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SATURDAY 05.16.15

LEGACY
OF A
LEGEND
Late B.B. King had
rich history at the
Jersey Shore.
Page 9A

USA TODAY

BOSTON MARATHON BOMBER SENTENCED TO DEATH PAGE 1B

SLOW DOWN!
TOM SPADER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

An NJ Transit train approaches the Long Branch station.

NJ Transit lags
on safety tech
missing in
Amtrak crash
BART JANSEN AND RUSS ZIMMER
@GANJANSEN AND @RUSSZIMMER

NJ Transit has yet to upgrade its soon-to-be outdated safety technology with the kind of controls that
experts say would have prevented Tuesday nights
deadly Amtrak 188 crash.
In 2008, Congress set a deadline of Dec. 31 for
trains and railroads to adopt automatic-braking
equipment called positive train control.
The goal is to automatically slow a train if the engineer isnt responding to lower speed limits or track
signals.
So far, the system is installed in only half of the
nations trains and on a little more than half the
tracks.

Since construction work


began on Parkway, seven
motorists have died
Ongoing construction on the Garden State
Parkway northbound near mile post 92
on Wednesday.

Waiting for technology

TOM SPADER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

NJ Transit spokeswoman Nancy Snyder said $225


million has been allocated for the design and installation of positive train control across the system, but
the technology will be operational only on a sevenmile stretch of the Morris & Essex Line by early next
year.

STEPH SOLIS @STEPHMSOLIS

The Garden State Parkway stretch between Exits 98


and 88 is like driving on the Autobahn in a construction
zone.
Since construction began some 2 12 years ago, there
have been seven deaths, including one Monday night.
It is not uncommon to see motorists blaze along at 80
mph nearly double the posted speed limit of 45 miles
per hour or more. Stretches of road have precariously narrow lines, aggressive drivers and changing traffic patterns that make it hard to navigate, commuters
say.
People fly in that area, said Eugenie Walling, of
Sea Bright. The problem is if you dare to do the low
posted speed limit you (will) cause an accident.
The work on the Parkway is part of a massive $330
million project to widen and improve a 16-mile stretch
of road between Wall and Toms River. The project was
See PARKWAY, Page 5A

See SAFETY, Page 7A

Dig this: New rules after ammo finds


SUSANNE CERVENKA @SCERVENKA

COURTESY OF U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

About 180 boosters, components of World War I-era


projectiles, have been found in Loch Arbour and Allenhurst.

First, the good news: The World War I-era ammunition parts found in Allenhurst and Loch Arbour last
week wont keep you from enjoying the beach Memorial Day weekend.
However, anyone planning on digging an awesome
moat around their sand castle will be sorely disappointed.
There will be some restrictions in place for a halfmile section of beach in the two towns where the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers have found 180 boosters

Raise a glass to
Asbury Parks
latest hit hotspot.
Indulge, 1D
ADVICE
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3A
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OBITUARIES
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components of the projectiles fired by howitzers


over the past week, corps spokesman Chris Gardner
said.
The federal agency is searching the sand for boosters, which landed on the beach thanks to a $38 million
sand replenishment project.
These preliminary surveys are expected to be complete before Memorial Day, and the Army Corps is giving municipal staff access to searched areas so they can
get the beach ready for crowds, Gardner said.
See RULES, Page 7A