hendersonville, NC 28793

LGBT*-focused nightlife

O.Henry’s/ The Underground 237 Haywood St. Asheville, NC 28801

Scandals Nightclub

11 Grove St.

Asheville, NC 28801

Smokey’s Tavern

18 Broadway St.

Asheville, NC 28801

All information courtesy of GayAshevilleNC.com

The rainbow-colored pride flag symbolizing LGBT* equality was draped above the entrance of City Hall
The rainbow-colored pride flag
symbolizing LGBT* equality was
draped above the entrance of City
Hall in Asheville on October 9,
2014, in anticipation of a ruling in
favor of marriage equality.

Get state-by-state guides to

knowing and protecting your rights.

A project of the Campaign for Southern Equality

lgbtrightstoolkit.org

next steps

from the Campaign for Southern Equality

33

We want to thank you for joining with us and sharing yourself, your work and your passion for equality.

We are at a critical stage in the long journey to full legal and lived equality. With a Supreme Court ruling about marriage equality on the horizon in June, it’s vital to keep calling publicly for full recognition of our families and to continue sharing our stories.

Our shared work doesn’t stop there. We look ahead to a landscape in which there are immediate needs in our community: improvements in access to LGBT* health and legal services; programs that

affirm and support youth and help them envision and live into a future of authenticity and fulfillment; fuller engagement in the political process as voters, advocates for inclusive policy and candidates for office; and standing as leaders and allies in movements for racial and economic justice. Our movement requires a broad array of strategies and tactics that far exceeds this list.

As you move forward, we hope that these past two days will help fuel you, and that connections made here yield new work and new ideas. We can’t wait to see what you do next.

work and new ideas. We can’t wait to see what you do next. The CSE Legal

The CSE Legal Team. From left to right:

Dizy Walton, Meghann Burke, Liz Vennum

From left to right: Dizy Walton, Meghann Burke, Liz Vennum CSE Staff. Back row from left

CSE Staff. Back row from left to right: Jasmine Beach-Ferrara, Lindsey Simerly, Aaron Sarver, Joey Lopez, Craig White; Front: Jarod Keith, Chloe Stuber, Shana McClain