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Texas

Homeland
Security
Strategic
Plan
Part I
Governors Vision
Rick Perry, Governor
January 30, 2004

CONTENTS
Forward
GOVERNORS LETTER
Part 1
GOVERNORS VISION
Part 2
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Part 3
STATE OF TEXAS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Table of Contents

ii

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Table of Contents

STATE OF TEXAS
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR
January 30, 2004

My fellow Texans:
Our great state has always prided itself on its strength and resilience. We have faced countless challenges
from natures fury to manmade disasters with a resolve and grit recognized around the world as uniquely
Texas. Our history has prepared us well to respond to any threat, including terrorism.
Immediately after the tragic attacks of September 11, 2001, my office began working to strengthen our
states ability to prevent and respond to the threat of terrorism. Texas already is home to an emergency
system that is among the nations best. From our largest cities to our smallest towns, I am confident in
our states ability to handle any crisis. But there is more we can do. Continued vigilance and planning on
the part of state and local officials will help ensure the safety of our citizens, our property and the freedom
we cherish.
On July 16, 2002, President Bush released the National Strategy for Homeland Security, a strategic plan
based on the principles of cooperation and partnership. The Presidents plan provides states with a
blueprint to develop and implement programs to enhance security and reduce the threat of terrorism.
Recognizing that state and local governments play important roles in these efforts, the national plan
challenges us to develop interconnected and complementary systems that are reinforcing rather than
duplicative.
Like its national counterpart, the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan, is built on partnerships among
local, state and federal agencies, volunteer organizations and the private sector. Our first goal must be to
do everything within our power to prevent a terrorist attack. That is why our effort to coordinate
communication among federal, state and local law enforcement agencies is so vital. We also recognize that
we must have an emergency management and response that is comprehensive, rapid and orderly.
The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan ensures the coordinated and comprehensive use of state
resources and federal funding to deter, detect and respond to terrorism, and it provides our state with clear
lines of authority and communication as we work together to accomplish these goals. I have designated a
Director of Homeland Security within my office to ensure the effective coordination of information and
resources. My Director of Homeland Security also will serve as the presiding officer of the Critical
Infrastructure Protection Council that was established by House Bill 9 in the 78th Texas Legislature.
The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan builds on the mandates of House Bill 9 and the Presidents
plan to outline the principles that will guide our states homeland security efforts. My office also has
iii

worked closely with the Texas Engineering Extension Service and Regional Councils of Governments to
develop the more detailed implementation steps and measurable objectives contained in Part II of the
state strategy. Part III of the strategy details operational and procedural guidance to implement the
States Emergency Management Plan.
The centerpiece of the Texas strategy is a regional network of interlocking and mutually supporting
counter-terrorism and preparedness programs. Disasters, whether manmade or natural, do not recognize
county lines or regional boundaries. For this reason, we have developed realistic plans that bring together
the many emergency response officials who would be expected to work together should a disaster occur.
The nature of terrorism is to exploit weaknesses in a security system, and terrorists will adjust their means
and methods of attack as we work to make our state and nation more secure. I expect the Texas strategy to
evolve as our state and nation adjust to the ever-changing threat of terrorism. In the battle against
terrorism, there is no time for complacency. I hope you will join me in taking every effort to ensure the
security of our great state.
Sincerely,

Rick Perry
Governor

iv

Texas
Homeland
Security
Strategic
Plan
Part I
Governors Vision
Rick Perry, Governor
January 30, 2004

Executive Summary

Leadership and Organization


The highest priority of any state is securing the safety To accomplish these objectives, the Texas Homeland
of its people. In Texas, our citizens are well served Security Strategic Plan is organized around four critical
and protected by a network of law enforcement, mission areas to enhance the states security:
emergency personnel and regulatory agencies. Our
Intelligence and warning: The first objective
state is building on this excellence to create a national
of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan
model for counter-terrorism and security efforts.
is to prevent a terrorist attack. The best way to
Governor Rick Perry has developed the Texas
accomplish this is through the receipt, analysis
Homeland Security Strategic Plan to maximize the
and dissemination of criminal intelligence.
use of state resources through coordinated and
Protecting critical infrastructure: Effective
comprehensive splanning. The Texas Homeland
communication and coordination among state
Security Strategic Plan sets three objectives that are
agencies and the involvement of the private
compatible with President Bushs national strategy:
sector will be necessary to reduce the states
Prevent terrorist attacks within Texas. The
states first priority is to detect and deter
potential attacks by enhancing coordination
and communication among state and local law
enforcement agencies and developing effective
partnerships with federal agencies and private
organizations.
Reduce the states vulnerability to terrorism.
The Governors Office works with state
agencies and the private sector to identify and
assess risks and take action to protect critical
infrastructure and key assets.

vulnerability to a terrorist attack and recover


quickly from any attack or other type of
disaster. The Governor established the State
Operations Group to accomplish this task.
Emergency preparedness and response: A
statewide network of regional, interlocking and
mutually supporting emergency preparedness
and response programs promotes
comprehensive planning and the collaborative
positioning of equipment and personnel.
Border security: Ensuring both the security
of the states international border and ports and
the efficient flow of traffic and commerce are
issues of critical importance and a shared
responsibility for the state and federal
governments.

Minimize the damage and recover from


attacks that do occur. The Governors Office
works to increase coordination and mutual aid
partnerships among local governments, the
states first responder community and state In developing the Texas Homeland Security Strategic
agencies to ensure a quick and orderly response Plan, Governor Perry has identified four important
priorities to help the state allocate resources. The state,
to any crisis.
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

which already has received more than $400 million


in federal homeland security grants, will continue to
aggressively pursue federal funds to help address these
priorities:
Support and train first responders.
Defend against biological, chemical and nuclear
terrorism.
Protect critical infrastructure.
Secure the states international borders and ports
of entry.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan is built around


this premise and emphasizes the importance of
grassroots input and planning. At the same time, this
plan brings leadership and organization to our states
security and response systems.

In a cover letter that accompanied the release of the


National Strategy for Homeland Security, President
Bush called for the development of compatible,
mutually supporting state, local and private-sector
strategies. Texas has risen to that challenge. The
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan is designed to
For years, Texas system of emergency planning has enhance our security and provide a state plan to
recognized that local officials are best able to make support and implement President Bushs vision for a
decisions about disaster response. Governor Perrys safer, stronger America.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Table of Contents

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan


Part I - Governors Vision
Introduction

Developing a State Strategy

Page 5

President Bushs National Strategy for Homeland Security calls on states and local
governments to implement compatible security strategies. For this reason, Texas
has used the national strategy as a model for developing a statewide plan.

Critical Mission Areas

Intelligence and Warning

Page 9

The first objective of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan is to prevent a
terrorist attack. The best way to accomplish this is through the receipt,
analysis and dissemination of criminal intelligence.

Protecting Critical Infrastructure

Page 11

The Critical Infrastructure Protection Council provides ongoing strategic


planning and coordination among state agencies to reduce the states vulnerability to a terrorist attack and ensure a quick and orderly recovery from any
attack or other disaster that does occur.

Emergency Preparedness and Response

Page 17

The most visible element of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan is the
Regional Response System. The strength of this system comes from interlocking and mutually supportive regional emergency response systems.

Border Security

Page 21

Ensuring the security of our international border and ports is of critical


importance and a shared responsibility for the state and federal governments.

Conclusion

A Safer, Stronger Texas

Page 23

The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan provides a solid framework for the
state to build on partnerships among local, state and federal agencies, volunteer
organizations and the private sector.

Appendix A: Governors Task Force on Homeland Security: Progress Rport


Appendix B: First Responders, Resources
Appendix C: Regional Councils of Governments
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Page 25
Page 32
Page 33
3

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Introduction

Developing A State Strategy


Since September 11, 2001, Texas has moved quickly
and surely to reduce the threat of terrorism. On
October 1, 2001, Governor Rick Perry established
the Task Force on Homeland Security to assess the
states readiness and ensure the continued safety of
Texans. The task force took testimony from experts
from numerous fields emergency response, law
enforcement, bioterrorism, border security, food safety
and others to develop recommendations to enhance
the states security.
Armed with the task force recommendations issued
in January of 2002, the Governors Office has
continued to work toward greater protection for our
state and its citizens. Most of the task force
recommendations already have been implemented, and
the others require federal action or additional funding.
(See Appendix A.) In addition, the State Infrastructure
Protection Advisory Council has submitted security
recommendations to Governor Perry. These reports
have given the Governors Office a more complete
picture of how well prepared Texas is to respond to
the unthinkable and a starting point to improve our
ability to detect and deter terrorism.

On July 16, 2002, President Bush released the first


National Strategy for Homeland Security to mobilize
and organize our nation to secure the U.S. homeland
from terrorist attacks. In a cover letter to the plan,
the President called on states and local governments
to implement compatible security strategies. For this
reason, Texas has used the national strategy as a model
for developing a statewide plan.
The National Strategy for Homeland Security sets three
broad objectives for homeland security:
Prevent terrorist attacks within the United States.
Reduce Americas vulnerability to terrorism.
Minimize the damage and recover from attacks
that do occur.

In developing the Texas Homeland Security Strategic


Plan, the Governors Office has adopted the strategic
objectives of the Presidents National Strategy for
Homeland Security to ensure that the state and national
plans are mutually supporting. The Presidents plan
also calls on each state to establish a single point of
contact for communication and coordination issues
involving federal, state and local agencies. In Texas,
On June 22, 2003, Governor Perry signed House Bill the Governors Office holds that responsibility.
9, passed by the 78th Texas Legislature, to set the
framework for the states homeland security strategy. A Strong Foundation
H.B. 9 provides for more centralized communication Long before September 11th, our states law
and coordination of the states homeland security enforcement community understood the very real
efforts, establishes the Critical Infrastructure Protection threat of terrorism. In 2000, the Texas Department
Council to serve as an advisory group to the Governor, of Public Safety began working with the Texas
and creates a communications center to coordinate Engineering Extension Service on a statewide risk and
the states intelligence, warning and response systems. vulnerability assessment and a process to identify
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Reports Lay Groundwork For Security Enhancements


Two advisory committees developed
recommendations on enhancing the
states security:

Governors Task Force on Homeland


Security:
Just two weeks after the terrorist attacks of
September 11, 2001, Governor Rick Perry
formed the Task Force on Homeland Security
to advise him on matters relating to the states
security. The Governor named Texas Land
Commissioner David Dewhurst to be the
chairman of the group. Dewhurst, now the
states lieutenant governor, is a former CIA
intelligence officer, State Department official
and member of a presidential commission to
evaluate the capabilities of the U.S.
intelligence community.
Governor Perry charged the task force with:

Assuring Texans of state and local


preparedness to respond to threats.

Assessing the ability of state and local


government agencies to respond to
threats and to effectively provide victims
assistance.

Aiding coordination among federal,


state and local efforts.

Developing recommendations on how


to improve Texas ability to detect, deter
and coordinate response to any terrorist
events.
The attacks of September 11 on the World
6

Trade Center and the Pentagon make it


abundantly clear that we cannot risk being
complacent, Governor Perry said at the time.
Our goal is to enhance the ability of the state
to identify individuals who might be planning
attacks and to stop them before they do any
harm.
The task force delivered a report to the
Governor on January 31, 2002, that included
44 recommendations to help ensure that the
state is well prepared to detect, deter and
respond to terrorism. The Governors Office
has accomplished most of the task force
recommendations. (See Appendix A.) The
complete task force report is available at
www.governor.state.tx.us/homelandsecurity.
Attorney Generals State Infrastructure
Protection Advisory Committee:
Former Texas Attorney General John Cornyn
convened an advisory committee to develop
recommendations to better protect essential
government services and forms of commerce
that enable Texas citizens to function normally.
Industry components included the
telecommunications, energy, financial services,
water and transportation sectors.
The mission of the State Infrastructure
Protection Advisory Committee (SIPAC) was to
work with local, state and federal government
officials as well as private-sector experts to
develop a strategy to protect state infrastructure
and minimize disruption to critical services if
these infrastructure are compromised.
On March 25, 2002, SIPAC submitted its
report, which included two primary
recommendations and 16 secondary
recommendations. The report is available at
www.oag.state.tx.us/sipac/sipac_report.pdf.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

critical infrastructure that could be targeted by


terrorists.
Texas also is home to one of the nations best emergency
response systems. The forces of nature often have tested
our states ability to cope with disaster. Texans have
learned from these lessons. From our metropolitan
areas to rural Texas, our state has developed emergency
response systems second to none.

Objectives of the Texas Plan


The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan
sets three objectives that are compatible
with President Bushs national strategy:

Prevent terrorist attacks within


Texas. The states first priority is to
detect and deter any potential attacks
by enhancing coordination and
communication among state and local
law enforcement agencies and
developing effective partnerships with
federal agencies.

Reduce the states vulnerability to


terrorism. The Governors Office
works with state agencies and the
private sector to assess and identify
risks and take action to protect critical
infrastructure and key assets.

Minimize the damage and recover


from attacks that do occur. The
Governors Office works to increase
coordination and mutual aid
partnerships among local governments,
the states first responder community
and state agencies to ensure a quick
and orderly response to any crisis.

However, our state cannot rest on the knowledge that


we are well prepared to handle any threat. The very
nature of terrorism seeks out and exploits weaknesses
in security systems. For this reason, we must remain
vigilant in protecting our state.
The sheer size and diverse geography of Texas make
security especially challenging. Texas 1,200 mile
border with Mexico is home to 14 border crossings,
more than any other state. And Texas has 367 miles
of coastline and 227,000 farms on 131 million acres
of land more than twice the number of farms of
any other state. All this makes border security and
protecting our nations food supply priorities for our
state, along with safeguarding the states 21 million
people and other critical infrastructure.

The Next Step


Governor Perry has developed the Texas Homeland
Security Strategic Plan to build on our emergency
response system. This plan maximizes the use of state
resources through coordinated and comprehensive
strategic planning and provides clear lines of authority,
responsibility and communication. The Texas
Homeland Security Strategic Plan brings leadership
and organization to our states security and response
systems.

Strategic planning for state security is an integral and


ongoing priority for the Governors Office, and the
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan will expand
in scope and detail as we continue to work with our
The Texas plan addresses four critical mission areas to local and national partners. Governor Perry has named
a Director of Homeland Security to ensure the
enhance the states security:
effective coordination of information and resources
Intelligence and warning.
and to serve as the presiding officer of the Critical
Infrastructure Protection Council that was established
Protecting critical infrastructure.
by House Bill 9 in the 78th Texas Legislature.
Emergency preparation and response.
In addition, state agencies that play a role in homeland
Border security.
security have been directed to address security issues
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

in their agency strategic plans. Each agency will be


responsible for developing operational plans to
implement the strategies set forth in their strategic
plans.
A great deal has been accomplished since September
11, 2001. Countless Texans have worked to assess
and enhance our states security. From the public
meetings to the behind-the-scenes planning, these
efforts have built a solid foundation for a statewide
security plan.
As we continue this vital work, Texans can be assured
that every region of our state will have the capacity
and capability to deter, detect and, if necessary, respond
to a terrorist attack or disaster.

Securing Texas: A Sizable Task


The State of Texas:
Has 21 million people.
Covers 267,277 square miles.
Occupies about 7 percent of the total
water and land area of the United
States.
Has 5,363 square miles of waterways.
Has 227,000 farms that cover 131
million acres, more than twice the
number of any other state.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Critical Mission Areas

Intelligence and Warning


The first objective of the Texas
Homeland Security Strategic Plan
is to prevent a terrorist attack.
The best way to accomplish this
is through the receipt, analysis
and dissemination of criminal
intelligence.

Meeting the Objectives


The Texas Homeland Security
Strategic Plan sets objectives
compatible with the national
plan. By focusing on
intelligence and warning, the
state is working to:

plan is designed to achieve rapid


mobilization of resources
throughout the state and
coordinate deployment of those
resources in the most efficient
and logical manner.

The Texas DPS Special Crimes


While the federal government
Service also is a member of the
has the primary responsibility for
Joint Regional Intelligence Exgathering, analyzing and
9 Prevent terrorist attacks
change System (JRIES), a powdisseminating foreign and
within Texas.
erful real-time network of feddomestic intelligence, state and
eral, state and local agencies dedilocal law enforcement plays a key
cated to counterterrorism initiarole as well. Local peace officers and citizens serve as tives. JRIES is a digital network connection between
the eyes and ears that help protect our state and nation. the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and more
By virtue of their numbers and positions in our than 60 law enforcement partners. It is also a bidireccommunities, citizens and local peace officers are in tional program, with all partners agreeing to share inthe best position to discover something out of the formation, respond to information requests and conordinary that prevents a crime or terrorist attack. This duct an intelligence and analysis mission.
makes the coordination of local, state and federal law
enforcement more important than ever before.
In October 2001, the state expanded and improved
In Texas, we have taken a giant step forward in the access to the $15 million Criminal Law Enforcement
coordination of state and local law enforcement. In Reporting and Information System. This database
August of 2001, at Governor Perrys direction, provides law enforcement agencies in Texas, Arizona,
representatives of the states law enforcement California and New Mexico with information on
community began developing policies and procedures more than 140,000 drug traffickers and criminals.
to increase coordination between the Department of
As a result of these actions, our local law enforcement
Public Safety (DPS) and local law enforcement
agencies can share criminal intelligence with each other
agencies that receive state grants.
and with the DPS Criminal Law Enforcement
The DPS Counter-Terrorism Mission Action Plan Division. These changes have helped forge important
continues to integrate the intelligence operations of partnerships among local, state and federal law
the states law enforcement community. This DPS enforcement agencies.
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

State Early Warning Systems


Both law enforcement and the public must be able to
rely on clear and timely warnings of any new terrorist
threats. The federal government gathers, analyzes and
disseminates foreign and domestic intelligence;
however, there are numerous state systems that must
be able to quickly and effectively relay information,
threats and warnings to their members and the public.
Because safety is first and foremost the responsibility
of local law enforcement, our states peace officers
must have the benefit of reliable and consistent
communication with their federal counterparts. A
critical function of Texas Security Alert and Analysis
Center, established by House Bill 9, is to monitor
the Joint Regional Intelligence Exchange System
(JRIES) for information regarding ongoing or
suspicious incidents throughout the United States that
may have an impact or connection to Texas, to respond
to requests for information from members of the
JRIES community, and to post relevant information
to the JRIES system regarding incidents in Texas.
In establishing the Texas Security Alert and Analysis
Center, Texas has implemented the first state-based
Emergency Response Network using the U.S.
Department of Homeland Securitys model. The
Texas system provides for comprehensive information
sharing across agencies and disciplines, and it also
offers a dynamic alert and notification system that
includes voice, e-mail, pager and fax messages.
Texas law enforcement agencies also have access to
the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications
System, giving the state instant access to federal alerts.
The Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications
System also facilitates the rapid exchange of
information among law enforcement agencies.

Information Systems
The Joint Regional Intelligence Exchange System is a digital network connection between the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security and more than 60 law
enforcement partners, who agree to share
information, respond to information requests and conduct intelligence and analysis
missions.
The National Law Enforcement
Telecommunication System (NLETS)
links more than 310,000 law enforcement
and criminal justice offices across the
country. Users are able to exchange
information and alerts in a matter of
seconds. The FBI has used NLETS to
issue alerts regarding terrorist threats to
state law enforcement agencies.
The Texas Law Enforcement
Telecommunication System provides an
electronic link among the states law
enforcement agencies similar to NLETS.

government officials in Texas to disseminate


information and instructions in potential or actual
emergencies to alert the public and provide continuous
communications services during an emergency.
Federal threat assessment system: Texas is using the
federal color-coded threat assessment system on the
Texas homeland security Internet site,
www.texashomelandsecurity.com.
Health Alert Network: The Texas Department of
Health has implemented a secure Internet connection
that links the states health resources and provides
information and warnings about bioterrorism and
other health issues.

Texas citizens should be able to rely on the state for


information on threats or other dangers. The Texas
Security Alert and Analysis Centers Emergency
Response Network uses several statewide components
Statewide Education Notification System: The Texas
to disseminate information:
Education Agency has established an Internet-based
Emergency Alert System: This system allows network that can deliver alerts to the states 1,200
broadcast stations, cable operators and designated school districts by pager, e-mail, phone and fax.
10

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Critical Mission Areas

Protecting Critical Infrastructure


Effective communication and
coordination among state
agencies and the involvement of
the private sector will be necessary
to reduce the states vulnerability
to a terrorist attack and recover
quickly from any attack or other
type of disaster that does occur.

All disasters whether man-made


or natural are ultimately local
Meeting the Objectives
events. Local responders are the
The Texas Homeland Security
first to arrive and the last to
Strategic Plan sets objectives
leave the scene. This means the
compatible with the national
success of the states strategic
plan. By focusing on protecting
plan and ultimately, the
critical infrastructure, the state
nations rests on the
is working to:
development of capable and
The Critical Infrastructure
compatible local plans. The
9 Prevent terrorist attacks
Protection Council, established
Critical Infrastructure Protection
within Texas.
by House Bill 9 in the 78th Texas
Council ensures effective
Legislature, provides ongoing
communication of the states
9 Reduce the states
strategic
planning
and
strategy and priorities to local
vulnerability to terrorism.
coordination for homeland
governments and provide clear
security among state agencies.
direction and resources for local
The council is comprised of
and regional emergency planning.
representatives from state agencies and the Governors
Office. This ensures a clear and consolidated line of Identifying and addressing critical issues will be an
communication between the Governors Office and important part of the states homeland security efforts.
state agencies on homeland security issues as well as a Cyber security, bioterrorism and food safety are just
liaison with local governments and the private sector. some of the areas the Critical Infrastructure Protection
Council is examining.
The Critical Infrastructure Protection Council meets
regularly and is responsible for statewide planning,
coordination and communication. It also helps Cyber Security
individual state agencies develop operational plans that The ability of society to operate in a normal way
are compatible with the Texas Homeland Security increasingly relies on maintaining functioning
Strategic Plan. While the Critical Infrastructure computer networks. Virtually every service and
Protection Councils primary responsibility is leading industry the electric power grid, the banking system,
and organizing security programs and emergency the national air traffic control system, the train system
response among state agencies, an important secondary is vulnerable to a potential cyber attack. For this
goal is communication and coordination with local and reason, the State Infrastructure Protection Advisory
regional governments and the private sector.
Council (SIPAC) developed recommendations to
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

11

Protecting Critical Infrastructure and Assets


Governor

Critical Infrastructure Protection Council


Ongoing coordination and strategic planning among state agencies
Maintain liaison with local governments and private sector
Identify and address issues critical to state security

Sector Lead Agency


Air Quality

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Agriculture Department of Agriculture


Criminal Intelligence
Electricity
Emergency Services

Department of Public Safety


Public Utility Commission of Texas
Governors Division of Emergency Management

Food Safety Texas Department of Health


Government
Information Services

Governors Office
Department of Information Resources

Military Texas National Guard


Oil and Gas

Railroad Commission of Texas

Public Health Texas Department of Health


Public Safety Texas Department of Public Safety
Telecommunications
Transportation
Water
12

Public Utility Commission


Texas Department of Transportation
Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

better protect the essential government services and


forms of commerce that Texans rely on daily. SIPACs
recommendations, like those of the Governors
Homeland Security Task Force, stress the importance
of communication and information sharing in
implementing a successful infrastructure protection
plan, involving the input and cooperation of both
the public and private sectors.
The Texas Department of Information Resources has
created a State Computer Security Group that
continues to review computer security and address
issues raised in the SIPAC report. In addition, the
Governors Office is working to develop partnerships
between state agencies, the federal government and
the private sector to assess and improve the cyber
security.

Critical Infrastructure
Protection Council
House Bill 9 requires that the Critical
Infrastructure Protection Council include
representatives from:
Governors Office
Department of Agriculture
Office of the Attorney General
General Land Office
Public Utilities Commission
Texas Department of Health
Department of Information Resources

Bioterrorism
Biological weapons present an immense danger to our
state and nation. In the right environment, biological
weapons can multiply, and they can naturally mutate,
frustrating protective measures. Chemical weapons,
for all their horrors, become less lethal as they are
dispersed and diluted. But even the smallest quantities
of disease organisms can be lethal. For example,
botulinum toxin has been described as 3 million times
more potent than the chemical nerve agent sarin.
Texas heath care workers and citizens must be
informed and educated about the potential biological
weapons of terrorism in order to quickly recognize
and respond to an attack. The Texas Department of
Health (TDH) has developed Internet resources,
www.tdh.state.tx.us/bioterrorism, for the public,
health care workers and first responders. TDH also
has created the Health Alert Network to distribute
information statewide to local health professionals and
officials. In addition, the Health Alert Network
ultimately will have the ability to compile a contact
listing for health professionals throughout Texas in
the event that mobilization or contact becomes
necessary. And TDH has enhanced its disease detection
and response capability by establishing the Office of
State Epidemiologist, increasing regional

Department of Public Safety


Governors Division of Emergency
Management
Texas National Guard
Texas Commission on Environmental
Quality
Railroad Commission
Texas Strategic Military Planning
Commission
Texas Department of Transportation

epidemiology staff, developing guidelines for team


responses, purchasing lab and testing supplies, and
expanding its laboratory capacity.
TDH has received $144 million from the federal
government for public health preparedness and
bioterrorism response for fiscal years 2002 and 2003,
and Governor Perry authorized the transfer of $12.2
million in February 2002 to TDH for these types of
activities.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

13

School Safety
Over the past several years, Texas has been a national
leader in school safety. The Texas School Safety Center,
originally organized in
May 1999 after the
Learn more
shooting at Columbine
High School in
Texas School
Colorado, serves as a
Safety Center:
resource to help Texas
www.txssc.swt.edu
schools develop and
im-plement policies
Advanced Law
and programs for a safe
Enforcement
learning environment.
Rapid Response
In 2001, Governor
Training Center:
Perry signed legislation
www.swt.edu/alerrt
to formally establish
the safety center,
and the Governors Criminal Justice Division has
supported the center with approximately $500,000 in
funding each year since 1999.

Bush on November 19, 2001, gives federal authorities


control over airport security. However, the
Governors Office and state leadership will continue
to monitor airport security to ensure the safety of
Texas travelers. On August 17, 2002, Governor Perry
and the U.S. Deputy Transportation Secretary
announced that 15 airports had received Federal
Aviation Administration grants totaling $36.7 million.
The grants will fund airport projects to improve
efficiency, safety and security.

Agriculture Security
Texas is the nations leading cattle producer and has more
than twice the number of farms of any other state.
Protecting our agricultural interests is important both
to the states economy and the nations food supply.

Following the terrorist attacks on America, Agriculture


Commissioner Susan Combs formed a Texas Border
Food Security Coalition of producer groups and
associations to examine security measures at the states
Another new training initiative also is helping make
farms and ranches. The Texas Department of
our schools safer. The Advanced Law Enforcement
Agriculture also compiled recommendations for
Rapid Response Training Center, based in San Marcos,
farmers and ranchers to help protect our food supplies.
specializes in helping officers learn the most effective
ways to handle and diffuse crisis situations such as the In 2002, the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded
Columbine High School shooting or the 1991 $4.6 million in grants to strengthen the security of
shooting at Lubys Cafeteria in Killeen. A $500,000 Texas farming and ranching food production systems.
grant from the Governors Criminal Justice Division
will help train more than 600 Texas officers through
the center. The new center includes a state-of-the-art Private Sector
weapons simulator facility, a tactical firearms training The private sector in Texas, including academic,
center, a multi-story structure that simulates an scientific, medical, engineering and technological
office building or school, a rappel tower and a live- facilities, is an abundant source of creative and
fire house.
innovative technologies and ideas. As President Bush
noted in his National Strategy for Homeland Security,
In addition, the Texas Education Agencys new webthese technologies and ideas ultimately will enable our
based warning system enhances school safety by
country to triumph over any terrorist threat.
allowing rapid notification of school districts to alerts
or threats. This new system was used after the Space The private sector owns the vast majority of Texas
Shuttle Columbia broke apart over Texas to warn infrastructure, such as agricultural and food distribution
school officials about the potential danger of shuttle facilities, utility companies and transportation systems.
debris.
Thus, a close partnership between the federal

Airport Security
The Aviation Transportation Act, signed by President
14

government, state government and the private sector is


necessary in identifying and eliminating any potential
threat to our existing critical infrastructure.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

An example of private sector coordination with


government agencies occured after the 2001 terrorist
attacks with the creation of the Texas Engineers Task
Force on Homeland
Security. When the
Learn more
Governors Task Force
on
Homeland
Texas Engineers
Security
needed
Task Force on
assistance
evaluating
Homeland Secuthe security of the
rity: www.tspe.org
states
critical
infrastructure,
Chairman David Dewhurst turned to the Texas Society
of Professional Engineers.

Another public-private partnership taking place in


Texas involves the implementation of a 211
information and referral system. While the Health
and Human Services Commission is responsible for
developing and maintaining the system, communitybased organizations such as the United Way will
operate information centers that respond to the calls.

Citizen Efforts and Volunteerism

The terrorist attacks of September 11th stirred a desire


in many Texans to help their fellow citizens, their
communities and their country. The Texas homeland
security Internet site provides resources to help citizens
develop safety plans, remain alert for suspicious
behavior and learn how to become involved in
The engineers established a means to provide the Task
community preparedness efforts.
Force on Homeland Security with immediate
technical assistance and also committed to con- At the federal level, President Bush developed Citizen
tributing long-term guidance to help the state prevent Corps to create opportunities for individuals to help their
and respond to acts of terrorism and other disasters. communities prepare for and respond to emergencies.
The Texas Engineers Task Force on Homeland Security The goal is to have all citizens participate in making their
includes five response teams to identify and organize communities safer, stronger and better prepared to
resources to meet potential threats, suggest risk prevent and respond to acts of terrorism, crime and
mitigation methods and promote citizen awareness. disasters.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

15

16

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Critical Mission Areas

Emergency Preparedness and Response


The Texas Disaster Act of 1975
gives the Governor the authority
to deploy state resources in
emergency situations and
disasters. The Act also creates
the Emergency Management
Council, a group of 31 state and
volunteer agencies who advise the
Governors Division of Emergency Management (DEM).

Meeting the Objectives


The Texas Homeland Security
Strategic Plan sets objectives
compatible with the national
plan. By focusing on emergency
preparedness and response, the
state is working to:

78th Texas Legislature, works


with local and regional
representatives, local law
enforcement agencies, first
responders, firefighters, emergency services personnel and
others to create a partnership that
seeks out local input and provides
resources for local success.

Minimize the damage and


recover from attacks that
do occur.

A state-of-the-art State
Operations Center is staffed
around the clock by DEM
employees and personnel from
other relevant agencies. This center, which monitors
routine and emergency events as they occur, is the
primary location from which crisis management and
coordination are accomplished in Texas.

The Critical Infrastructure


Protection Council coordinates
with the 24 regional councils of
governments (COGs) and other
local officials to ensure that every
area of the state enhances emergency planning. Because
terrorists seek to exploit a systems weakness, it is critical
that each region has access to technical assistance and
resources to safeguard its people and infrastructure.

Texas has enhanced emergency coordination by


developing a regional network that relies on
partnerships among local governments and
strategically placed equipment. This network is built
around mutual aid and response agreements to ensure
that every area of Texas has the capacity and capability
to react to a catastrophic event.

An Internet site, www.texashomelandsecurity.com,


provides valuable information to both the public and
local governments. This site is a one-stop resource to
the public for terrorist threat advisories and safety tips.
The site also helps local officials by providing access
to technical assistance and links to additional state
and federal resources.

Local officials are in the best position to help the state


accurately assess our security risks and help us mitigate
Effective communication, planning and links to those risks. The Critical Infrastructure Protection
resources will be crucial for local governments Council provides a critical link between the state
developing emergency response plans. The Critical vision for homeland security and the local ability to
Infrastructure Protection Council, established by the make that vision a reality.

Strategic Planning

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

17

Photo courtesy of Texas Engineering Extension Service

Texas Task Force I aided the recovery efforts after the attack on the World Trade Center in New York.

Texas Task Force I Search and Rescue Team


Texas Task Force I is an urban search and rescue team designed to provide a coordinated
response to disasters in urban environments. The task force specializes in locating and
extricating victims trapped in collapsed structures, confined spaces or trenches in largely
populated areas. Texas Task Force I, based in College Station, is capable of responding to state
and national disasters including earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and man-made technological
and terrorist events.
Texas Task Force I is one of 28 such teams in the nation, which are coordinated by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency, and one of only six teams in the nation designated to respond
to incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. The task force is comprised of 210
personnel on three, 70-person teams which include hazardous materials and weapons of mass
destruction technicians representing fire departments and emergency organizations throughout
the state. Designed to be logistically self-sufficient for the first 72 hours of operation, the task
force is able to function for up to 10 days.
Each 70-person task force is divided into two groups, each of which operates in 12-hour shifts
on a disaster scene. All task force members are cross-trained in search and rescue skills to
ensure depth of capability and integrated task force operations.
Each task force brings its own specialized equipment to the scene, including hydraulic jacks,
high-tech listening devices, hazardous material monitoring equipment, specialized victim
location devices and specialized medical and triage equipment.
18

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Regional Response Network


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Sher man

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Interlocking response systems will facilitate


strategic positioning of equipment and
personnel. The maps shaded areas represent
the states 24 regional
councils of governments.

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Regional Response Network


The states 24 COG regions set the framework for
the development of regional, interlocking and
mutually supporting terrorism prevention efforts and
preparedness programs.
The use of regionally based and interlocking response
systems promotes comprehensive planning and the
collaborative positioning of equipment and personnel.
Each of these regions is approximately 200 miles in
diameter, and they are based on the COG boundaries.

Jim Ho gg
Za pa ta

Broo ks

Kene dy

Sta rr
Hid algo

Wil lac y
Cam ero n

Identify the risks faced by each jurisdiction


and set priorities for addressing those risks.

Establish policies, procedures and plans for


how jurisdictions will respond to disasters.

Promote exercises using realistic simulated


conditions to ensure first responders ability
to work effectively and as a team.

A central component of the Regional Response


Identify operational deficiencies in exercises
Network is the Texas First Responder Preparedness
and correct them.
Program. This program creates a partnership among
Provide the facilities, equipment and expertise
federal agencies, state agencies, local government,
to implement plans when terrorists strike.
volunteer organizations and the private sector
working within the framework of the Texas Homeland
The states regional approach also has led to the
Security Strategic Plan to:
development of an effective and efficient system for
Maintain an emergency management and distributing federal homeland security funds. This
response system that is comprehensive, risk- system utilizes risk assessments and relies heavily on
based and capable of responding to any type regional planning and local input, with the COGs
determining the distribution of half of the local funds.
of disaster.
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

19

In June 2003, Governor Perry announced that more


than 700 Texas jurisdictions would be receiving grants
under this funding system a dramatic increase from
previous years. The local governments receiving the
grants represented more than 90 percent of the Texas
population. Using this new funding system, Texas
was able to ensure that available grant money was
distributed more broadly and fairly than ever before.

Center and has responded after floods in Del Rio and


Houston, a tornado in Jarrell and the bonfire collapse
at Texas A&M University. (See Page 22.)

The Texas National Guards 6th Civil Support Team


is stationed at Austin-Bergstrom International
Airport. This unit is trained and equipped to respond
to biological, chemical or nuclear incidents. Texas
was among the first states to get a Civil Support Team
when 10 such teams were authorized by the federal
Additional Response Resources
government in 1998. Today, 32 Civil Support Teams
In addition to capable local first responders and have been authorized. The Texas teams mission is to
emergency workers, Texas also is home to response go into an affected area, assess the incident, advise the
units with unique abilities to respond in times of crisis. civilian emergency responders, and bring in additional
resources to assist with the problem.
Texas Task Force I, based in College Station, is an urban
search and rescue team designed to provide a The Civil Support Team has sophisticated detection,
coordinated response to disasters in urban environments. communication and assessment equipment, including
The task force specializes in locating and extricating a mobile laboratory that gives the team the capability
victims trapped in collapsed structures, confined spaces of identifying more than 125,000 chemicals or
or trenches in largely populated areas. Texas Task determine the genetic blueprint of a biological
Force I aided the recovery efforts at the World Trade contamination.

20

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Critical Mission Areas

Border Security
Texas has a dozen seaports and
more than 1,000 miles of inland
waterways responsible for more
than 17 percent of the gross state
product. Our state also is home
to 14 border crossings more
than any other state including
seven of the nations 10 busiest
southern border crossings.
Ensuring the security of our
international border and ports
while allowing the smooth and
efficient flow of commerce is an
issue of critical importance to
Texas and our nation.

Meeting the Objectives


The Texas Homeland Security
Strategic Plan sets objectives
compatible with the national
plan. By focusing on border
security, the state is working
to:

Prevent terrorist attacks


within Texas.

In addition, Texas ports have been


awarded more than $37 million
in federal funding for security
improvements, including $2.3
million for strategic deployment
terminals at the Port of Corpus
Christi and $1.8 million for a
command center and expanded
security assessment at the Port of
Houston.

While the federal government is


primarily responsible for security
9 Reduce the states
at international points of entry,
vulnerability to terrorism.
Texas has taken steps to enhance
federal efforts. The Governors
Office has funded large-scale
In 2001, Governor Perry directed
the Texas Department of Transportation to seek training exercises in port and border cities to test and
federal funding to design and build efficient and secure improve the states ability to respond to a disaster. A
inspection facilities at the eight busiest truck crossings three-day Port of Houston exercise in 2002, which
in the state. The resulting $40.8 million award provided training for 400 emergency workers and first
represented 75 percent of the total federal funding responders, simulated a catastrophic terrorist attack
available under this grant program for southern border involving a weapon of mass destruction. Similar
states.
exercises have taken place in El Paso, Del Rio and
other border cities, and in the fall of 2003 state and
Texas is using the funding to build the states first federal agencies partnered with private petroleum
permanent border inspection stations, where trucks refineries to conduct a training program on security
will be checked to make sure they meet all safety for the petroleum industry.
standards. The state also has invited several federal
agencies including the U.S. Customs Service, the The Governors Office also launched a $1.5 million
U.S. Immigration Assistance Center, the U.S. Drug Border Security Intelligence Network to detect, track
Enforcement Administration and the U.S. and analyze criminal activity along the border. The
Department of Agriculture to house inspection border network includes officers in Del Rio, Laredo,
El Paso and McAllen. A companion water security
services in these facilities.
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

21

initiative will provide additional enforcement and


intelligence resources in Brownsville, Galveston,
Beaumont, Houston and Corpus Christi.

agencies to sponsor an international Border Terrorism


Conference. This conference the first of its kind in
the nation brought together local, state, federal and
Mexican law enforcement agencies and medical
In September 2003, the Governors Office and the experts to discuss homeland security planning and
Texas Attorney Generals Office joined with federal efforts on both sides of the border.

22

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Conclusion

A Safer, Stronger Texas


The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan provides
a solid framework for the state to build on
partnerships among local, state and federal agencies,
volunteer organizations and the private sector. The
ultimate goal is the coordination of law enforcement
and emergency response systems that protect our states
people and resources while safeguarding our freedom
and liberty.
House Bill 9, passed by the 78th Texas Legislature,
and the Presidents National Strategy for Homeland
Security set the stage for the states strategic plan. The
Critical Infrastructure Protection Council created by
H.B. 9 has begun meeting, and the Governors
Criminal Justice Division has awarded $1.7 million
in federal funding to establish the Texas Security Alert
and Analysis Center. The states 24 regional councils
of governments have submitted first responder plans
to the Governors Office that lay the groundwork for
a statewide network of interlocking and mutually
supportive regional response systems, and local
governments have received millions of dollars in
federal funding to enhance their security.
The tragic events of September 11, 2001, proved that
the threat of terrorism is real. The state and its citizens
must respond with a heightened vigilance against an
enemy who lays in wait, seeking to exploit any
weakness. But we also must respond with a courage
and determination that refuses to give in to fear.
Ultimately, it is our way of life at stake. It is only by
achieving this measured vigilance, protecting our state
while still enjoying our freedom, that we can prevail
against the threat of terrorism.

Sept. 11 Memorial
On Sept. 11, 2003, Governor Perry unveiled
the Sept. 11 Memorial at the Texas State
Cemetery. The memorial, which features
two beams recovered from the World Trade
Center, is dedicated to the Texans killed in
the attacks and in the war on terror.
We must do more than dedicate a
monument, the Governor said. We must
dedicate our hearts and minds to the cause
that continues on the cause of freedom.
We must maintain our resolve and our
purpose to rid this world of the terrorist
element. We must not waver. We must not
retreat. We must remain strong in honor of
those who died that day and on behalf of
generations to come.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

23

24

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Appendix A

Task Force Progress Report


Governor Rick Perry created the Task Force on Homeland Security to advise him on matters relating to the
states security. The task force delivered a report to the Governor on January 31, 2002, that included 44
recommendations to help ensure that the state is well prepared to detect, deter and respond to terrorism. The
Governors Office has accomplished most of the task force recommendations, with the remaining handful
requiring federal action on additional funding. The following progress report provides a brief look at the
ongoing work to analyze and implement the task force recommendations.

A 1:

Use state warning systems to communicate warning and safety information to the public.
Progress: Enhancements have been made to the states basic warning systems, and the Governors
Division of Emergency Management (DEM) has adopted the federal color-based warning system
announced by federal Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge on March 22, 2002. This color-coded
system, along with any state alerts, can be found on the states new homeland security Internet site,
www.texashomelandsecurity.com. The Commission on State Emergency Communication also is
reviewing funding requirements to implement a reverse 911 system, and the Texas Department of
Transportation is designing an advanced bridge warning system for use on selected bridges that would
alert bridge users when a bridge is out.

A 2:

Encourage public service messages and establish a web page to inform the public about what to
do in the event of a terrorist threat.
Progress: The states new Internet site, www.texashomelandsecurity.com, provides a one-stop resource
to the public for terrorist threat advisories and safety tips. The site also will help local officials by
providing updates on the statewide strategy, access to technical assistance and links to additional resources.
In addition, DEM has expanded its Internet site, www.demwmd.net, to include information about
terrorism awareness, prevention and preparedness. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) also has
developed an Internet site that addresses bioterrorism issues, incident response planning for mass
casualty and medical emergencies.

A 3:

Require cell phone companies to maintain portable towers for use in emergencies.
Progress: While this a federal issue under the authority of the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC), the state has worked with the FCC and cellular telephone companies to ensure that portable
towers will be available if the need arises.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

25

A 4:

Develop emergency training for schools on actions to take in the event of a terrorist threat.
Progress: The Texas School Safety Center, located at Southwest Texas State University, has been
funded by the Governors Criminal Justice Division since 1999 to provide information and training
for emergency situations within Texas schools. In addition, the Governors Office also recently approved
a $500,000 grant to train more than 600 Texas law enforcement officers at the new Advanced Law
Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center in San Marcos. This new center will train officers to
handle and diffuse crisis situations.

A 5:

Establish a 1-800 Call Center and e-mail address to allow the public to report certain activity.
Progress: The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) has a telephone number to allow the public
to report activity that may be terrorist related. The number is (800) 252-5402. In addition, DPS has
posted e-mail addresses for its Counter-Terrorism Intelligence Unit at www.demwmd.net.

A 6:

Establish a state agency warning system in the event of a terrorist threat.


Progress: In establishing the Texas Security Alert and Analysis Center, Texas has implemented the
first state-based emergency response network using the U.S. Department of Homeland Securitys
model. The Texas system offers a dynamic alert and notification system that includes voice, e-mail,
pager and fax messages. The Texas Security Alert and Analysis Center uses several statewide systems to
disseminate information:

Texas law enforcement agencies have access to the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications
System (NLETS), giving the state instant access to federal alerts and information. The FBI has
used NLETS to issue alerts regarding terrorist threats. The Texas Law Enforcement
Telecommunications System provides an electronic link among the states law enforcement agencies.

The Texas Department of Health has implemented the Health Alert Network. (For more
information, see progress note for recommendation C 3.)

The Texas Education Agency has established an Internet-based network that can deliver immediate
alerts to the states 1,200 school districts.

B 1:

Support funding of additional personnel and training for the Department of Public Safety for
intelligence and law enforcement efforts.
Progress: The Department of Public Safety has enhanced its intelligence and law enforcement efforts
through an internal reorganization that added resources to these important efforts.

B 2:

Request federal authorization and funding for a second Civil Support Team for Texas.
Progress: Governor Perry has requested federal authorization for a second Civil Support Team; however,
this request has not yet been approved. The Governors Office will continue to pursue this request.

B 3:

Identify an organization to set minimum standards for emergency response equipment for
specific purposes.
Progress: The Department of Justice, as do most federal and state agencies, sets minimum standards
for equipment purchased with funding obtained through that agency.

B 4:

Seek legislation to require appropriate physical documentation to be maintained for all persons
who change their legal name.
Progress: Such legislation failed to pass the 78th Texas Legislature.

26

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

B 5: Support funding for additional personnel for the Governors Division of Emergency Management
for field personnel to support local government efforts to plan and train for disasters.
Progress: See progress note for recommendation B 1. The Division of Emergency Management is
part of the Texas Department of Public Safety.
B 6:

Develop standards and a process for the certification of public and private Weapon of Mass
Destruction training courses.
Progress: The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) has developed a voluntary certification
process. Legislation would be necessary to require certification of training courses offered through the
private sector. First responders are encouraged to take courses that are recommended and preferred by
TEEX and DEM to ensure that training received conforms to Texas counter-terrorism strategies.

B 7:

Ensure that appropriate training resources are available for first response efforts.
Progress: The Governors Criminal Justice Division awarded a $1 million grant to DEM on October
10, 2001, for first responder terrorism and preparedness training. More than 10,000 Texans received
training under this grant and training exercises have been conducted in Texas City, Galveston, Freeport,
Hidalgo and Brazoria counties, the Port of Houston, Del Rio, Beaumont, Abilene and Conroe.
Additional exercises are planned for fiscal year 2004. In addition, a separate $230,000 grant to the
DPS Intelligence Division trained 2,808 first responders in fiscal year 2003 and will train more officers
in fiscal year 2004. Other training efforts include:

B 8:

TEEX provides first responder training for EMS, firefighters, hospitals and public works
employees through an interagency contract with the Texas Department of Health.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is using FBI counter-terrorism training for its personnel.
The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, formerly the Texas Natural resources
Conservation Commission, is conducting emergency response training for agencies and
localities within its areas of responsibility.
The Governors Criminal Justice Division has approved a $500,000 grant to train more
than 600 Texas law enforcement officers at the new Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid
Response Training Center in San Marcos.
The Governors Office is working with DEM to develop a Texas First Responder
Preparedness Program in anticipation of federal funding to states and communities. The
states first responder program is being developed to work within the framework of the
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan.

Request all health licensees to complete at least one hour of continuing education requirements
each year on reporting medical events and responding to terrorism.
Progress: House Bill 1483 requires nurses to complete continuing education in bioterrorism response.
Other state agencies are adding similiar requirements by rule.

B 9: Expand the role of the National Guard at Texas airports and deploy them at selected private and
government critical infrastructures during periods of high alert.
Progress: The Governor extended the National Guards presence at airports on March 7, 2002,
through May 2002. Almost 400 members of the Texas National Guard provided security assistance
at 26 Texas airports. In most airports, the Guard remained deployed through May 10, 2002. The
Aviation Transportation Act, signed by President Bush on November 19, 2001, now gives federal
authorities control over airport security.
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

27

B10:

Request all Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas develop plans for designating hazardous
material routes.
Progress: State law requires hazardous material routes for cities of greater than 750,000 in population;
however, cities with populations less than 750,000 may choose to designate routes. The Governor
encourages local and regional governments to work with TxDOT to voluntarily designate hazardous
materials routes. In addition, the Governors Trans Texas Corridor will create hazardous material
routes outside major cities.

B11: Develop expected security standards for industries that have identified critical infrastructure
assets and require such industries to submit security impact reports.
Progress: The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has conducted risk assessments
of dams and public drinking water facilities. The Public Utility Commission surveyed security measures
taken by 24 electric industry entities since September 11, 2001, and all reported heightened security
and additional communication with employees regarding information security. In addition, TxDOT
is developing site-specific emergency response plans for critical bridges.
B12: Support local efforts to require that new large special events facilities build emergency response
rooms.
Progress: This is a local zoning issue; however, the Governors Office will be providing information
to the states 24 regional councils of government to help local officials enhance security.
B13: Support local efforts to require that new large special events facilities build enhanced security
surrounding heating-venting and air-conditioning, water and wastewater systems.
Progress: See progress note for recommendation B12.
B14: Develop a plan to expand real-time monitoring of drinking water supplies to test for chemical
and biological agents that could be used as weapons.
Progress: The Governors Controlling Our Destiny water initiative takes steps to ensure the safety
of the states water resources. The governor has directed Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law
enforcement officers to police water supply facilities and dams. In addition, TCEQ is working with
the Environmental Protection Agency to obtain grants for projects related to drinking water protection
and quality assurance.
B15: Improve the research and development associated with detecting, deterring and responding to
terrorism.
Progress: Funding for research into homeland security will come primarily from the federal level;
however, the Governors Office supports the efforts of Texas universities to pursue these funding
opportunities. In July, Texas universities signed a memorandum of understanding to develop a proposal
for becoming a research center for homeland security. This new consortium will combine the strengths
of the Texas A&M University System, the University of Texas System, Texas Tech University System
and the University of Houston System in applications for federal research funding.
B16: Determine whether certain highly toxic chemical agents can be added to the existing air quality
monitoring network.
Progress: TCEQ already monitors air quality in Texas major metropolitan areas and will work with
the federal Environmental Protection Agency to determine the feasibility of monitoring for additional
airborne chemical agents.
28

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

C 1: Provide the Governor with a list of local jurisdictions that did not complete the jurisdictional
assessments of threat and vulnerability.
Progress: DEM and TEEX have conducted risk assessments within Texas communities to examine
potential risks to infrastructure and citizens. DEM and TEEX also have identified those localities that
did not submit data for the risk assessments. In addition, the state has developed planning standards,
sample planning products and instruments that can be used by local officials to develop response and
prevention capabilities.
C 2:

Assess, identify and provide additional training and resources that may be needed by local
emergency response entities.
Progress: See progress note for recommendation B 7.

C 3: Support the Texas Department of Healths recent plan to improve response capabilities in the
event of an anthrax or bio-terrorism event.
Progress: Governor Perry authorized the transfer of $12.2 million in February 2002 to TDH for
these activities. TDH has created the Health Alert Network to distribute information statewide to
local health professionals and officials. The Health Alert Network also will compile a contact listing
for health professionals throughout Texas in the event that mobilization or contact becomes necessary.
In addition, TDH has enhanced its disease detection and response capability by establishing the Office
of State Epidemiologist, increasing regional epidemiology staff, developing guidelines for team
responses, purchasing lab and testing supplies, and expanding its lab capacity. TDH also has received
$51.4 million from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for public health preparedness
and bioterrorism response.
D 1: Establish a coordinating council to develop a plan for early detection and streamlining responses
to bioterrorism.
Progress: TDH is appointing a Preparedness Coordinating Council to advise TDH and oversee the
coordinated planning and implementation of preparedness and response activities. Recommendations
for improving the surveillance of disease occurrence and the education and training of health care
professionals also are being implemented.
D 2:

Improve reporting of infectious diseases to TDH.


Progress: See progress note under recommendation C 3.

D 3: Review and update plans for quarantine, hospitalization and evacuation procedures in the event
of a terrorist attack.
Progress: TDH is updating its epidemic plans that will then be coordinated with the Centers for
Disease Control (CDC) and the states medical community. CDC has indicated pharmaceutical
companies have produced and stockpiled vaccines in preparation for bioterrorism attacks. TDH also
has established a Preparedness Coordinating Council. This high-level committee will provide advice
on major preparedness issues.
D 4: Develop a statewide plan to administer a mass vaccination and chemoprophylaxis.
Progress: See progress note under recommendation D 3.
D 5: Continue funding the Health Alert Network.
Progress: See progress note under recommendation C 3.
TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

29

D 6: Request all health licensing organizations and agencies to require licensees to provide business
fax numbers and e-mail addresses.
Progress: See progress note under recommendation C 3.
D 7: Establish 10 Regional HazMat WMD Teams (Hazardous Materials Weapons of Mass Destruction
Teams).
Progress: DEM, TxDOT and the Texas Engineering Extension Service are preparing their budget
request for the next legislative session, and consideration of this issue is part of that process. However,
there may be potential to fund regional hazardous materials teams out of anticipated federal funds.
D 8: Monitor the development of communication interoperability for first responders.
Progress: The Governors Office and DPS continue to monitor an initiative of the Texas Sheriffs
Association to develop a strategy to address the ability of emergency responders to communicate
across agency lines. While the long-term solution probably will include the conversion to a 700 MHz
system, that option would require a substantial financial commitment. As an interim approach, the
Texas Sheriffs Association is investigating the use of radio switchers to integrate systems.
D 9: Establish a centralized point of contact for intelligence information involving critical infrastructure.
Progress: The DPS Counter Terrorism Intelligence Unit is the statewide centralized point of contact
for intelligence gathering and training, information sharing, threat assessment and investigative response
to terrorist threats or attacks within the state. The unit takes calls and tips at (800) 252-5402 from
local law enforcement officers as well as the public.
D10: Support efforts regarding infrastructure protection and business continuity planning to ensure
the continuation of government services.
Progress: The states Department of Information Resources has created a State Computer Security
Group that is reviewing and enhancing the states computer security. In addition, Attorney General
John Cornyns report on cyber-security is being reviewed for possible further action.
D11: Support legislation to expand the current Good Samaritan Law to protect industrial response
teams responding to emergencies at neighboring facilities.
Progress: House Bill 9 includes provisions to protect workers responding to emergencies from civil
liability.
E 1:

Review compacts with neighboring states to ensure they address resource sharing before, during
and after terrorist incidents.
Progress: DEM currently coordinates with bordering states through compacts established by the
State of Texas.

E 2:

Initiate dialogue with Mexico to develop protocols for the sharing of resources and intelligence
on matters pertaining to terrorist incidents.
Progress: The Texas Secretary of States Office and DEM have begun this process.

E 3: Request the federal Office of Homeland Security to establish standardized terrorism classification
levels and assign minimum expected levels of response by industry and government.
Progress: DEMs Internet site conforms to the federal threat level classifications, which include suggested
protective measures. Consideration is being given to requesting regional and local governments to
formally adopt the system for the sake of uniformity and clear communication.
30

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

E 4:

Request the federal Office of Homeland Security ensure equal spending along Texas/Mexico
border as along the U.S./Canada border.
Progress: Governor Perry announced in June, 2002, that Texas will receive $40.8 million from the
U.S. Department of Transportation to build one-stop border inspection facilities designed to house
both federal and state inspectors.

E 5:

Direct the Texas Department of Transportation to prepare an assessment of assets and needs at
Texas ports of entry to aid the Governor in seeking funding for border security.
Progress: The Texas Department of Transportation is currently performing this assessment. Texas
ports have received more than $37 million in federal funding since September 2001 to enhance security,
including $2.3 million for strategic deployment terminals at the Port of Corpus Christi and $1.8 million
for a command center and expanded security assessment at the Port of Houston.

E 6:

Request the federal Office of Homeland Security investigate initiating limited background checks
for persons employed in critical infrastructure.
Progress: Requires federal legislation. The Governors Office will work with the appropriate federal
agencies to enhance the states security measures and ensure that the states strategic plan is compatible
with President Bushs federal plan.

E 7:

Request the federal Office of Homeland Security to coordinate risk management analysis among
federal agencies and publish a tool for government and industry to evaluate their infrastructure
risks.
Progress: The Governors Office will continue to work with the appropriate federal agencies to
enhance the states security measures and will form partnerships with both the public and private
sectors to help assess the states ability to protect critical state infrastructure.

E 8:

Coordinate with the federal Office of Homeland Security to create a biological agents registry.
Progress: It is expected that a registry of biological agents will be required at the federal level. The
Governors Office will work with the Office of Homeland Security to ensure that the state fully
complies with all federal guidelines regarding such a registry.

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

31

Appendix B

First Responders, Resources


Division of Emergency Management
www.demwmd.net

Texas Animal Health Commission


www.tahc.state.tx.us

Texas Department of Public Safety


www.txdps.state.tx.us

Railroad Commission of Texas


www.rrc.state.tx.us

Texas Engineering Extension Service


http://teexweb.tamu.edu

Texas Commission on Fire Protection


www.tcfp.state.tx.us

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department


www.tpwd.state.tx.us

Texas Animal Health Commission


www.tahc.state.tx.us

Texas Department of Transportation


www.txdot.state.tx.us

Department of Information Resources


www.dir.state.tx.us

Texas Adjutant Generals Department


www.agd.state.tx.us

Texas Department of Mental Health


and Mental Retardation
www.mhmr.state.tx.us

Texas Forest Service


http://txforestservice.tamu.edu

Texas Commission on Volunteerism


and Community Service
www.txserve.org/txcvcs

Texas Office of the Attorney General


www.oag.state.tx.us
Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
www.tceq.state.tx.us
Department of Agriculture
www.agr.state.tx.us
Texas Department of Health
Division of Emergency Preparedness
Bureau of Radiation Control
www.tdh.state.tx.us
32

Texas Association of Regional Councils


www.txregionalcouncil.org
Salvation Army
www.salvationarmytexas.org/disasters.htm
American Red Cross
www.redcrosstexas.org

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

Appendix C

Regional Councils of Governments


Region 1: Panhandle Regional Planning Commission
(806) 372-3381 fax (806) 373-3268
Region 2: South Plains Association of Governments
(806) 762-8721 fax (806) 765-9544
Region 3: Nortex Regional Planning Commission
(940) 322-5281 fax (940) 322-6743
Region 4: North Central Texas Council of Governments
(817) 695-9174 fax (817) 695-9145
Region 5: Ark-Tex Council of Governments
(903) 832-8636 fax (903) 832-3441
Region 6: East Texas Council of Governments
(903) 984-8641 fax (903) 983-1440
Region 7: West Central Texas Council of Governments
(915) 672-1197 fax (915) 676-9541
Region 8: Rio Grande Council of Governments
(915) 533-0998 fax (915) 532-9385
Region 9: Permian Basin Regional Planning Commission
(915) 563-1061 fax (915) 563-1728
Region 10: Concho Valley Council of Governments
(915) 944-9666 fax (915) 944-9925
Region 11: Heart of Texas Council of Governments
(254) 756-7822 fax (254) 756-0102
Region 12: Capital Area Planning Council
(512) 916-6160 fax (512) 444-7475

Region 17: Golden Crescent Regional Planning


Commission
(361) 578-1587 fax (361) 578-8865
Region 18: Alamo Area Council of Governments
(210) 362-5222 fax (210) 225-5937
Region 19: South Texas Development Council
(956) 722-3995 fax (956) 722-2670
Region 20: Coastal Bend Council of Governments
(361) 883-5743 fax (361) 883-5749

Region 13: Brazos Valley Council of Governments


(979) 775-4244 fax (979) 775-3466

Region 21: Lower Rio Grande Valley Development


Council
(956) 682-3481 fax (956) 682-3295

Region 14: Deep East Texas Council of Governments


(409) 384-5704 fax (409) 283-5437

Region 22: Texoma Council of Governments


(903) 813-3577 fax (903) 813-3539

Region 15: S.E. Texas Regional Planning Commission


(409) 727-2384, ext. 114 fax (409) 727-4078

Region 23: Central Texas Council of Governments


(254) 933-7075, ext. 202 fax (254) 939-0885

Region 16: Houston-Galveston Area Council


(713) 993-2427 fax (713) 993-2412

Region 24: Middle Rio Grande Development Council


(830) 876-3533 fax (830) 876-9415

TEXAS HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIC PLAN - PART I - GOVERNORS VISION

33

Texas
Homeland
Security
Strategic
Plan
Part II
Goals and Objectives
Rick Perry, Governor
January 30, 2004

Table of Contents

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan


Part II - Goals and Objectives
Introduction
Purpose

Page 1

Vision

Page 1

Focus

Page 1

Coordination

Page 2

Description of Jurisdictions

Page 2

Assessment Process

Page 2

Texas Risk Profile


Threat Assessment

Page 3

Vulnerability Assessment

Page 4

Agricultural Assessment

Page 5

Capabilities & Needs Profile


Planning

Page 7

Organization

Page 7

Equipment

Page 8

Training

Page 8

Exercises

Page 9

The Strategy
Strategy Organization

Page 11

Prevention Goal

Page 11

Response Goals

Page 12

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Recovery Goal

Page 20

Response Goal

Page 22

Recovery Goal

Page 23

Evaluation Plan

ii

Review & Analysis

Page 25

Biannual Strategy Implementation Reports

Page 25

Reported Information

Page 25

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Chapter 1

Introduction
Purpose

Reduce the States Vulnerability to Terrorism

This is a strategic framework to support the National


Strategy for Homeland Security and the Texas
Homeland Security Strategic Plan Part I. It builds on
Texas current disaster response network and will assist
state and local officials in developing regionally-based,
interlocking, and mutually supporting terrorism
preparedness programs. The states capability to respond
to terrorist incidents or other disasters can be enhanced
by providing the resources to allow local jurisdictions
and their mutual aid partners to respond to a potential
terrorist incident, mass casualty incident, or major
disaster until additional state and federal resources are
available. The size and diversity of Texas requires a
Homeland Security program that accounts for the full
spectrum of terrorism threats as well as disasters of any
kind.

Identify and assess risks and take action to protect


critical infrastructure and key assets.

Part II of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan


provides information to guide preparedness efforts for
the next three to five years. The dynamic nature of the
threat to Homeland Security and evolving technologies
require this strategy to be a living document. Users of
the strategy at the local, regional and state levels are
invited to submit recommended changes to Part II at
any time to the Texas Engineering Extension Service.

Vision
Prevent Terrorist Attacks Within Texas
The states first priority will be to detect and deter
potential attacks by enhancing coordination and
communication among state and local law enforcement
agencies and developing effective partnerships with
federal, public and private agencies and organizations.

Minimize the Damage and Recover from Attacks that


Occur
Increase coordination and mutual aid partnerships
among local governments, the states first responder
community, and state agencies to ensure a quick and
orderly response to any crisis.

Focus
To accomplish the strategic vision, the strategy is
organized around the following critical mission areas:
intelligence and warning
protecting critical infrastructure
emergency preparedness, response and recovery
border security
Response relies on the Incident Command System.
Whenever applicable, Texas will use an all hazards
approach that improves the ability to respond to
terrorism incidents as well as other disasters. For years,
Texas has had a fully-integrated Emergency
Management System (EMS) designed to prepare,
respond and recover. Please refer to Part III -State
Emergency Management Plan of the Texas Homeland
Security Strategic Plan for details on the operation of
this system. Texas Emergency Management System
recognizes that local officials are best able to make
decisions about disaster preparedness, response, and
recovery. The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan is
built around that premise and emphasizes the
importance of grassroots input and preparedness

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Critical Mission Areas

The Texas Division of Emergency Management


(DEM)

Intelligence and Warning


The primary focus of the strategy is to prevent a terrorist
attack. The best way to accomplish this is through the
timely receipt, analysis, and dissemination of criminal
intelligence information and adequate warning.
Protecting Critical Infrastructure
Effective communication and coordination between
local, state, federal, and public agencies and
organizations (along with the involvement of the private
sector) will be necessary to reduce the states
vulnerability to a terrorist attack and recover quickly
from any attack or other type of disaster that occurs.
Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery
A statewide network of regional, interlocking and
mutually supporting emergency preparedness, response,
and recovery programs will promote comprehensive
planning, provision of suitable emergency facilities, and
the collaborative positioning of equipment and
personnel.
Border Security
Ensuring both the security of the states international
border and ports and the efficient flow of traffic and
commerce are issues of critical importance and a shared
responsibility of the state and federal governments.
Priorities for Resource Allocation
Prepare and equip emergency responders.
Protect against Chemical, Biological, Radiological,
Nuclear or High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE)
terrorism.
Protect critical infrastructure.
Security of the states international border and ports
of entry.

Coordination

Part II of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan


was developed during regional sessions with the regional
Councils of Governments and local jurisdictions. The
results from the regional sessions were reviewed in a
statewide session that included the regional Councils of
Governments and representatives of the other groups
previously listed.
A multi-disciplined approach is critical in providing an
effective response to a potential terrorist Weapons of
Mass Destruction (WMD) incident. The assessment
process includes the following disciplines:
Law Enforcement (LE)
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
Emergency Management Agencies (EMA)
Fire Services (FS)
Hazardous Materials (HazMat)
Governmental Administrative (GA)
Public Safety Communications (PSC)
Public Works (PW)
Health Care (HC)
Public Health (PH)
At the state level, multi-discipline representation was
provided by members of the Critical Infrastructure
Protection Committee and the DEM. Representatives of
multiple disciplines also participated in the regional
strategy development sessions.

Description of Jurisdictions
The jurisdictions of Texas are the legally recognized
counties and incorporated municipalities of the state.
The additions to the basic definition for the purpose of
this strategy include the three Indian tribes located in
Texas and the Dallas Fort Worth airport. Coverage of
the entire state is a natural outgrowth of the involvement
of all 24 Regional Councils of Government together
with the jurisdiction definition.

Strategy Approval was from the Governor of Texas


through the State Director of Homeland Security. The
TEEX the State Administrative Agency (SAA)
coordinated strategy development with:
24 regional Councils of Governments
Members of the Governors Critical Infrastructure
Protection Council
2

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan- Part II - Goals and Objectives

Assessment Process
The SAA sent letters to each county judge and each
mayor of an incorporated municipality inviting them to
participate in the assessment and to designate a point of
contact. Jurisdictions began entering data in January
2003 on a Texas website that mirrored the information
that would later be available on the ODP site. TEEX
used the assessment results for the 2002, 2003 and 2003
II State Homeland Security Grant programs. The site
was reopened to allow jurisdictions that had not
previously completed the assessment to complete it for
the 2004 State Homeland Security Program.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan- Part II - Goals and Objectives

Chapter 2

Texas Risk Profile


To be eligible to receive funding through the State Homeland Security Grant Program, all counties and incorporated
municipalities in Texas were required to complete a Domestic Preparedness Assessment, using the Office for
Domestic Preparedness developed criteria. These assessments contain data that was self-reported by the individual
jurisdictions.
All counties, incorporated cities, and Indian tribes were eligible to complete the assessment. Assessment data gathered
for the statewide strategy is also being used for the Urban Area Security Initiatives (UASI) in Dallas, Houston, and
San Antonio. Participation in the assessment is a requirement for State Homeland Security Program grant funding in
Texas. The following tables summarize data reported by the individual jurisdictions of Texas.
Jurisdiction Participation in the Assessment
Assessment participation by Texas jurisdictions
Number of Jurisdictions

Population

Participated in Assessment

928

20,730,740

Did not Participate in Assessment

525

1,204,156

Total

1453

21,934,896

Threat Assessment
One component of the assessment process was a threat assessment that resulted in a threat rating for each jurisdiction
that ranged from low to high. Just over 14.5% of the jurisdictions that participated in the assessment received a
high threat rating.
Threats
Number of Jurisdictions in the Following Threat Rating Categories
Low
(Rating of 1)
614

Moderate
(Rating of 2-4)
179

High
(Rating of 5-10)
135

As part of the threat assessment, each jurisdiction identified the number of potential threat elements (PTEs) that had
been identified within their jurisdiction. A PTE is defined as any group or individual in which there are allegations or
information indicating a possibility of the unlawful use of force or violence, specifically the utilization of a WMD, against
persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of a
specific motivation or goal, possibly political or social in nature. The 928 participating jurisdictions in Texas identified a
total of 2,052 PTEs. It is unclear the extent to which this number may include duplicative reporting of a single PTE
by multiple jurisdictions.
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Threats
Total Potential Threat Elements (PTEs) identified
in Texas
2,052
Identified PTEs

Documented Capabilities of Potential Threat


Elements
Number of PTEs with
capability
Chemical

242

Biological

115

Radiological

71

Nuclear

Explosive

254

In addition to reporting the number of PTEs within their areas, jurisdictions were asked to assess whether any of the
PTEs in their area had WMD capabilities in any of the five categories or types of terrorism incidents Chemical,
Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive.
Threats
History of Suspected CBRNE Incidents and Criminal Incidents

Chemical

9,064

CBRNE Incidents
Determined Criminal
274

Biological

7,751

171

Radiological

53

Nuclear

Explosive

5,674

1,601

TOTAL

22,548

2,052

CBRNE Incidents

As a final component of the Threat Assessment, jurisdictions were asked to report the number of Chemical,
Biological, Radiological, Nuclear or Explosive (CBRNE) incidents that required dispatch of response assets in their
jurisdiction between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2002. Jurisdictions reported which of these incidents were
determined to have been criminal.

Vulnerability Assessment
Jurisdictions that completed the assessment conducted a vulnerability analysis. The vulnerability assessment resulted
in a vulnerability rating for each jurisdiction that ranged from low to high.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan -Part II - Goals and Objectives

Vulnerability
Number of Jurisdictions in the Following Vulnerability
Rating Categories
Low
(Rating of 1-5)

Moderate
(Rating of 6-9)

High
(Rating of 10-12)

488

307

135

As part of the Vulnerability Assessment, jurisdictions reported on the number of legal hazardous CBRNE (Chemical,
Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive) sites within their areas.
Vulnerability
Legal Hazardous Sites
Reported by Jurisdictions
Hazard

Number of Sites

Chemical

36,477

Biological

940

Nuclear/Radiological

1,279

Explosive

2,573

Total

41,269

Agricultural Assessment
Agriculture is the second largest industry in Texas after petroleum with annual cash receipts of more than $12.6
billion dollars. In addition to the concerns for animal and plant well being, a primary impact of an agroterrorism act
is the effect it could have on trade. Given the magnitude and diversity of the Texas agricultural industry, the long
border shared with 4 states of Mexico, and 4 states of the U.S., and a traditional marketing practice for agriculture,
protecting this critical infrastructure represents a major challenge. Even though Texas probably ranks among the best
in agricultural emergency response, there are still major vulnerabilies. Texas chose to do the Agricultural assessment at
the State level, based on the fact that both animal and plant emergency responses are coordinated at the State level.
The assessment was completed by representatives of the Texas Animal Health Commission, the Texas Department of
Agriculture, the United States Department of Agriculture and the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine. Texas
also recognizes that diseases intended against agriculture could also be zoonotic or could be engineered to infect
humans as well as livestock.
The State Agricultural Working Group completed the ODP developed worksheets for typical agriculture facilities in
the state. The results are shown below.
Type of Potential
Agricultural Target

Score
on Worksheet

Vulnerability Score on Scale of 1-12

Cattle Industry - Feedlot

35

12

Cotton

34

12

Poultry

31

11

Nursery/Greenhouse

30

11

Cereal Grains

29

10

Swine

29

10

Fruits/Vegetables

26

Sheep and Goats

25

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

The planning scenario for animal incidents was a Foot and Mouth disease outbreak at a large feedlot in West Texas.
The planning scenario used for the fruit and vegetable industry was the introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly
into the citrus region of South Texas.
The potential magnitude of an agricultural incident is seen in the planning figures. Foot and Mouth at a large West
Texas feedlot could result in 500 dead animals with up to 65,000 symptomatic, plus an additional 30,000 exposed
but not showing symptoms and up to 500,000 possibly exposed. Introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly could
lead to 200 contaminated trees with up to 3.3 million trees possibly contaminated.
Jurisdiction Prioritization
Jurisdictions are prioritized within each Council of Governments (COG) region using the results of the jurisdiction
assessment and the COG categorization of regional capabilities of each jurisdiction in the region. The prioritization
scores are used to determine allocation of a portion of available resources. The Regional Councils of Governments
determine the allocation for the remaining portion using the assessment result plus consideration of projects and
needs for the region.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan -Part II - Goals and Objectives

Chapter 3

Capabilities & Needs Profile


The Domestic Preparedness Assessment process required jurisdictions to self-assess their readiness across five solution
areas: planning, organization, equipment, training and exercises. As a component of the assessment process, this data
was self-reported by the participating jurisdictions within the state. The following tables summarize the information
reported by jurisdictions.

Planning
Jurisdictions reported whether or not that had a current emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and a Terrorism Incident
Annex (TIA). Non participating jurisdictions were not credited with having a plan or TIA.
Planning
Jurisdictions with both an
Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and a Terrorism Incident Annex (TIA)
Percentage of Participating Jurisdictions with EOP and TIA

52.26%

Percentage of Total in Area with EOP and TIA

33.38%

Organization
Jurisdictions were asked to report the number of specialty response teams that are operational within their area. Each
jurisdiction also reported if these teams receive and/or provide mutual aid to other jurisdictions.
Organization
Emergency Response Teams reported in the State,
and Jurisdictions Receiving/Providing Mutual Aid
Type of Team

Number of Teams

Number Receiving
Aid

Number Providing
Aid

HazMat

308

640

192

Decontamination
Teams

487

586

171

SWAT

353

630

245

Bomb Squad

71

568

58

Technical Rescue

596

590

244

Urban Search &


Rescue

395

548

177

Heavy Rescue

219

541

127

MMRS

27

409

39

Public Health Team

265

528

129

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Agricultural Organizations (State Level)


Type of Team
Number of
Teams

Number of
Personnel
per Team

Agriculture Emergency Response Team

100

Agricultural Assessment and Sampling Team

Equipment
Jurisdictions were required to assess their equipment inventories and needs in several equipment categories: CBRNE
Logistical Support, CBRNE Rescue, Decontamination, Detection, Explosive Device Mitigation & Remediation,
Interoperable Communications, Medical Supplies Pharmaceuticals, Personal Protective and Physical Security
Enhancement. Because the Texas assessment began before the inclusion of additional items in the Authorized
Equipment List (AEL), the assessment reflects information on equipment authorized on the 2002 AEL. In each
equipment area, jurisdictions identified the number of pieces of equipment needed and the number on hand.
Equipment
Summary of Jurisdiction Equipment Shortfall:
Equipment
Category

Value of
Equipment
Required

Value of
Equipment
On-Hand

Value of
Equipment
Shortfall

% of
Value
Met

Equipment
Required

Equipment
On-Hand

Equipment
Shortfall

% Need
Met

34,601

454

34,147

1.31%

$351,825,524

$8,170,203

$343,655,321

2.32%

5,247

1,150

4,097

21.92%

$86,741,000

$16,828,000

$69,913,000

19.4%

2,143,836

32,455

2,111,381

1.51%

$112,207,512

$2,514,708

$109,692,804

2.24%

137,600

8,977

128,623

6.52%

$88,881,648

$5,205,185

$83,676,463

5.86%

Explosive Device
Mitigation &
Remediation

24,553

3,295

21,258

13.42%

$95,470,787

$7,589,290

$87,881,497

7.95%

Interoperable
Communications

227,569

78,424

149,145

34.46%

$418,018,066

$155,129,045

$262,889,021

37.11%

Medical Supplies
Pharmaceuticals

2,751,929

605,140

2,146,789

21.99%

4132,241,336

$24,299,162

$107,942,173

18.37%

Personal
Protective

931,160

119,807

811,353

12.87%

$191,156,416

$46,050112

$145,106,034

24.09%

Physical Security
Enhancement

106,895

45,556

61,339

42.62%

$1,193,012,500

$66,090,500

$1,126,922,000

5.54%

6,363,390

895,258

5,468,132

14.07%

$2,669,554,788

$331,876,205

$2,337,678,583

12.43%

CBRNE Logistical
Support
CBRNE Rescue
Decontamination
Detection

TOTAL

Training
Jurisdictions reported their training needs by response discipline in ten areas: law enforcement (LE), emergency
medical services (EMS), emergency management (EM), fire service (FS), HazMat (HZ), public works (PW),
government administrative (GA), public safety communications (PSC), health care (HC) and public health (PH).

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Training
Training needs by Training Level, by Discipline Percent Requiring Training
Discipline
Awareness

LE
EMS
EM
FS
HZ
PW
GA
PSC
HC
PH
All
58.16% 40.94% 62.29% 43.24% 29.44% 87.15% 86.44% 73.69% 86.67% 66.98% 73.92%

Performance 84.63% 68.41% 67.28% 61.81% 33.77% 92.35% 88.99% 89.46% 91.67% 90.97% 80.21%
(Defensive)
Performance 88.88% 87.04% 71.76% 85.74% 55.94% 90.32% 87.18% 88.37% 86.52% 56.11% 83.62%
(Offensive)
73.34% 83.69% 74.45% 75.31% 71.23% 82.45% 90.66% 76.69% 93.97% 47.49% 80.28%
Planning/
Management

Exercises
Finally, jurisdictions reported the number of exercises needed to maintain WMD response capability. The assessment
allowed jurisdictions to indicate the scale of the exercise needed, whether tabletop, functional or full scale.

Exercises
Number/type of Exercises
Requested by Jurisdictions
Type

Number
Requested

Full Scale

220

Functional

291

Tabletop

687

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

10

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Chapter 4

Goals and Objectives


The pages that follow present the detailed goals and objectives to support Part I - Governors Vision of the Texas
Homeland Security Strategic Plan and to improve the states ability to detect, mitigate, prepare for, respond to and
recover from a WMD terrorism incident.

Strategy Organization
Part II of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan is organized to address goals in three areas prevention,
response and recovery as prescribed by the US Department of Homeland Securitys Office for Domestic
Preparedness. One or more goals are identified within each of these three areas. For each identified goal, one or more
objectives are presented in possible solution areas that include planning, organization, equipment, training and
exercises. For each identified objective, specific implementation steps are outlined, which comprise the
implementation plan for the strategy.

Prevention Goal
1. Goal: Enhance Intelligence and Warning
1.1. Planning Objectives
1.1.1.

The Governors Office determines requirements for a Coordinated Communications Center to


facilitate the gathering and sharing of intelligence between local state and federal agencies, and
provides a recommended timeline for establishing the center by April 1, 2004.
1.1.1.1. Implementation Step: Governors Office determines resource and facility
requirements.
1.1.1.2. Implementation Step: The Governors Office in coordination with the DEM and
TEEX, identify potential sources of funding to meet resource requirements.

1.1.2.

By Nov. 1, 2004, the Commission on State Emergency Communications develops an estimate


of requirements to establish network redundancy (dual mated tandems) for each 911
administrative entity (COGs, Emergency Communications Districts, Home Rule Cities,
Counties).

1.1.3.

Implementation Step: Commission on State Emergency Communications determines funding


requirements for staff to gather information for 911 system redundancies for each 911
administrative entity (COGs, Emergency Communications Districts, and Home Rule Cities).
1.1.3.1. Implementation Step: TEEX recommends funding for CSEC staff to work on
network redundancies project.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

11

1.1.3.2. Implementation Step: Each COG region identifies priority locations for 911
redundancies and uses the information as a potential factor in regional funding
allocation.
1.1.4.

The Commission on State Emergency Communications provides an estimate of funding


requirements for establishing an Emergency Notification System to each COG for use in
regional funding decisions by March 1, 2004.
1.1.4.1. Implementation Step: Each COG identifies primary locations in each region for the
Emergency Notification System and provides information to the Commission on
State Emergency Communications.
1.1.4.2. Implementation Step: The Commission on State Emergency Communications
provides an estimate back to each COG on the resource requirements to establish the
Emergency Notification System at the primary regional locations.

1.2. Equipping Objectives


1.2.1.

Each COG recommends funding distribution to provide resources to local jurisdictions or


regional agencies, consistent with other regional priorities and grant guidelines, to establish or
expand an Emergency Notification System beginning with the 2004 State Homeland Security
Grant Program and continuing annually thereafter as resources are available.
1.2.1.1. Implementation Step: Each COG annually reviews regional funding priorities. Where
appropriate, and when funding is available, funding may be awarded to jurisdictions
for the specific purpose of establishing or enhancing an Emergency Notification
System.
1.2.1.2. Implementation Step: Each COG monitors progress in achieving an operable
Emergency Notification System.

1.2.2.

Each COG recommends funding distribution to local jurisdictions or regional agencies,


consistent with other regional priorities, to establish or expand wireless 911 capabilities
beginning with the 2004 State Homeland Security Grant Program and continuing annually
thereafter as resources are available.
1.2.2.1. Implementation Step: Each COG annually reviews regional funding priorities. Where
appropriate, and when funding is available, funding is awarded to jurisdictions with
requirements that it be use to establish or expand wireless 911 capability.
1.2.2.2. Implementation Step: Each COG monitors progress in wireless 911 capabilities.

12

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Response Goals
2. Goal: Provide the resources to maintain a comprehensive state emergency management
program and support local emergency management programs.
2.1. Planning Objectives:
2.1.1.

By Oct. 1 of each year, the SAA reviews the currency and completeness of the Office for
Domestic Preparedness developed assessments of risk, capabilities and needs submitted by
jurisdictions. The SAA ensures that the assessments cover at least 90% of the states population.
2.1.1.1. Implementation Step: Update the list of Texas Jurisdictions by Feb. 1 of each year to
account for any changes due to incorporation or annexation.
2.1.1.2. Implementation Step: Provide newly-created jurisdictions the opportunity to
complete the assessment by March 1 of each year.
2.1.1.3. Implementation Step: Require newly-created jurisdictions that want to participate in
the State Homeland Security Grant Program to complete the assessment by June 1 of
each year.

2.1.2.

By October 1 of each year each COG ensures that the regional evaluation of jurisdiction
regional capabilities is complete and accurate for all jurisdictions with completed assessments in
the COGs region.
2.1.2.1. Implementation Step: Complete the regional assessment update for newly-created
jurisdictions and update regional assessments between June 1 and Step 30 of each
year.

2.1.3.

By October 1 of each year, the DEM updates threat/hazard assessments, as required, to


continue the current program of threat/hazard assessments.
2.1.3.1. Implementation Step: DEM reviews requirements for threat/hazard assessment.

2.1.4.

Texas maintains a comprehensive state emergency management plan, complemented by


specialized plans for specific types of threats with annual updates as required.
2.1.4.1. Implementation Step: The DEM reviews and updates existing plans in accordance
with established frequency requirements and identifies requirements for new specific
plans as threats and hazards are identified.

2.1.5.

By October 1 of each year complete a review of the status of state and local emergency
planning, and provide planning profiles to local governments and state and federal agencies.
2.1.5.1. Implementation Step: A statewide updated report of jurisdiction planning status is
completed by Oct. 1 of each year by each COG and by the DEM.

2.1.6.

Provide emergency planning guidance and assistance to local governments and state agencies.
2.1.6.1. Implementation Step: The DEM continues to provide planning tools in the form of
samples and templates to local jurisdictions.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

13

2.1.6.2. Implementation Step: Each COG works with jurisdictions in the region to assist in
plan completion, update, or enhancement.
2.1.7.

By October 1, 2004, identify any improvements needed in the system to provide hazard
information and emergency preparedness and response guidance to local officials and the
general public through multiple means of communication.
2.1.7.1. Implementation Step: The DEM identifies state-level requirements to provide
information to the local level and determines any additional resource requirements.

2.2. Organization Objectives:


2.2.1.

By October 1, 2004 the DEM, in coordination with other state agencies, will identify any
additional state emergency teams required and resources necessary to establish and maintain
state emergency teams and specialized response and recovery resources. The DEM will also
develop plans and procedures for activation, and use of those resources by October 1, 2005.

2.2.2.

By October 1 of each year, the DEM will identify resource requirements to train, equip, and
deploy liaison personnel to gather information, advise and assist local officials, and coordinate
requests for state assistance during emergencies.
2.2.2.1. The DEM identifies total requirements.
2.2.2.2. The DEM identifies and shortfalls that would impact the liaison program.

2.2.3.

By October 1 of each year, determine the funding requirements to support local emergency
management organizations in their effort to carry out emergency planning, training, and
exercise activities.
2.2.3.1. The DEM determines amounts needed, identifies jurisdictions to receive assistance,
and determines funding sources by October 1 of each year.

2.3. Equipment Objectives:


2.3.1.

Complete an analysis of requirements to equip, operate, and enhance the capability of state
emergency facilities to monitor and analyze threats, issue warnings to government officials, key
industries, and the public by October 1 of each year.
2.3.1.1. Implementation step: The DEM coordinates with other state agencies to determine
the requirements for state facilities.

2.3.2.

By October 1, the DEM reviews the resource requirements to ensure the State can mobilize,
deploy, and direct state emergency response and recovery resources to support local emergency
operations.

2.3.3.

By October 1, 2004 complete a plan to provide redundant telecommunications connectivity


between local, state, and federal direction and control facilities and enhance information
sharing capabilities.
2.3.3.1. DEM coordinates with other state agencies and with the regional COGs to identify
the key facilities and develop a plan.

14

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

2.3.4.

By April 1, 2004, fully integrate the Homeland Defense Equipment Utilization Reuse (HDER)
and other programs to provide radiological monitoring instruments to local governments and
state agencies, maintain such equipment, and provide training in its use.
2.3.4.1. The SAA fully integrates the HDER program.
2.3.4.2. The DEM continues management of other available programs for radiological
equipment and training.

2.3.5.

By June 1, 2004; local jurisdictions have sample formats to assist in the loaning of equipment
between jurisdictions or to private facilities such as hospitals.
2.3.5.1. The SAA works with the State Attorney Generals Office to develop the samples.
2.3.5.2. The SAA distributes the information through the Councils of Governments to local
jurisdictions.

2.4. Training Objectives:


2.4.1.

By October 1 of each year DEM identifies resources requirements to carry out a comprehensive
emergency management training program for local and state emergency responders and officials
and volunteers active in emergency operations. Ensure critiques are conducted of all training.

2.4.2.

By October 1, 2004 complete a plan for developing and conducting specialized training
relating to terrorism and WMD, emergency planning, incident management and EOC
operations, and emergency response and recovery operations.
2.4.2.1. Implementation step: This objective relates closely to training objectives found under
goal 3 and will require close coordination between DEM, TEEX and the Councils of
Governments.

2.4.3.

Continue to maintain a database of emergency management and specialized training


accomplishment. Provide periodic reports of training results. By Oct. 1, 2004 fully integrate the
information with the training database found under goal 3.

2.5. Exercise Objectives:


2.5.1.

Assist local governments and state agencies in designing, conducting and evaluating exercises
and maintain a database of exercise accomplishment. Provide periodic reports of exercise
accomplishments in accordance with existing state requirements.

2.5.2.

DEM publishes an exercise schedule on an annual basis to coordinate state participation in


local and federal emergency exercises.

3. Goal: Improve the capability of local governments to prepare for and respond to terrorist
and other hazardous incidents by providing suitable training for emergency responders.
3.1. Training Objectives
3.1.1.

Maintain a listing of state, local, and federal courses to include information on when they are
scheduled on an easily assessable web site by June 30, 2004.
3.1.1.1. Implementation Step: TEEX and DEM coordinate and select WEB site to use by
March 1, 2004.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

15

3.1.1.2. Implementation Step: Each COG provides listing of local courses by May 30, 2004.
3.1.1.3. Implementation Step: DEM provides listing of state courses.
3.1.1.4. Implementation Step: TEEX provides listing of Federal Courses.
3.1.2.

State Agencies responsible for certification and licensing provide recommendations on


requirements for WMD training and refresher training frequency by Oct. 1, 2005.
3.1.2.1. Implementation Step: TEEX requests recommendations from agencies responsible for
certification and licensing by June 20, 2004.
3.1.2.2. Implementation Step: Agencies provide recommendations on specific training
requirements and training frequencies to TEEX by Oct. 1, 2005.

3.1.3.

By Oct. 1, 2004 establish a program to expand training opportunities through training


provided by state-level associations and existing competent training providers.
3.1.3.1. Implementation Step: Using the listing of courses developed by TEEX, DEM, and the
COGS, identify existing courses relevant to potential response to a terrorist incident
offered by state level associations or competent training providers.
3.1.3.2. Implementation Step: Determine needs for training funding to expand the training
opportunities.

3.1.4.

By Oct. 1, 2004 develop a plan for the development of a standardized curriculum of specialized
training, pertinent to various responder groups, that could be offered on a recurring basis.
3.1.4.1. Implementation Step: TEEX and DEM, working in coordination with representatives
of emergency responder groups, identify existing ODP and other developed training
that would meet training needs.
3.1.4.2. Implementation Step: Identify additional curriculum requirements.

3.1.5.

By Oct. 1, 2004, currently available WMD courses will be evaluated for eligibility for
professional certification and continuing education credit. All courses added after Oct. 1, 2004
will be evaluated for eligibility prior to release.

3.1.6.

Awareness level training to ODP standards, for all disciplines, is available within each COG
region by February 15, 2005.
3.1.6.1. Implementation Step: Each COG identifies training academies, junior colleges, or
other training facilities that have the infrastructure and staff to present WMD
training.
3.1.6.2. Implementation Step: TEEX will provide curriculum and instructor certification for
the ODP developed courses.

16

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

4. Goal: Plan and conduct a systematic emergency exercise program using terrorism/WMD
scenarios to test plans and procedures and evaluate the adequacy of equipment and training
for local and state emergency responders and officials.
4.1. Exercise Objectives
4.1.1.

Publish a multi-year exercise schedule for local-state and local-state-federal emergency exercises
by October 1 of each year.

4.1.2.

Identify funding requirements to support a vigorous terrorism/WMD exercise program and to


disseminate lessons learned from such exercises for the next two years by October 1 of each year.

4.1.3.

By October 1, 2004, provide guidance to local governments on desirability of conducting


regular drills and exercises.

4.1.4.

By October 1, 2005, provide a self-contained exercise in a box package for jurisdictions that
want to conduct practice exercises or additional exercises at a level less than a functional
exercise.

4.1.5.

Beginning in June 2004, ensure that the Metropolitan Medical Response System and Public
Health Teams are incorporated into exercises.

5. Goal: Provide resources and assistance to Counties, Cities, and Tribal jurisdictions, to
establish and maintain a statewide interoperable radio communication system that is
accessible by local, regional, state, and federal responding agencies when needed.
5.1. Planning Objectives
5.1.1.

Identify current radio systems frequency, digital, analog, in each region by Oct. 1, 2004.
5.1.1.1. Implementation Step: Each COG collects the information on the jurisdictions in the
region.

5.1.2.

The DPS has a plan to ensure ability of DPS to communicate with local jurisdictions by
February 1, 2005.
5.1.2.1. Implementation Step: COG prepared listing of current systems in each region are
provided to DPS by Nov. 1, 2004.
5.1.2.2. Implementation Step: DPS identifies the best methods and equipment for
communicating with local jurisdictions and incorporates into plan.

5.1.3.

Assist regions and local jurisdictions in identifying licensing and renewal requirements by Oct.
1, 2005.

5.2. Organization Objectives


5.2.1.

Work with the federal, state, and local responding agencies to determine the best avenue to
create a statewide interoperable communications system with a target date of February 15,
2005.
5.2.1.1. Implementation Step: Complete the I-35 corridor project and use the lessons learned.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

17

5.3. Equipping Objectives


5.3.1.

By October 1 of each year, each COG completes an analysis of remaining funding requirements
necessary to assist local jurisdictions in purchasing equipment that will allow regional
communications.
5.3.1.1. Implementation Step: TEEX provides regular reports on equipment purchased with
grant funding to each COG.
5.3.1.2. Implementation Step: Each COG evaluates remaining requirements and uses the
information when making recommendations on distribution of regional funding.

5.4. Training Objectives


5.4.1.

Identify and provide resources necessary to provide training on a regional basis on


interpretability by September 30, 2004.
5.4.1.1. Implementation Step: Each COG identifies special training requirements for
interoperable communications equipment, i.e. switches, in the region and identifies a
location where the training could take place.

5.5. Exercise Objectives


5.5.1.

All Texas WMD exercises will include interpretability communications by the Oct. 1, 2004
date.
5.5.1.1. Implementation Step: DEM and TEEX include interoperable communications in
exercise design.

6. Goal: Enhance local emergency response capabilities by encouraging the adoption of interlocal (mutual aid) agreements for emergency response .
6.1. Planning Objectives
6.1.1.

Provide assistance to local jurisdictions in the form of updated Mutual Aid templates,
resolution of insurance and liability issues. and resolution of workmans compensation issues
with updates provided by September 30 of each year.
6.1.1.1. Implementation Step: The State Homeland Security Coordinator requests that the
Texas Attorney General review inter-jurisdictional Mutual Aid Assistance templates by
September 30 of each year to ensure compliance with current legislation. This review
should include templates between jurisdictions within Texas, agreements between a
Texas jurisdiction and a jurisdiction in another state, and potential agreements
between a Texas jurisdiction and a jurisdiction in Mexico. Updated templates can
then be distributed to local jurisdictions through the COGs.
6.1.1.2. Implementation Step. The State Homeland Security Coordinator requests the Texas
Department of Insurance conduct an annual review of Mutual Aid Agreement
insurance issues. Products of the review should include guidance for local jurisdictions
to be distributed through the COGs and, when appropriate, proposals for the
legislature. This review should be completed by September 30 of each year.

18

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

6.1.2.

Within each COG region, adequate inter-local (mutual aid) agreements are in place to create
regional coverage for emergency services essential for response to a potential terrorist incident
by February 1, 2006.
6.1.2.1. Implementation step: Each COG maintains information on the status of Mutual Aid
Agreements in the region for multiple emergency response disciplines and functions
to include public health.
6.1.2.2. Resources requirements necessary for mutual aid creation and monitoring in each
region for the next two years are available by Oct. 1 of each year.

6.2. Equipment Objectives


6.2.1.

Major regional responders have the necessary equipment to meet regional requirements by Oct.
1, 2008.
6.2.1.1. Implementation Step: Continue to use the prioritization system that emphasizes
regional response.
6.2.1.2. Each COG monitors progress toward regional capability when recommending
regional funding distribution.

6.2.2.

Develop and maintain a statewide database to provide information on available response


resources at the local, regional and state level by February 15, 2006.
6.2.2.1. Implementation Step: the Texas Forest Service makes database available to designated
agencies and jurisdictions.
6.2.2.2. Implementation Step: Ensure that the information requested is not an unreasonable
burden to local jurisdictions.
6.2.2.3. Implementation Step: Ensure that basic security requirements are met.
6.2.2.4. Implementation Step: The Texas Forest Service makes recommendations to TEEX on
any need for planning funding to local jurisdictions to offset costs of maintaining
current information.

6.3. Exercise Objectives


6.3.1.

By October 1, 2004, exercises conducted using State Homeland Security Grant Program
funding will exercise Mutual Aid Agreements.
6.3.1.1. TEEX and DEM include Mutual Aid Agreements in exercise design.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

19

7. Goal: Improve the capability of state agencies to assist local governments in responding to
all hazards, including terrorist incidents.
7.1. Planning Objectives
7.1.1.

By October 1 of each year, state agencies identify projects and resource requirements that
improve their ability to assist local governments in responding to terrorist incidents or other
disasters.
7.1.1.1. Implementation Step: Agencies submit their requirements by October 1 of each year
to the SAA for consolidation.
7.1.1.2. Implementation Step: The SAA prepares recommendations on use of potential grant
funding and provides recommendations to the State Director of Homeland Security.
7.1.1.3. Implementation Step: The State Director of Homeland Security presents
recommendations to the Governor on use of funds available for state level use.

7.2.Equipment Objectives
7.1.2.

By October 1 of each year, equipment requirements for state agencies identified when
completing the planning objective are provided to the SAA.
7.1.2.1. Implementation Step: Agencies submit their requirements by Oct. 1 to the SAA for
consolidation.
7.1.2.2. Implementation Step: The SAA prepares recommendations on use of potential grant
funding and provides recommendations to the State Director of Homeland Security.
7.1.2.3. Implementation Step: The State Director of Homeland Security presents
recommendations to the Governor on use of funds available for state level use.

8. Utilize Citizen Corps Councils to enhance response.


8.1. Planning Objectives
8.1.1.

By September 30 of each year develop a plan for forming additional Citizen Corps Councils
during the next fiscal year.

8.2. Training Objectives


8.2.1.

20

Provide resources to allow training of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) and
Citizen Corps Councils by developing a plan for resource allocation by February 15, 2004 and
by January 15 of each year thereafter.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Recovery Goal
9. Goal: Minimize recover y time.
9.1. Planning Objectives
9.1.1.

By Oct. 1, 2005, each COG region develops a plan for assisting local jurisdictions in
establishing private and public sector alliances.

9.2. Training Objectives


9.2.1.

By October 1 of each year, identify resources to provide training for damage assessment team
members.
9.2.1.1. Implementation Step: Identify any training opportunities for potential assessment
team members on a regional level.

Agricultural Goals and Objectives


Prevention Goal (agriculture)
10. Goal: To reduce the vulnerability of Texas agriculture to any act of terrorism that results in
the introduction of a livestock or crop pest or disease that causes damage to the agricultural
industr y, the contamination of food, or poses a threat to public health.
10.1. Planning Objective
10.1.1.

The TEEX coordinates efforts of the Texas Animal Health Commission, the Texas Department
of Agriculture, and other assets as needed to establish a statewide training program to train first
responders, stakeholders, veterinarians and health workers to recognize pests and disease
symptoms related to current agroterrorism threats by July 1, 2005.
10.1.1.1.Implementation Step: Determine resources requirements and desired delivery
methods.
10.1.1.2. Implementation Step: Identify locations for pilot program.
10.1.1.3.Implementation Step: Identify agencies for curriculum development.
10.1.1.4. Implementation Step: Identify instructors.
10.1.1.5.Implementation Step: Present pilot courses and obtain feedback for curriculum.

10.2. Organization Objective


10.2.1.

Improve detection and monitoring to provide early recognition and reporting of a pest or
disease outbreak or act of terrorism in high risk areas by July 1, 2005.
10.2.1.1.Implementation Step: Identify high risk areas.
10.2.1.2. Implementation Step: Determine current detection and monitoring capabilities in
high risk areas.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

21

10.2.1.3.Implementation Step: Develop a plan to meet the strategic goal for each high risk
area.
10.3. Equipment Objectives
10.3.1.

Increase capability of global information systems (GIS) spatial analysis and remote sensing to
analyze the scope of a pest or disease outbreak or attack, trace its origins and manage
intervention in Texas by July 1, 2005.
10.3.1.1.Implementation Step: Provide and inventory and analysis of current GIS capability by
Jan. 15, 2005.
10.3.1.2. Implementation Step: Integrate efforts with other state agencies using GIS.
10.3.1.3.Implementation Step: Identify needed equipment and software upgrades by June 15,
2005.
10.3.1.4. Implementation Step: Enhance system as resources become available.

10.3.2.

Improve response capabilities by enhancing epidemiological models, risk analysis tools, and
computerized decision support systems for analysis within high risk areas by Feb. 1, 2006.
10.3.2.1.Implementation Step: Provide an inventory and analysis of current tools by Jan. 15,
2005.
10.3.2.2. Implementation Step: Recommend improvements by June 15, 2005.
10.3.2.3.Implementation Step: Begin acquisition of tools as resources allow.

10.3.3.

Increase public information outreach to support all prevention activities focusing on areas of
high risk by February 1, 2006.
10.3.3.1.Implementation Step: Evaluate existing public outreach programs.
10.3.3.2.Implementation Step: Solicit industry support.
10.3.3.3.Implementation Step: Identify areas and programs for resourcing.

10.3.4.

Develop a system to maintain up to date information on efforts to improve the immune and/or
resistance status of animals and plants that are important to Texas agriculture and provide input
to research organizations on desired improvements by February 1, 2006.
10.3.4.1.Implementation Step: Work with Texas A&M University to obtain information on
efforts to improve animal and plant resistance at A&M and other institutions
nationwide.
10.3.4.2.Implementation Step: Identify means to input recommendations on research efforts.

22

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Response Goal (agriculture)


11. Goal: Develop, coordinate, and integrate rapid response plans, systems, and
communications to adequately address the needs of the agricultural community as a result
of the introduction of a livestock or crop pest or disease that causes damage to the
agricultural industr y, the contamination of food, or poses a threat to public health.
11.1. Planning Objectives
11.1.1.

Evaluate current agricultural response plans by February 1, 2005 and modify as needed.

11.1.2.

By September 30 of each year evaluate the need for new agricultural plans and establish a
timeline for development of new plans during the next fiscal year.

11.1.3.

Develop an effective After Action Review process to evaluate and enhance response operations
and improve countermeasures by Feb. 1, 2005.

11.2. Training Objective


11.2.1.

Establish a training implementation plan for training responders to effectively implement the
agricultural response plans by February 1, 2005.

11.3. Exercise Objective


11.3.1.

Develop an exercise plan for conducting agricultural exercises to test the response plans,
epidemiological modes, and decision support systems by February 1, 2005.

11.4. Equipment Objectives


11.4.1.

Identify and obtain an enhanced communications capability in conjunction with overall state
interoperable communications efforts with an objective of basic capability by February 1, 2006.
11.4.1.1. Implementation Step: Identify specific communication requirements for the
agricultural response.
11.4.1.2.Implementation Step: Follow the objectives and implementation steps found in Goal
5.

11.4.2.

Identify and obtain needed response equipment by Feb. 1, 2006.


11.4.2.1. Implementation Step: Identify and prioritize specialized equipment needed to support
response to a potential agroterrorism incident.
11.4.2.2. Implementation Step: Identify potential resources to obtain equipment.
11.4.2.3. Implementation Step: Proceed with equipment procurement as resources allow using
the priorities identified earlier to guide purchases.

11.4.3.

Increase public information outreach to support all response activities in areas of high risk by
February 1, 2006.
11.4.3.1.Implementation Step: Evaluate existing public outreach programs.
11.4.3.2.Implementation Step: Solicit industry support.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

23

11.4.3.3.Implementation Step: Identify areas and programs for resourcing.

Recovery Goal (agriculture)


12. Goal: To facilitate the return of the economic, social, and natural environment to preincident conditions .
12.1. Planning Objectives
12.1.1.

Develop a system to evaluate the economic and social impact of the incident as related to
stakeholders, responders, and other affected entities by Feb. 1, 2005.

12.1.2.

Develop a state system to quickly identify sources and/or develop mechanisms for rapid
compensation of affected parties by February 1, 2005.

12.1.3.

Incorporate plans for dealing with stress-related issues for responders and stakeholders to
include potential resources into statewide agriculture response plans by February 1, 2006.

12.1.4.

Incorporate plans to assist stakeholders in reestablishing their economic viability by restoring


production capabilities and markets, or by identifying alternative enterprise options into
agriculture response plans by July 1, 2006.

12.1.5.

Incorporate plans for evaluating and remediating any adverse environmental consequences as a
result of the incident into agricultural response plans by July 1, 2006.

12.1.6.

Increase public information outreach to support all recovery activities in areas of high risk by
February 1, 2006.
12.1.6.1.Implementation Step: Evaluate existing public outreach programs.
12.1.6.2.Implementation Step: Solicit industry support.
12.1.6.3.Implementation Step: Identify areas and programs for resourcing.

24

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Chapter 5

Evaluation Plan
Review & Analysis
The Office for Domestic Preparedness is providing evaluation tools in the form of the Biannual Strategy
Implementation Reports. These will be the principal means of evaluating strategy progress. Additional methods
include input from the Regional Councils of Governments on regional progress and review of progress with the State
Homeland Security Director. The Councils of Governments (COG) will fulfill a key role in gathering information on
implementation progress. The State Administrative Agency will conduct weekly conference calls with the 24 COGs
to evaluate strategy implementation progress in the areas of Planning, Organization, Equipping, Training and
Exercising. Each exercise will include an written After Action Report (AAR) that is provided to the participating
jurisdiction, the Division of Emergency Management, and the State Administrative Agency.

Biannual Strategy Implementation Reports


Texas will submit updated strategy implementation information biannually. The Biannual Strategy Implementation
Reports will serve as the reporting format for the Categorical Assistance Program Reports (CAPR), which are due
within 30 days after the end of the reporting periods (June 30 and December 31), for the life of the award. The
Biannual Strategy Implementation Report will update information on obligations, expenditures, and progress made
on implementing the strategy. A Final Strategy Implementation Report is due 120 days after the end date of the
award period.

Reported Information
Reports will focus on project accomplishment and relate the projects to goals and objectives of the State Homeland
Security Strategic Plan Part II.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

25

26

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

Annex A

List of Jurisdictions
Notes:
County populations have been adjusted to reflect only the population that resides outside of incorporated
municipalities.

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Alabama and Coushatta Tribes

48901

2,000

Yes

Anderson County

48001

34,427

Yes

Andrews County

48003

3,375

Yes

Angelina County

48005

35,450

Yes

Aransas County

48007

12,218

Yes

Archer County

48009

3,325

Yes

Armstrong County

48011

832

Yes

Atascosa County

48013

20,433

Yes

Austin County

48015

12,195

Yes

Bailey County

48017

2,039

Yes

Bandera County

48019

18,066

Yes

Bastrop County

48021

47,188

Yes

Baylor County

48023

1,144

Yes

Bee County

48025

19,315

Yes

Bell County

48027

51,327

Yes

Bexar County

48029

146,858

Yes

Blanco County

48031

5,907

Yes

Borden County

48033

701

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-1

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Bosque County

48035

9,321

Yes

Bowie County

48037

34,598

Yes

Brazoria County

48039

94,747

Yes

Brazos County

48041

18,312

Yes

Brewster County

48043

3,075

Yes

Briscoe County

48045

563

Yes

Brooks County

48047

2,632

Yes

Brown County

48049

14,144

Yes

Burleson County

48051

10,933

Yes

Burnet County

48053

20,425

Yes

Caldwell County

48055

15,002

Yes

Calhoun County

48057

6,513

Yes

Callahan County

48059

6,699

Yes

Cameron County

48061

82,870

Yes

Camp County

48063

7,219

No

Carson County

48065

1,700

Yes

Cashion Community

13198

342

Yes

Cass County

48067

17,674

Yes

Castro County

48069

2,311

Yes

Chambers County

48071

15,713

Yes

Cherokee County

48073

24,384

Yes

Childress County

48075

921

Yes

City of Abbott

100

311

No

City of Abernathy

160

2,771

Yes

City of Abilene

1000

115,225

Yes

City of Ackerly

1108

240

No

City of Adrian

1324

157

No

City of Agua Dulce

1396

737

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-2

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Alamo

1576

15,518

Yes

City of Alamo Heights

1600

7,262

Yes

City of Alba

1636

446

Yes

City of Albany

1648

1,937

Yes

City of Aledo

1744

2,074

No

City of Alice

1852

19,104

Yes

City of Allen

1924

57,216

Yes

City of Alma

2044

311

No

City of Alpine

2104

5,934

No

City of Alto

2188

1,127

No

City of Alton

2212

4,856

Yes

City of Alvarado

2260

3,671

Yes

City of Alvin

2272

22,025

Yes

City of Alvord

2284

1,138

No

City of Amarillo

3000

177,010

Yes

City of Ames

3072

1,140

No

City of Amherst

3084

783

No

City of Anahuac

3144

2,176

No

City of Anderson

3192

271

No

City of Andrews

3216

9,576

Yes

City of Angleton

3264

18,538

Yes

City of Angus

3288

354

No

City of Anna

3300

1,277

No

City of Annetta North

3340

488

No

City of Annona

3360

273

No

City of Anson

3372

2,451

Yes

City of Anton

3540

1,178

Yes

City of Appleby

3564

439

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-3

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Aquilla

3588

141

No

City of Aransas Pass

3600

8,276

No

City of Archer City

3696

1,857

Yes

City of Arcola

3708

1,137

No

City of Argyle

3768

2,596

No

City of Arlington

4000

349,944

Yes

City of Arp

4156

911

No

City of Asherton

4300

1,322

Yes

City of Aspermont

4408

908

Yes

City of Athens

4504

11,716

Yes

City of Atlanta

4516

5,640

Yes

City of Aubrey

4600

1,731

No

City of Aurora

4672

934

No

City of Austin

5000

671,873

Yes

City of Austwell

5036

190

No

City of Avery

5072

451

No

City of Avinger

5084

455

No

City of Azle

5168

9,968

Yes

City of Bailey

5264

215

No

City of Baileys Prairie

5288

709

No

City of Baird

5336

1,587

Yes

City of Balch Springs

5372

19,480

No

City of Balcones Heights

5384

3,015

Yes

City of Ballinger

5456

4,085

Yes

City of Balmorhea

5468

503

Yes

City of Bandera

5528

1,087

Yes

City of Bangs

5552

1,633

Yes

City of Bardwell

5612

603

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-4

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Barry

5708

215

No

City of Barstow

5720

390

Yes

City of Bartlett

5732

1,682

Yes

City of Bastrop

5864

6,233

Yes

City of Bay City

5984

18,450

No

City of Bayou Vista

6060

1,653

Yes

City of Baytown

6128

67,360

Yes

City of Beach City

6200

1,750

Yes

City of Beasley

6272

628

No

City of Beaumont

7000

112,871

Yes

City of Beckville

7108

752

No

City of Bedford

7132

48,378

Yes

City of Beeville

7192

12,962

Yes

City of Bellaire

7300

16,739

Yes

City of Bellevue

7396

399

Yes

City of Bellmead

7408

9,480

Yes

City of Bells

7420

1,222

Yes

City of Bellville

7432

4,133

Yes

City of Belton

7492

14,621

Yes

City of Benavides

7528

1,635

No

City of Benbrook

7552

20,652

No

City of Benjamin

7636

254

Yes

City of Berryville

7852

910

No

City of Bertram

7864

1,208

No

City of Beverly Hills

8104

2,099

No

City of Bevil Oaks

8128

1,309

Yes

City of Big Lake

8212

2,760

Yes

City of Big Sandy

8224

1,310

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-5

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Big Spring

8236

24,798

Yes

City of Big Wells

8260

716

Yes

City of Bishop

8392

3,255

Yes

City of Bishop Hills

8398

212

No

City of Blackwell

8488

349

Yes

City of Blanco

8536

1,595

No

City of Blanket

8596

400

Yes

City of Bloomburg

8752

372

Yes

City of Blooming Grove

8788

860

No

City of Blossom

8812

1,449

Yes

City of Blue Mound

8860

2,412

No

City of Blue Ridge

8872

763

Yes

City of Blum

9004

420

No

City of Boerne

9160

6,566

Yes

City of Bogata

9172

1,361

Yes

City of Bonham

9328

10,045

Yes

City of Booker

9448

1,340

No

City of Borger

9556

13,709

Yes

City of Bovina

9628

1,849

Yes

City of Bowie

9640

5,231

Yes

City of Boyd

9748

1,182

No

City of Brackettville

9868

1,912

Yes

City of Brady

9916

5,289

Yes

City of Brazoria

10072

2,851

Yes

City of Breckenridge

10132

5,690

Yes

City of Bremond

10144

868

Yes

City of Brenham

10156

13,568

Yes

City of Briaroaks

10216

514

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-6

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Bridge City

10252

8,629

Yes

City of Bridgeport

10264

4,606

No

City of Bronte

10528

1,061

Yes

City of Brookshire

10636

3,495

Yes

City of Brookside Village

10648

2,020

No

City of Browndell

10708

222

Yes

City of Brownfield

10720

9,438

Yes

City of Brownsboro

10756

818

No

City of Brownsville

10768

150,425

Yes

City of Brownwood

10780

19,093

Yes

City of Bruceville-Eddy

10828

1,528

No

City of Bryan

10912

66,669

Yes

City of Bryson

10960

535

Yes

City of Buda

11080

3,627

Yes

City of Buffalo

11116

1,867

Yes

City of Bullard

11212

1,263

Yes

City of Bulverde

11224

4,228

Yes

City of Bunker Hill Village

11300

3,754

Yes

City of Burkburnett

11368

10,778

Yes

City of Burke

11380

316

No

City of Burleson

11428

23,825

Yes

City of Burnet

11464

4,935

Yes

City of Burton

11536

357

Yes

City of Byers

11644

534

Yes

City of Bynum

11656

234

No

City of Cactus

11692

2,647

No

City of Caddo Mills

11716

1,170

No

City of Caldwell

11836

3,623

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-7

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Callisburg

11968

383

No

City of Calvert

11992

1,403

Yes

City of Cameron

12040

5,757

Yes

City of Camp Wood

12388

789

Yes

City of Campbell

12112

759

No

City of Canadian

12412

2,213

Yes

City of Caney City

12472

244

No

City of Canton

12496

3,382

Yes

City of Canyon

12532

12,980

Yes

City of Carbon

12736

223

No

City of Carl's Corner

12895

143

No

City of Carmine

12916

230

Yes

City of Carrizo Springs

12988

5,584

Yes

City of Carrollton

13024

115,107

Yes

City of Carthage

13108

6,544

No

City of Castle Hills

13276

4,194

Yes

City of Castroville

13312

2,798

Yes

City of Cedar Hill

13492

37,269

Yes

City of Cedar Park

13552

37,764

Yes

City of Celeste

13672

828

No

City of Celina

13684

2,140

Yes

City of Center

13732

5,635

Yes

City of Centerville

13900

932

Yes

City of Chandler

14224

2,169

No

City of Channing

14260

350

No

City of Charlotte

14404

1,727

No

City of Chester

14584

263

Yes

City of Chico

14620

1,005

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-8

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Childress

14668

6,650

Yes

City of Chillicothe

14680

759

Yes

City of China

14704

1,089

Yes

City of China Grove

14716

1,272

No

City of Christine

14860

467

No

City of Cibolo

14920

3,712

No

City of Cisco

15004

3,785

Yes

City of Clarendon

15112

1,985

Yes

City of Clarksville

15160

3,748

Yes

City of Clarksville City

15172

818

No

City of Claude

15196

1,313

Yes

City of Clear Lake Shores

15328

1,214

Yes

City of Cleburne

15364

27,492

Yes

City of Cleveland

15436

7,830

Yes

City of Clifton

15472

3,617

Yes

City of Clute

15652

10,698

No

City of Clyde

15676

3,351

Yes

City of Coahoma

15700

933

Yes

City of Cockrell Hill

15796

4,398

No

City of Coffee City

15820

196

No

City of Coldspring

15892

714

Yes

City of Coleman

15916

5,010

Yes

City of College Station

15976

70,550

Yes

City of Colleyville

15988

21,085

Yes

City of Collinsville

16036

1,324

Yes

City of Colmesneil

16048

635

Yes

City of Colorado City

16120

4,037

Yes

City of Columbus

16168

3,869

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-9

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Comanche

16192

4,296

Yes

City of Combine

16216

1,933

No

City of Commerce

16240

8,243

No

City of Como

16252

629

No

City of Conroe

16432

39,065

No

City of Converse

16468

11,939

Yes

City of Cool

16540

172

No

City of Coolidge

16552

857

No

City of Cooper

16564

2,128

No

City of Coppell

16612

39,460

Yes

City of Copperas Cove

16624

29,599

Yes

City of Corinth

16696

14,925

No

City of Corpus Christi

17000

278,520

Yes

City of Corral City

17024

125

No

City of Corrigan

17036

1,855

Yes

City of Corsicana

17060

25,187

Yes

City of Cottonwood

17200

191

No

City of Cottonwood Shores

17208

933

No

City of Cotulla

17216

3,609

Yes

City of Cove

17336

323

Yes

City of Covington

17372

291

No

City of Crandall

17504

2,984

No

City of Crane

17516

3,087

Yes

City of Cranfills Gap

17540

339

No

City of Crawford

17564

751

Yes

City of Creedmoor

17612

194

Yes

City of Crockett

17744

7,084

Yes

City of Crosbyton

17768

1,814

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-10

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Cross Plains

17816

1,040

Yes

City of Crowell

17948

1,085

Yes

City of Crowley

17960

8,174

Yes

City of Crystal City

18020

7,114

Yes

City of Cuero

18092

6,654

Yes

City of Cumby

18128

621

No

City of Cuney

18152

147

No

City of Cushing

18224

642

No

City of Daingerfield

18464

2,523

Yes

City of Daisetta

18476

1,082

No

City of Dalhart

18524

7,164

Yes

City of Dallas

19000

1,211,467

Yes

City of Dalworthington Gardens

19084

2,305

Yes

City of Danbury

19120

1,649

No

City of Dawson

19420

875

No

City of Dayton

19432

6,038

Yes

City of Dayton Lakes

19435

104

No

City of De Leon

19672

2,352

Yes

City of Dean

19456

356

Yes

City of Decatur

19528

5,584

Yes

City of Deer Park

19624

28,992

Yes

City of DeKalb

19648

1,802

Yes

City of Del Rio

19792

34,611

Yes

City of Dell City

19708

415

No

City of Denison

19900

23,169

Yes

City of Denton

19972

90,349

Yes

City of Denver City

19984

3,965

Yes

City of Deport

20020

727

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-11

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of DeSoto

20092

39,440

Yes

City of Detroit

20128

758

No

City of Devers

20140

433

No

City of Devine

20152

4,282

No

City of Diboll

20308

5,439

Yes

City of Dickens

20332

326

Yes

City of Dickinson

20344

17,668

Yes

City of Dilley

20428

4,166

Yes

City of Dimmitt

20464

4,236

Yes

City of Dodd City

20680

426

No

City of Dodson

20716

112

No

City of Domino

20848

52

No

City of Donna

20884

15,478

Yes

City of Dorchester

20932

113

No

City of Douglassville

21112

172

No

City of Dripping Springs

21424

1,625

Yes

City of Driscoll

21436

825

No

City of Dublin

21484

3,694

Yes

City of Dumas

21556

13,808

Yes

City of Duncanville

21628

36,203

No

City of Eagle Lake

21844

3,671

Yes

City of Eagle Pass

21892

23,506

Yes

City of Early

21904

2,687

Yes

City of Earth

21928

1,099

No

City of East Mountain

22168

599

No

City of East Tawakoni

22276

857

No

City of Eastland

22132

3,775

Yes

City of Easton

22192

546

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-12

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Ector

22516

610

No

City of Edcouch

22528

3,901

No

City of Eden

22552

2,514

Yes

City of Edgewood

22612

1,391

No

City of Edinburg

22660

52,764

Yes

City of Edmonson

22708

121

Yes

City of Edna

22720

5,871

Yes

City of Edom

22744

334

No

City of El Campo

22864

10,889

Yes

City of El Cenizo

22905

3,609

Yes

City of El Lago

23164

3,085

No

City of El Paso

24000

577,415

Yes

City of Eldorado

22960

1,955

Yes

City of Electra

22984

3,089

Yes

City of Elgin

23044

6,313

Yes

City of Elkhart

23140

1,233

No

City of Elmendorf

23272

702

No

City of Elsa

24036

5,934

No

City of Emhouse

24168

167

No

City of Emory

24216

1,138

No

City of Encinal

24240

637

Yes

City of Ennis

24348

17,883

Yes

City of Estelline

24636

163

No

City of Euless

24768

48,464

Yes

City of Eureka

24816

358

No

City of Eustace

24828

812

No

City of Evant

24864

388

Yes

City of Everman

24912

5,880

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-13

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Fair Oaks Ranch

25168

5,186

Yes

City of Fairfield

25104

3,338

Yes

City of Falfurrias

25368

5,134

Yes

City of Falls City

25392

590

Yes

City of Farmers Branch

25452

27,454

Yes

City of Farmersville

25488

3,221

No

City of Farwell

25548

1,335

No

City of Fate

25572

1,043

No

City of Fayetteville

25644

264

Yes

City of Ferris

25752

2,224

No

City of Flatonia

26028

1,420

Yes

City of Florence

26136

1,100

No

City of Floresville

26160

6,329

Yes

City of Floydada

26268

3,435

Yes

City of Follett

26328

416

No

City of Forest Hill

26544

13,223

Yes

City of Forney

26604

6,378

No

City of Forsan

26640

225

Yes

City of Fort Stockton

26808

7,588

Yes

City of Fort Worth

27000

567,516

Yes

City of Franklin

27288

1,468

Yes

City of Frankston

27300

1,194

No

City of Fredericksburg

27348

9,346

Yes

City of Freeport

27420

12,802

Yes

City of Freer

27432

3,180

No

City of Friendswood

27648

31,497

Yes

City of Friona

27660

3,807

Yes

City of Frisco

27684

47,652

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-14

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Fritch

27696

2,162

Yes

City of Frost

27768

673

No

City of Fruitvale

27804

433

No

City of Fulshear

27876

870

No

City of Gainesville

27984

15,930

Yes

City of Galena Park

27996

10,588

Yes

City of Gallatin

28008

388

No

City of Galveston

28068

56,685

Yes

City of Ganado

28080

1,898

No

City of Garden Ridge

28248

2,033

Yes

City of Garland

29000

219,646

Yes

City of Garrett

29036

459

No

City of Garrison

29060

840

No

City of Gary City

29108

303

No

City of Gatesville

29168

15,195

Yes

City of George West

29348

2,443

Yes

City of Georgetown

29336

33,246

Yes

City of Gholson

29408

942

No

City of Giddings

29432

5,269

Yes

City of Gilmer

29564

4,975

No

City of Gladewater

29660

6,161

Yes

City of Glen Rose

29876

2,322

No

City of Glenn Heights

29840

7,946

No

City of Godley

29972

923

No

City of Goldsmith

30044

256

No

City of Goldthwaite

30056

1,794

Yes

City of Goliad

30080

2,008

Yes

City of Golinda

30092

419

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-15

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Gonzales

30116

7,244

Yes

City of Goodlow

30188

276

No

City of Goodrich

30224

264

Yes

City of Gordon

30272

455

No

City of Goree

30296

307

Yes

City of Gorman

30308

1,236

Yes

City of Graford

30380

595

No

City of Graham

30392

8,581

Yes

City of Granbury

30416

6,162

Yes

City of Grand Prairie

30464

135,303

Yes

City of Grand Saline

30476

3,095

No

City of Grandfalls

30440

376

Yes

City of Grandview

30512

1,464

No

City of Granger

30548

1,271

Yes

City of Granite Shoals

30584

2,120

Yes

City of Granjeno

30608

313

No

City of Grapeland

30632

1,439

Yes

City of Grapevine

30644

45,830

Yes

City of Grays Prairie

30752

318

No

City of Greenville

30920

24,504

Yes

City of Gregory

31064

2,282

No

City of Grey Forest

31100

432

No

City of Groesbeck

31280

4,311

Yes

City of Groom

31292

590

Yes

City of Groves

31328

15,414

Yes

City of Groveton

31340

1,122

Yes

City of Gruver

31412

1,141

Yes

City of Gun Barrel City

31592

5,411

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-16

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Gunter

31616

1,415

Yes

City of Gustine

31628

439

No

City of Hale Center

31820

2,184

Yes

City of Hallettsville

31868

2,291

Yes

City of Hallsburg

31880

530

No

City of Hallsville

31904

2,783

No

City of Haltom City

31928

39,889

Yes

City of Hamilton

31952

2,971

Yes

City of Hamlin

31964

2,136

Yes

City of Happy

32156

632

Yes

City of Hardin

32240

795

No

City of Harker Heights

32312

18,055

Yes

City of Harlingen

32372

59,384

Yes

City of Hart

32576

1,175

Yes

City of Haskell

32696

3,002

Yes

City of Haslet

32720

1,294

No

City of Hawk Cove

80732

478

No

City of Hawkins

32816

1,377

Yes

City of Hawley

32840

630

Yes

City of Hays

32906

242

Yes

City of Hearne

32972

4,711

Yes

City of Heath

32984

5,455

Yes

City of Hebron

33020

155

No

City of Hedley

33044

385

Yes

City of Hedwig Village

33068

2,356

Yes

City of Helotes

33146

4,989

Yes

City of Hemphill

33188

1,083

Yes

City of Hempstead

33200

5,692

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-17

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Henderson

33212

11,150

Yes

City of Henrietta

33284

3,381

Yes

City of Hereford

33320

14,423

Yes

City of Hewitt

33428

11,944

Yes

City of Hico

33548

1,322

Yes

City of Hidalgo

33560

8,599

Yes

City of Higgins

33608

435

No

City of Highland Haven

33794

472

No

City of Highland Village

33848

13,527

Yes

City of Hill Country Village

33968

1,058

Yes

City of Hillcrest Village

33980

731

No

City of Hillsboro

34088

8,590

Yes

City of Hilshire Village

34148

742

Yes

City of Hitchcock

34220

7,107

Yes

City of Holiday Lakes

34502

1,131

No

City of Holland

34508

1,112

Yes

City of Holliday

34532

1,671

Yes

City of Hondo

34676

8,117

Yes

City of Honey Grove

34700

1,760

Yes

City of Hooks

34736

2,961

Yes

City of Houston

35000

2,009,834

Yes

City of Howardwick

35072

452

Yes

City of Howe

35084

2,610

Yes

City of Hubbard

35180

1,627

Yes

City of Hudson

35228

3,886

Yes

City of Hudson Oaks

35254

1,724

Yes

City of Hughes Springs

35300

1,851

Yes

City of Humble

35348

14,847

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-18

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Hunters Creek Village

35480

4,515

Yes

City of Huntington

35492

2,091

Yes

City of Huntsville

35528

35,730

Yes

City of Hurst

35576

36,809

Yes

City of Hutchins

35612

2,850

Yes

City of Hutto

35624

2,971

Yes

City of Huxley

35636

305

No

City of Idalou

35732

2,137

Yes

City of Impact

35816

38

No

City of Industry

35984

317

No

City of Ingleside

36008

8,796

No

City of Ingleside on the Bay

36020

649

No

City of Ingram

36032

1,794

No

City of Iowa Colony

36092

866

No

City of Iowa Park

36104

6,323

Yes

City of Iraan

36128

1,215

Yes

City of Iredell

36140

362

Yes

City of Irving

37000

196,119

Yes

City of Italy

37072

2,028

No

City of Itasca

37084

1,558

No

City of Jacinto City

37156

10,382

Yes

City of Jacksboro

37168

4,586

Yes

City of Jacksonville

37216

14,034

Yes

City of Jarrell

37396

1,384

Yes

City of Jasper

37420

7,634

Yes

City of Jayton

37468

484

No

City of Jefferson

37528

2,003

No

City of Jersey Village

37612

7,181

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-19

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Jewett

37648

897

No

City of Joaquin

37684

917

No

City of Johnson City

37780

1,248

Yes

City of Jolly

37924

194

Yes

City of Jonestown

38020

1,751

Yes

City of Josephine

38068

675

No

City of Joshua

38080

5,004

Yes

City of Jourdanton

38116

3,956

No

City of Junction

38248

2,631

Yes

City of Justin

38332

2,153

No

City of Karnes City

38452

3,439

Yes

City of Katy

38476

12,430

Yes

City of Kaufman

38488

7,204

No

City of Keene

38548

5,396

No

City of Keller

38632

32,921

Yes

City of Kemah

38776

2,325

Yes

City of Kemp

38788

1,189

No

City of Kempner

38800

1,084

Yes

City of Kendleton

38848

495

No

City of Kenedy

38860

3,431

Yes

City of Kenefick

38872

710

No

City of Kennard

38884

317

Yes

City of Kennedale

38896

6,320

Yes

City of Kerens

38992

1,720

No

City of Kermit

39004

5,466

Yes

City of Kerrville

39040

21,090

Yes

City of Kilgore

39124

11,477

Yes

City of Killeen

39148

92,707

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-20

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Kingsville

39352

25,175

Yes

City of Kirby

39448

8,707

Yes

City of Kirbyville

39460

2,061

Yes

City of Kirvin

39520

126

No

City of Knollwood

39680

406

No

City of Knox City

39700

1,163

Yes

City of Kosse

39844

503

No

City of Kountze

39868

2,114

Yes

City of Kress

39904

805

No

City of Krugerville

39916

1,046

No

City of Krum

39928

2,321

No

City of Kyle

39952

8,540

No

City of La Coste

40108

1,319

Yes

City of La Feria

40204

6,361

No

City of La Grange

40276

4,577

Yes

City of La Grulla

40288

1,277

Yes

City of La Joya

40384

4,136

No

City of La Marque

41116

13,729

Yes

City of La Porte

41440

33,214

Yes

City of La Vernia

41764

970

Yes

City of La Villa

41788

1,377

No

City of La Ward

41848

201

No

City of Lacy Lakeview

40168

5,778

Yes

City of Ladonia

40180

671

No

City of Lago Vista

40264

4,981

Yes

City of Lake Bridgeport

40450

396

No

City of Lake City

40472

528

No

City of Lake Dallas

40516

6,647

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-21

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Lake Jackson

40588

26,954

No

City of Lake Worth

41056

4,668

No

City of Lakeport

40696

889

No

City of Lakeside

40738

332

No

City of Lakeside City

40756

1,008

Yes

City of Lakeview

40888

148

Yes

City of Lakeway

40984

8,236

Yes

City of Lakewood Village

41050

354

No

City of Lamesa

41164

9,657

Yes

City of Lampasas

41188

7,207

Yes

City of Lancaster

41212

27,082

Yes

City of Laredo

41464

191,538

Yes

City of Latexo

41644

275

Yes

City of Lavon

41800

399

No

City of Lawn

41872

348

No

City of League City

41980

51,397

Yes

City of Leakey

42004

385

Yes

City of Leander

42016

11,661

Yes

City of Leary

42028

563

Yes

City of Lefors

42148

548

No

City of Leon Valley

42388

9,338

Yes

City of Leona

42340

189

No

City of Leonard

42352

1,905

No

City of Leroy

42400

329

No

City of Levelland

42448

12,932

Yes

City of Lewisville

42508

83,960

Yes

City of Lexington

42532

1,238

Yes

City of Liberty

42568

8,263

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-22

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Liberty Hill

42664

1,471

No

City of Lincoln Park

42808

566

No

City of Lindale

42820

3,370

Yes

City of Linden

42844

2,223

No

City of Lipan

42940

451

No

City of Little River-Academy

43066

1,637

Yes

City of Littlefield

43024

6,456

Yes

City of Live Oak

43096

9,567

Yes

City of Liverpool

43120

415

No

City of Livingston

43132

6,172

Yes

City of Llano

43144

3,459

Yes

City of Lockhart

43240

12,769

Yes

City of Lockney

43252

1,966

Yes

City of Log Cabin

43354

774

No

City of Lometa

43516

818

Yes

City of Lone Oak

43636

538

No

City of Lone Star

43684

1,638

Yes

City of Longview

43888

74,330

Yes

City of Loraine

43996

623

No

City of Lorena

44020

1,489

Yes

City of Lorenzo

44032

1,327

No

City of Los Fresnos

44116

4,803

No

City of Los Indios

44128

1,157

No

City of Los Ybanez

44170

31

No

City of Lott

44176

696

Yes

City of Lovelady

44260

611

Yes

City of Lowry Crossing

44308

1,470

Yes

City of Lubbock

45000

203,715

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-23

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Lucas

45012

3,174

No

City of Lueders

45048

287

Yes

City of Lufkin

45072

32,748

Yes

City of Luling

45096

5,281

Yes

City of Lumberton

45120

8,905

Yes

City of Lyford

45228

1,953

No

City of Lytle

45288

2,524

No

City of Mabank

45324

2,315

No

City of Madisonville

45996

4,189

Yes

City of Magnolia

46056

1,173

No

City of Malakoff

46224

2,290

No

City of Malone

46260

285

No

City of Manor

46440

1,187

Yes

City of Mansfield

46452

31,630

Yes

City of Manvel

46500

3,201

Yes

City of Marble Falls

46584

5,276

Yes

City of Marfa

46620

2,105

No

City of Marietta

46668

110

No

City of Marion

46692

1,122

Yes

City of Marlin

46740

6,428

Yes

City of Marquez

46752

225

No

City of Marshall

46776

23,977

Yes

City of Mart

46824

2,247

No

City of Martindale

46848

997

Yes

City of Mason

46968

2,163

Yes

City of Matador

47004

695

Yes

City of Mathis

47040

5,198

No

City of Maud

47088

1,018

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-24

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Maypearl

47268

787

No

City of McAllen

45384

113,877

Yes

City of McCamey

45432

1,731

Yes

City of McGregor

45672

4,756

Yes

City of McKinney

45744

73,081

Yes

City of McLean

45780

810

Yes

City of McLendon-Chisholm

45804

937

No

City of Meadow

47316

652

No

City of Meadowlakes

47330

1,520

No

City of Meadows Place

47335

5,176

Yes

City of Megargel

47460

250

Yes

City of Melissa

47496

1,686

No

City of Melvin

47568

148

Yes

City of Memphis

47616

2,395

Yes

City of Menard

47628

1,632

Yes

City of Mercedes

47700

14,150

Yes

City of Meridian

47760

1,491

Yes

City of Merkel

47796

2,597

Yes

City of Mertens

47820

150

No

City of Mertzon

47832

834

Yes

City of Mesquite

47892

128,776

Yes

City of Mexia

47916

6,583

No

City of Miami

47988

569

No

City of Midland

48072

95,829

Yes

City of Midlothian

48096

9,815

Yes

City of Midway

48180

297

No

City of Milano

48336

414

Yes

City of Mildred

48372

424

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-25

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Miles

48396

834

Yes

City of Milford

48408

693

No

City of Miller's Cove

48478

125

No

City of Millsap

48564

368

No

City of Mineola

48648

4,680

Yes

City of Mineral Wells

48684

16,968

Yes

City of Mingus

48720

248

No

City of Mission

48768

51,432

Yes

City of Missouri City

48804

59,186

Yes

City of Mobeetie

48852

104

Yes

City of Mobile City

48858

210

No

City of Monahans

48936

6,541

Yes

City of Mont Belvieu

49068

2,447

No

City of Montgomery

49128

523

No

City of Moody

49200

1,401

No

City of Moore Station

49272

187

No

City of Moran

49320

234

Yes

City of Morgan

49356

500

Yes

City of Morgan's Point

49380

342

No

City of Morgan's Point Resort

49392

3,357

Yes

City of Morton

49464

2,089

Yes

City of Moulton

49560

931

Yes

City of Mount Calm

49692

322

No

City of Mount Enterprise

49728

526

No

City of Mount Pleasant

49800

14,174

Yes

City of Mount Vernon

49860

2,325

Yes

City of Mountain City

49600

698

No

City of Muenster

49932

1,625

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-26

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Muleshoe

49968

4,441

Yes

City of Mullin

49992

176

Yes

City of Munday

50040

1,461

Yes

City of Murchison

50076

606

No

City of Murphy

50100

6,675

No

City of Mustang

50184

51

No

City of Mustang Ridge

50200

893

Yes

City of Nacogdoches

50256

30,289

Yes

City of Naples

50316

1,435

Yes

City of Nash

50352

2,169

Yes

City of Nassau Bay

50376

4,186

Yes

City of Natalia

50400

1,739

Yes

City of Navarro

50448

197

No

City of Navasota

50472

7,154

Yes

City of Nazareth

50496

353

Yes

City of Nederland

50580

17,035

Yes

City of Needville

50628

2,851

Yes

City of Nesbitt

50724

308

No

City of Nevada

50760

592

No

City of New Berlin

50796

483

No

City of New Boston

50808

4,667

Yes

City of New Braunfels

50820

41,239

Yes

City of New Chapel Hill

50876

570

No

City of New Deal

50916

732

No

City of New Fairview

80734

886

No

City of New Home

51012

314

No

City of New London

51168

998

Yes

City of New Summerfield

51336

1,035

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-27

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of New Waverly

51396

944

No

City of Newark

50772

1,011

No

City of Newcastle

50868

567

Yes

City of Newton

51372

2,447

Yes

City of Neylandville

51444

58

No

City of Niederwald

51492

632

Yes

City of Nixon

51588

2,204

No

City of Nocona

51648

3,213

Yes

City of Nolanville

51708

2,171

Yes

City of Nome

51720

510

Yes

City of Noonday

51756

534

No

City of Nordheim

51792

322

No

City of Normangee

51840

744

No

City of North Cleveland

51984

278

No

City of North Richland Hills

52356

59,186

Yes

City of Novice

52668

137

Yes

City of Oak Grove

52902

777

No

City of Oak Leaf

53115

1,253

Yes

City of Oak Point

53130

2,107

No

City of Oak Ridge

53154

254

Yes

City of Oak Ridge North

53190

3,086

No

City of Oakhurst

52992

241

No

City of Oakwood

53232

485

No

City of O'Brien

53304

130

Yes

City of Odem

53376

2,463

No

City of Odessa

53388

90,961

Yes

City of O'Donnell

53436

983

Yes

City of Oglesby

53520

456

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-28

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Old River-Winfree

53824

1,850

No

City of Olmos Park

53988

2,317

Yes

City of Olney

54000

3,319

Yes

City of Olton

54012

2,301

No

City of Omaha

54024

999

No

City of Onalaska

54048

1,271

Yes

City of Opdyke West

54075

195

No

City of Orange

54132

18,198

Yes

City of Orange Grove

54168

1,318

Yes

City of Orchard

54192

441

No

City of Ore City

54216

1,138

No

City of Overton

54432

2,334

No

City of Ovilla

54444

3,585

Yes

City of Oyster Creek

54528

1,231

No

City of Paducah

54600

1,409

Yes

City of Paint Rock

54636

308

Yes

City of Palacios

54684

5,238

No

City of Palestine

54708

17,731

No

City of Palisades

54726

364

No

City of Palmer

54744

1,910

No

City of Palmhurst

54780

4,960

No

City of Palmview

54804

4,293

No

City of Pampa

54912

17,312

Yes

City of Panhandle

54960

2,601

Yes

City of Panorama Village

55008

2,125

Yes

City of Paradise

55056

492

No

City of Paris

55080

26,212

Yes

City of Parker

55152

1,672

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-29

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Pasadena

56000

145,034

Yes

City of Pattison

56108

452

Yes

City of Patton Village

56156

1,481

No

City of Payne Springs

56276

700

No

City of Pearland

56348

44,540

Yes

City of Pearsall

56384

7,105

Yes

City of Pecan Gap

56468

217

Yes

City of Pecan Hill

56485

697

No

City of Pelican Bay

56640

1,605

No

City of Penelope

56672

219

Yes

City of Penitas

56696

1,175

No

City of Perryton

56912

7,827

Yes

City of Petersburg

56996

1,231

Yes

City of Petrolia

57044

814

Yes

City of Petronila

57056

82

No

City of Pflugerville

57176

23,072

Yes

City of Pharr

57200

51,278

Yes

City of Pilot Point

57476

3,818

No

City of Pine Forest

57524

630

Yes

City of Pine Island

57615

853

Yes

City of Pinehurst

57608

2,245

Yes

City of Pineland

57644

926

No

City of Piney Point Village

57800

3,464

Yes

City of Pittsburg

57908

4,328

Yes

City of Plains

57968

1,440

Yes

City of Plainview

57980

21,916

Yes

City of Plano

58016

238,091

Yes

City of Pleasanton

58280

8,732

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-30

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Plum Grove

58448

982

No

City of Point

58532

890

No

City of Point Blank

58556

575

Yes

City of Point Comfort

58568

767

Yes

City of Port Aransas

58808

3,505

Yes

City of Port Arthur

58820

56,885

Yes

City of Port Isabel

58892

5,174

No

City of Port Lavaca

58916

11,939

Yes

City of Port Neches

58940

13,338

Yes

City of Portland

58904

15,422

Yes

City of Post

59012

3,796

No

City of Post Oak Bend

59066

426

No

City of Poteet

59084

3,464

No

City of Poth

59096

1,959

Yes

City of Pottsboro

59132

1,619

Yes

City of Powell

59168

108

No

City of Poynor

59192

322

No

City of Prairie View

59336

4,486

Yes

City of Premont

59384

2,795

No

City of Presidio

59396

4,555

No

City of Primera

59540

2,954

No

City of Princeton

59576

3,728

No

City of Progreso

59636

5,053

No

City of Progreso Lakes

59642

242

No

City of Putnam

59984

85

No

City of Pyote

59996

128

No

City of Quanah

60044

2,860

Yes

City of Queen City

60080

1,593

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-31

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Quinlan

60140

1,422

No

City of Quitaque

60176

413

Yes

City of Quitman

60188

2,065

Yes

City of Ralls

60356

2,184

Yes

City of Ranger

60632

2,542

Yes

City of Rangerville

60644

204

No

City of Rankin

60668

777

Yes

City of Ravenna

60752

222

No

City of Raymondville

60836

9,630

No

City of Red Lick

61172

852

No

City of Red Oak

61196

5,458

Yes

City of Redwater

61340

884

Yes

City of Reklaw

61508

328

No

City of Reno

61604

2,595

No

City of Reno

61592

2,823

No

City of Retreat

61616

352

No

City of Rhome

61700

682

No

City of Rice

61736

860

No

City of Richardson

61796

96,956

Yes

City of Richland

61820

304

No

City of Richland Hills

61844

8,204

Yes

City of Richland Springs

61880

342

Yes

City of Richmond

61892

11,863

Yes

City of Richwood

61904

3,123

No

City of Riesel

62108

986

No

City of Rio Bravo

62138

5,657

No

City of Rio Grande City

62168

12,603

Yes

City of Rio Hondo

62180

2,019

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-32

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Rio Vista

62240

686

No

City of Rising Star

62252

829

Yes

City of River Oaks

62384

7,049

Yes

City of Riverside

62408

425

No

City of Roanoke

62504

3,339

Yes

City of Roaring Springs

62528

247

No

City of Robert Lee

62564

1,157

Yes

City of Robinson

62588

8,220

Yes

City of Robstown

62600

12,608

Yes

City of Roby

62612

659

Yes

City of Rochester

62636

368

Yes

City of Rockdale

62672

5,439

Yes

City of Rockport

62804

8,192

Yes

City of Rocksprings

62816

1,243

Yes

City of Rockwall

62828

22,334

Yes

City of Rocky Mound

62870

96

No

City of Rogers

62924

1,097

Yes

City of Rollingwood

63008

1,382

Yes

City of Roma

63020

10,135

Yes

City of Roman Forest

63044

1,975

No

City of Ropesville

63140

519

Yes

City of Roscoe

63176

1,316

Yes

City of Rose City

63200

519

Yes

City of Rose Hill Acres

63272

483

Yes

City of Rosebud

63188

1,443

Yes

City of Rosenberg

63284

27,136

Yes

City of Ross

63380

233

No

City of Rotan

63464

1,561

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-33

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Round Rock

63500

73,858

Yes

City of Rowlett

63572

49,908

Yes

City of Roxton

63584

698

Yes

City of Royse City

63668

3,579

No

City of Rule

63752

674

Yes

City of Runaway Bay

63782

1,199

Yes

City of Runge

63788

1,084

No

City of Rusk

63848

5,228

No

City of Sabinal

64004

1,627

Yes

City of Sachse

64064

13,015

No

City of Sadler

64088

419

No

City of Saginaw

64112

15,389

Yes

City of Saint Hedwig

64172

1,968

No

City of San Angelo

64472

87,423

Yes

City of San Antonio

65000

1,194,222

Yes

City of San Augustine

65024

2,480

Yes

City of San Benito

65036

24,068

No

City of San Diego

65180

4,671

Yes

City of San Juan

65516

28,182

Yes

City of San Marcos

65600

41,602

Yes

City of San Patricio

65612

318

No

City of San Perlita

65636

678

No

City of San Saba

65648

2,680

Yes

City of Sanctuary

65066

273

No

City of Sanford

65384

199

No

City of Sanger

65408

5,006

No

City of Sansom Park

65660

4,216

No

City of Santa Anna

65672

1,042

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-34

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Santa Clara

65690

924

No

City of Santa Fe

65726

10,019

Yes

City of Santa Rosa

65768

2,863

No

City of Savoy

66008

861

Yes

City of Schertz

66128

20,762

Yes

City of Schulenburg

66188

2,747

Yes

City of Scotland

66284

449

Yes

City of Scottsville

66332

268

No

City of Seabrook

66392

10,177

Yes

City of Seadrift

66416

1,376

No

City of Seagoville

66428

11,094

Yes

City of Seagraves

66440

2,282

Yes

City of Sealy

66464

5,563

Yes

City of Seguin

66644

22,741

Yes

City of Selma

66704

1,159

No

City of Seminole

66764

5,803

Yes

City of Seven Oaks

66884

142

Yes

City of Seven Points

66908

1,211

No

City of Seymour

66968

2,785

Yes

City of Shallowater

67136

2,153

Yes

City of Shamrock

67160

1,914

Yes

City of Shavano Park

67268

1,939

Yes

City of Shenandoah

67400

1,541

No

City of Shepherd

67424

2,138

Yes

City of Sherman

67496

35,788

Yes

City of Shiner

67640

2,032

Yes

City of Shoreacres

67688

1,554

No

City of Silsbee

67832

6,451

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-35

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Silverton

67904

740

No

City of Simonton

67964

788

No

City of Sinton

68036

5,590

No

City of Slaton

68180

6,047

Yes

City of Smiley

68300

465

No

City of Smithville

68456

4,242

Yes

City of Smyer

68504

483

Yes

City of Snook

68576

582

No

City of Snyder

68624

10,415

Yes

City of Socorro

68636

27,964

No

City of Somerset

68708

1,669

No

City of Somerville

68720

1,736

No

City of Sonora

68756

2,959

Yes

City of Sour Lake

68828

1,679

Yes

City of South Houston

69020

16,142

No

City of South Mountain

69120

411

Yes

City of Southlake

69032

23,767

Yes

City of Southmayd

69104

1,052

No

City of Southside Place

69272

1,605

Yes

City of Spearman

69476

2,972

Yes

City of Splendora

69548

1,374

No

City of Spofford

69560

75

Yes

City of Spring Valley

69812

3,669

Yes

City of Springtown

69800

2,299

No

City of Spur

69848

1,057

Yes

City of Stafford

69908

17,935

Yes

City of Stagecoach

69932

480

No

City of Stamford

69980

3,447

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-36

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Stanton

70040

2,485

Yes

City of Star Harbor

70076

422

No

City of Stephenville

70208

14,894

Yes

City of Sterling City

70232

1,048

Yes

City of Stinnett

70340

1,889

Yes

City of Stockdale

70376

1,468

Yes

City of Stratford

70544

2,072

No

City of Strawn

70580

744

No

City of Streetman

70604

207

No

City of Sudan

70772

1,040

No

City of Sugar Land

70808

68,599

Yes

City of Sullivan City

70868

4,137

No

City of Sulphur Springs

70904

14,612

Yes

City of Sun Valley

71356

53

Yes

City of Sundown

71060

1,530

Yes

City of Sunray

71180

1,961

No

City of Sunrise Beach Village

71228

741

Yes

City of Sunset

71264

345

Yes

City of Sunset Valley

71324

468

Yes

City of Sweeny

71492

3,684

No

City of Sweetwater

71540

10,937

Yes

City of Taft

71684

3,458

No

City of Tahoka

71708

2,794

Yes

City of Talco

71732

571

No

City of Tatum

71924

1,181

No

City of Taylor

71948

14,062

Yes

City of Taylor Lake Village

71960

3,695

No

City of Teague

72020

4,652

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-37

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Tehuacana

72080

311

No

City of Temple

72176

54,447

Yes

City of Tenaha

72188

1,061

No

City of Terrell

72284

15,147

No

City of Terrell Hills

72296

5,044

Yes

City of Texarkana

72368

35,205

Yes

City of Texas City

72392

43,063

Yes

City of Texhoma

72464

377

No

City of Texline

72476

511

Yes

City of The Colony

72530

32,257

Yes

City of Thorndale

72776

1,304

Yes

City of Thornton

72788

531

No

City of Thrall

72824

790

Yes

City of Three Rivers

72872

1,805

Yes

City of Throckmorton

72896

834

Yes

City of Timpson

73076

1,100

Yes

City of Tioga

73112

819

Yes

City of Tira

73124

249

No

City of Toco

73196

89

No

City of Todd Mission

73224

156

No

City of Tolar

73268

535

No

City of Tom Bean

73328

967

Yes

City of Tomball

73316

9,725

Yes

City of Tool

73352

2,307

No

City of Toyah

73496

95

Yes

City of Trent

73580

312

No

City of Trenton

73592

665

Yes

City of Trinidad

73652

1,104

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-38

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Trinity

73664

2,739

Yes

City of Troup

73724

1,997

Yes

City of Troy

73748

1,369

Yes

City of Tulia

73868

4,918

Yes

City of Turkey

73964

482

Yes

City of Tuscola

74048

725

Yes

City of Tye

74132

1,163

No

City of Tyler

74144

87,030

Yes

City of Uhland

74216

408

Yes

City of Uncertain

74240

149

No

City of Union Grove

74312

358

No

City of Universal City

74408

15,073

Yes

City of University Park

74492

23,817

Yes

City of Uvalde

74588

15,179

Yes

City of Valentine

74648

185

No

City of Valley Mills

74732

1,132

No

City of Van

74912

2,446

No

City of Van Alstyne

74924

2,579

Yes

City of Vega

75188

919

No

City of Venus

75236

2,069

No

City of Vernon

75308

11,044

Yes

City of Victoria

75428

61,031

Yes

City of Vidor

75476

11,302

Yes

City of Waco

76000

115,749

Yes

City of Waelder

76024

969

Yes

City of Wake Village

76096

5,175

Yes

City of Waller

76228

2,072

Yes

City of Wallis

76240

1,210

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-39

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Walnut Springs

76348

776

Yes

City of Warren City

76576

344

No

City of Waskom

76636

2,092

No

City of Watauga

76672

23,376

Yes

City of Waxahachie

76816

23,059

Yes

City of Weatherford

76864

20,619

Yes

City of Webster

76948

9,158

Yes

City of Weimar

77020

1,960

Yes

City of Weinert

77044

172

No

City of Weir

77056

628

Yes

City of Wellington

77152

2,189

No

City of Wellman

77164

204

No

City of Wells

77176

791

No

City of Weslaco

77272

29,094

Yes

City of West

77332

2,694

Yes

City of West Columbia

77416

4,308

No

City of West Lake Hills

77632

3,065

Yes

City of West Orange

77752

4,045

Yes

City of West Tawakoni

77896

1,579

No

City of West University Place

77956

14,908

Yes

City of Westbrook

77380

195

No

City of Westminster

77680

410

No

City of Weston

77740

663

No

City of Westworth Village

78064

2,122

No

City of Wharton

78136

9,386

Yes

City of Wheeler

78208

1,307

Yes

City of White Deer

78316

1,071

Yes

City of White Oak

78436

5,786

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-40

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of White Settlement

78544

15,154

No

City of Whiteface

78328

436

No

City of Whitehouse

78388

6,235

Yes

City of Whitesboro

78532

3,919

Yes

City of Whitewright

78628

1,759

Yes

City of Whitney

78664

1,931

Yes

City of Wichita Falls

79000

102,926

Yes

City of Wickett

79036

436

Yes

City of Willis

79408

4,169

No

City of Willow Park

79492

3,069

No

City of Wills Point

79564

3,611

Yes

City of Wilmer

79576

3,651

Yes

City of Wilson

79612

512

No

City of Windcrest

79672

5,110

Yes

City of Windthorst

79696

444

Yes

City of Winfield

79720

515

No

City of Wink

79768

893

Yes

City of Winnsboro

79816

3,667

Yes

City of Winona

79828

595

Yes

City of Winters

79876

2,800

Yes

City of Wixon Valley

79919

232

No

City of Wolfe City

79948

1,606

Yes

City of Wolfforth

79972

2,655

Yes

City of Woodbranch Village

80044

1,356

No

City of Woodcreek

80058

1,367

Yes

City of Woodloch

80144

253

No

City of Woodson

80188

276

Yes

City of Woodville

80212

2,355

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-41

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

City of Woodway

80224

8,721

Yes

City of Wortham

80296

1,098

No

City of Wylie

80356

18,380

Yes

City of Yantis

80440

336

Yes

City of Yoakum

80560

5,715

Yes

City of Yorktown

80584

2,242

Yes

City of Zavalla

80728

652

Yes

Clay County

48077

5,710

Yes

Cochran County

48079

957

Yes

Coke County

48081

1,620

Yes

Coleman County

48083

2,717

Yes

Collin County

48085

33,801

Yes

Collingsworth County

48087

802

No

Colorado County

48089

10,884

Yes

Comal County

48091

39,089

Yes

Comanche County

48093

6,478

Yes

Concho County

48095

1,032

Yes

Cooke County

48097

17,814

Yes

Coryell County

48099

28,766

Yes

Cottle County

48101

388

Yes

Crane County

48103

787

Yes

Crockett County

48105

3,807

Yes

Crosby County

48107

1,540

Yes

Culberson County

48109

502

Yes

Dallam County

48111

1,051

No

Dallas County

48113

8,231

Yes

Dawson County

48115

4,754

Yes

Deaf Smith County

48117

3,973

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-42

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Delta County

48119

3,025

Yes

Denton County

48121

37,650

Yes

DeWitt County

48123

8,733

Yes

DFW Airport

19004

160,000

Yes

Dickens County

48125

1,319

Yes

Dimmit County

48127

2,578

Yes

Donley County

48129

1,065

Yes

Duval County

48131

4,176

Yes

Eastland County

48133

5,820

Yes

Ector County

48135

32,189

Yes

Edwards County

48137

838

Yes

El Paso County

48141

47,056

Yes

Ellis County

48139

78,539

Yes

Erath County

48143

14,489

No

Falls County

48145

9,193

Yes

Fannin County

48147

14,023

Yes

Fayette County

48149

12,988

Yes

Fisher County

48151

2,026

Yes

Floyd County

48153

2,054

Yes

Foard County

48155

460

Yes

Fort Bend County

48157

168,915

Yes

Franklin County

48159

6,634

Yes

Freestone County

48161

9,165

Yes

Frio County

48163

4,978

Yes

Gaines County

48165

6,226

Yes

Galveston County

48167

31,388

Yes

Garza County

48169

1,180

Yes

Gillespie County

48171

12,261

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-43

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Glasscock County

48173

1,369

Yes

Goliad County

48175

5,067

Yes

Gonzales County

48177

8,002

Yes

Gray County

48179

3,418

Yes

Grayson County

48181

34,696

Yes

Gregg County

48183

19,668

Yes

Grimes County

48185

17,159

Yes

Guadalupe County

48187

44,025

Yes

Hale County

48189

8,382

Yes

Hall County

48191

474

Yes

Hamilton County

48193

3,657

Yes

Hansford County

48195

1,175

No

Hardeman County

48197

871

Yes

Hardin County

48199

29,356

Yes

Harris County

48201

1,131,952

Yes

Harrison County

48203

31,348

No

Hartley County

48205

2,572

Yes

Haskell County

48207

1,520

Yes

Hays County

48209

48,333

Yes

Hemphill County

48211

1,119

Yes

Henderson County

48213

42,891

Yes

Hidalgo County

48215

193,725

Yes

Hill County

48217

17,479

Yes

Hockley County

48219

6,001

Yes

Hood County

48221

34,012

Yes

Hopkins County

48223

16,188

Yes

Houston County

48225

13,499

Yes

Howard County

48227

7,259

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-44

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Hudspeth County

48229

2,926

Yes

Hunt County

48231

37,671

Yes

Hutchinson County

48233

5,111

Yes

Irion County

48235

923

Yes

Jack County

48237

3,844

Yes

Jackson County

48239

6,394

Yes

Jasper County

48241

25,859

Yes

Jeff Davis County

48243

2,026

Yes

Jefferson County

48245

30,461

Yes

Jim Hogg County

48247

5,173

Yes

Jim Wells County

48249

15,803

Yes

Johnson County

48251

67,757

Yes

Jones County

48253

5,810

Yes

Karnes County

48255

6,867

Yes

Kaufman County

48257

36,858

Yes

Kendall County

48259

18,052

Yes

Kenedy County

48261

419

No

Kent County

48263

323

Yes

Kerr County

48265

21,973

Yes

Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of

48902

893

Yes

Kimble County

48267

1,871

Yes

King County

48269

333

Yes

Kinney County

48271

1,460

Yes

Kleberg County

48273

5,950

Yes

Knox County

48275

876

Yes

La Salle County

48281

2,844

Yes

Lamar County

48283

9,554

Yes

Lamb County

48277

1,630

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-45

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Lampasas County

48279

17,080

Yes

Lavaca County

48285

10,082

Yes

Lee County

48287

9,822

Yes

Leon County

48289

10,601

Yes

Liberty County

48291

45,992

Yes

Limestone County

48293

9,166

Yes

Lipscomb County

48295

616

No

Live Oak County

48297

7,578

Yes

Llano County

48299

13,558

Yes

Loving County

48301

64

Yes

Lubbock County

48303

27,881

Yes

Lynn County

48305

1,831

Yes

Madison County

48313

1,608

Yes

Marion County

48315

14,266

No

Martin County

48317

25,145

Yes

Mason County

48319

2,448

Yes

Matagorda County

48321

37,748

Yes

Maverick County

48323

856

Yes

McCulloch County

48307

8,574

Yes

McLennan County

48309

9,078

Yes

McMullen County

48311

2,054

Yes

Medina County

48325

22,330

Yes

Menard County

48327

697

Yes

Midland County

48329

20,801

Yes

Milam County

48331

11,567

Yes

Mills County

48333

3,163

Yes

Mitchell County

48335

4,493

Yes

Montague County

48337

9,484

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-46

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Montgomery County

48339

268,051

Yes

Moore County

48341

1,925

Yes

Morris County

48343

6,636

Yes

Motley County

48345

394

Yes

Nacogdoches County

48347

26,905

Yes

Navarro County

48349

13,388

Yes

Newton County

48351

12,499

Yes

Nolan County

48353

2,576

Yes

Nueces County

48355

15,051

Yes

Ochiltree County

48357

1,212

Yes

Oldham County

48359

1,080

Yes

Orange County

48361

38,774

Yes

Palo Pinto County

48363

10,481

Yes

Panola County

48365

14,920

Yes

Parker County

48367

55,348

Yes

Parmer County

48369

2,886

Yes

Pecos County

48371

7,618

Yes

Polk County

48373

34,745

Yes

Potter County

48375

14,293

Yes

Presidio County

48377

1,021

Yes

Rains County

48379

7,351

Yes

Randall County

48381

16,742

Yes

Reagan County

48383

422

Yes

Real County

48385

1,825

Yes

Red River County

48387

7,298

Yes

Reeves County

48389

2,935

Yes

Refugio County

48391

2,660

Yes

Roberts County

48393

288

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-47

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Robertson County

48395

7,594

Yes

Rockwall County

48397

9,356

Yes

Runnels County

48399

3,404

Yes

Rusk County

48401

28,960

Yes

Sabine County

48403

8,361

Yes

San Augustine County

48405

6,256

No

San Jacinto County

48407

19,579

Yes

San Patricio County

48409

15,225

Yes

San Saba County

48411

3,126

Yes

Schleicher County

48413

989

Yes

Scurry County

48415

5,462

Yes

Shackelford County

48417

1,167

Yes

Shelby County

48419

16,421

Yes

Sherman County

48421

836

No

Smith County

48423

76,223

Yes

Somervell County

48425

4,902

No

Starr County

48427

32,671

Yes

Stephens County

48429

3,763

Yes

Sterling County

48431

298

Yes

Stonewall County

48433

585

Yes

Sutton County

48435

1,158

Yes

Swisher County

48437

1,763

Yes

Tarrant County

48439

33,218

Yes

Taylor County

48441

10,356

Yes

Terrell County

48443

998

Yes

Terry County

48445

2,429

Yes

Throckmorton County

48447

601

Yes

Tigua Tribe Ysleta del Sur

48903

1,288

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-48

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Titus County

48449

13,020

Yes

Tom Green County

48451

15,595

Yes

Town of Addison

1240

14,117

Yes

Town of Annetta

3336

1,157

No

Town of Annetta South

3342

579

No

Town of Anthony

3432

3,980

No

Town of Bartonville

5768

1,252

No

Town of Bayside

6104

351

No

Town of Bayview

6140

358

No

Town of Broaddus

10384

186

No

Town of Buckholts

11020

400

Yes

Town of Buffalo Gap

11128

449

Yes

Town of Chireno

14776

399

No

Town of Clint

15544

985

No

Town of Combes

16204

2,830

Yes

Town of Copper Canyon

16636

1,254

No

Town of Cross Roads

17852

626

No

Town of Cross Timber

17917

292

No

Town of Cut and Shoot

18260

1,222

No

Town of Darrouzett

19288

305

No

Town of Double Oak

21028

2,481

No

Town of Edgecliff Village

22588

2,575

Yes

Town of Enchanted Oaks

24228

374

No

Town of Fairview

25224

3,405

Yes

Town of Flower Mound

26232

58,642

Yes

Town of Fulton

27888

1,606

No

Town of Hackberry

31715

467

No

Town of Hickory Creek

33476

2,437

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-49

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Town of Highland Park

33824

8,920

No

Town of Hollywood Park

34628

3,035

Yes

Town of Horizon City

34832

6,707

No

Town of Indian Lake

35918

571

No

Town of Lakeside

40744

1,118

No

Town of Lindsay

42868

851

No

Town of Little Elm

43012

9,147

No

Town of Marshall Creek

46782

470

No

Town of New Hope

51036

692

No

Town of Northlake

52212

995

No

Town of Oak Ridge

53160

521

No

Town of Oak Valley

53217

422

No

Town of Palm Valley

54798

1,292

No

Town of Pantego

55020

2,357

Yes

Town of Pecos

56516

8,945

Yes

Town of Pleasant Valley

58400

395

Yes

Town of Ponder

58664

660

No

Town of Prosper

59696

2,612

Yes

Town of Quintana

60164

39

No

Town of Rancho Viejo

60544

1,762

No

Town of Ransom Canyon

60672

1,054

Yes

Town of Refugio

61436

2,860

No

Town of Round Mountain

63476

116

No

Town of Round Top

63524

78

Yes

Town of Saint Jo

64184

964

Yes

Town of Saint Paul

64220

709

No

Town of San Felipe

65372

902

No

Town of Shady Shores

67100

1,712

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-50

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Town of Skellytown

68120

620

Yes

Town of South Padre Island

69140

2,442

Yes

Town of Springlake

69764

139

No

Town of Sunnyvale

71156

3,498

No

Town of Talty

80736

1,113

No

Town of Thompsons

72740

256

No

Town of Thorntonville

72800

428

No

Town of Trophy Club

73710

7,027

Yes

Town of Valley View

74756

777

No

Town of Van Horn

75032

2,337

No

Town of Westlake

77620

209

Yes

Town of Westover Hills

77788

680

Yes

Town of Windom

79684

246

No

Town of Woodsboro

80176

1,663

No

Travis County

48453

140,768

Yes

Trinity County

48455

10,227

Yes

Tyler County

48457

17,490

Yes

Upshur County

48459

25,596

No

Upton County

48461

779

Yes

Uvalde County

48463

9,702

Yes

Val Verde County

48465

11,292

Yes

Van Zandt County

48467

35,432

Yes

Victoria County

48469

23,901

Yes

Village of Bear Creek

6242

371

No

Village of Bee Cave

7156

778

No

Village of Bonney

9388

409

No

Village of Briarcliff

10197

860

No

Village of Buffalo Springs

11155

495

No

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-51

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Village of Fairchilds

25068

739

No

Village of Jamaica Beach

37252

1,073

Yes

Village of Jones Creek

37984

2,173

No

Village of Laguna Vista

40336

2,024

No

Village of Lake Tanglewood

40804

833

No

Village of Pernitas Point

56840

262

No

Village of Pleak

58088

1,024

Yes

Village of Rosser

63404

409

No

Village of Salado

64268

1,951

Yes

Village of San Leanna

65552

390

No

Village of Surfside Beach

71384

775

Yes

Village of The Hills

72578

1,871

No

Village of Tiki Island

72989

1,105

Yes

Village of Timbercreek Canyon

73030

445

No

Village of Vinton

75668

1,972

No

Village of Wimberley

79624

2,685

Yes

Walker County

48471

25,289

Yes

Waller County

48473

16,515

Yes

Ward County

48475

2,210

Yes

Washington County

48477

16,701

Yes

Webb County

48479

6,807

Yes

Wharton County

48481

21,054

Yes

Wheeler County

48483

1,697

Yes

Wichita County

48485

6,111

Yes

Wilbarger County

48487

2,983

Yes

Willacy County

48489

7,729

No

Williamson County

48491

98,285

Yes

Wilson County

48493

23,822

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-52

Jurisdiction

FIPS

Population

Assessment

Winkler County

48495

531

Yes

Wise County

48497

32,834

No

Wood County

48499

26,222

Yes

Yoakum County

48501

1,901

Yes

Young County

48503

5,258

Yes

Zapata County

48505

12,788

No

Zavala County

48507

4,442

Yes

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-53

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II - Goals and Objectives

A-54

Texas Domestic Preparedness Assessment Handbook of Instructions


Texas Jurisdictions contributed a great amount of time and effort to complete the
assessment of risk, capabilities and needs. The link below will allow users to access the
instructions that were available for the assessment.
https://www.texasdpa.com/media/Texas_book.pdf

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part II- Goals and Objectives
Link to Domestic Preparedness Assessment Handbook

Texas
Homeland
Security
Strategic
Plan
Part III
State of Texas Emergency Management Plan
Rick Perry, Governor
January 30, 2004

STATE OF TEXAS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


BASIC PLAN
Revision 5

APPROVAL AND IMPLEMENTATION

This plan applies to all State agencies, boards, commissions, and departments assigned
emergency responsibilities in this plan, and to others as designated by the Governor or Director
of the Governors Division of Emergency Management as well as local governments in Texas.
The Director, Governors Division of Emergency Management, will provide guidance and
direction to the State Coordinator, Governors Division of Emergency Management, in the
conduct of emergency response and disaster recovery activities.
This plan is hereby approved for implementation and supersedes all previous editions.
Pursuant to The Texas Disaster Act of 1975, Government Code 418.042, 418.043(13), and
418.173(a), failure to comply with this plan or a rule, order, or ordinance adopted under this plan
is an offense punishable, for each transaction, by penalty of a fine up to $1,000.00 or
confinement in jail for a term not exceeding 180 days.

Date

______________________________________
Governor

______________________________________
Director
Governors Division of Emergency Management

______________________________________
State Coordinator
Governors Division of Emergency Management

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
i

RECORD OF CHANGES
STATE OF TEXAS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN

CHANGE NUMBER

DATE OF CHANGE

INITIALS AND DATE ENTERED

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS
AUTHORITY ......................................................................................................... 1

I.

A. STATE
.................................................................................................................... 1
B. FEDERAL .................................................................................................................... 1
C. MUTUAL AID AGREEMENTS AND CONTINGENCY PLANS ....................................... 2

II.

PURPOSE

......................................................................................................... 2

A. PURPOSE OF THIS PLAN ............................................................................................ 2


B. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANNING DOCUMENTS ............................................. 2
1. RELATIONSHIP TO HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGIES ................................................... 3
2. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER STATE PLANS ....................................................................... 3
3. RELATIONSHIP TO FEDERAL CONTINGENCY PLANS ........................................................ 3
4. RELATIONSHIP TO INTERSTATE AGREEMENTS ............................................................... 3

III.

SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS ........................................................................ 4


A. SITUATION .................................................................................................................... 4
B. ASSUMPTIONS .............................................................................................................. 5

IV.

CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS ................................................................................... 7


A. GENERAL .................................................................................................................... 7
B. PLANNING CONCEPTS.................................................................................................. 7
1. COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT ............................................................... 7
2. ALL-HAZARDS PLANNING .............................................................................................. 8
3. COMPREHENSIVE RESOURCE PLANNING ....................................................................... 9
4. INFORMATION SUPPORT FOR EMERGENCY PLANNING AND OPERATIONS ......................... 9
C. OPERATIONAL GUIDANCE .......................................................................................... 9
1. THREAT MONITORING ................................................................................................... 9
2. ALERT & WARNING ....................................................................................................... 10
3. ACTIVATION OF EMERGENCY FACILITIES ........................................................................ 10
4. PRECAUTIONARY PREPOSITIONING OF RESOURCES ....................................................... 11
5. INTERAGENCY COORDINATION ...................................................................................... 12
6. REQUESTS FOR ASSISTANCE ........................................................................................ 13
7. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL & DISASTER DISTRICT COMMITTEE
OPERATIONS ............................................................................................................... 14
8. STATE LEAD AGENCIES FOR CERTAIN INCIDENTS .......................................................... 15
9. LOCAL GOVERNMENTS ................................................................................................. 16
10. STATE DIRECTION AND CONTROL SYSTEM ...................................................................... 17
11. EFFECT OF A DISASTER DECLARATION............................................................................ 18
12. CATASTROPHIC DISASTER OPERATIONS ......................................................................... 18
13. TECHNOLOGICAL HAZARD OPERATIONS ................................................................. 20
14. DROUGHT OPERATIONS ................................................................................................ 20

V.

ORGANIZATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES............................... 20


A ORGANIZATION ............................................................................................................ 20
B. RESPONSIBILITIES ....................................................................................................... 22
1. KEY OFFICIALS ............................................................................................................. 22

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

iii

2. ORGANIZATIONS ........................................................................................................... 26
3. FACILITIES ................................................................................................................... 36

VI.

DIRECTION AND CONTROL .................................................................................... 37


A. GENERAL .................................................................................................................... 37
B. EFFECT OF STATE DISASTER DECLARATION ON STATE
RESPONSE/RECOVERY OPERATIONS...................................................................... 39
C. EFFECT OF A FEDERAL EMERGENCY OR DISASTER DECLARATION................... 39

VII.

READINESS & RESPONSE LEVELS.................................................................... 39


A. STATE READINESS & RESPONSE LEVELS ................................................................ 39
B. HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY SYSTEM ............................................................. 41
C. RELATIONSHIP STATE EMERGENCY READINESS & RESPONSE
LEVELS AND HSAS ............................................................................................ 42

VIII.

CONTINUITY OF GOVERNMENT ......................................................................... 42


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.

IX.

GENERAL .................................................................................................................... 42
LINES OF SUCCESSION ............................................................................................... 43
PRE-DELEGATION OF EMERGENCY AUTHORITIES................................................. 43
EMERGENCY ACTION STEPS...................................................................................... 44
ALTERNATE OPERATING FACILITIES ......................................................................... 44
PROTECTION OF GOVERNMENT RESOURCES ........................................................ 44
PROTECTION OF VITAL RECORDS ............................................................................ 44

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT...................................................................... 45


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

X.

SUPPORT .................................................................................................................... 45
AGREEMENTS AND UNDERSTANDINGS.................................................................... 45
REPORTS AND RECORDS ........................................................................................... 45
EXPENDITURES AND RECORD KEEPING .................................................................. 45
CRITIQUES .................................................................................................................... 46

PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE...................................................... 46


A. DEVELOPMENT.............................................................................................................. 46
B. MAINTENANCE............................................................................................................... 46

ATTACHMENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

State Emergency Management Council


State Emergency Management Council Matrix of Responsibilities
Critical Infrastructure Protection Council
Critical Infrastructure Protection Council Responsibilities
Disaster District Boundaries
Channels for Requesting Emergency Assistance
Primary Federal & State Functional Responsibilities
State Plan Annex Assignments
Summary of Agency Emergency Responsibilities

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

iv

EXPLANATION OF TERMS
A. ACRONYMS
AGD
ARC

Adjutant General s Department


American Red Cross

BPC

Texas Building & Procurement Commission

CAP
CERT
CIPC
COG
COOP
CPA

Civil Air Patrol


Community Emergency Response Team
Critical Infrastructure Protection Council
Continuity of government or councils of government
Continuity of operations
Comptroller of Public Accounts

DADS
DARS
DDC
DFO
DPFS
DHS
DIR
DPS
DRC
DSHS

Department of Aging & Disability Services


Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Service
Disaster District Committee
Disaster Field Office
Department of Protective & Family Services
Department of Human Services
Department of Information Resources
Department of Public Safety
Disaster Recovery Center
Department of State Health Services

EAS
EMAC
EMC
EOC
ERN
ERT-A
ESC
ESF

Emergency Alert System


Emergency Management Assistance Compact
Emergency Management Coordinator
Emergency Operations Center
Emergency Response Network
FEMA Emergency Response Team Advance
Emergency Support Center
Emergency Support Function

FCO
FEMA
FRP
FRERP

Federal Coordinating Officer


Federal Emergency Management Agency, an element of US DHS
Federal Response Plan
Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan

GAR
GDEM
GLO

Governors Authorized Representative


Governors Division of Emergency Management
Texas General Land Office

HCA
HSAS

Department of Housing & Community Affairs


Homeland Security Advisory System

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan- Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

ICP

Incident Command Post

JIC
JOC
JRIES

Joint Information Center


Joint Operations Center
Joint Regional Intelligence Exchange System

MHMR

Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation

NAWS
NCP
NLETS
NRP

National Warning System


National Contingency Plan
National Law Enforcement Telecommunication System
National Response Plan

OAG
ORCA

Office of the Attorney General


Office of Rural Community Affairs

PUC

Public Utility Commission of Texas

ROC
RRC
RRP
RSA

FEMA Regional Operations Center


Railroad Commission of Texas
FEMA Regional Response Plan
Resource Staging Area

SAO
SAC
SCO
SEMC
SERC
SERT
SOC

State Auditors Office


State Area Command
State Coordinating Officer
State Emergency Management Council
State Emergency Response Commission
State Emergency Response Team
State Operations Center

TAHC
TCEQ
TCFP
TDA
TDCJ
TDH
TDI
TEA
TEEX
TFS
TEWAS
TIPCC
TLETS
TPWD
TRC
TSA
TSAAC
TSMPS
TWC

Texas Animal Health Commission


Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
Texas Commission on Fire Protection
Department of Agriculture
Department of Criminal Justice
Department of Health
Department of Insurance
Texas Education Agency
Texas Engineering Extension Service
Texas Forest Service
Texas Warning System
Texas Infrastructure Protection Communications Center
Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunication System
Texas Parks & Wildlife Department
Texas Rehabilitation Commission
The Salvation Army
Texas Security Alert & Analysis Center
Texas Strategic Military Planning Commission
Texas Workforce Commission

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

vi

TXDOT

Department of Transportation

US DHS
US EPA
US NRC

US Department of Homeland Security


US Environmental Protection Agency
US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

B. DEFINITIONS
Critical Infrastructure: Public or private assets, systems, and functions vital to the security,
governance, public health and safety, economy, or morale of the state or the nation.
Emergency: The occurrence or imminent threat of a condition, situation, or event that
requires immediate response actions to save lives; prevent injuries; protect property, public
health, the environment, and public safety; or to lessen or avert the threat of a disaster. An
emergency is a situation larger in scope and more severe in terms of actual or potential
effects than an incident. The local Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is typically activated
to mobilize local resources, coordinate external resource support, conduct mid- and long-term
planning, and disseminate emergency public information. Some technical assistance or
resources may be requested from the State; the local Disaster District EOC and the State
Operations Center (SOC) are typically activated to monitor and respond to the situation.
Emergency situations: This term is used in this Plan when the intent is to describe a full
range of crisis situations from incidents at the low end of the crisis spectrum to disasters
at the high end of spectrum.
Disaster: The occurrence or imminent threat of widespread or severe damage, injury, loss of
life or property that is beyond the capability of the governments within the affected area to
resolve with their resources. Local EOCs are activated to carry out the functions described
above. State and/or federal response assistance will be needed to resolve the situation and
carry out recovery activities. One or more Disaster District EOCs and the State Operations
Center (SOC) will be fully activated to respond to the disaster.
Homeland Security Activity: Any activity related to the prevention or discovery of, response
to, or recovery from a terrorist attack, natural or manmade disaster, hostile or paramilitary
action, or extraordinary law enforcement emergency.
Incident: An emergency situation that is limited in scope and potential effects on lives and
property and is typically handled by one or two local response agencies acting under an
incident commander. An incident may require limited external assistance from other local
response forces. The local EOC is usually not activated.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

vii

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

viii

STATE OF TEXAS
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN
I.

AUTHORITY

This plan applies to emergency management operations in the State of Texas and supersedes all
previous editions. Strategic planning guidance and authorities governing its enactment and
implementation include:
A. STATE
1. Constitution of the State of Texas.
2.

Executive Order of the Governor relating to Emergency Management and Homeland


Security

3.

Chapter 418 (Emergency Management), Government Code.

4.

Chapter 421 (Homeland Security), Government Code.

5.

Chapter 433 (State of Emergency), Government Code.

6.

Chapter 791 (Interlocal Cooperation Contracts), Government Code.

7.

Chapter 778 (Emergency Management Assistance Compact), Health and Safety Code.

8.

Sections 88.112-88.116 (South Central Interstate Forest Fire Protection Compact),


Education Code

9.

Respective State Agency, Department, and Commission enabling legislation.

10. Title 37 (Public Safety and Corrections), Administration Code.


11. The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan, Parts I and II, December 15, 2003.
B. FEDERAL
1.

Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, as
amended.

2.

The National Strategy for Homeland Security, July 16, 2002.

3.

Emergency Management and Assistance, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 44.

4.

Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988, Public Law 100-408, as amended.

5.

Emergency Management Assistance Compact, Public Law 104-321.

6.

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 3: Homeland Security Advisory System.

7.

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5: Management of Domestic Incidents.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
1

8.

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7: Critical Infrastructure Identification,


Prioritization, and Protection.

C. MUTUAL AID AGREEMENTS AND CONTINGENCY PLANS


1.

Southern Agreement for Mutual State Radiological Assistance

2.

Federal Response Plan (FRP)

3.

FEMA Region VI Regional Response Plan (RRP)

4.

Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP)

5.

National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP)


II. PURPOSE

A. PURPOSE OF THIS PLAN


1.

This plan has been prepared by the Governors Division of Emergency Management
(GDEM) pursuant to 418.042 of the Government Code, which requires that GDEM
prepare and keep current a comprehensive emergency management plan, and Chapter
421 (Homeland Security) of the Government Code. A comprehensive emergency
management plan describes how the State will mitigate against, prepare for, respond to,
and recover from the impact of hazards to public health and safety, including natural
disasters, technological accidents, homeland security threats, and other emergency
situations.

2.

This plan establishes operational concepts and identifies tasks and responsibilities
required to carry out a comprehensive emergency management program. It describes
the States emergency management organization and a statewide system of direction
and control. It indicates who is expected to do what, when, where, and how to prevent
and manage emergency situations. It defines the specific duties and responsibilities of
departments, agencies, and organizations represented on the Emergency Management
Council and provides for coordination of appropriate preparedness, mitigation, response,
and recovery actions with both the federal government and with local governments.

3.

This plan addresses the steps necessary to ensure continuity of our representative form
of government in the event of a major disaster as well as the continuity of the operation of
State government and local governments to provide protection and essential services to
the citizens of the State.

4.

This plan, though comprehensive, includes provisions for flexibility of methods,


operations, and actions needed to facilitate the efforts of the State and local governments
in accomplishing emergency management objectives.

B. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANNING DOCUMENTS


1.

Relationship to Homeland Security Strategies. This plan is intended to implement the


general homeland security strategy for the State established by the Governor in the
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan, Parts I and II, which in large part implement the

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national strategy established by the President in the National Strategy for Homeland
Security. The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan sets three general objectives:
a.
b.
c.

Prevent terrorist attacks within Texas by enhancing communication and


coordination.
Reduce the States vulnerability to terrorism by protecting critical infrastructure and
key assets.
Minimize the damage and recover from attacks that do occur.

This plan provides for the employment of state resources in partnership with local
governments, industry, volunteer groups, and the federal government to carry out
operational strategies to achieve homeland security and emergency management
objectives and should be considered as Part III of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic
Plan.
2.

Relationship to Other State Plans. This basic plan is supported by a number of


specialized state plans.
These include specialized plans for complex large-scale
hazards such as the Drought Contingency Plan, and other plans developed to address
special emergency situations, typically of limited scope and duration, such as the
Emergency Drinking Water Plan.
Such stand-alone plans are considered as
supplements to the State of Texas Emergency Management Plan. The State also
produces a State Mitigation Action Plan to guide state hazard mitigation activities and a
number of administrative plans required by the federal government which outline policies
and procedures for certain recovery programs.

3.

Relationship to Local Emergency Management Plans. This plan provides for


coordination with local officials concerning credible threats and the effective integration of
state support for local emergency operations when local officials request state
assistance. Local emergency management plans provide guidance for the employment
of local emergency resources, mutual aid resources, and specialized regional response
resources under a local incident commander, who may be supported by a local EOC.
Local emergency plans include specific provisions for requesting and employing state
resources to aid in managing and resolving emergency situations for which local
resources are inadequate.

4.

Relationship to Federal Contingency Plans. This plan provides for integration of state
response operations with the federal agencies responding to emergency situations in
Texas at the request of the Governor pursuant to the Federal Response Plan (FRP), the
Federal Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (FRERP), the National Contingency
Plan (NCP) and other federal contingency plans. These three federal response plans are
in the process of being incorporated into a new National Response Plan.

5.

Relationship to Interstate Agreements. This plan also addresses provisions for


requesting emergency assistance from other states or providing emergency assistance to
other states pursuant to the Emergency Management Assistance Compact and a number
of specialized agreements to which the State of Texas is party.

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III. SITUATION & ASSUMPTIONS


A. SITUATION
1.

The State of Texas Hazard Analysis, published by the GDEM, provides detailed
information concerning the occurrences and impact of hazards in Texas. The types of
hazards threatening this state include:
a.

Natural hazards such as wildfires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, snow or


ice storms and droughts;

b.

Technological hazards such as major transportation accidents, oil spills, industrial


fires and explosions, nuclear facility accidents, or hazardous material spills
(radioactive or chemical);

c.

Homeland Security threats, including attacks by foreign military forces and terrorists
with conventional, chemical, biological, nuclear, and radiological weapons; and

d.

Other threats, including civil unrest, strikes affecting production and distribution of
critical goods and services, and energy shortages.

2.

The federal government recognizes that an attack on the United States is possible by
foreign military forces, although that is presently considered highly unlikely; attacks by
terrorists are considered more likely. A large-scale military attack would likely be
preceded by a period of international tension that may provide strategic warning.
However, acts of terrorism can occur any place and at any time with little or no
warning.

3.

It is possible for emergency situations to occur at any time and at any place in the State
and all levels of government must be prepared to respond with little or no warning. For
emergency situations that develop slowly, such as riverine flooding, dissemination of
timely warning and implementation of preventive measures may be possible to reduce
the threat to lives and property. Similarly, dissemination of specific credible intelligence
on terrorist threats may aid local and state officials in preventing terrorist acts.

4.

The State of Texas has periodically experienced disasters that were so widespread or
severe that local and state and local resources were insufficient to meet response and
recovery needs. In these circumstances, the State has sought and received assistance
from the federal government and some other states. However, most large disaster
recovery programs are federal programs, and not all disasters that occur in Texas will
qualify for federal disaster assistance. In these cases, the State and volunteer groups
may be able to provide limited recovery assistance.

5.

Many of the threats facing the State have the potential to cause catastrophic damage,
mass casualties, and mass fatalities. The occurrence of a catastrophic disaster could
quickly overwhelm affected local governments and rapidly deplete state resources. It is
essential that all levels of government be prepared to continue to operate effectively
during crises and continue to ensure public safety, provide essential services, and
maintain uninterrupted direction and control capabilities.

6.

The Constitution of the State of Texas, as well as other state laws, requires the State and

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local governments to implement certain continuity of government (COG) programs,


including providing for emergency succession of governmental officials, identification of
alternate operating facilities, preservation of vital records, and protection of government
personnel, materials, and facilities. These measures should be in place before threats
materialize to ensure continuity of government is maintained following emergencies or
disasters.
7.

Effective pre-disaster mitigation, thorough preparedness, timely warning, and welltrained and equipped response forces can reduce the number of deaths and injuries
caused by a hazard. Effective pre-disaster mitigation can also reduce the amount of
damage to private and public property and facilities that results from a disaster.

8.

The ability of the State and local governments to respond to and provide for the safety
and welfare of the public during an emergency or disaster is directly influenced by the
effectiveness of preparedness, response, and continuity of government operations.
The ability of the State and local governments to recover and resume normal operations
following a disaster is directly influenced by the effectiveness of continuity of government,
continuity of operations, and recovery planning.

9.

The availability of critical emergency response and recovery capabilities and resources
can be expanded through employment of intrastate and interstate mutual aid. Local
governments are encouraged to enter into local and regional mutual aid agreements to
supplement their capabilities.

10. Although the State and local governments have a wide variety of emergency response
assets, both the State and many local governments also contract with industry for certain
specialized emergency response equipment, supplies, and services to supplement their
organic resources.
11. Elected officials in Texas do not have the authority to issue mandatory evacuation orders.
However, the Governor, mayors, and county judges may recommend evacuation of the
population and control ingress and egress to and from a disaster area.
B. ASSUMPTIONS
1.

The State and its political subdivisions will continue to experience emergency situations
and disasters that may cause death, injury, and damage, or may necessitate evacuation
and sheltering of the public at risk.

2.

Local governments will develop, maintain, and implement comprehensive emergency


management plans that address all hazards and contain mitigation, preparedness,
response, and recovery elements and procedures in accordance with state planning
standards.

3.

In the event of an enemy attack involving nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons, large
areas of the State could suffer catastrophic levels of deaths, casualties, physical
damages, and long-term contamination. To save lives, the Governor, at the request of
the President, may request that residents of possible target areas relocate to areas of
lower risk.

4.

Emergency response and recovery capabilities can be enhanced by employment of


supplemental resources obtained through intrastate and interstate mutual aid

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agreements and from private industry.


5.

Local emergency operations, including mutual aid, will be directed by officials of the
local government, except in those situations where state law requires that a state
agency exercise lead responsibility or where local government personnel require
special expertise to cope with the problem(s) at hand.

6.

State resources may be committed when local resources, including mutual aid resources,
are inadequate to cope with an emergency situation or threat and a valid request for
supplemental state assistance is made by a mayor, county judge or their designee. To
insure that the most readily available sources of emergency assistance are fully
considered, cities must request assistance from their county before requesting
assistance from the State. If a state assistance team is operating to cope with a unique
emergency situation such as a hazardous material (hazmat) spill or radiological incident,
then the local chief elected official or his designee will be kept informed of progress in
responding to and rectifying the situation.

7.

A number of hazards that threaten Texas are capable of causing a catastrophic disaster.
The most probable is a Category 4 or greater hurricane, with sustained winds in excess
of 130 miles per hour, impacting heavily populated areas of the Texas Coast.

8.

The occurrence of a catastrophic event could cause such widespread damage to the
infrastructure that existing emergency response capabilities of state and local
governments are curtailed or are otherwise inadequate to the needs of the situation.
Such an event could result in governments being victims of the disaster and therefore
unable to adequately provide for the safety and welfare of the general public.

9.

It is expected that state-owned facilities and resources in a catastrophic disaster area


also will suffer widespread damage and destruction. This situation may severely limit or
eliminate immediate response capabilities of state agencies within the disaster area.

10. Federal level response and recovery assistance will be necessary to provide for the
public safety before, during, and after a catastrophic event in Texas. It is expected that
federal assistance provided to Texas will be based upon specific requests and priorities
provided by the State.
11. Although this plan outlines procedures for coordinating the provision of supplemental
emergency assistance, it is essential for all levels of government to be prepared to carry
out emergency response and short-term recovery actions on an independent basis.
12. Actions should be taken to maintain a representative form of government in the State.
Emergency situations may cause the death of or injury to key elected and appointed
officials. Should this occur, emergency response operations will be more effective if lines
of succession have been pre-established that clearly identify who is in charge and what
emergency powers they are authorized to use.
13. Government offices, including emergency facilities, may be destroyed or become
inoperable during a major disaster. Emergency response operations will be more
effective if emergency facilities are protected and alternate sites for essential government
operations pre-selected. Having mobile emergency operations centers or command
posts available may also preserve operational capabilities.

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14. Normal communications systems may be destroyed, degraded, or rendered inoperable in


a disaster. Emergency response operations will be more effective if compatible,
alternate, and/or mobile communications capabilities are available and operational.
Comprehensive pre-planning will be necessary to ensure effective communications
during crisis situations.
15. Normal operating procedures can be disrupted during a crisis situation; however,
governments can still operate effectively if employees understand their emergency
responsibilities and have pre-designated tasks and assembly instructions.
16. The destruction of key facilities as well as essential equipment and supplies located in
hazard-vulnerable areas can be greatly reduced through preplanned actions to protect
these resources in place or by relocating them.
17. The identification and continued protection of vital records is essential to the continuity of
government and the effective return to normal operations of an area affected by a
disaster.

IV. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS


A. GENERAL
The State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (the State Plan) is Part III of the Texas
Homeland Security Strategic Plan. It is the basic planning document for state-level
comprehensive emergency management actions. The State Plan consists of a basic plan
(this document) and functional support annexes, which detail general coordination
responsibilities and emergency actions required during various phases of emergency
management. The Plan establishes Emergency Support Functions (ESF); annexes to the
plan outline specific responsibilities of each agency or organization assigned to each ESF.
Appendices to most annexes have been prepared to facilitate accomplishment of functional
responsibilities. Specific information on how functions are to be performed are outlined in
standard operating procedures (SOPs), operating manuals, and other documents which
may be referred to in the basic plan, annexes, or appendices.
B. PLANNING CONCEPTS
1. Comprehensive Emergency Management
a.

Emergency management consists of phased, coordinated, mutually supporting


actions by government at all levels -- local, state, and federal -- to mitigate the
effects of hazards, to prepare to conduct effective emergency operations by
planning and conducting training, to respond appropriately during emergencies and
provide necessary assistance, and to implement recovery operations in order to
efficiently return a community to normal following an emergency or disaster.

b.

Comprehensive emergency management involves a cycle of activities conducted by


each level of government before, during, and after an emergency situation, including:

1) Mitigation: Mitigation activities eliminate hazards, reduce the probability of their


occurrence, or their effects.
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2) Preparedness: Mitigation efforts alone cannot eliminate or prevent all


emergency situations. Preparedness activities ensure governments and their
citizens are ready to react promptly and effectively during an emergency.
Preparedness activities include obtaining information on threats, carrying out
emergency planning to prepare an organized response to emergencies,
providing disaster preparedness training for emergencies, conducting
emergency drills and exercises to test plans and training, obtaining and
maintaining emergency equipment and facilities, establishing intergovernmental
coordination arrangements, and conducting public education related to
emergencies

3) Response: Response includes those actions that must be carried out when an
emergency exists or is imminent. It includes notifying key officials and warning
the public of emergency situations; activating emergency facilities; mobilizing,
deploying, and employing personnel, equipment, and supplies to resolve the
emergency situation; and providing emergency assistance to the affected local
population.

4) Recovery: Recovery consists of short-term and long-term activities.


a) Short-term recovery operations are conducted to restore vital services, such
as electrical power, water, and sewer systems, clear roads in affected areas,
and to provide emergency assistance to disaster victims. Disaster relief
programs to help restore the personal, social, and economic well being of
private citizens will be administered by non-profit disaster relief and
charitable organizations, and local, state, and federal disaster relief
programs
b) Long-term recovery focuses on restoring communities to a normal state by
assisting property owners in repairing or rebuilding their homes and
businesses and assisting local governments, school districts, and other
public non-profit agencies in restoring or reconstructing damaged
infrastructure. State and local agencies will administer the provisions of
federal and state disaster relief laws to provide for restoration and recovery
of vital facilities. Post disaster mitigation programs may also be implemented
during the recovery period.
2. All-Hazards Planning
State and local emergency planning in Texas uses an all-hazard approach, which is used
by the Federal government and recommended by the US Department of Homeland
Security for state and local governments. All-hazard planning is based on the fact that
most of the functions performed during emergency situations are not hazard specific. For
example, evacuation may be required because of flooding, a chemical spill, or a terrorist
threat. Hence, the most efficient approach to planning is to plan in some detail for the
tasks required to carry out basic emergency functions, such as warning or evacuation, that
may have to be executed whether an incident is caused by a natural, technological, or
man-made hazard. All-hazards plans are supplemented by some hazard specific plans for
unique threats.

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3. Comprehensive Resource Planning


a.

Comprehensive resource planning should include public sector resources and those
private sector resources that can be reasonably expected to be made available,
either on a voluntary or paid basis, including resources of industry and volunteer
organizations, quasi-public resources, and donations. Similarly both intrastate and
interstate mutual aid resources and federal resource assistance should be
considered, where appropriate. All emergency organizations should have an
inventory of their major emergency resources or provisions for representatives of the
departments, agencies, and organizations that develop its plans and staff its
emergency operations facilities to provide current resource information.

b.

When resources are limited, plans should address suspending, reducing, or


deferring some government services so that personnel, equipment, supplies, and
facilities involved can redirected to support emergency operations.

4. Information Support for Emergency Planning and Operations


a.

The emergency planning process provides for the development of the information
and intelligence needed both to develop realistic plans and to conduct effective
emergency operations. This effort should include:

1) An accurate analysis of natural and technological hazards, descriptions and/or


2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

b.

maps of possible impact areas, and information on the characteristics of such


areas.
Intelligence on the identity, number, capabilities, and intentions of security
threats.
Estimates of the potential effects of various threats on people and property and
where appropriate, tools to make dynamic assessments of such threats.
A list of key facilities and major equipment that is needed to carry on the
essential functions of government.
A list of critical infrastructure, which typically includes both public and private
sector facilities that are essential for to security, public health and safety, or the
economy.
Resource data, including public resources and those industry and volunteer
group resources that can reasonably be expected to be available for emergency
use.

The State shall take the measures necessary to obtain and share intelligence and
operational information essential to conducting effective emergency management
operations with both the Federal government and with local governments. In the
case of homeland security threats, much of that intelligence is sensitive and must be
protected through effective safeguards. Effective information sharing provides
decision makers at all levels of government with a sound basis for making decisions
to posture and commit resources and implement plans and procedures.

C. OPERATIONAL GUIDANCE
1. Threat Monitoring
a.

The SOC will monitor the impact of natural and technological threat information,
including weather warnings, disseminated by federal authorities and other agencies

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as well as monitor the status of incidents that are reported by and being handled by
local officials that may require state assistance. The SOC also assesses the
potential impact of potential threats.
b.

State agencies are expected to monitor security threats reported by the industries
they regulate, and provide information on those threats to the Department of Public
Safety (DPS).

c.

The Texas Security Alert and Analysis Center (TSAAC) will analyze suspicious
incidents relating to homeland security reported by law enforcement agencies, share
information developed by the state with local governments, other states, and the US
Department of Homeland Security through the Joint Regional Intelligence
Exploitation System (JRIES) and respond to queries relating to such incidents.

2. Alert & Warning


a. Alert. The SOC receives warnings of actual or potential emergency situations from
federal agencies, state agencies, local governments, industry, and other sources.
The SOC makes notification of impending threats and significant incidents that have
occurred to senior state officials and state agencies. For many types of incidents,
the SOC also makes notifications to FEMA and other federal agencies and to
volunteer organizations active in disasters.
b. Warning. In its role as the state warning point, the SOC relays warnings received
through the National Warning System (NAWAS) and other warning networks as well
as warnings generated by the state officials to regional warning points and local
governments. Some types of warning, such as weather warnings, are disseminated
on a routine basis. Other warnings are issued after a threat or situation has been
analyzed and a determination made by senior officials that special warning is
appropriate.
c.

The two general warning systems used by the State include the Texas Warning
System (TEWAS) and the Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System
(TLETS). The Emergency Response Network (ERN) is a specialized alerting system
for designated state and local officials. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) is the
primary warning system that can be used to provide short warning or information
messages directly to the public. Specialized agency communications systems that
may be used for certain types of warning include the Department of Healths Health
Alert Network, which reaches health professionals, and the Texas Education
Agencys Statewide Education Notification System, which reaches school officials.

3. Activation of Emergency Facilities


a.

Emergency facilities will be activated at a level necessary to effectively monitor or


respond to threats or actual emergency situations.

b.

State Operations Center (SOC). The SOC operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week, but the level of staffing varies with the Emergency Readiness and Response
Level.

1) During Normal Conditions (Level 4), the permanent SOC staff operates the
facility.
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2) At Increased Readiness (Level 3), other member of the GDEM staff may
augment the SOC staff.

3) At Escalated Response (Level 2), GDEM SOC teams are activated to conduct
operations and the Emergency Management Council will be partially or fully
activated, and selected liaison personnel may be summoned.
4) At Emergency Conditions (Level 1), GDEM SOC teams operate the facility,
the full Council is typically convened, and liaison personnel are present.
GDEM SOPs for certain hazards provide specific guidance for activation of the
SOC for those hazards.
c.

Disaster District Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Disaster District Chairs


activate Disaster District EOCs as needed. The DDC Chair may partially or fully
activate the local Disaster District Committee to assist in coordinating state
resource support.

d.

Incident Command Posts (ICPs). For most incidents and emergencies, local
governments will establish an incident command post at which state agencies and
organizations providing assistance will be represented. State incident command
posts may be established as needed for incidents for which the State has primary
responsibility, typically incidents that occur on state property.

e.

Local EOCs. Local EOCs are activated and deactivated as deemed necessary by
local officials.

f.

Agency Emergency Support Centers. State agencies may establish emergency


support centers (ESCs) from which to manage agency resources during
emergencies and/or disasters. State Council member agencies that establish and
operate an ESC to manage agency resources are still required to coordinate
emergency operations and provide representatives as appropriate to the SOC and
DDC EOCs.

g.

Disaster Field Office (DFO).


State-federal Disaster Field Offices will be
established by FEMA for those emergency events that result in a federal disaster
or emergency declaration. It generally takes four to six days after a disaster or
major emergency occurs for a DFO to be activated in the general area of impact.
The facility will normally continue in operation until the state and FEMA agree that
a centralized disaster recovery facility is no longer required in the affected area
and residual functions can be transferred to GDEM and the FEMA regional
headquarters.

h.

Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs). Federal and state personnel at the DFO
coordinate on the locations for and opening and closing of DRCs.

4. Precautionary Prepositioning of Resources


a.

Where the impact point of an impending threat is known with reasonable certainty
and precautionary deployment of personnel and equipment and prepositioning of
supplies can facilitate a rapid response, the State may preposition resources. The
State Coordinator will coordinate with the Governors Office regarding the
prepositioning of state resources. The Governor must approve the activation and
deployment of National Guard and State Guard assets.

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b.

In instances where a state agency wishes to pre-stage assets, the agency should
coordinate with the appropriate Disaster District chair and the SOC

c.

Pre-deployment of state resources generally involves a significant cost to the State.


Hence, the benefits of prepositioning resources should be carefully weighed
against the cost.

5. Interagency Coordination
a.

Coordination

1) The State will coordinate regularly with local governments, federal agencies,
volunteer groups, and industry during impending threats, response operations,
and recovery activities to coordinate actions, provide information, and resolve
issues.

2) The SOC and DDC EOCs are equipped to conduct telephone conference and
video teleconferences.
General coordination conferences are normally
conducted several times a day during emergency situations.
Separate
conference calls or video teleconferences may be conducted on specific
issues.

3) The DFO staff conducts periodic conference on disaster recovery and postdisaster mitigation issues.
b.

Situation Reporting

1) Local emergency plans provide that local EOCs will provide Situation Reports
(SITREPs) to their Disaster District during major emergencies and disasters.

2) Disaster Districts are required to provide SITREPs to the SOC during major
emergencies and disasters.

3) The SOC uses the SITREPs submitted by Disaster Districts and other
information to prepare state SITREPs, which are disseminated to the
Governors Office, legislators, state agencies, federal agencies, and volunteer
groups active in disasters.
c.

Liaison Personnel

1) To facilitate information exchange, the State requests liaison officers from


federal agencies, industry, and volunteer groups active in disasters during
major emergencies and disasters. The State provides liaison officers to
federal agencies and local governments.

2) Liaison Officers at the SOC


The following agencies and organization may be requested to provide liaison
officers at the SOC:
a) FEMA for most major emergencies and all disasters.
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b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)

The FBI for security related situations.


Volunteer groups for most major emergencies and disasters.
National Weather Service for severe weather.
US Coast Guard for maritime incidents and search and rescue.
US Environmental Protection Agency for major hazardous materials spills.
US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for nuclear facility incidents.
Nuclear power plants for nuclear power plant incidents.

3) State Liaison Officers


During major emergencies and disasters, GDEM Regional Liaison Officers
and/or other state agency personnel may be deployed to local EOCs to assist
in coordinating state emergency response activities with local governments.
6. Requests for Assistance
a.

Local governments have primary responsibility for local emergency management


activities and directing and conducting emergency response operations during local
emergency situations. Affected jurisdictions are expected to use their own resources
first to respond to an emergency incident, summon mutual aid resources to assist,
activate volunteer auxiliaries such as Community Emergency Response Teams
(CERTs), implement any contingency support agreements or contracts that may
exist with industry, and request assistance from local volunteer groups who have
agreed to support the jurisdiction during emergencies.

b.

When an emergency situation exceeds a local government's capability to respond or


recover, that government may seek supplemental assistance, to include assistance
in obtaining information needed to respond to an emergency situation, from the
State. Counties may request assistance directly from their DDC Chairperson. Cities
must first request assistance from their county. If the county cannot provide the
requested assistance, the city may then request assistance from the appropriate
DDC Chairperson. Attachment 6 illustrates the channels for requesting assistance.

c.

The DDC Chair is expected to validate the request for assistance and identify and
task resources available with the District to meet the need. Use of the National or
State Guard requires advance approval by the Governor, which will be coordinated
by the SOC. If a particular state agency is required by law to render assistance in a
certain type of emergency (e.g., oil spill, hazmat, animal disease outbreak,
radiological event, etc.), then direct communications between local government
officials and that state agency is appropriate; however, the DDC Chair must be kept
informed of the operational situation. If state assistance is authorized by the DDC
Chair or directed by statute, state agencies will provide response and recovery
assistance within their capabilities in accordance with state statutes and regulations
and this plan.

d.

State assistance furnished to local governments is to supplement local resources,


not a substitute for them. The provision of state response assistance to local
governments is not dependent upon a formal declaration of a State of Disaster either
by the local government or Governor when such response is required by state law
or, in the opinion of either the Governor, the Director of the Division of Emergency
Management, the State Coordinator, or the DDC Chair, such assistance is needed
for lifesaving operations or to relieve suffering and hardship.

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e.

If the resources or information requested cannot be provided at the Disaster District,


then the request for assistance will be forwarded to the SOC for action.

f.

When state resources are insufficient to deal with an emergency situation, the SOC
senior staff will coordinate with the Governors Office to request specific assistance
from other states or the federal government.

1) The Federal government may provide supplemental response and/or recovery


assistance to Texas and its political subdivisions pursuant to the Stafford Act
and other statutes. Federal resources are typically activated and employed in
accordance with the Federal Response Plan (FRP), the National Oil and
Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) or the Federal
Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP).

2)

Assistance also may be provided by other states in accordance with provisions


of current agreements and plans, to include the Southern Agreement for Mutual
State Radiological Assistance, the South Central Interstate Forest Fire
Protection Compact, and the Emergency Management Assistance Compact
(EMAC), which are discussed in Annexes D, F, and N, respectively.

7. Emergency Management Council & Disaster District Committee Operations


a.

The SEMC consists of both state agencies and volunteer organizations named to
the Council by the Governor in the Executive Order Relating to Emergency
Management. (See Attachment 1 for SEMC membership.)

b.

The SEMC is organized as a matrix organization that includes 22 emergency


support functions, most consisting of a primary agency and one or more support
agencies. Each ESF coordinates state planning for a specific emergency function
and takes the lead in coordinating the execution of that function during emergencies.
(See Attachment 2 for the matrix of ESF assignments.) The federal government
also uses an ESF organizational scheme for its emergency operations. The ESF
concept provides for efficient allocation of resources and a team approach to
problem solving, and facilitates multi-agency operations. SEMC or DDC member
agencies may be assigned as both a "primary" and/or a "support" agency for more
than one ESF.

1) Primary agencies coordinate the activities of their ESFs to develop and maintain
appropriate annexes to this plan, and related materials and procedures. (See
Attachment 8 for annex assignments.) Primary agencies are also responsible
for coordinating emergency response and recovery activities through the
established state emergency direction and control system as outlined in this
plan, and for providing inputs for operational reports and other documentation in
accordance with this plan and current procedures.

2) State "support" agencies in each ESF are responsible for assisting designated
primary agencies in accomplishing appropriate functional responsibilities and
tasks in accordance with this plan and current procedures. Additionally, they
are responsible for providing information and appropriate documentation as
requested by designated primary agencies.
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c.

This approach requires no radical organizational changes because, for the most
part, the state departments or agencies that are responsible for certain functions on
a daily basis retain those responsibilities during emergency response and disaster
recovery operations. (See Attachment 9 for general agency responsibilities.) To the
extent possible, the same personnel and material resources are employed. There
are some exceptions, however, since some emergency management functions, such
as managing donations, may not be performed by the state on a regular; in an
emergency these functions must be coordinated by the most appropriate ESF of the
SEMC and at the appropriate DDC.

d.

While ESFs of the SEMC are replicated to the fullest extent possible at the DDC
level, some state agencies do not have regional offices and therefore cannot operate
as ESF members except at the DDC. In these instances, the DDC Chairperson will
select the most appropriate ESF member agency to act as the "primary" agency for
that ESF.

e.

Requests for information relating to the emergency situation or requests for state
resource assistance will be assigned to the most appropriate ESF at the DDC or
SEMC for resolution. Most requests for assistance can be readily categorized and
assigned to an identifiable ESF for resolution. However, some specific support
requirements cannot not be easily categorized, such as emergency testing of
privately owned water wells, emergency construction of levees, or conducting
structural safety inspections in a disaster area. Such requests must be assigned to
the most appropriate ESF(s). If the assistance is not available from state
government, the ESF member agencies will use their working relationships with
industry, associations, and other groups to determine how best the request for
assistance might be satisfied.

f.

The response to requests for assistance or information addressed to the DDC or the
SEMC will be coordinated by the most appropriate ESF. The agencies composing
an ESF are expected to work together to satisfy emergency needs. They are
expected to ensure they have a clear understanding of the assistance required,
explore the full range of possible solutions, and recommend a preferred solution to
the SOC Controller or DDC Chair. These recommended actions could include: (1)
providing assistance through resources of an agency/organization in the ESF; (2)
providing assistance through resources of a public or private non-state organization
associated with an agency within the ESF; (3) providing assistance through a
mission tasking to the Military Support ESF; (4) determining that the needed
assistance is not available from any organization at the state government level and
should be passed to the federal government for resolution; or (5) providing
assistance through employment of intra or inter-state mutual aid resources. Based
on the recommendations provided, mission assignments will then be issued by the
appropriate direction and control authority and implemented by tasked
agencies/organizations.

g.

Annexes to this plan detail the organization, responsibilities, actions, and operational
procedures of each ESF. Functional responsibilities and tasks are multi-disciplined.

8. State Lead Agencies for Certain Incidents


In accordance with state laws, "lead" state agencies have been designated to exercise
state oversight responsibilities for or manage the state response to certain types of
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
15

incidents. ESF responsibilities contained in the State Plan do not negate or alter these
existing these mandates or procedures. Lead agencies designated with specific incident
oversight responsibilities are as follows:

9.

a.

General Land Office - incidents involving state-owned lands, coastal oil spills, and
onshore/offshore petroleum storage facilities.

b.

Railroad Commission of Texas - incidents involving public safety or environmental


threats such as spills or releases resulting from the exploration, development, and
production of oil or geothermal resources.

c.

Department of Health - incidents involving radioactive materials.

d.

Texas Forest Service - coordination of response to major or potentially major


wildfires.

e.

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality - incidents involving hazardous


materials spill response, water quality, and dam safety.

f.

Governors Division of Emergency Management - long-term energy emergencies


and emergency response to drought.

Local Governments
a.

By Executive Order, the Governor has designated the mayor of each municipal
corporation and the county judge of each county as emergency management
directors for these political subdivisions. In that same Executive Order, the Governor
further authorized those elected officials to exercise the powers granted the
Governor by Chapter 418 of the Government Code an appropriate local scale during
disasters.

b.

Mayors and county judges are responsible for emergency management planning
within the jurisdiction and for providing guidance and direction for emergency
response and recovery operations should emergency situations threaten or occur.
Mayors and County Judges may appoint an emergency management coordinator
(EMC), who shall serve as an assistant to the chief elected official to manage the
emergency management program.

c.

Each local and interjurisdictional emergency management agency is required by


state statute to prepare and keep current a local or interjurisdictional emergency
management plan. GDEM promulgates state standards for local and
interjurisdictional plans. Plans must address all aspects of emergency management
to include hazard mitigation, preparedness, response, recovery, and continuity of
government.

d.

In the event that an emergency situation occurs, local officials are expected to:

1) Activate an incident command operation and, if needed, the local EOC and
other emergency facilities, and commit and direct appropriate local resources,
including mutual aid resources and organized volunteer groups such as CERTs,
to resolve the emergency situation.

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2) Take measures to protect public health and safety and public and private
property from damage or destruction.

3) Provide information on the emergency situation to the public and instructions on


how to deal with it.

f.

4)

Provide situation reports to the appropriate Disaster District.

5)

If local resources are insufficient to deal with the emergency situation, request
assistance from the State and facilitate delivery and employment of those
resources.

6)

Facilitate state and federal recovery support if needed

State Assistance
1)

Response Assistance. If local emergency resources, including mutual aid


resources, are exhausted, inadequate, or unsuitable for the emergency
response tasks that must be performed, the county judge or mayor should
request supplemental state assistance from the appropriate DDC Chair. Mayors
must initially forward requests for supplemental assistance to the county judge.
If the county cannot provide the needed assistance, the city should then forward
the request to their DDC Chair. Requests should identify the nature of the
emergency/disaster, an estimate of the type and quantity of assistance needed,
the approximate length of time the assistance will be required, point-of-contact
information, and the desired delivery or staging location.

2)

Recovery Assistance. If state and/or federal recovery assistance will be


necessary to cope with a disaster, mayors and judges should submit a written
request for such assistance to GDEM. The request should be accompanied by:
a completed Disaster Summary Outline (DSO), a local Disaster Declaration, and
other documentation as required by the most current version of the Disaster
Recovery Texas (DEM-62) distributed by GDEM.

10. State Direction and Control System


a.

During emergency operations, state and local emergency responders will remain, to
the extent possible, under the established management and supervisory control of
their parent organizations.

b.

Key officials have been vested, either by state law, executive order, or this plan, with
the responsibility for executing direction and control of multi-agency state response
and recovery operations in a defined area of responsibility within Texas.

c.

These key officials are identified and discussed in Section VI of this plan. They are
responsible for deciding response and/or recovery priorities of need. They have
been provided the authority to commit state resources necessary and reasonable to
satisfy those prioritized needs and likewise provided the authority to escalate the
assistance request to a higher response support level. These key officials have the
authority to issue mission assignments that involve the commitment of state
personnel and/or material resources, and the expenditures of state funds to resolve
emergency and/or disaster requirements.

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d.

This direction and control system provides a means for agencies/ organizations to
pursue existing mission requirements and for their emergency workers to continue to
operate under their existing supervisory chain of command. This system also
provides a means to focus the efforts and actions of multiple agencies/organizations
to resolve the most important problems facing the entire impacted area through the
prioritized commitment of efforts and deployment of resources.

11. Effect of a Disaster Declaration


a.

The Governor, by executive order or proclamation, may declare a State of Disaster


for areas of the state affected by a disaster or the imminent threat of such an event.
A county judge or mayor may also declare a local State of Disaster for their
jurisdiction.

b.

A State of Disaster proclamation activates the disaster recovery and rehabilitation


aspects of this plan and authorizes the deployment and use of resources needed to
cope with the disaster situation. Such a proclamation by the Governor is also a
requirement to activate the full-range of federal disaster recovery programs available
to the state and a condition for requesting interstate mutual aid through the
Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC).

c.

Emergency response operations will be conducted in accordance with existing


emergency management plans and are not dependent upon the declaration of a
State of Disaster either at the State or local level.

12. Catastrophic Disaster Operations


a.

Upon determination of a possible catastrophic threat to Texas, the SOC and


appropriate DDC EOCs will commence emergency operations. These facilities will
continue operations for as long as needed.

b.

If adequate warning time is available prior to occurrence of a potentially catastrophic


event, affected local governments, the applicable DDC Chair(s), and SEMC
members will be informed of the situation and advised to commence pre-event
response operations. The FEMA Region VI Director also will be advised of the
situation and notified of the possible need for federal response assistance.

c.

It is essential that, when possible, response operations commence prior to actual


occurrence of a catastrophic event. This requires the deployment and prepositioning
of specific personnel, resources, and capabilities so as to be ready for immediate
deployment into the disaster area once conditions allow. Based on need, the State
Emergency Response Team (SERT) may be notified to report to designated staging
areas for possible deployment into the disaster area. Based on anticipated needs
and the seriousness of the situation, EMAC member states will also be notified of
possible interstate mutual aid support requirements.

d.

The Governor must be provided with accurate and timely risk and threat assessment
information prior to occurrence of a catastrophic event. If adequate warning time is
available, it is expected that the State Coordinator will request that the Governor
declare a State of Disaster based upon imminent threat. The commencement of
immediate response operations, however, is not dependent upon such a declaration.

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As a means to secure federal assistance and funds to reimburse the State and local
governments for authorized response and recovery-related expenditures, the
Governor will request federal assistance from the President through the FEMA
Region VI Director in accordance with the Stafford Act. The Governor may request a
Presidential Emergency Declaration prior to occurrence of the potentially
catastrophic event (i.e., massive wildfires) and a Presidential Major Disaster
Declaration soon after the actual occurrence of such an event.
e.

Following a request to the FEMA Region VI Director, the Regions Emergency


Response Team Advance Element (ERT-A), consisting of representatives of
federal agencies that provide response/recovery assistance, will deploy to the SOC
to obtain an update on the situation and coordinate the state staff. If it appears a
federal emergency or disaster declaration will be granted, the ERT-A will then deploy
to the vicinity of the disaster to inspect facilities for a Disaster Field Office.

f.

The Federal Response Plan (FRP) and the associated Region VI Regional
Response Plan (RRP) provide for federal response and recovery assistance through
the coordinated actions of federal agencies. Federal agencies are also organized
ESFs consisting of a primary agency and support agencies tasked to address
functional-related needs, requirements, and capabilities. (See Attachment 7 for
federal ESF information.)

g.

When requested by a DDC Chair or directed by the State Coordinator, the SERT will
be activated and deploy into the disaster area. The SERT will provide immediate,
additional state presence in the disaster area, assess impact, identify immediate
lifesaving and hazard-abatement needs, and provide an on-scene capability for
enhanced emergency response operations.

h.

As soon as safe and practical, state response and recovery operations will begin
in the disaster area. The goal of these operations is to save lives, reduce human
suffering, and assist local governments. State and federal-level response and
recovery operations in the disaster area are based on demonstrated need. Initial
state and federal response assistance is expected to be limited immediately
following the occurrence of a catastrophic event because of frequent difficulty in
getting resources to the affected area. Affected local governments and state
agencies should be prepared to provide for their own needs until the full response
capability of state government, interstate mutual aid providers, and the federal
government is deployed and operational. This amount of time will be influenced by
the levels of preparedness achieved prior to occurrence of a catastrophic event.

i.

When a Federal Emergency or Disaster Declaration is approved by the President,


FEMA, in conjunction with the State, will normally establish a Disaster Field Office
(DFO) in proximity to the disaster area whenever there is significant field
deployment of federal resources to provide response and recovery assistance.
The DFO is a state-federal operation that is staffed by designated federal agency
staff members and by representatives of designated SEMC agencies needed to
coordinate response/recovery activities

j.

The SOC will continue operations for as long as needed to facilitate emergency
response and initial recovery activities and until the DFO is staffed and operationally
capable of coordinating recovery efforts. Once the DFO is operational, and where
practical, the State Coordinator may transfer direction and control of certain state

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
19

response operations from the SOC to the DFO. This action will not change the
role/responsibility of the DDC Chair(s), who will retain responsibility for operations
within the Disaster District(s).
k.

A Joint Information Center (JIC) is normally established as part of the DFO to


facilitate coordinated news releases to the public and support media operations.
This is also a combined state-federal operation. The JIC will remain operational as
long as needed to support emergency response and recovery activities, including
conducting outreach to disaster victims.

l.

Once conditions in the disaster area stabilize somewhat, recovery programs will
begin and response operations will be reduced accordingly. Both response and
recovery operations may be conducted concurrently for a limited time. Once
response operations are terminated, recovery operations will continue for as long as
required by conditions in the disaster area.

13. Technological Hazard Operations


a.

A wide range of technological hazards threaten the State. Emergency response and
disaster recovery operations for technological hazards parallel actions taken in
response to natural and man-made hazard events, but differ in regards to
procedures for accessing federal assistance.

b.

Federal assistance is provided under the provisions of several hazard-specific


federal contingency plans. These plans, along with state responsibilities and
procedures, are discussed in appropriate annexes to this plan, specifically Annex D
(Radiological Emergency Management) and Annex Q (Hazardous Materials and Oil
Spill Response).

14. Drought Operations


The Texas Water Code requires a wide range of actions to be accomplished whenever
drought conditions threaten the State. Contingency plans and procedures have been
developed to insure that these actions are coordinated and parallel emergency response
and recovery requirements of this plan. These plans, along with state responsibilities and
procedures, are discussed in appropriate annexes to this plan, specifically Annex N
(Direction and Control) and Annex V (Food and Water)

V. ORGANIZATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES


A. ORGANIZATION
1.

Chapter 418 (Emergency Management) of the Government Code provides that


emergency management be structured around organized government. The Governor, as
Chief Executive of the State, is responsible for meeting the dangers confronting the
people of Texas. Chapter 421 (Homeland Security) of the Government Code provides
that the Governor shall direct homeland security in the State and develop a statewide
homeland security strategy that improves the states ability to:
a.
b.

Detect and deter threats to homeland security;


Respond to homeland security emergencies; and

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
20

c.

Recovery from homeland security emergencies.

2.

The Governor has by executive order appointed the Director of the Governors Office of
Homeland Security as the Director of the Governor's Division of Emergency Management
(GDEM) and the Chair of the State Emergency Management Council (SEMC).

3.

The SEMC includes representatives of each state agency, board, or commission whose
functions or capabilities relate to important phases of emergency management. The
Governor also has appointed representatives of organized volunteer groups to the
Council. (See Attachment 1.)

4.

The SEMC has been authorized to issue such directives as may be necessary to
effectuate the purpose of the Texas Disaster Act (Chapter 418, Government Code).

5.

The SEMC has been organized into Emergency Support Functions composed of
personnel and resources of SEMC agencies and organization. Coordination for each
group is directed by a primary agency, which has been selected on the basis of its
authority or capability in that particular functional area. The other agencies and
organizations within the group are designated as support agencies and organizations
based on their ability to provide equipment, personnel, and expertise in support of
specific functional requirements. (See Attachment 2.)
a.

ESFs identified in this plan are similar to, but not exactly the same as, the
counterpart federal-level ESFs contained in the FRP and RRP. This is to facilitate
better coordination between the State and its local governments while enhancing
coordinated response and recovery operations jointly conducted by state and federal
agencies in Texas. A matrix that identifies counterpart state and federal primary
agencies for each federal ESF is provided in this plan. (See Attachment 7.)

b.

The ESF organization doesn't negate legislated mandates for lead agencies in
certain types of emergencies (i.e., oil spills, hazmat, radiological incidents). In those
cases, the lead agency, by law, will always be the lead state responder regardless of
its placement (either primary or support agency) in the ESF organization.

6.

A state Critical Infrastructure Protection Council (CIPS) has been established to advise
the Governor on development and coordination of the statewide critical infrastructure
protection strategy and implementation of that strategy.

7.

State Disaster Districts have been established to divide the State into a number of
manageable emergency response/operations areas. These districts parallel the Highway
Patrol districts and subdistricts of the Texas Department of Public Safety. (See
Attachment 2.)

8.

Disaster District Committees (DDCs), consisting insofar as possible of representatives of


each agency/organization represented in the SEMC, are established at the Disaster
District level to coordinate state emergency response operations. Commanders of
Highway Patrol districts and subdistricts serve as DDC Chairs. Some SEMC agencies
do not have field offices and cannot provide representatives at all DDCs.

9.

DDC Chairs shall report to the Director of the Office of Homeland Security on matters
relating to disasters and emergencies and shall keep the Director of the Department of
Public Safety appraised on all matters as requested by the Director of that Department.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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10. Regional Liaison Officers (RLOs) of the Governor's Division of Emergency Management
are assigned to each of the Department of Public Safety districts and assist the DDC
Chairperson within their assigned areas.
11. Typical state-local emergency management organizational arrangements in the response
phase are depicted in Figure 1. The typical recovery phase organization is depicted in
Figure 2.
B. RESPONSIBILITIES
1.

Key Officials
a.

The Governor

1) The Governor has ultimate responsibility for meeting the dangers to the people
of Texas. The Governor may issue executive orders, proclamations, and
regulations and amend or rescind them. Such actions by the Governor have the
force and effect of law.

2) Under the provisions of Subchapter B of Chapter 418, Government Code, the


Governor, by executive order or proclamation, may declare a State of Disaster if
a disaster has occurred or the occurrence or threat of disaster is imminent.
During and following a State of Disaster, the Governor is the commander in
chief of state agencies, boards, and commissions having emergency
responsibilities.

3) Pursuant to authority vested in the Governor under Subchapter B, the Governor


may:
a) suspend the provisions of any regulatory statute prescribing the procedures
for conduct of state business or the orders or rules of a state agency if
compliance with the provisions, orders, or rules would in any way prevent,
hinder, or delay necessary action in coping with a disaster;
b) use all available resources of state government and any political subdivision
that are reasonably necessary to cope with a disaster;
c) temporarily reassign resources, personnel, or functions of state executive
departments and agencies or their units for the purpose of performing or
facilitating emergency services;
d) commandeer or use any private property if the Governor finds it necessary
to cope with a disaster, subject to compensation requirements of the law;
e) recommend the evacuation of all or part of the population from a stricken or
threatened area in the State if the Governor considers the action necessary
for the preservation of life or other disaster mitigation, response, or recovery
actions;
f)

prescribe routes and destinations in connection with an evacuation;

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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Figure 1
State-Local Emergency Management Organization
(Response Phase)

Governor

Director of Homeland Security

FEMA
ROC
JOC

State Coordinator
STATE OPERATIONS CENTER
TIPCC & TSAAC
State Emergency Management Council

Disaster District Chair


DISASTER DISTRICT EOC
Disaster District Committee

Mayor / County Judge


LOCAL EOC

Incident Commander
INCIDENT COMMAND POST

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
23

Figure 2
State-Local Emergency Management Organization
(Recovery Phase)

US
DHS

Governors
Office

FEMA
Region VI

GDEM
DISASTER
FIELD OFFICE
FCO

SCO

ERT
(Federal
staff)

State
staff

Mission Assignments

Mission Assignments

Joint
Info.
Center

Federal
Agencies

State
Agencies

Disaster Recovery
Centers

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
24

g) control ingress and egress of a disaster area and the movement of persons
and the occupancy of premises in an area;
h) enter into purchase, lease, or other arrangements with an agency of the
United States for temporary housing units to be occupied by disaster
victims, and may make units available to any political subdivision; and
i)

b.

through the use of any state agency or instrumentality, clear or remove


debris or wreckage from public or private lands or water if it threatens public
health or safety.

Director of the Governors Division of Emergency Management

1) By executive order, the Governor has designated the Director of the Governors
Office of Homeland Security as the Director of the Governors Division of
Emergency Management (GDEM).

2) By executive order, The Director serves as the Chair of the state Emergency
Management Council.

3) The Director shall advise the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and Speaker of
the House of Representatives on critical matters relating to homeland security
and man-made or natural disasters.

4) As the Director of the Governors Office of Homeland Security, the Director is


responsible for overseeing and coordinating state homeland security efforts
among local, state, and federal agencies.
c.

State Coordinator, Governors Division of Emergency Management

1) The State Coordinator is responsible for the day-to-day management and


coordination of statewide emergency management activities, for operating the
SOC, and for executing direction and control of statewide resources during
emergency response and recovery operations

2) The Executive Order of the Governor Relating to Emergency Management


provides that the State Coordinator shall serve as the Chair of the State
Emergency Response Commission (SERC), which carries out certain planning,
reporting, and public information access responsibilities relating to hazardous
materials that are mandated by the federal Emergency Planning and
Community Right-to-Know Act.

3) 16.055 of the Water Code provides that the State Coordinator shall serve as
the State Drought Manager and is responsible for managing and coordinating
the drought response component of the state water plan. The State Coordinator
chairs the Drought Preparedness Council.
d.

Disaster District Committee (DDC) Chairs

1) Disaster Districts are state regional emergency management elements


responsible for managing state emergency operations within a given geographic
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area. See Attachment 3 for a map of Disaster Districts. The DDC Chair, the
Highway Patrol captain or command lieutenant for that Highway Patrol district or
subdistrict, is responsible for monitoring and reporting on emergency situations.
The DDC Chair also receives and validates requests for state emergency
assistance from local governments, works with the DDC members to identify
resources which can satisfy the request, coordinates arrangements for getting
those resources to the place where they are needed, and monitors the use of
those resources.

2) The DDC Chairs may activate their EOCs to monitor emergency situations and
execute direction and control of state resources during emergency response
and recovery operations within disaster district boundaries.

3) DDC Chairpersons are responsible for overseeing SERT operations within


district boundaries and exercise operational control of mission-assigned
National Guard and mutual aid emergency response forces operating in the
district.
e.

2.

County Judges and Mayors


1)

County judges and mayors are responsible for directing, controlling, and
coordinating emergency operations within their jurisdictions.

2)

Incident management is typically delegated to local incident commander who


directs operations at the scene and is supported by an EOC providing resource
support, resolving problems, coordinate with other jurisdictions and agencies,
and providing emergency public information.

Organizations
a.

State Emergency Management Council (SEMC)

1) The Governor, by executive order, has established the SEMC, which is


composed of the heads of designated state agencies, boards, and
commissions, and representatives of the American Red Cross and The
Salvation Army. The SEMC is responsible for providing advice and assistance
in all matters relating to statewide emergency management activities in Texas.
Its primary operational role is to identify, mobilize, and deploy state resources
needed to respond to emergency situations, and respond to requests for
information needed to conduct response and recovery operations. (See
Attachment 1 for a list of SEMC members.)

2) The Director of the Governors Office of Homeland Security, who is also Director
of the Governors Division of Emergency Management, chairs the SEMC. The
Director or the State Coordinator may convene the full SEMC or portions of it
when emergency situations occur and request that SEMC members report to
the SOC.

3) General Responsibilities. All SEMC agencies and organization will ensure that
capabilities exist for their organizations to execute statewide emergency
management responsibilities. Each SEMC member will:
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a) Ensure that qualified personnel are available to staff and operate state and
joint direction and control and support facilities that may be activated during
emergency response and recovery operations. These facilities include the
SOC, Disaster District EOCs, a Joint Operations Center, on-scene
command posts, the Disaster Field Office, a Joint Information Center (JIC),
Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs), and Resource Staging Areas (RSAs).
State agency representative to the SEMC and DDCs must be
knowledgeable of the type, quantity, and location of agency resources and
the capabilities and limitations of those resources; they should have in place
procedures to mobilize and deploy those resources in a timely manner to
accomplish emergency response and recovery tasks.
b) Designate an individual to serve as the first call for their agency and serve
the primary point-of-contact and notification point for emergency
management activities as well as at least two additional contact persons.
Designations should be in writing and sent to the State Coordinator and
include office address, office telephone number and fax number, pager
number, and a home telephone number (or the number of a cellular phone
which is available during non-duty hours) for each individual. The
designation shall include the priority of notification first call, second call,
and third call.
c) Ensure that designated points of contact notify the agency or organization
senior staff of emergency situation and arrange to notify employees who
may have to participate in emergency operations.
d) Ensure qualified personnel are available to conduct extended field
operations as a member of the SERT if the agency has been tasked to
participate in the SERT.
e) Develop and maintain detailed plans and operating procedures for
accomplishment of agency and functional responsibilities.
f)

b.

Provide for direction and control of agency resources, continuity of


government, and the collection and reporting of situational information and;

Emergency Support Functions (ESFs)


State ESFs include the following:

1) Warning ESF
a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to use
available warning networks to disseminate warning of emergency situations
of state, local, and federal officials and to alert the public of emergency
situations and provide information and instructions. Maintains Annex A to
the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Public Safety
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agency: Governor's Division of Emergency Management

2) Communications ESF
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a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to provide


required telecommunications support (including all software and hardware
support for electromagnetic communications) for state emergency response
and recovery efforts. Maintains Annex B to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Information Resources
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 2
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. General Land Office
2. Texas Building and Procurement Commission
3. Governors Division of Emergency Management
4. Public Utility Commission of Texas
5. Railroad Commission of Texas
6. Department of Criminal Justice
7. Department of Health
8. Department of Public Safety
9. Department of Transportation
10. Texas Engineering Extension Service
11. Texas Forest Service
12. Adjutant General Department

3) Shelter and Mass Care ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to assist local
governments and disaster relief agencies in providing temporary shelter,
food, and first aid to disaster victims, coordinate and distribute emergency
relief supplies, and feed emergency workers. Maintains Annex C to the
State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: The Salvation Army
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 6
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. American Red Cross
2. Department of Human Services
3. Texas Education Agency
4. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

4) Radiological Emergency Management ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to provide a
coordinated response to emergency situations involving radioactive
materials, assess the impact of such events, and to determine and
recommend or implement measures to protect life, property, and the
environment in a radiological emergency. Maintains Annex D to the State
Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Health
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Governors Division of Emergency Management
2. Department of Agriculture
3. Department of Public Safety
4. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
5. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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5)

Evacuation ESF
a)

Responsible For: Coordinating development of traffic management plans


and emergency actions which integrate efforts of state and local agencies to
conduct orderly large-scale evacuations of the public from threatened areas
to designated reception and care areas, and providing local governments
with information to support evacuation planning and execution. Maintains
Annex E to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Public Safety
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Governor's Division of Emergency Management
2. Department of Transportation

6) Firefighting ESF
a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to detect and
suppress fires on state and private lands, coordinate firefighting operations
for large wildland fires encompassing several governmental jurisdictions,
and assist in large industrial/structural fires. Maintains Annex F to the State
Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency:
Texas Forest Service
c) Applicable Federal ESF#:
4
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Adjutant Generals Department
2. Governors Division of Emergency Management
3. Texas Commission on Fire Protection
4. Department of Criminal Justice
5. Department of Insurance
6. Department of Public Safety
7. Department of Transportation
8. Texas Engineering Extension Service
e) Other Support Agencies: Civil Air Patrol

7) Law Enforcement ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to carry out
traffic control, maintain public order, secure designated areas, and provide
other law enforcement services as needed to support state emergency
response and recovery operations and assist local governments when
requested. Maintains Annex G to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Public Safety
c) Applicable Federal ESF #: none
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Office of the Attorney General
2. Department of Criminal Justice
3. Texas Forest Service
4. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
5. Department of Family & Protective Services

8) Health and Medical Services ESF


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29

a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to provide


supplemental and technical assistance to local governments in identifying
and meeting the health and medical needs of disaster victims and
emergency workers. Maintains Annex H to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Health
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 8
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. American Red Cross
2. Texas Animal Health Commission
3. Department of Criminal Justice
4. Department of Human Services
5. Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation
6. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
7. Texas Rehabilitation Commission
8. Department of State Health Services
9. Department of Aging & Disability Services
10. Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services

9) Public Information ESF


a) Responsible For: Developing, coordinating, and disseminating emergency
information, instructions to the general public, and disaster preparedness
educational materials, and by direct contact and through the news media
using briefings, presentations, news releases and advisories, and response
to public and news media queries. Maintains Annex I to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Governors Division of Emergency Management
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agencies
1. Adjutant General's Department
2. American Red Cross
3. General Land Office
4. Office of the Attorney General
5. Railroad Commission of Texas
6. Texas Animal Health Commission
7. Texas Commission on Fire Protection
8. Texas Economic Development
9. Department of Health
10. Department of Insurance
11. Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation
12. Department of Public Safety
13. Department of Transportation
14. Texas Forest Service
15. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
16. The Salvation Army

10) Recovery ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating and conducting damage assessment and
post-disaster recovery activities in coordination with federal agencies,
processing requests for disaster assistance, and implementing stateadministered disaster assistance programs when such programs are
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
30

authorized. Maintains Annex J to the State Plan


b) Primary Council Agency: Division of Emergency Management
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. American Red Cross
2. Texas Building and Procurement Commission
3. Office of the Attorney General
4. State Comptroller of Public Accounts
5. Texas Animal Health Commission
6. Department of Housing and Community Affairs
7. Department of Human Services
8. Department of Insurance
9. Department of Mental Health & Mental Retardation
10. Department of Transportation
11. Texas Forest Service
12. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
13. Texas Workforce Commission
14. The Salvation Army
e) Other Support Agencies: Department on Aging

11) Public Works & Engineering ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to provide
coordinated engineering support services to accomplish state emergency
response and recovery requirements. Maintain Annex K to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Transportation
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 3
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Texas Building and Procurement Commission
2. Department of Criminal Justice
3. Texas Forest Service
4. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

12) Energy and Utilities ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to provide
emergency power and other energy sources to support emergency
response and recovery efforts and efforts to restore non-telecommunications
utility systems damaged as a result of disasters. Maintains Annex L to the
State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Public Utility Commission
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 12
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Railroad Commission of Texas
2. Comptroller of Public Accounts (State Energy Conservation Office)

13) Resource Support ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to provide
logistical and resource support to state and local emergency response and
recovery efforts. Maintains Annex M to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Texas Building and Procurement Commission
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31

c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 7


d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Department of Criminal Justice
2. Texas Forest Service
3. Texas Workforce Commission
e) Other Support Agencies: Adventist Community Services

14) Direction and Control ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating plans and emergency actions to mobilize,
deploy, direct, and control appropriate state resources to accomplish
emergency response and recovery activities. Maintains Annex N to the
State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Governors Division of Emergency Management
c) Applicable Federal ESF #: 5
d) Council Support Agencies: All Emergency Management Council agencies
provide support for this function.

15) Disaster Mental Health ESF


This ESF is being developed.

16) Hazard Mitigation ESF


a) Responsible For: Planning and conducting mitigation activities intended to
eliminate or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or manmade hazards. Maintains Annex P to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Governors Division of Emergency Management
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: None
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. General Land Office
2. Railroad Commission of Texas
3. Texas Animal Health Commission
4. Department of Housing and Community Affairs
5. Department of Insurance
6. Department of Transportation
7. Texas Engineering Extension Service
8. Texas Forest Service
9. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
10. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
e) Other Support Agencies: Texas Water Development Board

17) Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating planning for and emergency actions to carry
out the state response to threatened or actual large-scale releases of
hazardous materials and oil spills. Maintains Annex Q to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 10
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. General Land Office
2. Railroad Commission of Texas
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Texas Commission on Fire Protection


Department of Health
Department of Insurance
Department of Public Safety
Department of Transportation
Texas Engineering Extension Service
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

18) Search and Rescue ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating planning for and emergency actions to
provide trained personnel, specialized equipment, and other resources to
assist local governments in search and rescue efforts. Maintains Annex R
to the State Plan
b) Primary Council Agency: Texas Engineering Extension Service
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 9
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Governor's Division of Emergency Management
2. Department of Criminal Justice
3. Department of Public Safety
4. Texas Forest Service
5. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
e) Other Support Agencies: Civil Air Patrol

19) Transportation ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating planning and emergency actions for the use
of transportation resources for the movement of personnel, equipment, and
goods via air, road, rail, or marine transportation to support emergency
operations. Maintains Annex S to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Criminal Justice
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 1
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. General Land Office
2. Texas Building and Procurement Commission
3. Railroad Commission of Texas
4. Department of Health
5. Department of Mental Health & Mental Retardation
6. Department of Public Safety
7. Department of Transportation
8. Texas Education Agency
9. Texas Engineering Extension Service
10. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
11. Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

20) Donations Management ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating the operations of the State's donations
management program, to include providing information to the public on the
most appropriate methods for donating; efficiently handling donations of
goods and services, and assisting Texas voluntary disaster relief agencies,
as needed, in receiving, storing, and distributing donated goods to disaster
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
33

victims. Maintains Annex T to the State Plan.


b) Primary Council Agency: Governors Division of Emergency Management
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Department of Information Resources
2. Texas Building and Procurement Commission
3. State Comptroller of Public Accounts
4. Department of Health
5. Texas Workforce Commission
6. Department of Family & Protective Services
e) Other Support Agencies
1. Texas Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
2. Texas Association of Retired and Senior Program Directors
3. Volunteer Center(s)
4. Corporation of National Service

21) Terrorist Incident Response ESF


a) Responsible For: Clarifying of roles and responsibilities for terrorist incident
response and coordinating of emergency actions to deter threatened acts of
terrorism or respond to acts that have occurred. Maintains Annex U to the
State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Public Safety
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: none
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Adjutant Generals Department
2. Texas Animal Health Commission
3. Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation
4. Department of Transportation
5. Texas Forest Service
6. Texas Building and Procurement Commission
7. Department of Health
8. Texas Engineering Extension Service
9. Governors Division of Emergency Management
10. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
11. The Salvation Army

22) Food and Water ESF


a) Responsible For: providing supplemental assistance to local governments
by identifying and obtaining food, water, and ice resources for distribution to
areas affected by a disaster. Maintains Annex V to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency: Department of Human Services
c) Applicable Federal ESF#: 11
d) Council Support Agencies:
1. Adjutant Generals Department
2. American Red Cross
3. Department of Agriculture
4. Department of Criminal Justice
5. Department of Health
6. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
7. The Salvation Army
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34

e) Other Support Agencies: Texas Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster

23) Military Support ESF


a) Responsible For: Coordinating planning for and emergency actions to
activate, deployment and employ, National Guard and State Guard
personnel and equipment to support civil authorities in emergency response
and recovery operations as authorized by the Governor. Maintains Annex
W to the State Plan.
b) Primary Council Agency:
Adjutant General's Department
c) Applicable Federal ESF#:
none
d) Council Support Agency: none
c.

Critical Infrastructure Protection Council (CIPC)

1) A state Critical Infrastructure Protection Council has been established


pursuant to 421.021 of the Government Code.

2) The responsibilities of the CIPC include:


a) Advising the Governor on:
1. the development and coordination of a statewide critical infrastructure
protection strategy;
2. the implementation of the Governors homeland security strategy by
state and local agencies and provide specific suggestions for helping
those agencies implement the strategy; and
3. other matters related to the planning, development, coordination, and
implementation of initiatives to promote the Governors homeland
security strategy.
b) Submitting an annual report on:
1. the Councils progress in developing and coordinating a statewide
critical infrastructure protection strategy;
2. the status and funding of state programs designed to detect and deter
homeland security emergencies;
3. recommendations for actions to reduce threats to homeland security,
including threats related to terrorism, and
4. recommendations for improving the alert, response, and recovery
capabilities of state and local agencies.

3) CIPC membership is outlined in Attachment 3 to this Plan. Attachment 4


describes the responsibilities of various CIPC members for monitoring various
types of infrastructure.
d.

Disaster District Committees (DDCs)


DDCs are composed of representatives of state agencies and certain volunteer
groups that operate within the District. They function as regional equivalents of the
State Emergency Management Council and advise and assist the DDC Chairperson
in identifying, mobilizing, deploying, and employing state resources within the

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District. DDC Chairs activate DDCs and maintain a current call list for their DDC.
3.

Facilities
a.

State Operations Center

1) The SOC is located in a hardened underground facility at DPS Headquarters in


Austin and is operated by GDEM.

2) The responsibilities of the SOC include:


a) Maintaining databases, maps, and other information relating to potential
threats, key facilities, critical infrastructure, resources, and other planning
data.
b) Coordinating with state agencies, local governments, volunteer groups, and
industry with respect to threatened or actual emergency situations.
c) Responding to requests from emergency assistance from local governments
and state agencies managing emergency incidents.
d) Supporting the emergency response coordination activities of the
Emergency Management Council when it is activated during major
emergencies and disasters to coordinate the use of state resources for
response and recovering.
e) During emergency situations, providing emergency information and
instructions to the public in coordination with the Governors Press Office
and state agency public information staffs.
f) Coordinating state Amber Alert operations.
b.

Texas Infrastructure Protection Communications Center (TIPCC)

1) The TIPCC is the states primary entity for planning, coordination, and
integration of government communications capabilities to implement the
Governors homeland security strategy and ensure an effective response to
homeland security emergencies.

2) The TIPCC responsibilities include:


a) promoting emergency preparedness;
b) receiving notice of and monitoring emergency threats and incidents and
analyzing the impact of such threats and incidents;
c) making notification regarding threats and incidents to state officials and
providing situation reports on ongoing emergency situations;
d) operating the State Warning Point, receiving warning through NAWAS and
other warning systems and disseminating warning of impending threats to
state agencies, federal agencies, and local governments through TEWAS,
TLETS, and other means;
e) authorizing and facilitating cooperative efforts related to emergency
response and recovery.

3) The TIPCC is collocated and integrated with the SOC.


c.

Texas Security Alert and Analysis Center (TSAAC)

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36

1)

The Texas Security Alert and Analysis Center (TSAAC), staffed by DPS Special
Crimes personnel, will analyze suspicious incidents relating to homeland
security reported by law enforcement agencies, share information developed by
the state with and respond to queries from local governments, other states, and
the US Department of Homeland Security through the Joint Regional
Intelligence Exploitation System (JRIES).

2)

The TSACC is collocated with the SOC.

VI. DIRECTION AND CONTROL


A. GENERAL
1. The Governor will provide general guidance for the conduct of major emergency
operations.
a.

Under the Texas Disaster Act of 1975, as amended, the Governor is granted broad
powers to deal with disasters. Under this Act, the Governor may issue executive
orders, proclamations, and regulations and amend or rescind them. Executive
orders, proclamations, and regulations have the force and effect of law.

b.

Additional authority to issue directives calculated to protect life and property, and to
control and terminate an emergency, is granted the Governor in instances when a
State of Emergency is proclaimed under provisions of Chapter 433 of the Texas
Government Code.

2. Under the auspices of the Governor, the State Emergency Management Director and
State Coordinator exercise overall direction and control of state emergency response and
recovery operations, usually from the State Operations Center (SOC) in Austin.

3.

a.

The State Director or State Coordinator establishes objectives and authorizes


mission assignments to state agencies, requests commitment of federal assets and
interstate mutual aid emergency response forces, and assigns operational control as
required. Coordination of all state activities during emergency situations will be the
primary responsibility of the Governors Division of Emergency Management.

b.

The Assistant State Coordinator for Operations is responsible for managing the state
response. He will provide guidance to the SOC Controllers and special staff and is
the single point of contact for SOC Controllers to resolve any issue that the SOC
Controller cannot resolve. He will ensure that there is a continually coordinated
response to achieve the objectives set by the State Coordinator.

c.

The SOC coordinates with state agencies to identify, activate, and deploy state
resources to perform specific missions need to deal with emergency situation.
Once deployed, such resources are directed and controlled by the DDC Chair.

Disaster District Committee (DDC) Chairs exercise direction and control of State
response operations within the boundaries of a Disaster District.
a.

The DDC Chairperson issues mission assignments to state agencies and exercises
operational control of National Guard, State Guard, and mutual aid emergency

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37

response forces assigned to the District.

4.

b.

Texas National Guard and State Guard personnel ordered to state active duty status
by the Governor will at all times remain under command and control of military
authorities in accordance with the military chain-of-command established by the
Adjutant General of Texas. Upon direction of the Governor, the Adjutant General will
designate a Task Force Commander to execute command and control of National
Guard personnel and their associated resources supporting emergency response
and recovery operations in a Disaster District or deployed out of the State under
provisions of EMAC. Within the State, the DDC Chairperson will provide mission
assignments to the designated National Guard Task Force Commander.

c.

State resources provided to assist local governments during emergency situations


are provided to conduct a specific mission. They will not be employed to carry out
other tasks without prior approval of the DDC Chair.

Tactical Direction & Control


a.

Local Incident Command.

1) Mayors and County Judges are expected to provide direction and control of city
and county emergency response operations, typically from the local EOC. Local
response forces normally establish an incident command post at the scene of
an emergency situation, which may operate for some time before state
resources are requested and deployed.
The local incident commander
normally carries out the Incident Command System (ICS) function of command
making operational decisions to manage the incident from that command
post.

2) Responding local mutual resources and state and federal resources will
normally be integrated into the ongoing incident command structure and accept
tactical direction from the incident commander.

3) It is desirable that normal supervisors direct organized units.


4) In situations where multiple jurisdictions or state or federal agencies are
providing significant response resources or technical assistance for an
emergency, it is generally desirable to transition from the normal ICS structure
to a Unified Command structure. This arrangement helps ensure that all
participating agencies are involved in developing objectives and strategies to
deal with the emergency.
b.

5.

State Command Posts. State field command posts may be established for
emergency situations for which the state has primary responsibility, primarily those
involving state property. The lead state agency or DDC Chair shall designate a state
incident commander to provide direction and control of state personnel involved in
site-specific response activity. The State Incident Commander shall keep the DDC
Chair informed of the emergency situation and the progress of response operations.

State Area Command (SAC) A SAC may be established in the event that an emergency
or disaster area is widespread and encompasses more than one disaster district. A SAC
is an organization formed to manage multiple incidents that are each being handled by

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38

an incident management team, or very large incidents that have multiple incident
management teams. Among the types of emergencies for which a SAC may be
established are extensive wildfires or an ice storm that affects a large area.
a.

An SAC is expected to establish an overall strategy and priorities, allocate assigned


resources based on priorities, ensure that incidents are properly managed, and that
objectives are met and strategies followed. A SAC may be located in an existing
DPS regional or district office or in another facility.

b.

The State Coordinator, in conjunction with the designated lead agency and affected
DDC Chairs, will determine the need to establish a SAC, and will develop and
distribute an Operational Control Plan that specifies the organization, direction and
control, resource allocation, and operational procedures for the incident.

B. EFFECT OF STATE DISASTER DECLARATION ON STATE RESPONSE/RECOVERY OPERATIONS


1.

When the Governor issues a Declaration of a State of Disaster and requests a


Presidential Emergency or Major Disaster Declaration, a Governor's Authorized
Representative (GAR), and State Coordinating Officers (SCOs) will be appointed. The
Governor will normally select the GAR and SCOs, along with alternates, from GDEM staff
personnel.

2. The GAR, assisted by the SCOs, will exercise overall direction and control of State
response/recovery operations, to include management and administration of programs
authorized by the Stafford Act. The GAR will delegate mission assignment and federal
and mutual aid resource commitment authority as needed, to insure the uninterrupted
ability to conduct response and recovery operations throughout the State.
C. EFFECT OF A FEDERAL EMERGENCY OR DISASTER DECLARATION
1.

If a Presidential Emergency or Major Disaster Declaration is issued, the President will


appoint a Federal Coordinating Officer (FCO) to exercise overall direction and control of
all federal response/recovery assistance operations. The FCO, along with the Disaster
Recovery Manager (DRM), who is a FEMA official responsible for management and
administration of recovery assistance programs authorized by The Stafford Act, may
initially operate from the SOC and then from the DFO once that facility is operational.

2.

When activated, the DFO is a joint federal operation, with federal agencies supervised by
the FCO and state staff supervised by the SCO. Once a DFO has been activated, state
response operations will gradually be shifted to that facility and the SOC will reduce its
operational level. Recovery operations will be conducted from the DFO until such time as
the State and FEMA agree that a dedicated facility for response coordination is no longer
required in the affected area.

VII. READINESS & RESPONSE LEVELS


A. STATE READINESS & RESPONSE LEVELS
1. Emergency situations occur on a daily basis throughout the State, and responder
agencies/organizations such as fire departments and emergency medical services
routinely respond to them. Local responders handle the vast majority of emergency
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
39

situations without external assistance. However, those potential or actual emergency


situations that may produce a severe or widespread impact may create a need for state
assistance or for state and federal assistance. The State uses readiness and response
levels" to match the intensity of its preparedness and response activities to the intensity of
a potential threat or the impact of an actual events. As the intensity of threats or impacts
increases, emergency facilities are activated or increase their operations tempo, staffing
and equipment readiness is increased, and additional resources are alerted, mobilized,
deployed, and employed.
2. The State uses a four-tier readiness and response level scheme. Plans and standard
operating procedures provide that certain actions be taken at each response level based
on the specific hazard anticipated or encounter. The state readiness and response
conditions are:
a.

Normal Conditions (Readiness & Response Level 4)


During Normal Conditions:

1) Planning, training, drills and exercises, and other preparedness activities are
2)
3)
4)
5)

6)

b.

conducted.
Emergency equipment and facilities are maintained.
Warning and communications systems are tested.
Current natural, technological, and homeland security threats are monitored.
Criminal intelligence is collected, analyzed, and, where appropriate, reported.
Local responders generally resolve emergency incidents that occur. Additional
assistance, if needed, is requested from adjacent jurisdictions or responder
organizations in accordance with established mutual aid agreements. Normal
operations of local government have not been affected.
Certain types of incidents reported to the SOC or the TSAAC by local
governments, state agencies, other organizations, industry, or the public may be
monitored until investigated or resolved.

Increased Readiness (Readiness & Response Level 3)


During Increased Readiness:

1) Local responders generally resolve routine emergency incidents that occur.


2) A significant emergency situation has not yet occurred; however, a higher than
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)

normal level of readiness is warranted because of increased vulnerability to a


specific hazard, such as an approaching severe storm or extreme wildfire threat.
Key staff is alerted and personnel and equipment availability reviewed. Staffing
at some emergency facilities may be increased to provide additional situation
monitoring.
Contingency plans and procedures are reviewed.
Equipment needs and supply shortages should be filled, if possible.
Some response units may be alerted and equipment readiness may be
increased.
Coordination activities increase and extra effort is exerted to review, evaluate,
and update appropriate plans and procedures to ensure ability to meet
anticipated challenges of specific hazard.
Emergency public information activities should commence.

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9) Appropriate officials and agency representatives are briefed on anticipated risk


situations, expected impacts, and contingency measures. There may be limited
impairment of some normal government operations because some staff
members may be involved in increased readiness activities.
c.

Escalated Response (Readiness & Response Level 2)


During Escalated Response:
1)

2)
3)
4)
5)
5)
6)

d.

The scope of the emergency situation has expanded beyond that which can be
handled by normal responder agencies, and additional emergency support
functions such as shelter and mass care and evacuation may have to be
implemented.
Staffing of emergency facilities is increased, and hours of operation are
expanded, and coordination is intensified.
Response units are deployed and employed.
Requests for emergency assistance may be initiated between various
governments, and mutual aid resources may be summoned.
Appropriate officials and agency representatives are briefed on the current
situation and anticipated impacts.
Emergency public information activities should be expanded.
There may be some impairment of normal state and local government
operations.

Emergency Conditions (Response Level 1)


During Emergency Conditions:

1) The scope of the emergency has expanded to the point that all appropriate
2)

3)
4)
5)
6)

B.

emergency response and recovery assets within some jurisdictions have been
committed to the emergency situation or disaster.
The SOC and appropriate Disaster District EOCs are fully staffed by
representatives from appropriate/required agencies and organizations and
remains operational on a continuing basis for as long as needed.
Interagency coordination and situation reporting are increased to meet demands
for information on the current situation.
The State receives requests for emergency assistance from local governments
and coordinates resource assistance.
Intrastate mutual aid may be sought and federal aid may be requested.
State and local government operations in impact areas may be impaired by the
evacuation of personnel or damage to facilities and equipment

Homeland Security Advisory System (HSAS)


1. The HSAS the means the Federal government uses to disseminate information regarding
the risk of terrorist acts to Federal, state, and local authorities and the general public.
The Secretary of the US Department of Homeland Security determines HSAS threat
conditions. Use of the system is binding on the Federal government and voluntary by
other levels of government and the private sector.
2. The HSAS uses five threat conditions identified by a description and color; the higher the
threat condition, the greater the risk of a terrorist attack and the greater protective

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41

measures should be implemented. From lowest to highest, the conditions are:


a.

Low = Green. This condition is declared when there is a low risk of terrorist attacks.
General preventive and protective measures should be developed and
implemented.

b.

Guarded = Blue. This condition is declared when there is a general risk of terrorist
attacks. General protective measures should be implemented.

c.

Elevated = Yellow. This condition is declared when there is a significant risk of


terrorist attacks. Surveillance of key facilities and critical infrastructure should be
increased; emergency plans may be implemented.

d.

High = Orange. This condition is declared when there is a high risk of terrorist
attack. Increased security should be implemented and precautions taken at planned
public events; access to key facilities and critical infrastructure may be restricted.

e.

Severe = Red. This condition reflects a severe risk of terrorist act. During this
condition, staffing for emergency response and equipment readiness should be
increased, and special response teams mobilized; the operation of transportation
systems may be curtailed, and some public and government facilities may be closed.

C. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STATE EMERGENCY READINESS & RESPONSE LEVELS AND HSAS
1.

State Readiness & Response Level 4/Normal Conditions is generally appropriate for
HSAS threat condition Green/Low

2.

State Readiness & Response Level 3/Increased Readiness is generally appropriate for
HSAS threat conditions Blue/Guarded and Yellow/Elevated.

3.

State Readiness and Response level 2/Escalated Response is generally appropriate for
HSAS threat condition Orange/High.

4.

State Readiness & Response Level 1/Emergency Conditions is generally appropriate for
HSAS threat condition Red/Severe.

VIII. CONTINUITY OF GOVERNMENT


A. GENERAL
1. The occurrence of a disaster could impede the ability of the State and local government to
provide for the safety and well being of the people of Texas. Continuity of Government
(COG) consists of a variety of comprehensive activities designed to insure the
preservation of our representative form of government and the continued ability of state
and local governments to provide protection and essential services to the public.
2. Continuity of government requirements include key direction and control actions that must
be accomplished so that State government can continue to operate effectively regardless
of the emergency or disaster situation and actions necessary for the reconstruction of
State government.
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B. LINES OF SUCCESSION
1.

General
Article III, Section 62 of the State Constitution provides for the prompt and temporary
succession to the powers and duties of public offices, whether by election or
appointment. At any time the incumbents of those offices become unavailable for
carrying on the duties of such offices, the Legislature may appoint successors.

2.

Executive
The lines of succession to the Governor are specified in the State Constitution (Article IV,
Section 3a) and the Emergency Interim Executive Succession Act (Title 4, Chapter
401.021 - 401.023). The succession order includes the Lieutenant Governor, President
Pro-Tempore of the Senate, Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Attorney
General, and then the Chief Justice of each of the Courts of Appeals in the numerical
order of the Supreme Judicial Districts in which they serve.

3.

Legislative
The lines of succession for the State Legislature are detailed in the Emergency Interim
Legislative Succession Act (Title 3, Chapters 304.001 -304.011) and extend seven deep
for each Legislative position.

4.

Judiciary
There is no automatic succession for members of the Judiciary. Vacancies of state
judges or justices are temporarily filled by the Governor until the next general election
occurs. (Article V, Sections 2 and 28 of the State Constitution detail this process.)

5. State Agencies
Lines of succession for state agencies are detailed in the Emergency Interim Public
Office Succession Act (Title 110A, Article 6252-10a of the Government Code) and
require a minimum of three and a maximum of seven successors for key positions.
Council members are tasked to develop and maintain appropriate lines of succession for
key positions and procedures for the orderly succession of responsibilities.
6. Local Governments
Lines of succession for local governments are detailed in appropriate state and local
laws, regulations, and local government emergency management plans.
C. PRE-DELEGATION OF EMERGENCY AUTHORITIES
The Governor's Executive Order Relating to Emergency Management, and the Texas
Disaster Act of 1975, Government Code Chapter 418, outline legal authorities available to the
Governor during a major emergency or disaster situation affecting the State. The State
Constitution, Article III, Section 62, outlines when and how the Governor can relocate the
"seat of government" if required by a disaster situation. Council members are tasked to
identify emergency legal authorities and their limits affecting their agencies and under what
circumstances and by whom they may be exercised. This includes those actions that can be
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
43

carried out by that agency during a declared emergency, which couldn't be accomplished on a
normal everyday basis (e.g., changing priorities, limiting/excluding the bidding process, etc.)
D. EMERGENCY ACTION STEPS
Procedures to be followed during emergencies and/or disasters affecting the State are found
in this plan or associated documents. Each Council agency member is tasked to develop
operating procedures that include actions to be accomplished during emergencies and/or
disaster situations to include emergency assignments, responsibilities, duty stations and
notification/alerting of staff members. Action Guides are included in each Annex of this plan
that identify actions to be taken by each agency and the circumstances that trigger these
actions.
E.

ALTERNATE OPERATING FACILITIES


Primary and alternate SOCs have been identified and detailed standard operating procedures
(SOPs) have been developed. Disaster District EOCs have also been selected. The
Department of Public Safety will select alternate EOCs for each Disaster District and develop
and maintain SOPs for each facility. Council members will prepare SOPs that detail how their
agency will staff and operate from the SOC and Disaster District EOCs as appropriate. SOPs
should address, but not be limited to: responsibilities; location of the EOC, emergency
notification of personnel, telephone numbers, and other communications capabilities;
administrative data and report requirements; security; logistical requirements; public
information activities; and staffing requirements to insure 24-hour-a-day operations for a
prolonged period of time.

F.

PROTECTION OF GOVERNMENT RESOURCES


1.

Unless government resources, specifically personnel, facilities, and equipment, remain


intact and operational during crisis situations, continuity of government objectives of this
plan cannot be accomplished. The emergency situation or disaster may require that state
offices, facilities, work areas, or even the State's "Seat of Government" be relocated to
safer locations. A relocation of this type will require an adjustment to daily operations
and a concentrated effort to accomplish only mission-essential responsibilities resulting in
a decreased effort devoted to non-essential functions.

2.

State agencies need to develop and maintain procedures for identifying and recalling key
personnel, deciding which mission functions must continue at what level of
performance/output, relocating existing work areas including computer operations to preselected alternate work areas and/or dispersal sites, establishing applicable security
protection measures both en route and at new locations, and clearly identifying those
responsible for accomplishment of these tasks. The Department of Information
Resources will provide assistance and guidance to state agencies concerning computer
operations, specifically security and protection of computer data records.

G. PROTECTION OF VITAL RECORDS


Vital records and reports will be protected in accordance with the Preservation of Essential
Records Act (Title 4, Chapter 441.051 - 441.062). Council member agencies should
identify those records considered essential for the recovery process following a disaster
which has damaged or destroyed state facilities or systems. State agencies should also
develop and maintain procedures for the identification, duplication, storage, and protection
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
44

of essential records and identify those responsible for accomplishment of these tasks.

IX. ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT


A. SUPPORT
1.

In most situations, requests for federal assistance will be made through the SOC to the
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Exceptions to this are detailed in
federal, hazard-specific contingency plans and procedures and in Annexes D, F, N, and
Q to this plan.

2.

The process for requesting and providing interstate mutual aid is addressed in Annexes
D, F, and N to this plan.

B. AGREEMENTS AND UNDERSTANDINGS


All agreements and understandings entered into for the purchase, lease, or otherwise use of
equipment and services will be in accordance with the provision of state law and procedures.
The declaration of a State of Disaster, issued by the Governor, may suspend selected rules
and regulations that impede emergency response and recovery operations.
C. REPORTS AND RECORDS
1.

In addition to individual intra-agency recording and reporting requirements, all Council


member agencies will provide emergency management reports in accordance with this
plan, its annexes, and procedures.

2.

Based on situational requirements, operational reports will be submitted to the DDC


Chairperson(s) affected by the emergency situation for review and consolidation prior to
submission to the SOC in Austin. This reporting requirement is applicable to local
governments, field-deployed state command posts, and all Council member agencies
conducting emergency response activities within the geographical boundaries of a
Disaster District.

3.

Upon determination of need, the State Director, the State Coordinator, or the GAR may
authorize and impose additional emergency recording and reporting requirements
applicable to local governments and state agencies.

D. EXPENDITURES AND RECORD KEEPING


1.

It is the intent of the Legislature, and the policy of the State, that funds to meet disaster
emergencies always be available, and that the first recourse be to the funds regularly
appropriated to state and local agencies.

2.

Each agency is responsible for establishing administrative controls necessary to manage


the expenditure of funds and to provide reasonable accountability and justification for
federal reimbursement in accordance with the established federal program guidelines, or
standard cost accounting procedures, if acceptable by the reimbursing federal agency.

3.

Under the provisions of EMAC, Texas is responsible for the reimbursement of expenses
incurred by responding states during the delivery of mutual aid or for the out-of-state

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
45

sheltering or repatriation of Texas residents. Texas is likewise responsible for the


computation and submission of bills for reimbursement of expenses incurred while
responding to a requesting state.
4.

E.

In accordance with established procedures, state agencies may seek financial assistance
for unreasonably great emergency operations costs from the Disaster Contingency
Fund pursuant to section 418.073 (b) of the Disaster Act.

CRITIQUES
1.

Primary and lead state agencies are responsible for conducting critiques following the
conclusion of a significant emergency event/incident or exercise.

2.

The critique conducted will entail both written and verbal input from all appropriate
participants, including field personnel.

3.

In consultation with appropriate support agencies, the state agency having primary
and/or lead responsibility shall develop a written critique report, which will be provided
to the State Coordinator.

X. PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE


A. DEVELOPMENT
1.

The Governor's Division of Emergency Management has the overall responsibility for
emergency planning and coordination of state resources in the conduct of emergency
operations.

2.

Each member agency of the State Emergency Management Council is responsible for
the development and maintenance of appropriate planning documents that address
responsibilities assigned in this plan, to include standard operating procedures.

3.

The State Coordinator, Governor's Division of Emergency Management, will ensure


appropriate distribution of the Basic Plan and any changes thereto. Distribution of
functional annexes and changes will be accomplished by the designated agency with
primary responsibility for the annex.

B. MAINTENANCE
1.

The State Coordinator of the Governors Division of Emergency Management will


authorize and issue changes to this plan until such time as the plan is superseded.

2.

The State Coordinator will maintain and update this plan, as required. Council member
representatives may recommend changes and will provide information concerning
capability changes that impact their emergency management responsibilities.

3.

State Emergency Management Council agencies are responsible for participating in the
annual review of the plan. The State Coordinator will coordinate all review and revision
efforts, and ensure that the plan is updated as necessary, based on lessons learned
during actual occurrence events and exercises, and other changes in organization,
technology and/or capabilities.

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
46

4.

Council members have the responsibility for maintaining annexes, appendices, standard
operating procedures, notification lists, and resource data to ensure prompt and effective
response to emergencies. Agency resource data must be accessible to agency
representatives at the SOC and at each affected Disaster District EOC to facilitate the
capability of agency to support its emergency management responsibilities. Council
member agencies are also required to conduct and/or participate in training activities
designed to enhance their ability to accomplish their responsibilities as assigned by this
plan.

5.

This plan shall be exercised at least annually in the form of a simulated emergency in
order to provide practical, controlled, operational experience to those who have SOC
responsibilities. This requirement is applicable to the SOC and each Disaster District
EOC.

6.

All emergency management-related exercises will be designed so as to evaluate the


effectiveness of this plan and its associated annexes and procedures. These exercises
will be coordinated with the State Coordinator of the Governor's Division of Emergency
Management. The Council member agency having primary responsibility for hazardspecific tasks, in consultation with appropriate support agencies, will develop, conduct,
and evaluate operational exercises of this plan. As part of the evaluation process, the
primary state agency will provide written recommendations for revisions to this plan to the
State Coordinator.

Attachments
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

State Emergency Management Council


State Emergency Management Council - Matrix of Responsibilities
Critical Infrastructure Protection Council
Critical Infrastructure Protection Council Responsibilities
Disaster District Boundaries
Channels for Requesting Emergency Assistance
Primary Federal & State Functional Responsibilities
State Plan Annex Assignments
Summary of Agency Emergency Responsibilities

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
47

Attachment 1

STATE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL


(SEMC)

Chair: Director of Homeland Security/Director, Division of Emergency Management


1. Adjutant Generals Department (AGD)
2. American Red Cross (ARD) **
3. Department of Information Resources (DIR)
4. General Land Office (GLO) *
5. Governors Division of Emergency Management (GDEM)
6. Office of Rural Community Affairs (ORCA)
7. Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUC) *
8. Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) *
9. Salvation Army (TSA)
10. State Auditors Office (SAO)
11. State Comptroller of Public Accounts (CPA)
12. Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)
13. Texas Attorney Generals Office (OAG)
14. Texas Building & Procurement Commission (BPC)
15. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) *
16. Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP)
17. Department of Aging & Disability Services (DADS) - when activated
18. Department of Agriculture (TDA) *
19. Department of Assisted & Rehabilitative Services (DARS) - when activated
20. Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ)
21. Department of Health (TDH) * - will be dissolved)
22. Department of Housing & Community Affairs (TDHCA)
23. Department of Human Services (DHS) will be dissolved
24. Department of Insurance (TDI)
25. Department of Mental Health & Mental Retardation (MHMR) - will be dissolved
26. Department of Protective & Family Services (DFPS)
27. Department of Public Safety (DPS) *
28. Department of State Health Services (DSHS) - when activated
29. Department of Transportation (TCDOT) *
30. Texas Education Agency (TEA)
31. Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) *
32. Texas Forest Service (TFS)
33. Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) *
34. Texas Rehabilitation Commission (TRC) Will be dissolved.
35. Texas Workforce Commission (TWC)

Indicates departments and agencies which are members of the State Emergency
Response Commission (SERC)
** Non-governmental organizations

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Attachment 1

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Attachment 2

STATE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL


MATRIX OF RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Organizational acronyms used in the matrix that follows are defined in Attachment 1.
2. Legend:
P = primary agency
S = support agency.

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2-1

AGD
ARC
CPA
GDEM
DIR
DPS
GLO
TBPC
MHMR
OAG
ORCA
PUC
RRC
SAO
TAHC
TCFP
TDA
TDCJ
S

P
S
P
S
S
S

S
S

S
S
S

S
P
S

S
S
S
S

S
S
S

S
S
S

S
S
S
S
S
S

S
S
P

S
S
S

S
S

2-2
P

S
S
S

S
P
S

S
S
S
S

S
P

S
S

S
P

S
S

S
S

S
S
S

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
O RESERVED/FUTURE USE

W - MILITARY SUPPORT

T - DONATIONS MGMT.

S - TRANSPORTATION

R - SEARCH AND RESCUE

Q - HAZMAT & OIL SPILL

U - TERRORIST INCIDENT
RESPONSE
V - FOOD AND WATER

S
S
S
S
P
S
S
S
P S
S
S
S
P
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S S

P - HAZARD MITIGATION

N - DIRECTION & CONTROL

K - PUBLIC WORKS &


ENGINEERING
L - ENERGY & UTILITIES
M - RESOURCE SUPPORT

J - RECOVERY

I PUBLIC INFORMATION

H - HEALTH AND MEDICAL

G - LAW ENFORCEMENT

F - FIRE FIGHTING

E - EVACUATION

D - RADIOLOGICAL EMER

C - SHELTER AND MASS

B - COMMUNICATIONS

A - WARNING

Attachment 2

Part 1 of 2

TXED
TDH
DSHS
TDADS
DARS
DFPS
TDHCA
DHS
TDI
TEA
TEEX
TFS
TCEQ
TPWD
TRC
TSA
TWC
TXDOT
S

S
S

S
S
S
S

P
S S

P
P

S
S

S
P S
S S
S S S

S S
S
S S

2-3

S
P S
P S
S
S

S
S
S
S S

S
S
S

S
S

P
S
S
S
S
S
S S
S
S
S
S
S S
S

S
S
S

S S

S S P
S
S
S P
S S S

U - TERRORIST INCIDENT
RESPONSE
V - FOOD AND WATER

S
S
S
S
S
S

S
S

S
S

S
S
S
S
S

S
S

S
S

S
S

S S
P

S
S

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
O RESERVED/FUTURE USE

W - MILITARY SUPPORT

T - DONATIONS MGMT.

S
S

S - TRANSPORTATION

R - SEARCH AND RESCUE

Q - HAZMAT & OIL SPILL

P - HAZARD MITIGATION

N - DIRECTION & CONTROL

M - RESOURCE SUPPORT

K - PUBLIC WORKS &


L - ENERGY & UTILITIES

J - RECOVERY

I PUBLIC INFORMATION

H - HEALTH AND MEDICAL

G - LAW ENFORCEMENT

F - FIRE FIGHTING

E - EVACUATION

D - RADIOLOGICAL EMER

C - SHELTER AND MASS

B - COMMUNICATIONS

A - WARNING

Attachment 2

Part 2 of 2

Attachment 2

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
2-4

Attachment 3

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION COUNCIL


(CIPC)

Chair: Director of Homeland Security/Director, Division of Emergency Management


1. Department of Agriculture (TDA)
2. Office of the Attorney General
3. General Land Office (GLO)
4. Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUC)
5. Department of Health (TDH) - will be dissolved
6. Department of Information Resources (DIR)
7. Department of Public Safety (DPS)
8. Governors Division of Emergency Management (GDEM)
9. Adjutant Generals Department (AGD)
10. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ)
11. Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC)
12. Texas Strategic Military Planning Commission (TSMPC)
13. Department of Transportation (TXDOT)

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Attachment 3

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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Attachment 4

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION COUNCIL


RESPONSIBILITIES

Sector

Lead Agency

Air Quality

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Agriculture

Department of Agriculture

Criminal Intelligence

Department of Public Safety

Electricity

Public Utility Commission of Texas

Emergency Services

Governors Division of Emergency Management

Food Safety

Department of Health

Government

Governors Office

Information Service

Department of Information Resources

Military

Texas National Guard

Oil & Gas

Railroad Commission of Texas

Public Health

Department of Health

Telecommunications

Public Utility Commission of Texas

Transportation

Department of Transportation

Water

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

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Attachment 4

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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Attachment 5

STATE DISASTER DISTRICT BOUNDARIES

Sherman HansfordOchiltree Lipscomb

Dallam

Hartley

Moore

Oldham

Potter

Roberts Hemphill
Hutchinson
Gray

Carson

5B

Wheeler

Randall Armstrong Donley Collingsworth

Deaf
Smith

Parmer Castro Swisher Briscoe

Hall

Childress
Hardeman

Bailey

Lamb

Hale

Floyd

Motley Cottle

Foard

Wilbarger

Wichita
Clay

Cochran Hockley Lubbock

Yoakum Terry

5A

Lynn

CrosbyDickens

Garza

King

Knox

Archer

Baylor

Young
Kent Stonewall Haskell
Throckmorton

Montague

Sub
5A
Jack

Cooke

Wise

Grayson Fannin

Sub
1A

Denton

Collin

1A

Gaines

Andrews

Dawson Borden

4A

Loving Winkler

El
Paso
Hudspeth

Ward

Culberson

Scurry

Martin Howard Mitchell

4B

Nolan Taylor CallahanEastland

Upton

Hood Johnson
Erath Somervell

Pecos
Jeff
Davis
Terrell

Brewster

Titus M
or
Camp ris

Bowie

Wood Upshur

1B

Cass
Marion

Dallas
Kaufman Van
Harrison
Zandt
Gregg
Smith
Ellis
Henderson
Panola
Rusk
Navarro

Coleman

6A

Runnels

6C

6B

Presidio

Rains

kli

Sub
2B

Sub
4B

Reeves

Sub
4A

an

Hill
Comanche
Bosque
Cherokee
Anderson
Brown
Shelby
Freestone
Hamilton
Nacogdoches
McLennan
San
Augustine
Limestone
Mills
Tom
Reagan
Coryell
Houston
Concho
Green
Leon
Angelina
Sabine
Irion
Falls
McCulloch San
Lampasas
Trinity
Bell
Saba
Jasper
Robertson Madison
Newton
Schleicher Menard
Polk
Burnet
Milam
Tyler
Walker
Mason
Crockett
Williamson
Llano
Brazos
San
Grimes
Jacinto
Sutton
Burleson
Kimble
Hardin
Blanco
Montgomery
Travis
Lee
Gillespie
Washington
Orange
Liberty
Bastrop
Hays
Kerr
Waller
Edwards
Val
Kendall
Austin
Jefferson
Harris
Fayette
Real
Caldwell
Comal
Verde
Chambers
Bandera
Colorado
Guadalupe
Fort Bend
Gonzales
Bexar
Galveston
Lavaca
Medina
Kinney Uvalde
Wilson
Brazoria
Wharton
DeWitt
Jackson Matagorda
Karnes
Frio Atascosa
Zavala
Maverick
Victoria
Goliad
Calhoun
Dimmit La Salle
Bee Refugio
McMullen Live
Aransas
Oak
San
Patricio
Jim
Webb
Nueces
Duval Wells

Glasscock
Coke
Ector Midland
Sterling
Crane

Palo
Shackelford
Jones
Stephens Pinto

Fisher

Red
River

Fr

Hunt Hopkins

Rockwall
Parker Tarrant

Lamar
Delta

2C

2B

Sub
8A

Sub
2C

3B

2A

3A

Sub
8A

Zapata

Kleberg

Jim
Hogg
Starr

Brooks

8A

Kenedy

Willacy

Hidalgo
Cameron

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Attachment 5

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Attachment 6

CHANNELS FOR REQUESTING OPERATIONAL ASSISTANCE

US DHS/
FEMA

GOVERNOR

Other
States

STATE OPERATIONS CENTER


TIPCC

TSAAC

State Emergency Management Council

DISASTER DISTRICT
CHAIR
Disaster District Committee

Regional
Response
Teams
Other
Local
Governments

Business
&
Industry
LOCAL
GOVERNMENTS

Volunteer
Groups

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Attachment 6

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)
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Attachment 7

PRIMARY FEDERAL/STATE FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

FEDERAL
ESF #

FUNCTION

PRIMARY
FEDERAL AGENCY

PRIMARY
STATE AGENCY

TRANSPORTATION

Department of
Transportation

Department of Criminal
Justice

COMMUNICATIONS

Office of Science &


Technology Policy

Department of Information
Resources

PUBLIC WORKS AND ENGINEERING

U.S. Army Corps of


Engineers

Department of
Transportation

FIREFIGHTING

Department of
Agriculture

Texas Forest Service

INFORMATION & PLANNING

Federal Emergency
Management Agency

Governor's Division of
Emergency Management

MASS CARE

American Red Cross

The Salvation Army

RESOURCE SUPPORT

General Services
Administration

Texas Building and


Procurement Commission

HEALTH & MEDICAL SERVICES

Department of Health
and Human Services

Department of Health

URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE

Federal Emergency
Management Agency

Texas Engineering
Extension Service

10

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

Environmental
Protection Agency

Texas Commission on
Environmental Quality

11

FOOD

Department of
Agriculture

Department of Human
Services

12

ENERGY

Department of Energy

Public Utility Commission

The FEDERAL RESPONSE PLAN assigns emergency support function (ESF) responsibilities to specific federal
agencies. This chart identifies federal primary agencies for each numbered federal ESF and their
counterpart state agency.

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Attachment 7

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Attachment 8

STATE PLAN ANNEX ASSIGNMENTS


ANNEX

EMERGENCY SUPPORT FUNCTION

PRIMARY STATE
AGENCY

FEDERAL ESF #

Annex A

Warning

DPS

Annex B

Communications

DIR

Annex C

Shelter and Mass Care

TSA

Annex D

Radiological Emergency Management

TDH

Annex E

Evacuation

DPS

Annex F

Firefighting

TFS

Annex G

Law Enforcement

DPS

Annex H

Health and Medical Services

TDH

Annex I

Public Information

GDEM

Annex J

Recovery

GDEM

Annex K

Public Works and Engineering

TxDOT

Annex L

Energy and Utilities

PUC

12

Annex M

Resource Support

TBPC

Annex N

Direction and Control

GDEM

Annex O

(Reserved for Future Use)

Annex P

Hazard Mitigation

GDEM

Annex Q

Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill


Response

TCEQ

10

Annex R

Search and Rescue

TEEX

Annex S

Transportation

TDCJ

Annex T

Donations Management

GDEM

Annex U

Terrorist Incident Response

DPS

Annex V

Food and Water

DHS

Annex W

Military Support

AGD

11

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Attachment 8

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Attachment 9

SUMMARY OF AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

Adjutant General's Department .................................................................................................... 9-2


American Red Cross .................................................................................................................... 9-3
Department of Information Resources ......................................................................................... 9-4
General Land Office...................................................................................................................... 9-5
Texas Building and Procurement Commission............................................................................ 9-6
Governor's Division of Emergency Management ........................................................................ 9-7
Office of the Attorney General...................................................................................................... 9-8
Office of Rural Community Affairs................................................................................................ 9-9
Public Utility Commission of Texas .............................................................................................. 9-10
Railroad Commission of Texas ................................................................................................... 9-11
State Auditor's Office ................................................................................................................... 9-12
State Comptroller of Public Accounts.......................................................................................... 9-13
Texas Commission on Fire Protection ........................................................................................ 9-14
Department of Aging & Disability Services ................................................................................. 9-15
Department of Agriculture............................................................................................................ 9-16
Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services..................................................................... 9-17
Texas Economic Development ................................................................................................... 9-18
Department of Criminal Justice ................................................................................................... 9-19
Department of Family & Protective Services .............................................................................. 9-20
Department of Health .................................................................................................................. 9-21
Department of Housing & Community Affairs ............................................................................. 9-22
Department of Human Services .................................................................................................. 9-23
Department of Insurance............................................................................................................. 9-24
Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation ............................................................... 9-25
Department of Public Safety........................................................................................................ 9-26
Department of State Health Services.......................................................................................... 9-27
Department of Transportation ..................................................................................................... 9-28
Texas Education Agency............................................................................................................. 9-29
Texas Engineering Extension Service ........................................................................................ 9-30
Texas Forest Service................................................................................................................... 9-31
Texas Commission on Environmental Quality............................................................................ 9-32
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department......................................................................................... 9-33
Texas Rehabilitation Commission............................................................................................... 9-34
Texas Workforce Commission .................................................................................................... 9-35
The Salvation Army ..................................................................................................................... 9-36
Texas Animal Health Commission .............................................................................................. 9-37

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Adjutant General's Department (AGD)

The Texas National Guard (TNG), to include the Texas Army and Air National
Guard, will:
Under command of the Governor of Texas, provide trained and equipped
units to assist civil authorities in the protection of life and property and the
preservation of peace, order, and public safety in the State of Texas.
Support also involves assisting local authorities in civil and natural
emergencies as well as community service activities.
When ordered or called into active federal service by the President of the
United States, provide trained and equipped units for war or national
emergencies, or at such other times as national security may require,
provide augmentation of the United States Armed Forces. This includes
supporting Department of Defense airlift requirements worldwide as well as
24-hour alert air defense missions on the Texas Gulf Coast and along the
United States' southern border.
The Texas State Guard, as a state reserve force, will, when activated by the
Governor, provide trained and equipped individuals to supplement the Texas
National Guard and to replace the TNG when that force is called into federal
service.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Government Code, Section 431.002

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:Military Support

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Public Information
Direction and Control
Food and Water
Firefighting
Terrorist Incident Response
Communications

MEMBER OF CIPC

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

American Red Cross (ARC)

ARC responds year-round to assist victims of hurricanes, floods, earthquakes,


tornadoes, fires, hazardous material spills, transportation accidents, and other
incidents. Assists the public in preventing, preparing for, and coping with disasters
to include helping people plan for specific types of disasters, reducing their
traumatic impact, preventing injuries, saving lives, and reducing property loss.
After a disaster occurs, the ARC provides emergency shelter, food, medicine, and
first aid to provide for basic human needs, and also distributes food and home
clean-up items throughout the affected areas. The ARC also meets immediate
emergency needs by providing cash vouchers for groceries, new clothing,
temporary housing, emergency home repairs, transportation, basic household
items, medicines, and tools. The ARC additionally helps when all other resources,
such as insurance benefits and government assistance, are not available or are
inadequate to meet disaster-related needs. Disaster relief work by the ARC
includes feeding emergency workers, referring those affected by a disaster to other
available resources, handling inquiries from concerned family members outside the
disaster area, providing blood and blood products to disaster victims, and providing
disaster-related mental health services and specialized counseling.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Act of Congress, January 5, 1905, 33 Sta. 599, as amended by 36


U.S. Code Section 1

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

(None)

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Shelter and Mass Care


Health and Medical Services
Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control
Food and Water

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Information Resources (DIR)

DIR provides the State of Texas with an innovative use of information resources to
support better service delivery, cost-effective use of resources, and increased
accountability. DIR also conducts information technology research for the State.
Specifically, DIR coordinates and directs the use of information resources
technologies by state agencies that provide the most cost-effective and useful
retrieval and exchange of information both within and among the various agencies
and branches of government to the people of Texas and their elected
representatives. DIR additionally operates a disaster recovery site to prevent loss
of information.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Government Code, Section 2054.004

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:Communications

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Direction and Control


Donations Management

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

General Land Office (GLO)

GLO is responsible for the management of over 20 million acres of state land and
the mineral rights therein. This includes 13 million acres dedicated to the
Permanent School Fund and state-owned "submerged" lands from the mean high
tide line out to 10.3 miles into the Gulf of Mexico. The GLO also manages
programs which offer qualified Texas veterans low-interest loans to purchase land,
homes, and make home improvements; is responsible for inventorying and
evaluating more than 2 million acres of property owned by state agencies to ensure
highest and best use; and plays an active role in environmental and economic
issues to include cleaning-up spills in state coastal waters, operating a recycling
education and market development program, mobilizing thousands of volunteers to
clean Texas beaches twice a year, and running an alternative fuels program that
emphasizes the use of clean natural gas as a fleet vehicle fuel.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Constitution, Article IV, Section 1

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:(None)

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Public Information
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Transportation

MEMBER OF CIPC

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Building and Procurement Commission (BPC)

TBPC provides its state customers with a cost-effective central source for the
timely delivery of goods, services, and facilities. This includes centralized
purchasing for all state agencies and operating the state's business program;
centralized services to state agencies including travel, mail and messenger, vehicle
fleet management, alternative fuels, office machine repair, and the central store;
providing staff support to the Council on Competitive Government; operating the
state and federal surplus property programs; conducting inspections of construction
projects and providing minor construction services to state agencies; managing the
state's leasing program for rental of office space; overseeing asbestos abatement
in the Capitol Complex; providing custodial services and building and grounds
maintenance for state-owned buildings; operating the Capitol Complex recycling
program; and planning, designing, managing, and operating the statewide TEX-AN
communications network and the Capitol Complex Centralized Telephone System.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Revised Civil Statutes Annotated, Article 601b

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:Resource Support

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Recovery
Public Works and Engineering
Direction and Control
Transportation
Donations Management
Terrorist Incident Response

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Governor's Division of Emergency Management (GDEM)

GDEM, as a legislated operational arm of the Governor's Office, administers a


program of comprehensive emergency management throughout the State to
reduce the vulnerability of citizens and communities of Texas to damage, injury,
and loss of life and property from natural or man-made disasters, riots, and/or
hostile military or paramilitary actions. The Governor has designated the Director
of the Office of Homeland Security as the Director of GDEM who in turn has
appointed a State Coordinator to manage the activities of the Division. GDEM
administers a variety of emergency management programs, provides guidance and
technical assistance, and coordinates emergency management activities at the
State, local, and federal government level to mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and
recover from emergencies and disasters.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Disaster Act of 1975 (Government Code, Chapter 418)

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Donations Management

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Warning
Communications
Radiological Emergency Management
Evacuation
Firefighting
Search and Rescue
Terrorist Incident Response

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9

SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Office of the Attorney General (OAG)

The Texas Attorney General is charged to defend the laws and the Constitution of
the State of Texas, represent the State in litigation, and approve public bond
issues. The Attorney General also serves as legal counsel to over 300 boards and
agencies of the state government. The OAG additionally serves and protects the
rights of all citizens of Texas through many of its activities, including consumer and
environmental protection, criminal law enforcement, financial litigation, and health
and safety enforcements, to name only a few. The OAG further collects unpaid
debts owed to the State as well as interpreting and defending state laws. The OAG
represents the State in civil matters and in criminal cases in the federal appellate
courts and may assist local prosecutors at their invitation. Civil matters include
antitrust activities, sales, deceptive trade practices, and other tax collection; bond
approval; insurance, banking, and securities activities; labor, agriculture, and
housing activities; environmental protection and energy law; representation of the
State's agencies and officials; investigation of crime victim's requests for
assistance; administration of the state workers' compensation system; and
investigation of Medicaid fraud. The OAG also is responsible for enforcing child
support to assist the families of non-supporting parents by locating the parents,
establishing paternity and court-ordered support obligations, and by enforcing
collection of established obligations. The OAG additionally administers the Crime
Victims' Compensation Program as well as the Court-Appointed Volunteer
Advocate program, which provides volunteer guardian assistance to juveniles.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Constitution, Article IV, Section I


Texas Government Code, Chapter 402

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Law Enforcement
Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Office of Rural Community Affairs (ORCA)

ORCA was created in 2001 during the 77th legislative session (House Bill 7) to
serve as a focal agency for the states health, economic development, and
community development programs targeting rural Texas communities.
The agencys goal is to assure a continuing focus on rural issues, monitor
governmental actions affecting rural Texas, research problems and recommend
solutions, and coordinate rural programs among state agencies.
The Office administers programs supporting rural health care, the federal
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) non-entitlement program, and
programs designed to improve the leadership capacity of rural community
leaders. The Office also coordinates and monitors the states effort to improve
the results and cost-effectiveness of programs affecting rural communities, as
well as provide an annual evaluation of the condition of rural Texas Communities.
House Bill 7 created ORCA by merging three existing programs administered by
the state: the Center for Rural Health Initiatives (CRHI), previously associated
with the Department of Health, the Texas Community Development Program
(TCDP) and Local Government Services (LGS), both from the Department of
Housing and Community Affairs.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

House Bill 7, 77th Legislature

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Recovery
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUC)

The mission of the PUC is to assure the availability of safe, reliable, high quality
services that meet the needs of all Texans at just and reasonable rates. To
accomplish this mission, the PUC shall regulate electric and telecommunications
utilities as required while facilitating competition, operation of the free market, and
customer choice.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Revised Civil Statutes, Article 1446c, Section 5

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Energy and Utilities

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Direction and Control

MEMBER OF CIPC

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC)

The RRC has regulatory responsibility over oil and gas exploration, development,
and production operations; gas utilities; pipeline and rail safety; the liquefied
petroleum gas industry; and the surface mining of coal, uranium, and iron ore
gravel. In particular, the agency administers regulations to protect public health
and safety and the environment from activities associated with oil and gas
exploration, development and production operations, which include pipeline
transportation of crude oil and natural gas, underground storage of hydrocarbons,
and management of oil and gas waste. The RRC administers an industry-funded
program to plug abandoned wells and clean-up abandoned, contaminated surface
sites, and manages crude oil and natural gas conservation programs. The RRC
also ensures a continuous, safe supply of natural gas is available to Texas
consumers at a reasonable price; administers a federally funded program to ensure
the safe operation of natural gas and hazardous liquids pipeline systems; and
regulates propane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas to protect
public safety. The agency additionally inspects railroad operations and equipment,
hazardous materials handling on railroads, signal operation, and railroad tracks
within Texas. Another responsibility of the RRC is to regulate surface mining of
coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel as well as to administer a program for reclaiming
abandoned mine lands. Finally the Commission conducts research and educates
the public about propane and other environmentally beneficial fuels and develops
marketing, advertising, and information programs to increase public awareness
about the fuel.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Constitution, Articles X (Sec 2) & XVI (Sec 30)


Texas Revised Civil Statutes, Article 6447

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Public Information
Energy and Utilities
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Transportation

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-11

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

State Auditor's Office (SAO)

SAO is a legislative agency that functions as the independent auditor of the entities
comprising state government in Texas. The Office reviews state agencies,
universities, and programs for management and fiscal controls, effectiveness,
efficiency, performance measures, and legal compliance. The State Auditor serves
under the general guidance of, and is responsible to, the Legislative Audit
Committee, a permanent standing joint committee of the State Legislature. The
Office also provides other services, such as responding to legislative requests,
advising state agencies, designing and developing technical training for internal
auditors, and managing the state employee position classification system.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Government Code, Section 321.005

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Direction and Control

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

State Comptroller of Public Accounts (CPA)

The State Comptroller serves as the chief fiscal and revenue forecasting officer for
the State of Texas. The State Comptroller administers and enforces revenueproducing tax laws; collects, processes, and deposits state revenue collections in
the State Treasury; monitors and approves expenditures of appropriated state
funds; provides accounting services to state agencies; and estimates state revenue
for the purpose of certifying legislative appropriations. The State Comptroller also
administers certain state energy programs and the oil overcharge fund. The
primary functions of the Comptroller's Office are tax administration, funds
management, and central administration.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Constitution, Article IV, Section 1


Texas Government Code, Chapter 403

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Recovery
Energy and Utilities
Direction and Control
Donations Management

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-13

Attachment 9

SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP)

TCFP regulates and provides technical and financial assistance to paid fire
protection personnel and fire departments of municipalities, counties, specialpurpose districts, and other political subdivisions of the State. It adopts regulations
for certification of marine and aircraft crash and rescue fire protection personnel.
The Commission establishes minimum educational, training, physical, and mental
standards for fire protection personnel and may establish standards for advanced
or specialized fire-protection personnel.
The Commission inspects municipalities to assess the public firefighting services
and capabilities and reviews the key rate schedule of the Department of Insurance
and makes recommendations for revisions, which may affect fire insurance rates.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Government Code, Title 4, Sections 419.002 and 419.004

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Firefighting
Public Information
Direction and Control
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-14

Attachment 9

SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Aging & Disability Services (DADS)

To be published

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

To be published

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR: None


SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Health & Medical Services

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-15

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Agriculture (TDA)

TDA is involved in regulatory activities, marketing, producers outreach, public


health, agricultural resource protection, agricultural research and economic
analysis activities and administers more than fifty separate laws. Current duties
include controlling destructive plant pests and diseases; ensuring the quality of
seed sold in the State; testing and certifying the accuracy of weights and measures
used in commercial transactions; regulating the sale, use, and disposal of
pesticides and herbicides; promoting Texas agricultural products locally, nationally,
and internationally; and providing financial assistance in agricultural and rural
economic development through the Texas Agricultural Finance Authority.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Agriculture Code, Title 2, Chapter 11

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Radiological Emergency Management


Direction and Control
Food and Water

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-16

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services (DARS)

MISSION:

To be published

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

To be published

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Health & Medical Services

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-17

Attachment 9

SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Economic Development (TXED)

TXED is the primary economic development and tourism agency in the State. The
Department works in partnership with economic development organizations,
businesses, communities, government entities, and elected officials by creating
opportunities for growth among Texas companies and exhibits Texas' relative
economic strengths to companies planning to relocate. TXED also provides
business, economic analysis, and financial assistance to Texas communities and
to businesses seeking to expand or locate in Texas; promotes Texas as an ideal
international business location; and provides assistance to Texas companies
seeking to export goods or services. The Department additionally promotes the
State of Texas as a key travel destination through an extensive national and
international media campaign which includes providing information to the travel
industry to assist in selling Texas more aggressively and knowledgeably;
conducting familiarization tours for travel writers, tour operators, and travel
counselors; and participating in travel missions in key national and international
markets.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Revised Civil Statute, Article 4413 (301)

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Public Information
Direction and Control

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-18

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ)

The mission of TDCJ is to provide public safety, promote positive change in


offender behavior, reintegrate offenders into society, and assist victims of crime.
The Department, under the operational leadership of an executive director and
delegated staff, is aligned organizationally to address specialized functions. The
Institutional, State Jail, Parole, and Community Justice Assistance Divisions
provide either direct or indirect supervision and rehabilitative services to offenders
within the criminal justice system. Eleven support divisions plan, execute, and
manage the logistical functions necessary to maintain the Departments daily
operations. Within this category, services range from administrative support and
facility construction to industry operations, financial management, and employee
recruitment.
In regard to the TDCJ program for use of offender labor for community and public
service, it is the policy of the TDCJ to provide offender labor for the purposes of
developing lands pursuant to a public service program; providing improvement and
beautification to units/facilities; providing vocational programs for offenders; aiding
offenders transition between confinement and society thus reducing recidivism;
saving taxpayer dollars; and similar purposes which serve the public interest. This
program provides offender labor to state agencies, local governments and entities,
and non-profit organizations. This program is in place to provide services to the
general public and enhance social welfare and the general well being of the
community.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Government Code, Chapter 493

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Transportation

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Firefighting
Law Enforcement
Health and Medical Services
Public Works and Engineering
Resource Support
Direction and Control
Search and Rescue
Food and Water

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-19

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Family & Protective Services (DFPS)

The mission of DFPS is to protect the unprotected children, elderly, and people
with disabilities from abuse, neglect, and exploitation.
DFPS provides adult protective services for elderly people and those with
disabilities and child protective services for children in their own homes and in
foster care. The agency also licenses child care facilities, including day care
homes and centers and residential child-care facilities, and manages communitybased programs that prevent delinquency, abuse, neglect, and exploitation of
children, the elderly, and disabled.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

To be published

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Law Enforcement

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-20

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Health (TDH)

TDH serves as the state's primary agency for public health planning, services, and
regulation. Public health programs of TDH are grouped into six major areas of
responsibility: health care delivery, disease control and prevention, health care
financing, special health services, environmental and consumer health, and public
health regions. Services are provided both directly and by contract with local public
and private providers throughout the state.
TDH provides a wide-range of public health services, operates the state's Bureau
of Vital Statistics, and certifies and licenses emergency medical services (EMS)
personnel and organizations.
TDH also licenses the possession and use of radioactive materials in Texas, and
department field inspectors ensure that high safety standards are maintained.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Health and Safety Code, Chapter 11

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Radiological Emergency Management


Health and Medical Services

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Public Information
Direction and Control
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Transportation
Donations Management
Food and Water
Terrorist Incident Response

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-21

Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Housing & Community Affairs (TDHCA)

TDHCA's responsibilities are to assist local governments in providing essential


public services to their residents in overcoming financial, social, and environmental
problems; to provide for the housing needs of persons and families of low and
moderate income; to contribute to the preservation, development, and
redevelopment of neighborhoods and communities; to serve as an advocate for
local governments by assisting the Governor and the Legislature in coordinating
federal and state programs affecting local governments; and to provide information
to federal and state offices and the public on methods by which local governments
can be assisted. This includes fostering intergovernmental cooperation, regional
and community services, rural community services, education and training,
research, and economic opportunity; issuing bonds, notes, or other obligations to
finance multi-family housing developments or single-family residential housing;
providing grants to reduce malnutrition and to provide a healthier environment for
the elderly, persons with disabilities, and other special needs populations; providing
emergency and permanent shelter, utilities, nutrition, clothing, medical, and other
homeless services; providing energy-related assistance to low-income individuals
for home weatherization, utility assistance, and financial intervention for energy
crisis emergencies; providing affordable housing to low-income persons and
providing developers of low-income housing with dollar-for-dollar reduction in
federal tax liability for the purpose of promoting the production of low income rental
housing; administering housing-related programs and providing funds for rental and
home ownership housing to low-income and very low-income persons through
housing acquisition, new construction, rehabilitation, and tenant-based assistance;
providing grants to large communities for improvements to public facilities and
services, physical planning, and economic development; and ensuring that
manufactured homes are well constructed and safe, that homes are installed
correctly, that consumers are provided fair and effective remedies, and that
measures are taken to provide economic stability for the Texas manufactured
housing industry.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Government Code, Section 2306.021

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Recovery
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Human Services (DHS)

TDHS provides quality services, which have a positive impact on the lives of
eligible Texans. Services include (1) financial assistance, medical benefits, food
stamps, special food and nutrition programs, and assistance to victims of natural
disasters; (2) case management, and support services to help Aid For Families
With Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients, food stamp recipients, and lowincome families become and stay self-sufficient; (3) community care for people who
are aged or disabled, including meals, attendant care, nursing care, physical
rehabilitation, emergency response, adult foster care, and residential care; and (4)
institutional care, when appropriate, for people who are aged or disabled, including
nursing facility care. DHS also exercises state responsibility for the state
Repatriation Program.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Human Resource Code, Section 21.001

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Food and Water

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Shelter and Mass Care


Health and Medical Services
Recovery
Direction and Control

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Insurance (TDI)

TDI works for the availability of quality insurance products for all Texans at
reasonable prices and under reasonable terms and strives to protect the public
from the adverse consequences of insurer insolvency. TDI is also tasked to
enforce solvency standards and promote competition in the industry while
protecting the public from fraud, misrepresentation, and unfair practices. The TDI
is responsible to educate the public about insurance so that Texans can make
informed choices, and the Department will insist that the industry be responsible to
its customers. Specifically, TDI is responsible to ensure that insurance will be
available at the lowest possible cost to all consumers who need it; that consumers'
insurance assets are protected; that efforts to ensure prices are fair and
reasonable; and that claims are handled fairly, promptly, and professionally.
The Office of the State Fire Marshal investigates arson and suspected arson, and
administers and enforces applicable provisions of the Insurance Code and other
laws.
The State Fire Marshal also develops educational programs and
disseminates materials for public education in fire prevention and safety.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Insurance Code, Article 1.02

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Firefighting
Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:
MISSION:

Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (MHMR)

MHMR is the mental health authority in the State of Texas. The Department
operates and manages a series of residential and treatment facilities. In all, MHMR
provides services through its nine (9) State Hospitals, twelve (12) State Schools,
two (2) State Centers, and thirteen (13) State Operated Community Centers. The
Department also contracts with thirty-six (36) Community MHMR Centers.
The Department strives to respond to the diverse needs of all people with mental
illness and mental retardation by creating an accessible system of services that
supports individual choices and promotes lives of dignity and independence.
The Disaster Assistance Program is located within the Office of the Medical
Director. The mission of the program is to assist in reducing, alleviating and/or
preventing adverse emotional reactions to all citizens in the State of Texas who
may be exposed to serve traumatic events. In short, the major goal of the program
is to prevent citizens from entering the MHMR system, support those who do, and
assist in promoting dignity and independence of all. The program is also designed
to enhance all MHMR facilities and community centers in promoting and assisting
in mitigation, preparedness, planning, and recovery from facility-level emergencies.
The Disaster Assistance Program also provides, independently and as a member
of the State Crisis Consortium, Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) and
Crisis Counseling. CISM and/or Crisis Counseling may be provided to emergency
responders, recovery personnel, and other groups as requested. MHMR may be
required or requested to provide state-level CISM event management and/or assist
in the coordination of a situation requiring a CISM response.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Health and Safety Code, Title 7, Chapter 532

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Health and Medical Services


Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control
Transportation
Terrorist Incident Response

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Public Safety (DPS)

DPS has responsibilities in three major areas: traffic law enforcement (TLE),
criminal law enforcement (CLE), and emergency management. TLE serves as the
State's police authority and is responsible for the supervision of traffic on Texas
roadways. It also administers the state driver and vehicle regulatory laws and
provides key assistance in the area of criminal law enforcement, furnishes security
officers for the Governor, and provides security and law enforcement for the State
Capitol, Capitol Complex, and various other state office buildings. CLE is
responsible for investigation of criminal activity in Texas and works closely with
local law enforcement agencies to investigate crime. This includes investigating
the illegal traffic of controlled substances and dangerous drugs; gathering and
analyzing information to suppress, investigate, and prosecute crime and corruption
in Texas; identifying stolen vehicles and apprehending individuals involved in auto
theft; administering polygraph examinations; and examining and analyzing physical
evidence (e.g., fingerprints, DNA, etc.). The Director of DPS is appointed as the
State Director of Emergency Management by the Governor and in this capacity
chairs the State Emergency Management Council and is responsible, through the
State Coordinator, for all activities of the Governor's Division of Emergency
Management (GDEM).

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Government Code, Chapter 411

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Warning
Evacuation
Law Enforcement
Terrorist Incident Response

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Radiological Emergency Management
Firefighting
Public Information
Direction and Control
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Search and Rescue
Transportation

MEMBER OF CIPC

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

Department of State Health Services (DSHS)

MISSION:

To be published

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

To be published

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Health and Medical Services

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Public Information
Direction & Control
Hazardous Materials & Oil Spill Response
Transportation
Donations Management
Food & Water
Terrorist Incident Response

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Department of Transportation (TxDOT)

TxDOT provides for the safe, effective, and efficient movement of people and
goods over state-maintained highways and farm-to-market/ranch roads, via public
transportation systems, and at airports throughout the State. TxDOT receives,
disburses, and administers federal and state funds for general aviation airports and
assists small communities in building, maintaining, and upgrading airports;
supervises the design, environmental oversight, acquisition of right-of-way,
materials testing and validation, construction, and maintenance of state highways;
issues oversize/overweight load permits and is responsible for commercial motor
carrier insurance filings and registration, vehicle storage facilities licensing, and
interstate movement authority; licenses new car dealers, distributors, converters,
and manufacturers doing business in Texas to include enforcement of the Lemon
Law; provides financial and technical assistance to urban, rural, and elderly or
disabled public transit providers; regulates outdoor advertising and junkyards;
oversees programs in traffic engineering, traffic safety, railroad crossing and
signals, and traffic management; supports tourism by operating travel information
centers and publishing travel literature; administers the statewide system for
collecting fees for motor vehicle registration and certificates of title; and advises on
international transportation in the region on both sides of the 2,000-mile U.S.Mexico border.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Revised Civil Statue, Article 6663

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Public Works and Engineering

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Evacuation
Firefighting
Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Transportation
Terrorist Incident Response

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Education Agency (TEA)

TEA performs specific statutory functions relating to public education for grades
pre-kindergarten through 12. The responsibility for public education in Texas is
divided between local school district authorities and the State with the majority of
responsibilities vested in 1000+ local school districts.
The primary state responsibility is allocating state funds to local school districts
through per capita aid and payments from the Foundation School Program. TEA
also handles federal funds related to public education.
TEA is organized to improve the effectiveness of school teachers and
administrators; to enhance educational programs for students; to provide funding to
local districts while ensuring proper use of state and federal funds; to conduct
educational research; to develop and administer student and teacher testing
programs; and to provide comprehensive information bases.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Constitution, Art. VII, Section 8


Texas Education Code, Section 11.01

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Shelter and Mass Care


Direction and Control
Transportation

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX)

TEEX is dedicated to serving the needs of Texans through training, retraining,


continuing education, technical assistance, and technology transfer. The Agency
offers more than 700 different training programs that focus on the needs of private
industry or assist public agencies in complying with local policies and meeting state
and federal laws.
All training is designed to increase the skills of employed workers. Special
emphasis is placed on increasing safety in the workplace, protecting property,
building minority-owned business, and increasing productivity in the work place
across the Nation and around the world.
TEEX provides training in the following disciplines: electronics, electric power and
safety, fire protection, construction equipment and public works, law enforcement
and security, occupational and environmental safety, management, small
businesses, transportation, telecommunications, water and wastewater. TEEX
also operates the mid-continent Technology Transfer Center (one of six in the
Nation) which serves a 14-state area.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Education Code, Section 88.001

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Search and Rescue

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Firefighting
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Transportation
Terrorist Incident Response

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Forest Service (TFS)

TFS develops and implements a coordinated plan for effective forest fire protection
for over 20 million acres in 52 East Texas counties. The agency also provides
assistance and direction in the suppression of major wildland fires throughout the
State as needed. TFS additionally plans and conducts a cooperative fire protection
program with rural communities and neighborhood groups, providing development,
organizational, and material assistance. TFS provides support and assistance in
search and rescue, law enforcement, hazardous materials, evacuation,
reconnaissance, communications, and direction and control as needed.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Education Code, Section 88.101

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Firefighting

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Law Enforcement
Public Information
Recovery
Public Works and Engineering
Resource Support
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Search and Rescue
Terrorist Incident Response

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ)

TCEQ is a public agency dedicated to protecting human health and the


environment through efforts to ensure clean air, clean water, and proper and safe
disposal of various forms of pollutants, consistent with sustainable economic
development.
The agency is actively engaged in five major activities:
water resource
management, air quality, waste management, legal and regulatory services, and
administrative services.
One of TCEQ's primary goals is to protect public health and safety and the
environment by reducing the release of pollutants and contaminants, ensuring that
waste, including low-level radioactive waste, is properly managed and safely
disposed of, and expediting the cleanup of contaminated sites. TCEQ is
responsible for managing the State's water resources, enforcing compliance with
state and federal clean air and water laws, dam safety, floodplain management
activities, and for providing meteorological / climatological services.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Constitution, Article III, Section 49-C


Texas Water Code, Sections 5.001, and 5.051

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Radiological Emergency Management


Health and Medical Services
Public Information
Recovery
Public Works and Engineering
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Transportation
Food and Water
Terrorist Incident Response

MEMBER OF CIPC

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

9-32

Attachment 9

SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD)

TPWD provides outdoor recreational opportunities through managing and


protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat and acquiring and managing parklands and
historic areas.
TPWD administers hunter and water safety programs, protects and manages
wildlife habitat and resources, enforces game, fish, and water safety laws, acquires
and oversees public lands including wildlife management areas, state parks, and
historic sites.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Parks and Wildlife Code, Section 11.011

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Communications
Shelter and Mass Care
Radiological Emergency Management
Law Enforcement
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation
Hazardous Materials and Oil Spill Response
Search and Rescue
Transportation

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Rehabilitation Commission (TRC)

TRC is a "Human Energy Agency" that provides services to Texans with disabilities
who are attempting to be more independent, more productive, and more involved in
their communities.
TRC serves as the State's principal authority on the rehabilitation of persons with
disabilities, except those with visual impairments and those who are legally blind.
The Commission administers a variety of programs and manages transitional
planning and services for mentally retarded, mentally ill, and developmentally
disabled offenders, and provides administrative support services to the Texas
Planning Council for Developmental Disabilities.
TRC is actively involved in providing services for comprehensive medical
rehabilitation, disability determination, vocational rehabilitation, extended
rehabilitation, and support for independent living centers located across the State.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Human Resource Code, Section 111.011

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Health and Medical Services


Direction and Control

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

Texas Workforce Commission (TWC)

TWC serves in a dual function as both an employment service and an agency for
the payment of unemployment benefits.
TWC's primary objectives are to promote the well-being of individuals in the State's
labor force, to participate in the development and full use of employment
resources, and to serve employers. TWC's specific responsibilities include the
operation of efficient employment and training programs that help individuals find
employment and furnish employers with qualified applicants and personnel
services, and the operation of an unemployment insurance program involving the
collection of unemployment insurance taxes with which to pay benefits to assist the
unemployed and cushion a community's economy against the detrimental effects of
unemployment. TWC also develops and analyzes labor market information and
related data to assess labor force characteristics and needs.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Labor Code, Chapter 202

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Recovery
Resource Support
Direction and Control
Donations Management

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES

AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:

MISSION:

The Salvation Army (TSA)

The Salvation Army (TSA) is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church
with a mission to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs
without discrimination. TSA provides temporary shelter to those individuals in
financial straits; low-cost housing to those living on pensions or social security;
maternity homes for unwed mothers; emergency shelters, medical and counseling
services for women alcoholics and drug addicts; homes for predelinquent
adolescent girls; other children's homes; and day care centers. TSA provides
financial assistance to families as well as counseling regarding marriages,
child/parent relationships, and the problems of adolescents.
TSA works
cooperatively with the judicial, prison, and probation systems to include ministering
to inmates, pre-release job training, community-based rehabilitation centers,
halfway houses, and work-release programs. During major disasters, The
Salvation Army works cooperatively with federal, state, and local emergency
management agencies to meet various emergencies by providing food, clothing,
crisis counseling, and spiritual comfort to the disaster victims. The Salvation Army
also accepts cases to search for missing persons in all parts of the world.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

None; founded in 1865 in London, England

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

Shelter and Mass Care

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Public Information
Recovery
Direction and Control
Food and Water
Terrorist Incident Response

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Attachment 9
SUMMARY OF
AGENCY EMERGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES
AGENCY/ORGANIZATION:
MISSION:

Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)

The mission of the TAHC is the prevention, surveillance, control, diagnosis, and
eradication of certain diseases and conditions affecting livestock, poultry, and exotic
animals, some of which have human health implications. These functions contribute
to the building of a solid foundation for economic prosperity while decreasing the
human health risks for the people of Texas.
The Commission is directed to protect livestock, domestic animals, and domestic
fowl from all diseases recognized as communicable by the veterinary profession;
may act to eradicate or control any disease or agent of transmission for any
disease that affects livestock, exotic livestock, domestic animals, domestic fowl,
exotic fowl, or canines, regardless of whether the disease is communicable; and
may adopt any rules necessary to carry out the purposes of this action, including
rules for testing, movement, inspection, and treatment.
TAHC consists of a central office in Austin and eight area offices strategically
located across the State. The Commission also works in cooperation, and is
partially funded by the U.S. Department of Agricultures Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service, Veterinary Services (USDA-APHIS-VS). Field veterinarians
and livestock inspectors are the first line of communication between TAHC and
producers. They test livestock on ranches and farms, inspect livestock markets to
ensure that diseased animals are shipped to proper destinations, and check
livestock shipments entering the State to make certain health certificates and
permits are valid. They determine when a disease or dangerous pest is present
and what animals may be exposed or at risk, communicate with producers to
develop epidemiological information, collect specimens, and interpret test results.
TAHC operates the Texas Emergency Response Team (TERT), which ensures
adequate planning, collaboration, and coordination among the States animal
health-related agencies, agriculture industries, and other related agencies and
parties including universities, other government officials, and private veterinarians
regarding emergency disease situations in livestock. The TERT may also assist in
responding to natural and human-caused emergencies and disasters.

ENABLING LEGISLATION:

Texas Agricultural Code, Chapter 148


Texas Agricultural Code, Chapters 161-168

PRIMARY AGENCY FOR:

None

SUPPORT AGENCY FOR:

Health and Medical Services


Terrorist Incident Response
Recovery
Public Information
Direction and Control
Hazard Mitigation

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan (Rev 5)

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Links for Additional Information on Part III State Emergency Management Plan
The Division of Emergency Management web-site is a source of valuable information on
emergency response in Texas. The link to the downloadable documents page of the
DEM site contains documents and templates useful for state and local response in Texas.
Texas Division of Emergency Management Home Page
Downloadable Documents from the Texas Division of Emergency Management
The Texas State Emergency Plan includes annexes that provide detailed information.
Click on the annex to view it on the DEM website
A: Warning
B: Communications
C: Shelter and Mass Care
D: Radiological Emergency Management
E: Evacuation
F: Firefighting
o

Appendix 4 to Annex F Fire Districts

G: Law Enforcement
H: Health and Medical Services
o

Appendix 3 to Annex H Organizational Chart

Appendix 4 to Annex H Foreign Animal Disease

I: Public Information
J: Recovery
K: Public Works and Engineering
L: Energy and Utilities
M: Resource Support
N: Direction and Control
P: Hazard Mitigation
Q: HazMat & Oil Spill Response
R: Search and Rescue
S: Transportation
T: Donations Management
U: Terrorism Incident Response
V: Food and Water
W: Military Support

Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan - Part III - State of Texas Emergency Management Plan
Links to Annexes