Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 4

Factoring

 is  un-­multiplying,  so  in  order  to  understand  factoring,  it  is  helpful  to  
understand  multiplying.    You  may  have  multiplied  using  the  “square”  method  in  
Algebra  I,  let’s  review  that  method,  now.  
 
To  multiply   ( x − 3) ( x + 2 ) ,  for  instance,  we  will  do  the  following.  
 
Draw  a  box,  divide  it  into  two  rows  and  two  columns  (since  each  thing  we’re  
multiplying  has  two  parts.  
 
 
     
     
     
 
Write  one  term  of  the  first  polynomial  over  each  box  across  the  top,  and  one  term  of  
the  second  polynomial  in  next  to  each  box  down  the  side.  
 
  x   -­‐3  
x      
2      
 
Fill  out  each  cell  of  the  table  by  multiplying  the  two  things  above  and  next  to  that  
cell.  
 
  x   -­‐3  
x   x2    
2      
 
 
  x   -­‐3  
x   x2   -­‐3x  
2      
 
  x   -­‐3  
x   x2   -­‐3x  
2   2x    
  x   -­‐3  
x   x2   -­‐3x  
2   2x   -­‐6  
 
Add  up  what  you  wrote  in  each  cell,  and  that’s  the  product!  
 
( x − 3) ( x + 2 ) = x 2 − 3x + 2x − 6 = x 2 − x − 6  
 
You  can  multiply  things  with  more  terms  this  way,  too,  for  example  .  .  .  .    
 
( 3x 2 + 2x − 5 −2x 2 + 1   )( )
 
Now,  when  you  draw  your  box,  divide  it  into  three  rows  and  two  columns,  since  one  
of  the  things  you’re  multiplying  has  three  terms.  
 
  3x2   2x   -­‐5  

-­‐2x2        

1        

 
And  fill  in  each  cell  like  before.  
 
  3x2   2x   -­‐5  

-­‐2x2   -­‐6x4   -­‐4x3   10x2  

1   3x2   2x   -­‐5  

 
And  add  everything  up!  
 
( )( )
3x 2 + 2x − 5 −2x 2 + 1 = −6x 4 − 4x 3 + 10x 2 + 3x 2 + 2x − 5 = −6x 4 − 4x 3 + 13x 2 + 2x − 5
 
 
This  can  also  be  useful  to  help  you  factor  by  grouping,  but  it’s  not  quite  as  
straightforward.      Instead  of  starting  with  the  factors  and  moving  to  the  terms,  we  
are  going  to  start  with  the  terms  and  move  to  the  factors.      
 
Take  something  like   6x 2 − 4x − 2 .    Let’s  split  the  middle  term  up,  like  before,  by  
looking  for  factors  of   ( 6 ) ( −2 ) = −12  that  add  to  -­‐4  .  .  .  .  -­‐6  and  2.      
 
Re-­‐write  the  original  equation  by  splitting  the  middle  term  up.  
 
6x 2 − 4x − 2 = 6x 2 − 6x + 2x − 2  
 
Start  with  our  2X2  table,  as  before,  and  put  the  terms  in  the  body  of  the  table.  
 
     

  6x 2   -­‐6x  

  +2x   -­‐2  

 
We  need  to  fill  in  the  margins  with  what  we  would’ve  multiplied  together  to  get  
these  terms,  since  the  first  column  and  first  row  both  have  x’s  in  both  spots,  we  
know  those  spots  on  the  edges  must  have  x’s.  
 
  x    

x   6x 2   -­‐6x  

  +2x   -­‐2  

 
The  cells  in  the  first  row  also  both  have  a  6,  so  the  cell  along  the  edge  there  likely  
has  a  6.    The  cells  on  the  bottom  row  both  have  a  two,  so  the  cell  along  the  edge  
there  likely  has  a  2.  
 
  x    

6x   6x 2   -­‐6x  

2   +2x   -­‐2  

 
The  right  hand  column  is  negatives,  so  that  spot  along  the  edge  should  also  have  a  
negative.  
 
  x   -­‐1  

6x   6x 2   -­‐6x  

2   +2x   -­‐2  
Check  each  cell,  can  I  get  what  is  in  that  cell  by  multiplying  the  terms  above  it  and  to  
the  side  of  it?    Yup!    The  expressions  across  the  top  and  down  the  edge  are,  
therefore,  the  factors.  
 
6x 2 − 4x − 2 = ( x − 1) ( 6x + 2 ) .  
 
Try  another  one,   5x 2 − 13x + 6 .  
 
1. Find  factors  of  ac  that  add  to  b  
2. Split  the  middle  term  up.  
3. Fill  the  terms  in  in  the  body  of  the  table  
4. Fill  in  the  spots  along  the  edges  by  looking  for  common  factors  in  each  row  
and  column.  
 
  x   -­‐2  
5x   5x2   -­‐10x  
-­‐3   -­‐3x   6  
 
5x 2 − 13x + 6 = ( 5x − 3) ( x − 2 )