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2013

Undergraduate
Handbook

School of Mechanical and


Aerospace Engineering

Undergraduate Student Handbook

MAE Handbook 2013 e-version 1.5

This Handbook is based on information available at the time of


publication. The School reserves the rights to make changes
without notice. Students are advised to check the Schools
website (www.mae.ntu.edu.sg) and their emails regularly for
updated information.

Table of Contents
The School .................................................................................................... 3
Key Faculty Members .................................................................................. 4
Undergraduate Office/Pastoral Care Unit Contact Information .................. 7
General NTU Contact Information ............................................................... 9
Academic Mentoring Scheme ....................................................................11
Leadership Development Programme .......................................................12
MAE Club....................................................................................................13
Overseas Programme .................................................................................14
URECA ........................................................................................................17
Overview of Curriculum .............................................................................18
Grade Point Average System .....................................................................23
Curriculum (Mechanical Engineering) ........................................................32
Curriculum (Aerospace Engineering) .........................................................35
Major Prescribe Electives ..........................................................................38
Minor Programmes ...................................................................................41
Design Stream ............................................................................................42
Mechatronics Stream .................................................................................44
Laboratory Experiments.............................................................................46
Engineering Innovation and Design ...........................................................48
Attachment Programme ............................................................................49
Final Year Project .......................................................................................51

Undergraduate Student Handbook

The School
Vision
A global leader in education and research in Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering, preferred by students, industry and the
community.

Mission

To provide world-class education and conduct cutting-edge research


to achieve international eminence.

To nurture leaders and professionals to serve society with integrity


and excellence.

Degree Programmes
The School offers four degree programmes

Aerospace Engineering
Aerospace Engineering and Economics
Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering and Economics

To produce well-rounded graduates, the School aims to train all students to a


high level of competency in the following key areas: understanding of
fundamental engineering principles, use of equipment and instrumentation,
computation, projects and experiments. It also provides a stimulating
environment rich in diverse ideas and encourages students to use their
knowledge creatively and innovatively.

Key Faculty Members


Chair
Professor Chua Chee Kai

Phone: 6790 5486 Office: N3-02a-02


Email: d-mae@ntu.edu.sg

Associate Chair (Academic)


Assoc Professor Ooi Kim Tiow
Phone: 6790 4725 Office: N3-02a-10
Email: vd-mae-acad@ntu.edu.sg

Associate Chair (Graduate Studies)


Assoc Professor Ong Lin Seng
Phone: 6790 6827 Office: N3-02a-25
Email: ac-mae-gs@ntu.edu.sg

Associate Chair (Research)


Professor Lam Yee Cheong
Phone: 6790 6957 Office:N3-02a-06
Email: vd-mae-res@ntu.edu.sg

Assistant Chair (Students)


Assoc Professor Lee Yong Tsui
Phone: 6790 5867 Office: N3-02a-08
Email: sd2-mae@ntu.edu.sg

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Key Faculty Members


Assistant Chair (Alumni & Development)
Assoc Professor Chou Siaw Meng
Phone: 6790 4958 Office: N3.2-02-71
Email: sd1-mae@ntu.edu.sg

Head-Aerospace Engineering
Assoc Professor Ng Teng Yong
Phone: 6790 4963 Office: N3.2-02-04
Email: h-dase@ntu.edu.sg

Head-Engineering Mechanics
Assoc Professor Ang Wei Tech
Phone: 6790 5521 Office: N3.2-02-83
Email: h-dem@ntu.edu.sg

Head-Manufacturing Engineering
Assoc Professor Sridhar Idapalapati
Phone: 6790 4782 Office: N3.2-01-15
Email: h-dmer@ntu.edu.sg

Head-Mechatronics & Design

Assoc Professor Phee Soo Jay, Louis


Phone: 6790 4367 Office: N3-02c-85
Email: h-dmd@ntu.edu.sg

Key Faculty Members


Head-Systems & Engineering
Management
Assoc Professor Leong Kah Fai
Phone: 6790 4364 Office: N3.2-01-04
Email: h-dsem@ntu.edu.sg

Head-Thermal & Fluids Engineering


Professor Lua Aik Chong

Phone: 6790 4366 Office:N3-02b-60


Email: h-dtfe@ntu.edu.sg

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Undergraduate Office
This unit provides a variety of administrative services for our undergraduate
students.
6790 5492 : N2-02a-14 : askMAE@ntu.edu.sg

ChongPY@ntu.edu.sg

Ms Chong
Poh Yee
Student
Exchange
Ms Yeoh Lok
Po Carol

lpyeoh@ntu.edu.sg

mklho@ntu.edu.sg

AltheaChua@ntu.edu.sg

Chua
Student
Activities

Course
Registration

Ms Agatha
Ho Kim Lan
FYP

Ms Thaiyana
Engineering
Innovation
& Design
Thaiyana@ntu.edu.sg

Ms Altthea

Ms Susan
Tan
Attachment

SusanTanPP@ntu.edu.sg

Pastoral Care Unit


This unit provides student counseling and pastoral care for all MAE students.

Pastoral
Care
Unit

Mr. Koh Wee Hock


Phone: 6790 5507
Email: mwhkoh@ntu.edu.sg
Office: N3-02a-22

Ms Patt Choi Wah


Phone: 6790 4241
Email: CWPatt@ntu.edu.sg
Office: N3-02a-22

Undergraduate Student Handbook

General NTU Contact Information


Department / Enquiry of
General Issues such as

Location / General Contact

Office of Academic Services

Location: Student Services Centre, Level 1

Registration schedule, examination


timetable, course vacancy, minor
programmes,
satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) option,
examination timetable and venue,
change of programme, defer national
service training letter, request for letter
of certification, withdrawal from
programme

Office Operating Hours:


Mon to Thu: 8.30am to 5.45 pm
Fri: 8.30am to 5.15 pm
For enquiries on Matriculation/Change of
Programme/Leave of Absence
Tel: 6592 2451
Email: matric@ntu.edu.sg
For enquiries on Course Registration
Tel: 6592 2445/ 2446
Email: regn_course@ntu.edu.sg
For enquiries on Examinations/ Transcripts
Tel: 6592 2447/ 2448
Email: exam@ntu.edu.sg
For enquiries on Convocation
Tel: 6592 2449/ 2450
Email: convo@ntu.edu.sg

Student Wellbeing Centre

Location: Student Services Centre, Level 5

Professional counseling, group


programmes and talks, training
workshops

Office Operating Hours:


Mon to Thu: 8.30am to 5.45 pm
Fri: 8.30am to 5.15 pm
Tel: 6790 4462
Email: studentwellbeing@ntu.edu.sg

Centre for IT Services


Computer account, resetting password,
unlocking of NTU Network or Windows
Live account, email application matters

IT Service Counters:
1) Academic Complex North, N2.1 - B1
2) Lee Wee Nam Library, IT Helpdesk, Level 2
Tel: 6790 4357 (from 7:00am to 11:00pm daily)

General NTU contact Information


Department / Enquiry of General
Issues such as

Location / General Contact

Career & Attachment Office

Location: Student Services Centre, Level 4

Industrial Attachment (IA), Industrial


Orientation (IO)

Tel: 6790 6575


Email: cao@ntu.edu.sg

Centre for Excellence in Learning


and Teaching

Location: Academic Complex North, N2.1 - B1

edveNTUre e-learning portal

Email: bb-help@ntu.edu.sg

International Student Centre

Location: International House Level 2

For International Students: Hospitalisation


and surgical insurance, pastoral care,
scholarships and financial assistance

Tel: 6790 6823 (during office hrs)


Crisis hotline: 9721 8066 (24-hr hotline)

Tel: 6790 5223

Email: isc@ntu.edu.sg

Student Affairs Office

Location: Student Services Centre, Level 5 & 6

For all undergraduates: ECA certificate and


record, EZ-Link Concession Card, student
organisations, undergraduate housing,
transportation, lost & found

Email: sao-fa@ntu.edu.sg

For International Students: Immigration


(including Student's Pass and medical
examination), Part-time employment

Medical Centre

Location: South Academic Complex SS3-B2-15

Fullerton Healthcare Group @ Gethin-Jones,


NTU

Tel: 6793 6974 or 6793 6828

Note: (last registration is half an hour before


closing time)

Consultation Hours: Mon to Thu: 0830hrs to


1230hrs, 1400hrs to 1700hrs Fri: 0830hrs to
1230hrs, 1400hrs to 1630hrs Sat: 0930hrs to
1200hrs

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Academic Mentoring Scheme


Introduction
The objectives of the student mentoring scheme are to help students adapt
to undergraduate life and academic study in MAE, to establish rapport and
encourage interaction between academic staff and students, to provide a
feedback channel for students, and to provide academic, study and career
advice to students.
Mentors for Year 1 students
Each year one student will be assigned a professor as his/her mentor. At the
beginning of the semester, students will be informed of their mentors via
email. Each mentor provides academic guidance to students, and may meet
students in groups or individually as appropriate. Students should proactively
seek to meet their mentors if they need help or advice.
Mentors for Year 2 to 4 Students
All year two MAE students will be required to read MA2079 Engineering
Innovation and Design (EID). Students will be assigned into groups for their
EID projects. Each group will have a professor as the EID mentor. The
professor will also be the academic mentor throughout the students
remaining years in MAE.
For more information, students may contact the pastoral
care unit (contact details on page 6). Alternatively,
students may approach:
A/P Lee Yong Tsui (Asst Chair Students)
6790 5867 : N3-02a-08 : mytlee@ntu.edu.sg

11

Leadership Development Programme


The Leadership Development Programme (LDP) is exclusive to the school of
MAE. The aim is to nurture talented MAE undergraduates. It seeks to imbue
bright students with qualities of leadership, inter-personal skills, creative
thinking, independent problem-solving and teamwork, so as to further
enhance their potential as individuals, members of organisations and part of
the society.
LDP students are given the
opportunity
to
participate
in
enrichment seminars, forums and
workshops on personal development,
political awareness and general
knowledge organized by the School,
University or selected external
organisations. LDP students are often selected to be student ambassadors of
the school as well as representatives of the student body.
Programs initiated by LDP members include peer tutoring sessions, social
bonding events, Annual Leadership Speech Series, Project Gratitude and
Project L.O.V.E.-LDP Overseas Volunteer Experience. Project L.O.V.E. aims to
encourage participants to identify what is wrong with the world today and to
take steps to rectify them. Examples of Project L.O.V.E. team achievements
include building of houses in a slum on the outskirts of Manila and teaching
in various schools in and around Neijiang city, just to name a few.
For more information please contact:
A/P Sridhar Idapalapati (LDP Advisor)
6790 4782 : N3.2-01-15 : msridhar@ntu.edu.sg

Undergraduate Student Handbook

MAE Club
MAE club serves to provide assistance to MAE students in terms of academic
and welfare needs. In order to serve the student community, some of the
initiatives undertaken by the club include preparation of lecture notes and
past year paper suggested solutions, organization of information talks such as
the Stream Exposure Talk and Industrial Attachment Talk.
All students of the School are automatically
members of the MAE Club. Therefore, they
can participate in activities organised by
the club. The MAE Club organises more
than ten events every year. Some of the
events include the Exam Welfare Package,
Second-Hand Textbooks Sales, MAE
Sharing Night, Birthday Giveaways, Subcommittee Bonding Session,
Investiture and MAE Games. Another service brought by MAE Club is the use
of MAE Nexus. Officially launched in 2007, the Nexus (located at N3-B3b-08)
serves as a place for group discussions and studying. It is well-equipped with
sofas and discussion tables, as well as daily newspapers and magazines.
Students can visit the MAE website www.maeclub.com for the latest
information.
The MAE Club encourages passionate and dedicated individuals to step
forward and serve the student community by joining the MAE Club
committee.
If you wish to take up an active role in the MAE club, do
send an email to: maincomm@maeclub.com
A/P Lee Yong Tsui (MAE club Advisor)
6790 5867: N3-02a-08 : mytlee@ntu.edu.sg

13

Overseas Programme
Introduction
Overseas programmes allow students to read courses
and/or to work overseas. Earned academic credits
will be counted towards graduation requirements.
Through such programmes, students will be able to:

Experience an international education


Develop global perspectives
Experience cultural immersion
Learn foreign languages
Develop networking opportunities

NTU students who attend overseas programmes will continue to abide by all
rules and regulations set at the University level, as well as at the School level.
NTU students who attend overseas programmes are also our student
ambassadors at the overseas university. The benefits to the students are
enormous but at the same time, there is also a need for students to be able
to cope with the challenges associated with overseas studies. Bearing the
above in mind, it is necessary to be stringent during the selection of
students.
Students should not participate in Overseas Programmes in their final year
due to Final Year Project (FYP) matters.
Detailed information can be found at:
http://www.mae.ntu.edu.sg/CurrentStudents/Undergraduate(FullTime)/Page
s/OverseasProgrammes.aspx

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Overview
Outbound

Semester
Exchange

Semester
Fee-paying

Programme

Other Criteria

GEM
Explorer

3.6

Completed 1 semester of studies at the point of


application and 2 semesters at the point of
admission to the host institution

GEM
Discoverer
(Work &
Study)

2.5

Year 3 standing. To pass all required interviews by


School and/or company. Proficient in Chinese
language (for Work and Study in China)

GEM
Discoverer
(Research
Attachment)

3.5

Year 3 standing
Subjected to availability of projects

Overseas
Attachment
Programme

N.A.

Year 3 standing
To meet all pre-requisites for attachment

SUSEP

3.6

Completed 1 semester of studies at the point of


application and 2 semesters at the point of
admission to NUS/SMU

3.6

Completed 1 semester of studies at the point of


application and 2 semesters at the point of
admission to the host institution. To pass any
required interviews by the Exchange Coordinators

Overseas
Study
Programme
(OSP)
GEM
Discoverer
(Summer
Studies)

Special Term

Min
CGPA

3.0

Completed 1 semester of studies at the point of


application and 2 semesters at the point of
admission to the host institution

GEM
Discoverer
(Prelude)

3.0

Priority for final year students

GEM
Discoverer
(Research
Orientation)

3.5

Year 3 standing
Subjected to availability of projects

15

Contact Details
Programme

Contact Details

GEM Explorer semester


(University level matters)

Office of Global Education and Mobility (OGEM)


Email: GEM-Explorer@ntu.edu.sg

Fee-paying semester
(University level matters)

Office of Academic Services


Student Services Centre, Level 1
Tel: 6592 2446
Fax: 6791 1604 / 6793 1703
Email: ng_prog@ntu.edu.sg

GEM Explorer/Fee-paying semester


(School level academic matters e.g.
course matching)

Ms Chong Poh Yee


Email: ChongPY@ntu.edu.sg
Tel: 6790 5914
Office: N3-02a-14

GEM Explorer/Fee-paying semester


GEM Discoverer (Summer Studies)
Singapore Universities Student
Exchange Programme (SUSEP)
(School level administrative matters)

Ms Chong Poh Yee


Email: ChongPY@ntu.edu.sg
Tel: 6790 5914
Office: N3-02a-14
Ms Thaiyanayagee d/o Venugopalan
Email: Thaiyana@ntu.edu.sg
Tel: 6790 5492
Office: N3-02a-14

GEM Discoverer
(University level matters)

Office of Global Education and Mobility


Email: GEMDiscoverer@ntu.edu.sg

GEM Discoverer (Work and Study)


GEM Discoverer (Research)
GEM Discoverer (Prelude)
(School level matters)

A/P Tan Soon Huat


E-mail: MSHTan@ntu.edu.sg
Tel: 6790 4837
Office: N3.2-02-01

Singapore Universities Student


Exchange Programme (SUSEP)
(University level matters)

Office of Academic Services


Student Services Centre, Level 1
Tel: 6592 2446

Overseas Attachment

Career & Attachment Office (CAO)


Email: cao@ntu.edu.sg

Undergraduate Student Handbook

URECA
The university-wide Undergraduate Research Experience on Campus (URECA)
programme is offered to the most academically able second and third year
undergraduates. This programme enables such students to experience
research first-hand by being immersed in a given research problem for a
period of time. Eligible students who choose to undertake URECA for their
Unrestricted Electives will be awarded the President Research Scholarship
and will be known as President Research Scholars (PRSs). They will receive a
scholarship stipend of $400/month (for ten hours/week) and an award of
three Academic Units. More details on the different categories of
participation may be obtained at: www.ntu.edu.sg/ureca/
PRSs will work on a project under the supervision of a professor for an
average of ten hours/week for eight months in an academic year. A URECA
function will be held in August each year to introduce eligible students to the
programme. The students will be able to select from a list of projects posted
online and meet with the professors to discuss them. As this is a universitywide programme, students are allowed to select projects proposed by
professors from ANY school in fact research with a professor from a
different school is strongly encouraged.

For more information please contact:


A/P Ang Whye Teong (Coordinator)
6790 5937: N3.1-B2c-11: mwtang@ntu.edu.sg

17

Overview of the Curriculum


The Universitys academic structure for its undergraduate programmes is

based on the Academic Unit System. The system provides opportunities for
students to broaden their learning experience and progress at a pace most
suited to their individual needs while maintaining high academic standards.
The main features of the Academic Unit System are the semester
arrangement of the academic year and the use of Academic Units (AU) for
measuring academic workload.
Academic Calendar
The academic year starts off with an orientation week. It is divided into two
semesters, Semester 1 of 18 weeks and Semester 2 of 17 weeks.
Examinations are held at the end of each semester. There are two special
terms during the Semester 2 vacation.
Academic Units
Under the Academic Unit System, each course is assigned a certain number
of AU. The AU is a measure of the student's workload associated with both
class attendance and preparation.
For a typical one-semester course, the number of AU is calculated as follows:

1 hour of lecture/tutorial per week: 1 AU


3 hours laboratory/fieldwork per week: 1 AU

Curriculum Structure/Requirement
The curriculum structure comprises 2 categories of requirements, Major
Requirement and General Education Requirement.
Under Major Requirement, the courses are classified under 2 groups:

Undergraduate Student Handbook

I.
II.

Core Courses (Major Core) these are compulsory courses required


to satisfy a programmes requirement.
Major Prescribed Electives (Major PE) - these are courses for
specialisation in a particular degree programme.

General Education Requirement (GER) is a curriculum requirement for


broadening study and is divided into 3 areas of studies as follows:
i.

Core Courses (GER-Core) (12 AUs)


HW0110 Effective Communication (2 AUs)
HW0210 Technical Communication (2 AUs)
HW0310 Professional Communication (2 AUs)
MA0100 Environmental Sustainability (3 AUs)
MA0101 Singapore Studies (3 AUs)

ii.

Prescribed Electives (GER-PE) (15 AUs)


Cross-disciplinary in nature, GER-PEs courses will provide students
with the fundamental knowledge base and analytical skills in
overlapping fields that will open up more career options for their
future.
S/N

Category

AU

Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences (AHSS)

Business & Management (BM)

Liberal Studies (LS)

Science, Technology & Society (STS)

*The fifth GER-PE (3 AUs) can be read from any category.

iii.

Unrestricted Electives (GER-UE)


These are courses chosen by students to broaden their learning
experience. Unrestricted electives may be taken from the list of
courses offered by the School or, with the approval of the Chair
concerned, from courses offered by other Schools in the University.
For the purpose of fulfilling the requirements of the programme and

19

for classification of the degree, once a course is confirmed by the


student as being registered as a prescribed elective, it cannot be reclassified as an unrestricted elective, and vice-versa.
Students who opt to read for a Minor will read the courses required to fulfill
the requirements of the Minor using the GER-UE requirements. Courses that
are used to fulfill the Minor requirements must be graded.
Prerequisites
Some courses may only be offered to students who have obtained at least
the specified grade in related courses offered at a lower level. These lowerlevel courses are called the prerequisites for the higher-level courses.
Period of Candidature
The period of candidature for each programme is as follows:
Period of Candidature
Programme
Normal

Minimum

Maximum

4-Year Single Degree Programme

4 years

3.5 years

6 years

Direct Entry Single Degree


Programme

3 years

2.5 years

5 years

Double Degree Programme

5 years

4.5 years

7 years

Classification of Students
Students are classified as Year 1 to Year 5 according to the number of AU
earned. Students placed on Academic Warning and Academic Probation will
not be re-classified until they have been restored to good academic standing.

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Graduation and Residential Requirements


To be eligible for the award of a Bachelors degree from NTU, a student must
fulfill the following conditions:
i.
ii.
iii.

A minimum of 69 AUs of graded courses. In addition, at least 60% of


their Core courses and Major PEs must be graded.
Pass all or been exempted from some of the examinations prescribed
for the degree.
Satisfy all other requirements prescribed for the degree.

Transfer of Academic Units


With the prior approval of the Chair, students are allowed to take some
courses from another university and transfer the number of AU earned from
that university towards fulfilling the degree requirements of NTU. This could
include participation in exchange programmes and/or other overseas
programmes. Students who have taken some courses from another
university prior to their admission to NTU may also apply for transfer of
credits earned. They must submit their application for transfer of credits
within the first semester of their enrolment in NTU. Grades obtained for
credits earned in other institutions are not counted in the classification of the
degree awarded. Students who transfer credits from another university must
comply with the requirements in Section on Graduation and Residential
Requirements.
Registration of Courses
All students must register their courses through the Student Automated
Registration System (STARS) according to the schedule announced by the
Office of Academic Services. Students who join any classes without
registration will not be allowed to take the examination(s) for the course(s)
involved.

21

Students with outstanding tuition and hostel rental fees will be denied access
to STARS and barred from course registration. Students must pay their
outstanding fees before registering courses.
Students may add or drop any course provided this is done within the
add/drop period as announced by the Office of Academic Services. A course
that is dropped during the add/drop period will not appear in the official
transcript. A student who is still registered for a course after the add/drop
period but did not subsequently sit for the examination will be deemed to
have read and failed the course. An 'F' will appear on his official transcript.
Examination
An examination for each of the courses offered in the semester is held at the
end of the semester. Students are not allowed to retake courses they have
passed in order to improve on the grades of these courses. The grades for all
attempts in all courses taken by a student are shown in his official transcript.
More information on curriculum and course registration can be found at:
http://www.mae.ntu.edu.sg/CurrentStudents/Undergraduate

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Grade Point Average (GPA) System


GPA Calculation
i.

ii.

Grades and grade points are assigned as follows:


Letter-Grade

Grade Point

A+

5.00

5.00

A-

4.50

B+

4.00

3.50

B-

3.00

C+

2.50

2.00

D+

1.50

1.00

0.00

The following non-letter grades and notations are also used:


*- Course with Pass/Fail grading only
# - Repeated attempt
IP - In Progress
LOA - Leave of absence granted
EX - Exempted from course
TC - Transfer credits
S - Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory

iii.

The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) represents the grade


average of all courses (including failed courses) attempted by a
student. The computation of CGPA is as follows:

23

[Grade Point x AU for Course 1] + [ Grade Point x AU for Course X] + .


[Total AU attempted in all the semesters so far]

iv.

Only letter-graded courses i.e. courses with grades A+, A, A-, ... are
included in the computation of CGPA. Courses where only Pass/Fail
grades are given, where the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option was
invoked, where the students were absent with valid reasons, and
courses that the students are exempted from or are incomplete (i.e.
awarded an IP grade) are not included in the computation of CGPA.
The YGPA and CGPA will be reflected in students transcripts.

v.

The Year Grade Point Average (YGPA) represents the grade average
of all courses (including failed courses) attempted by a student in an
academic year. The computation of YGPA is as follows:
[Grade Point x AU for Course 1] + [ Grade Point x AU for Course X] + ..
[Total AU attempted in an academic year]

vi.

The method of computing the YGPA is similar to that for computing


the CGPA. Courses attempted in the Special Terms are not included
in the computation of the YGPA.

vii.

The CGPA will be reflected in students transcripts.

viii.

An F grade obtained in a course, and a new grade attained for a


repeated attempt of the course, will both be reflected in the
transcript. Both grades will also be counted in the computation of
YGPA (if they are taken within the same academic year) and CGPA.

ix.

Students are not allowed to repeat any courses taken except those
with F grade.

x.

CGPA calculator can be found at:


http://www.mae.ntu.edu.sg/CurrentStudents/Undergraduate

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option
i.

The Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) option allows a student to take


a course on an ungraded basis i.e. no letter grade such as A, B, etc
will be awarded. A course will be indicated as 'S (Satisfactory) if the
final letter grade obtained is a 'C' or better (i.e. grade point of 2.0 and
above). Conversely, it will be indicated as 'U (Unsatisfactory) if the
grade obtained is lower than a C grade. The descriptor Satisfactory
or Unsatisfactory will appear in the result slip and the transcript
issued by the University.

ii.

A student will receive AU towards his degree only if he attains a


Satisfactory (S) grade. He earns no AU for courses with a 'U' grade.
The 'S' or 'U' notations carry no grade point and hence have no effect
on the CGPA and the classification of degrees.

iii.

A student is to select the courses that he would like to be graded S/U


online, before the examinations. Students will be informed each
semester on the period to declare S/U for the courses that they have
registered in that semester. Schools will advise their students on the
courses that are available on S/U option.

iv.

The S/U option does not apply to:


Pass/Fail courses
courses that count towards the requirements for second major
or minor programme
graduate courses
incoming exchange and non-graduating students

v.

The maximum number of AU that a student can choose for S/U


grading during his candidature is as follows:

25

Programme

S/U Quota

For students admitted to Year 1

12 AUs

For students admitted directly to Year 2

9 AUs

vi.

Once opted for S/U grading, the course AU will count towards the
S/U quota regardless of the final results i.e. S, U or absent with valid
reasons (LOA).

vii.

The S/U option that students have exercised for a course is


irrevocable. Hence, students cannot appeal for the course(s) that
they have opted to take on S/U basis to be changed to graded basis
after the exercise for S/U option is over. A student who obtains a 'U'
can repeat the course. However, the 'U' grade that he gets for his
first attempt will remain in his academic record and will be printed in
the transcript issued by the University.

viii.

The repeat attempt(s) of a course will retain the grading option


chosen for the first attempt i.e. S/U or letter-graded. The repeat
course includes replacement courses. The AU of a course that has
been opted for S/U grading will be counted against the S/U quota
only once. Its repeat will not be counted against the quota again.

ix.

Students who exercise the S/U option must comply with the
requirements in Section on Graduation and Residential
Requirements.

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Classification of Degree
The cut-off for each degree class is as follows:
CGPA
Range

Degree Classification
4-year Courses

4.50 - 5.00

First Class(with at least an 'A-' grade for the Final Year Project)

4.00 4.49

2nd Class Upper

3.50 3.99

2nd Class Lower

3.00 3.49

Third Class

2.00 2.99

Pass

Academic Standing
i.

The requirements for graduation are as follows:


Successful completion of the prescribed academic unit
requirement as set out by the programme curriculum.
A minimum CGPA of 2.00 is required at the end of the final
semester of study.
Satisfy all other requirements prescribed for the degree

ii.

The criteria for satisfactory academic standing in any given semester


are:

iii.

maintaining a minimum CGPA of 2.00.

completing at least 75% of the normal AU workload.

Students with poor results will be accorded the following academic


standing and subjected to performance review:

Academic Warning if the CGPA falls below 2.00 for any given
semester.

Academic Probation if the CGPA falls below 2.00 for the


following semester.

Academic Termination if the CGPA falls below 2.00 for the 3rd
consecutive semester, or at the end of the final semester of

27

study. A letter of termination will be issued. Appeal against


termination on the grounds of extenuating circumstances may be
made, subject to the following rules:
o The appeal must be submitted to the relevant School
within 2 weeks after the release of the semester
examination results or before the start of the next
semester, whichever is earlier.
o Normally only one appeal is allowed per candidature.
iv.

A minimum CGPA of 2.0 must be maintained at the end of each


semester to qualify for the overloading of courses.

v.

The Deans list is compiled on a yearly basis. The top 5% of the


cohort, subject to attaining a minimum YGPA of 4.50 and the
specified AU of graded courses by curriculum type taken in NTU in
the academic year, is eligible for the Deans list. Full-time single
degree students have to complete at least 15 AU of graded courses.
Double-degree students have to complete a total of 15 AU of discrete
graded courses from both degrees, and 9 AU of graded courses from
each degree, to be eligible for Deans list. Courses that are graded as
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) and Pass/Fail or those with grades
EX (Exempted), IP (In Progress) and LOA (Leave of Absence) are
not counted in the AU of graded courses for the purpose of
determining the Deans List. Besides this, final year students must
attain at least a Second Upper Honours degree in order to be
considered for the Deans List.

vi.

Students enrolled in the Accelerated Bachelors Programme must


maintain a minimum CGPA of 4.00 in order to remain in the
Programme.

vii.

Credits for courses taken from approved student exchange/feepaying programmes will be excluded from the CGPA computation,
but they will be counted toward the academic unit requirement for
graduation, and reflected in the transcript.

Undergraduate Student Handbook

AU Requirement
AU requirement for graduation is shown in the table below.
Single Degree
Programmes

MAE

GER

Aerospace Engineering
(AE)

Core

4 years or
3.5 years (ABP)
90 AUs

Major PE

6 AUs

Mechanical Engineering (ME)


4 years or
3.5 years
(ABP)
84
AUs

12 AUs
12 AUs

10 AUs

GER PE AHSS

3 AUs

0 AUs

GER PE BM

3 AUs

0 AUs

GER PE STS

3 AUs

0 AUs
3 AUs

GER PE
(Any Category)
GER UE
Total

Double Degree
Programmes
(DDP)

GER

78 AUs

GER Core

GER PE LS

MAE

Direct Entry to Year 2

3 AUs

0 AUs

15 AUs

9 AUs

138 AUs

112 AUs

Aerospace Engineering and


Economics (ASEC)
IA

Mechanical Engineering and


Economics (MEEC)

IO

IA

IO

Core

115 AUs

109 AUs

Major PE

45 AUs

51 AUs

GER Core

12 AUs

GER PE AHSS

0 AUs

GER PE BM

0 AUs

GER PE STS

0 AUs

GER PE LS

0 AUs

GER PE
(AHSS/BM/STS/LS)
GER UE

3 AUs

Total

6 AUs

2 AUs

4 AUs

0 AUs

181 AUs

177 AUs

179 AUs

175 AUs

29

Courses for Mainstream/Design/Mechatronics

Mainstream

Design
Stream

Differentiating
Core
Course
MA2007 Thermodynamics

AU
3

MA3003 Heat Transfer

MA4001 Engineering
Design

MA4002 Fluid Dynamics

MA2013 Creative Thinking


and Design

MA2014 Product
Presentation

Differentiating
Major PEs
Course

GER
AU

No restriction unless student


reads a Specialisation

To select 4 out of the following


5 courses:
MA4831 Computer-aided
Engineering
MA4843 Management of
Product Development

MA3010 Thermodynamics
and Heat Transfer

MA4011 Engineering
Product Design

MA4846 Product Design


Engineering

MA4847 Human Factors


Engineering
To select 4 out of the following
5 courses:

MA2011 Mechatronics
Systems Interfacing

MA4844 Industrial Design

MA4825 Robotics

Mechatronics
Stream

MA2012 Introduction to
Mechatronics Systems
Design

MA4829 Machine
Intelligence

MA3010 Thermodynamics
and Heat Transfer

MA4830 Real Time


Software for
Mechatronics Systems

MA4012 Mechatronics
Engineering Design

MA4831 Computer-aided
Engineering
MA4832 Microprocessor
Systems

Same graduating requirements

ME
Programme

Undergraduate Student Handbook

CGPA Computation for BEng

Core
Major PE

ASEC

MEEC

Remarks

IA

IO IA IO

94

90 88 84 All MA XXXX, FE XXXX & PH XXXX


courses, excluding MA48XX courses
6

12

MA48XX courses

Discipline
Requirements

12

Compulsory level 1 and 2 Economics


courses: HE1001, HE1002, HE1005,
HE2005

13

Level 3 and level 4 Economics courses


that yield the highest CGPA

12

HW0110, HW0210, HW0310, MA0100,


MA0101

UE

General Education

GER-Core

Requirements

GER-PE
GER-UE

Total

3
0

ASEC MEEC

Core
Major PE

Requirements
UE

All Economics Core courses

10

MA4079 Final Year Project

39

HE XXXX Economics courses

16

19

Level 1 Engineering courses

21

20

Level 2 and level 3 Engineering courses that


yield the highest CGPA

GER-Core

12

HW0110, HW0210, HW0310, MA0100,


MA0101

GER-PE

GER-UE
Total

Remarks

23

General Education
Requirements

142 138 140 136

CGPA Computation for BA


(Economics)

Discipline

0
126

31

Curriculum (Mechanical Engineering)


Level One Courses
Note: Students should read Physics and Mathematics I in semester 1
CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

PH1011

Physics

For students with a pass in 'A' level Physics


Not applicable to Direct-entry Year 2 students.

PH1012

Physics A

For students without a pass in 'A' level Physics.


Applicable to Direct Entry Year 2 students.

MH1810

Mathematics I

FE1008

Computing

FE1073

Introduction to
Engineering and Practices

HW0110

Effective Communication

MH1811

Mathematics II

MA1001

Dynamics

MA1002

Fundamental Engineering
Materials

MH2812

Essential Mathematics

Not applicable to Direct-entry Year 2 students.

PRE-REQUISITE: Having read PH1011/ PH1012/


CY1301 and MH1810/MH2812/CY1201

Applicable to Direct-entry Year 2 students.


Offered in Semester 1 only.
Applicable to Direct-entry Year 2 only. Offered
in Semester 1.

Level Two Courses


CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MA2001

Mechanics of Materials

REMARKS

MA2002

Theory of Mechanism

PRE-REQUISITE: MA1001

MA2003

Introduction to Thermo-fluids

Undergraduate Student Handbook


MA2004

Manufacturing Processes

MA2005

Engineering Graphics

Recommended to read in Semester 2.

MA2006

Engineering Mathematics

PRE-REQUISITE: MH1810 and MH1811 or


CY1203 for Year 1 Students or MH2812 for
direct entry students.

MA2007

Thermodynamics

MA2009

Introduction to Electrical
Circuits & Electronics Devices

MA2011

MA2012

Mechatronics Systems
Interfacing
Introduction to Mechatronics
Systems Design

Applicable to Mechatronics Stream students


Not applicable to Stream students
only.

MA2013

Creative Thinking and Design

Applicable to Design Stream students only.

MA2014

Product Presentation

HW0210

Technical Communication

MA2071

Laboratory Experiments (ME)

MA2079

Engineering Innovation and


Design

Applicable to mainstream students only. PREREQUISITE: MA2003

Mainstream students only

Year 2 standing

Will be completed in Semester 2 + first week


of Special Term 1.

Level Three Courses


CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MA3001

Machine Element Design

PRE-REQUISITE: Having read MA2001 and


MA2002

MA3002

Solid Mechanics and


Vibration

PRE-REQUISITE: MA2001

MA3003

Heat Transfer

Applicable to Mainstream students only


PRE-REQUISITE:MA2007

MA3004

Mathematical Methods in
Engineering

PRE-REQUISITE: One of the following: MH1810


and MH1811 or CY1203 or MH2812

33

MA3005

Control Theory

PRE-REQUISITE: Having Read MA2006

MA3006

Fluid Mechanics

PRE-REQUISITE: MA2003

MA3010

Thermodynamics and Heat


Transfer

Applicable to Design / Mechatronics Streams


students only PRE-REQUISITE: MA2003

MA3071

Engineering Experiments
(ME)
Environmental
Sustainability

MA0101

Singapore Studies

MA3079

Industrial Attachment (IA)

MA3076

Industrial Orientation (IO)

MA0100

PRE-REQUISITE: Year 3 standing and completed


4 semesters. Pass/Fail grade. For IO, students
may self-source for placements.

Level Four Courses


CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MA4001

Engineering Design

PRE-REQUISITE: Having read MA3001

MA4002

Fluid Dynamics

Applicable to Mainstream students only. PREREQUISITE: MA3006

MA4079

Final Year Project

Year 4 Standing. Completed over 2 semesters.

HW0310

Professional
Communication

Year 4 Standing

MA48XX

ME Major PE 1

MA48XX

ME Major PE 2

MA48XX

ME Major PE 3

MA48XX

ME Major PE 4

Prerequisites vary. These four major prescribed


electives may be taken from more than one
final year specialisation groups.

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Curriculum (Aerospace Engineering)


Level One Courses
Note: Students should read Physics and Mathematics I in semester 1
CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MH1810

Mathematics I

MH1811

Mathematics II

FE1008

Computing

PH1011

Physics

For students with 'A' level Physics

PH1012

Physics A

For students without 'A' level Physics

HW0110

Effective Communication

MA1001

Dynamics

MA1700

Aerospace Discovery Course

Having read PH1011/PH1012/CY1301 and


MH1810/CY1201

Level Two Courses


CODE

COURSES

AU

MA2001

Mechanics of Materials

MA2003

Introduction to Thermo-fluids

MA2005

Engineering Graphics

MA2006

Engineering Mathematics

MA2007

Thermodynamics

MA2008

Experimental Methods for


Engineers

REMARKS

Recommended to read in Semester 1.


PRE-REQUISITE: MH1810 and MH1811 or
CY1203
PRE-REQUISITE:MA2003

35

CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MA2072

Laboratory Experiments (AE)

MA2700

Aerospace Materials

Offered in Semester 2 only.

MA2701

Flight Performance

Offered in Semester 1 only. PREREQUISITE: MA1001 & MA1700

HW0210

Technical Communication

Year 2 standing

MA2079

Engineering Innovation and


Design

Will be completed in Semester 2 + first


week of Special Term 1.

Level Three Courses


CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MA3003

Heat Transfer

PRE-REQUISITE: MA2007

MA3006

Fluid Mechanics

PRE-REQUISITE:MA2003

MA3072

Engineering Experiments (AE)

Offered in Semester 1 only.

MA3700

Aircraft Structures I

Offered in Semester 1 only. PREREQUISITE: MA2001

MA3701

Aerodynamics

Offered in Semester 1 only.

MA3702

Aircraft Propulsion

Offered in Semester 1 only.

MA3703

Flight Dynamics

Offered in Semester 1 only. PREREQUISITE: MA1001 & MA1700

MA3704

Aircraft Electrical Devices

Offered in Semester 1 only.

MA3705

Aerospace Control Theory

Offered in Semester 2 only. PREREQUISITE: MA3703 and having read


MA2006

MA0101

Singapore Studies

Undergraduate Student Handbook


CODE

COURSES

AU

REMARKS

MA3079

Industrial Attachment (IA)

MA3076

Industrial Orientation (IO)

Year 3 standing and completed 4


semesters. Pass/Fail Grade. For IO,
students may self-source for placements.

AU

REMARKS

Level Four Courses


CODE

COURSES

MA4701

Aircraft Design I

PRE-REQUISITE: MA3701, MA3702 &


MA3703

MA4702

Aircraft Structures II

PRE-REQUISITE: MA2001, MA3700 &


MA3701

MA4703

Aircraft Design II

PRE-REQUISITE: MA4701

MA4704

Aeroelasticity

PRE-REQUISITE: MA3700 &


MA3701

MA4705

Aircraft Navigation and Flight


Computers

PRE-REQUISITE: MH1811

HW0310

Professional Communication

PRE-REQUISITE: Year 4 standing

MA0100

Environmental Sustainability

MAXXXX

Major PE 1

MAXXXX

Major PE 2

MA4079

Final Year Project

PRE-REQUISITE: Year 4 standing. To be


completed in 2 semesters.

37

Major Prescribed Electives


Mainstream
Students can choose their Major Prescribed Electives (PEs) from more than
one final year specialisation groups. Those who have passed at least three
Major Prescribed Electives from one specialization group will be deemed to
have specialised.
Aeronautical Engineering

Major PEs (Aeronautical)


MA4814 Computational Fluid Dynamics
MA3700 Aircraft Structures I
MA3701 Aerodynamics
MA3702 Aircraft Propulsion
MA4871 Non-Destructive Testing
MA4872 Aircraft Reliability and
Maintainability
MA4876 Advanced Aircraft Propulsion

This
equips
students
with
knowledge about various structural
components of the aircraft; the
loads experienced during the
various stages of flight; aircraft
performance, stability and control;
types of gas turbine engines used
on commercial aircraft; and the
aerothermodynamics of engine components.
Energy and the Environment
Students in this specialisation will
gain a general understanding of the
various factors that contribute
towards energy consumption in
buildings. Apart from learning to
appreciate the economic and
environmental issues related to
energy use by human society and
environmental pollution, students
will be taught to perform technical
analysis and evaluation of different
energy conversion and utilisation
technologies.

Major PEs (Energy and the


Environment)
MA4803 Noise and Vibration Control
MA4811 Psychrometry and Air
Conditioning
MA4812 Environmental Pollution
Control
MA4813 Building Services Engineering
MA4814 Computational Fluid Dynamics
MA4816 Heat and Mass Transfer

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Innovative Design
Students in this specialisation will
learn how industrial design operates
in
a
product
development
environment, the elements and
principles of form design, effective
design communication and the
industry usage of packaging design.
Particular emphasis is also placed on
the human factors design process,
human performance, cognitive and
sociological aspects of design, and
human computer interaction.

Major PEs (Innovative Design)


MA4800 Biomechanics
MA4804 Optimisation Theory and
Applications
MA4831 Computer-aided Engineering
MA4843 Management of Product
Development
MA4844 Industrial Design
MA4845 Manufacturing Automation
MA4846 Product Design Engineering
MA4847 Human Factors Engineering
MA4854 Quality Assurance and
Management

Manufacturing Engineering
This provides students with a broad
knowledge of materials engineering
and a fundamental understanding of
automated flow lines, vibratory bowl
feeders, industrial robots, rapid
prototyping and computer-aided
manufacturing. Students are taught
the roles of engineering logistics in
achieving corporate goals of
reducing manufacturing costs and
the savings that come from planning
and managing supply chains
effectively.

Major PEs (Manufacturing Engineering)


MA4834 Materials for Biomedical
Applications
MA4837 Net Shape Manufacturing
MA4838 Non-conventional
Manufacturing Processes
MA4842 Engineering Metrology
MA4845 Manufacturing Automation
MA4853 Manufacturing Systems
MA4850 Supply Chain and Logistics
Management
MA4854 Quality Assurance and
Management

39

Naval Architecture and Marine


Engineering
This equips Mechanical Engineering
undergraduates with the principles
and applied knowledge of marine
and offshore engineering needed to
practice as mechanical engineers in
the marine and offshore industry.

Major PEs (Marine and Offshore


Engineering)
MA4856 Naval Architecture and Marine
Engineering (Compulsory course)
MA4803 Noise and Vibration Control
(Compulsory course)
MA4807 Marine Structural Integrity
MA4808 Marine Control Systems
MA4809 Ship Design
MA4810 Marine Power and Propulsion
MA4814 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Mechatronics and Control


This introduces students to the fundamental principles of computer
operation based on an 8-bit
microprocessor,
the
current Major PEs (Mechatronics and Control)
technologies that make monitoring MA4825 Robotics
and diagnosis an affordable practice MA4831 Computer-aided Engineering
in industry, the major techniques in MA4829 Machine Intelligence
artificial intelligence and their MA4830 Realtime Software for
practical applications in engineering, Mechatronic Systems
kinematics, dynamics and control of MA4832 Microprocessor Systems
robots.
Systems Engineering
Systems Engineering helps to
integrate both engineering and nonengineering disciplines in the
conceptualisation,
design,
development (or manufacture) and
distribution of products and in the
collection of used products for
reuse, recycling and disposal.
Systems Engineers help to realise the
notion of integrated development in
each sector of the economy.

Major PEs (Systems Engineering)


MA4849 Operations Research
MA4850 Supply Chain and Logistics
Management
MA4851 Systems Engineering and
Management
MA4853 Manufacturing Systems
MA4854 Quality Assurance and
Management

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Minor Programmes
Minor programmes equip students with multiple skills and broader
knowledge, beyond what their major disciplines may provide. Students will
not be offered a minor in the same field as his major (single degree, double
degree or double major programme). Students intending to pursue a minor
are to indicate their intention and when they have fulfilled the minor
requirements, they are to file for the award of the minor. The award of minor
will be reflected in a graduates transcript but not his degree certificate. No
additional certificate will be issued.
Important Notes

Students have to read minor courses as Unrestricted Electives and the


academic units earned will count towards the students academic unit
requirements for Unrestricted Electives. A minor course that is NOT read
as Unrestricted Electives (e.g. read as Major Prescribed Electives or GER
Prescribed Electives) cannot be counted again towards fulfilling the
minor.
A course cannot be counted towards the requirements of two minors
(unless otherwise stated).
To be awarded a minor, students must not opt for these courses to be
graded Satisfactory (S)/Un-Satisfactory (U).

More information about the Minor Programmes at NTU can be found at:
www.ntu.edu.sg/collegesandprogrammes/Pages/MinorProgramme.aspx

41

Mechanical Engineering Design Stream


Design is a skill best learned through actual experience and reflection on that
experience. The philosophy of the Design Stream emphasizes on the
combination of creativity, technology and design methodology with a
concern for human values and the needs of society. Diversity, one of the
Design Streams strengths, is required to maintain a leadership position in the
rapidly changing world of design and manufacturing. Students will soon
discover this embedded philosophy as they journey through the programme.
They will also experience the close-knit community spirit and camaraderie
between themselves and their classmates. Through a series of design related
courses and design-and-build team projects, which might be sponsored by
industry (e.g. Toshiba sponsored the Engineering Product Design course
projects in AY 2012/13), students will gain practical experience in problem
solving skills as well as form and visual design.
Creative Thinking and Design in the second Year
Students
will
be
taught
the
fundamentals of creative thinking and
design, the process of product design
and development, ideas generation,
problem solving techniques and design
foundation, including elements and
principles of visual design. Students will
gain practical experience in problem
solving skills as well as form and visual
design through a series of assignments
and mini-projects. They will work on a
design-and-build team project, culminating in a competition that is
challenging, exhilarating and fun.

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Industrial Attachment / Orientation Third Year


Students experiential learning biased towards design and developments will
be reinforced by industrial attachment and industrial orientation.
Final Year Project Fourth Year
These specially formulated and selected final year projects feature emphasis
on creativity, innovation, design methodology and management as well as
human factors design.
International Design Events
Another key feature is the direct
participation in International
Design Workshops, Competitions
and Conferences. Participation
in
International
Design
Workshops, e.g. with Chiba University (Japan) and National Cheng Kung
University (Taiwan), will expose students to the design culture and practice in
different countries, and thus widening their scope and experience. This is an
important part in their education to prepare them for a global economy.
Favourite Hangouts
The Design Lab at N3.2-B1-02 and the Manufacturing Process Lab 3 at N3-B4W211 will be the two laboratories most heavily used and visited by students.
The Design Lab contains drafting equipment, drawing and light model-making
materials as well as product catalogues. Tools and machinery for modelmaking and prototyping can be found in the lab.
For more information please contact:
A/P Chen Chun-Hsien (Director, Design Stream)
6790 4888 : N3.2-01-06 : mchchen@ntu.edu.sg

43

Mechanical Engineering Mechatronics


Stream
The Mechatronics Stream Programme (MSP) started in 1999. In this
programme, Mechanical Engineering undergraduates learn how computers
and electronics technologies are used to enhance the performance of
mechanical systems and to create new products. It provides opportunities to
learn about, and work with technological innovations, computerised
mechanical systems and products ranging from small robots to humanmachine systems.
The Curriculum
The major elements of Mechanical
Engineering and Mechatronics are
taught from the second year to the
fourth year. In the fourth year, students
have the opportunity to read many
different courses. However, they are
encouraged to plan for their various
electives throughout the years in MAE.
More importantly, if they are interested in overseas exchange programmes
they should always consult with the coordinators to optimise their overseas
experience.
Mechatronics Education
It begins with the Mechatronics Systems Interfacing Course in Year 2.
Students will learn about interfacing between the micros and mechanical
systems using sensors (encoders, infrared detectors) and actuators (motors,
and solenoids) and devices such as buttons, switches and key-pads.

Undergraduate Student Handbook

In the third and fourth year, students will be taught in courses such as Real
Time Programming for use in robots, unmanned vehicles, and machines etc.,
the basics of the Micros, Robotics and Mechatronics Systems Design. They
will learn integration at two levels: the PC level and the micro-computer
level.
Exciting final year projects fields include robotics, aerial vehicles,
nanotechnology, smart material technology, bio-mechatronics and biorobotics for medical applications.
The MSP learning experience is exciting but requires perseverance, diligence
and intelligence. The major challenges are found in the multitude of exercises
where mistakes are made and learning reinforced, and where group
collaboration, time management and endurance become important.
Home Base and Other Activities
The Mechatronics Laboratory will be
the most frequently used laboratory
by MSP students. It is also used by
students taking part in various
robotics competitions. Mechatronics
students have participated in the
International Competition in India,
the Singapore Robotics Games and
the RoboCup. Another important
laboratory is the Robotics Research Centre at N3-01a-01, which is used
mainly for final year projects and graduate research students. We wish you a
happy journey with the MSP and hope you will enjoy it as the students above
did.
For more information please contact:
A/P Zhong Zhaowei (Director, Mechatronics Stream)
6790 5588 : N3-02c-98 : mzwzhong@ntu.edu.sg

45

Laboratory Experiments
Laboratory Sessions start on the first week of the semester.
Requirements Students are required to complete all ten (10) laboratory
experiments consisting of nine (9) Log-Sheet and one (1) technical report
submissions within the semester. Experiments run on Mondays, Tuesdays,
Wednesdays and Fridays for Mechanical Engineering students and Thursdays
for Aerospace Engineering students. Attendance for Laboratory Experiments
is COMPULSORY. A medical certificate/approved leave of absence will be
required if you are absent. If Absent (with or without MC), you are required
to Make-Up for your session on the next available session by reporting to the
Laboratory Staff.
Laboratory groups Aero (MA2072) arranged from AE01 to AE02 in semester
one. Mech (MA2071) arranged from LA01 to LA08 (08 groups) in a semester
for the Second Year Laboratory Experiments. Each laboratory group is
further divided into five sub-groups, designated by the letters (a), (b), (c), (d)
and (e).
Name lists of the laboratory sub-groups will be posted on the second year
notice board in the School of MAE before the commencement of experiment
schedules. Check and determine your final grouping details to confirm the
sub-group (e.g. LA01(a), LA01(b) ) you belong to for your experiment timetable.
Laboratory sessions (experiments) begin from the first week of the semester,
in accordance with timetables for Laboratory Experiments.
If any session falls on a holiday or on a day reserved for student activities, a
make-up date will be arranged as shown in the laboratory schedule.
Assessment of laboratory experiments course work is based on performance
during the laboratory sessions (CAs) and written assessment (Log sheet and

Undergraduate Student Handbook

technical report). Each student will be assessed on both their CAs and
individual written assessments (Log sheet or technical report). If you were
absent for any Experiment Session you will be marked Absent (ABS) and will
be given No Marks for that session unless you have made a formal Make-Up
for the session you have missed. The weights for MA2071 experiments and
technical report are given in the table below.
9 Log-Sheet Experiments
80%
CA
Log Sheets
50%
50%

1 Technical Report Experiment


20%
CA
Report
50%
50%

Submission of experiment Log Sheets: Each student has to submit his/her log
sheets for assessment on the same day at the end of each experiment. Log
sheets should be written on A4 paper/graph paper. Log sheets should contain
concise descriptions of the experiment, the results, discussions and
conclusion and should be no more than 500 words.
Submission of Technical Reports: During week/session 5, all experiments
(E2.1 to E2.10) will be assigned as a technical report experiment week. Each
student has to submit a Technical Report to the assigned laboratory within 1
week from the date of the experiment.
For more information please contact:
A/P Pang Hock Lye, John
ME Course Coordinator
6790 5514: N3-02b-55 : mhlpang@ntu.edu.sg
A/P Chai Gin Boay
AE Course Coordinator
6790 5756 : N3-02c-88: mgbchai@ntu.edu.sg

47

Engineering Innovation and Design


The MA2079 Engineering Innovation and Design (EID) Programme is an
integral part of the MAE second year curriculum. The course aims to
introduce students to essential engineering
and technopreneurship skills that are not
covered in the regular curriculum and to
provide students an opportunity to
innovate. Students are challenged to
develop their own high technology business
venture, produce a prototype and business
plan and to market their idea (known as i-project). The Programme
culminates in an Open House in Nanyang Auditorium where all the i-projects
are displayed at an exhibition and judged on their marketing potential and
novelty by a panel of industrialists and
venture capitalists. Prizes are awarded in
each category; past prizes have been
generously sponsored by companies such as
ST Engineering, Housing and Development
Board, Motorola and Farnell Components.
The program consists of compulsory modules such as technopreneurship and

business plan writing. Students attend compulsory talks over semester 2 and
work on the i-projects; the talks focus on compulsory and specialized topics
such as patent search, prototyping, and business plan development..
For more information please contact:
A/P Rajesh Piplani (EID Chairman)
6790 5601 : N3-02c-84 : mrpiplani@ntu.edu.sg

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Attachment Programme
Introduction
Students must successfully complete one attachment programme before
their graduation. The purposes of attachment are to supplement NTUs inhouse practical professional training and to instill in students the right work
attitudes and professionalism. A pass mark in Attachment is a necessary pre
requisite for the award of the degree (except for students who are
exempted).
Types of Attachments
The various options for attachment are as follows:
i.
ii.
iii.

Industrial Orientation (IO): The duration is 10 weeks.


Industrial Attachment (IA): The duration is 20 weeks.
Enhanced Industrial Attachment (EIA): This option is for students who
prefer to have a long stint in the industry. The duration is 30 weeks.
International Research Attachment (IRA): This option is for students
who are interested in applied research project in overseas research
Centres/Institutions.

iv.

Overseas Industrial Attachment


i.

Students on scholarships or sponsorships (IA with the sponsor), may


also apply for overseas IA, subjected to their sponsor's approval. An
approval letter from the sponsor must be provided to the School and
Career Attachment Office (CAO).
For more information about overseas IA, please read the section on
IA for Students on Academic Exchange via: StudentLink > Academic
>Industrial Attachment > Information on IA > Industrial Attachment
for Students on Academic Exchange

ii.

Criteria for exemption of attachment

Polytechnic graduate
At least 2 years of relevant working experience after graduating
from polytechnic

49

To apply, students must submit the following documents:

Application Form for Exemption of Attachment (Studentlink)

A letter from employer or exemployers HR stating the period of


employment and job responsibility

A report of at least 2000 words on the last 6 months of employment

Testimonial from employer/exemployer (optional)


A copy of Poly Diploma

Students applying for exemption are advised to apply as early as possible as,
not later as the start of Semester 2 of Year 2.
IO

IA

EIA

IRA

Duration

10 weeks
May Jul

20 weeks
Jan Jun or Jul Dec

30 weeks
Jan Aug

30 weeks
Jan Aug

Period of Study

End of Yr 2, Yr 3
or Yr 4*

Yr 3 S1 or S2

Yr 3 S2

Yr 3 S2

AU

12

12

Source for Placement

Self-sourced**

CAO /Self-sourced**

No. of Assessments

One

Two

Submission of Report
Registration,
Application and
Outcome

Self-sourced**
Three

Three

Yes
Notification by CAO

Notification
by IRO

* Cannot attend convocation, but still considered as graduating in 4 years (if pass)
**For Self-Sourcing Attachment, please refer to Rules on Self-Sourcing Attachment
Placement under Information on Attachment via StudentLink

For more information please contact:


A/P Teo Ee Chon (IA/IO Coordinator)
6790 5529 : N3-02b-44 : mecteo@ntu.edu.sg

Undergraduate Student Handbook

Final Year Project


The purpose of the Final Year Project (FYP) is to give students an opportunity
to work individually and independently under the guidance of their FYP
supervisor(s) on a project of their choice. The FYP, carrying 8 AUs, spans over
two semesters. Each student is required to analyse and synthesize problems
in any of the disciplines of mechanical and aerospace engineering through a
project requiring application of basic engineering principles. The project may
take any one or a combination of the following forms: feasibility study,
product development, computer modeling and analysis, design and
construction, testing and experimental investigation, software development
and implementation. The emphasis is on motivating students to learn,
undertake and manage projects independently to their successful completion
and to write good technical reports.

Each student must submit the following reports during the course of the
project:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.

statement of the objective of the project, the scope of the work to be


performed to achieve this objective, a project plan,
an interim report on the progress of the project
a draft report about the project for comments by the supervisor(s)
an unbound final FYP report (with copies for the supervisor(s) and
moderator)

Brief descriptions and the respective scope of work of projects will be posted
on the website through the FYP system. For more information about the FYP,
please contact:
For more information please contact:
Dr. Wu Zhang (FYP Coordinator)

6790 4445 : N3.2 02-14 : mzwu@ntu.edu.sg

51

School of Mechanical and Aerospace


Engineering
Nanyang Technological University
50 Nanyang Avenue Singapore 639798
Tel: (65) 6790 5492 | Fax: (65) 6795 4172
www.mae.ntu.edu.sg