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Global Country Study Report

On
Tourism Industry of Liza World Travels
Business Opportunities for Norway
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Country Study Report on Tourism Industry of Norway Business
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Preface
This report is respect to presentation of Norway country.
It is confidently believed that it will furnish them. The necessary number and
variety of exercise for essential to successful instruction.
While here we encounter the comparison of tourism sector between two
countries.
The example in each article has been carefully graded. In each article the
number of examples presented is made to depend upon the difficulty and
importance of particular subject presented.

Acknowledgement

We forward our special thanks to faculty guide Prof. Latika Karnani of ITM
Universe for guiding us in Global Country Study report. The valuable
suggestions of the faculty member during the course of our project work gave
us the inspiration to achieve our goal. The shape that project has been taken is
due to judicious guidance, encouragement and help of guide. We express our
gratitude to our Institute (ITM Universe) and other faculty members of MBA
department, who has been guiding us in this path step by step and made our
path really simple to get through.

Table of Contents

1.Summary of Part 1
In the Global Country Study Report on Tourism Industry of Norway Business
Opportunities for Arunachal Pradesh we have seen Indian tourism is the
temporary, short-term movement of people to destination outside the places
where they normally live and work and their activities during the stay at each
destination. It includes movements for all purposes. India is poised to emerge
as the 2nd fastest growing (8.8%) tourism economy in the world over 2005-14
according to the World Travel &Tourism India is now recognized as a year round
destination According to World Tourism Organization estimates, India will lead
in South Asia with 8.9 million arrivals by 2020.
Norway has implemented a system where destinations can get environmental
certified at a national level. But Norwegian sustainability goes beyond systems
and certifications. Enjoying nature and the outdoors is considered a national
pastime, and this is reflected in the peoples attitude towards conservation and
use of the wilderness. As of August 2014 no less than 7 percent of mainland
Norway is made up of 37 national parks, and all told almost 17 percent of
mainland Norway consists of protected areas in one form or another, not
counting Svalbard. This is in accordance with the goals set by the International
Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Access to protected areas is for the
most part still allowed, however, due to Norways right of access-law that gives
everyone the right of free access in the countryside.
In our Global Country Study Report on Tourism Industry of Norway Business
Opportunities for Arunachal Pradesh part-1 we have seen the following thing
point which were covered in our report:-

India Norway RelationsBeginning with the first official contact on 21.2.1947 through a telegraphed
message from Foreign Minister Halvard Lange to Indias Special Envoy V.K.
Krishna Menon in Stockholm confirming the Norwegian governments in
principle agreement to establish bilateral relations, India and Norway have had
cordial and friendly relations. The two countries respect each other for
commonly shared values such as democracy, human rights and rule of law.
In recent years, both countries have been increasingly tapping bilateral
economic and technical complementarities.
There have been regular exchanges of high level visits between the two
countries. Visits from the Norwegian side during the last three years have
included those of Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg in early February 2010 for the
Delhi Sustainable Development Summit (DSDS); Minister of Agriculture and

Food Lars PederBrekk in February, 2010; Foreign Minister Jonas GahrStre in


early March 2010 to co-chair the India-Norway Joint Commission Session;
Minister of Environment and International Development Erik Solheim in March,
2010, November 2010, and February 2012; Trade and Investment Minister
TrondGiske in October 2010; Minister of Higher Education and Research Ms.
ToraAasland in early February, 2011; Minister of Local Government and
Regional Development , Ms. Liv Signe Navarsete, from 10th to 13th January
2012; and, Minister of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs
to India, Ms. RigmorAasrud, from February 6-8, 2012.
There have also been several Ministerial level visits from India to Norway,
including that of Shri Chidambaram, the then Finance Minister in October 2007
and ShriKapilSibal, Minister of HRD in July 2008. Ministerial visits from India
during 2010 included those of Minister of State for S & T and Earth Sciences
ShriPrithvirajChavan in June 2010 to enhance cooperation on Polar Research
and other areas in Science & Technology and Dr. C.P. Joshi, Minister for Rural
Development and Panchayati Raj in September, 2010 to sign the MoU for
Mutual Cooperation on Local Governance. ShriPawan Kumar Bansal, Honble
Minister of Earth Sciences, Science and Technology & Parliamentary Affairs,
visited Norway from 17-22 May 2011 to further enhance cooperation on Polar
Research and Science & Technology. Honble Minister for Shipping Shri G.K.
Vasan visited Norway to attend the Maritime Summit held in Oslo on 24 May
2011 and to increase bilateral cooperation in the area of shipping.
ShriPallamRaju, Honble Minister of State for Defence, made a goodwill visit to
Norway from 26 September to 1 October 2011. Dr. Farooq Abdullah, Honble
Minister for New & Renewable Energy from 10-12 October 2011 visited Oslo to
attend the Conference, Energy for all: Financing Access for the Poor IndiaNorway Joint Commission sessions are held on a regular basis under the
chairmanship of the respective Foreign Ministers, the last session having been
held in New Delhi on March 2, 2010. Foreign Office Consultations between the
two Foreign Ministries are held on an annual basis, alternately in New Delhi and
Oslo, at the level of Secretaries. Norway has extended its support to Indias bid
for a permanent seat in the UN Security Council, as well as for Indias
candidacy for a non-permanent seat in the Security Council for the period
2011-2012.

BILATERAL TRADE RELATIONS WITH INDIA AND NORWAYIn 2005 bilateral trade between India and Norway reached 413 million US
dollars. This represents a 30% increase compared to the numbers in 2004.
Norway would like to see a further strengthening of trade with India, says the
Norwegian Minister of Trade and Industry Mr Dag Terje Andersen.
During my meeting with the Indian Minister of Commerce and Industry, Kamal
Nath, in November, I hope to promote a free trade agreement between EFTA
(Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein, Switzerland) and India, says Minister
Andersen.
Increased internationalization is a priority of the Norwegian government and an
important part of the industrial policy. Norway depends upon trade in order to
sustain the high levels of welfare and value creation. With regard to India this
implies strengthening and expanding economic cooperation, says Minister
Andersen.
A free trade agreement between the EFTA countries and India will open up for
increased trade between India and Norway by decreasing and eliminating
customs duties and other barriers to trade, says Minister Andersen. Today
Norwegian exports are mostly machines and ships. About 35 Norwegian
companies are established in India.
India is an interesting market for Norwegian shipping. More than 4000 Indian
seafarers, the great majority officers, serve on Norwegian ships. India and
Norway are presently workinging towards a bilateral maritime agreement. This
agreement is supposed to provide better commercial conditions in the Indian
market for Norwegian ship owners. I will stress the importance of both these
agreements during my conversations and talks with my Indian colleagues,
Minister Nath and Minister Baalu in New Delhi, says Minister Andersen.
During the visit the focus will be on Indo-Norwegian economic cooperation in a
range of sectors such as the energy sector, the maritime sector, the marine
sector, trade and services as well as tourism. Both Indian and Norwegian
businesses stand to benefit from closer cooperation in these areas.
The political and economic importance of India, locally, regionally and globally,
is increasing. The country's economic growth over the past ten years has been

impressive, and all evidence suggests that the increase will continue.
Considerable investments are being made towards improving Indian
infrastructure and securing Indian energy resources. Foreign investments have
increased considerably over the past years. India is thus a market with
enormous potential and opportunities.

STEEPLED Analysis-

STEEPLED Analysis of Norway Tourism

Social Environment
The improvements of infrastructure and new leisure amenities that result from
tourism also benefit the local community.
Tourism encourages the preservation of traditional customs, handicrafts and
festivals that might otherwise have been allowed to wane and it creates civic
pride. Interchanges between hosts and guests create a better cultural
understanding and can also help to raise global awareness of issues such as
poverty and human rights abuses.
There is some concern that tourism development may lead to destinations
which may lead cultural identity by catering for the perceived needs of tourists
particularly from international markets.
A community involved in the planning and implementing of tourism has a more
positive attitude, is more supportive and has better chance of making a profit
than a population passively ruled or overrun by tourism.
The core elements of sustainable tourism development is community
development. This gives the community the process and capacity to make
decisions that consider the long-term economy, ecology and equity of all
communities.
Tourism provides opportunities for regional development particularly for
regional areas undergoing structural changes. Being a labour intensive
industry, the right encouragement tourism can deliver great employment and
training opportunities particularly for young people.

Technological Environment
Technology is key connection to the innovation of our products and services.
Making Waves is a consulting company in Norway and they use content
analysis, insight into users online behavior and design thinking to develop
innovative digital services.
With design thinking at core they believe that true insight into consumers
needs combined with a deep understanding of business processes and
opportunities across tourism sector is key to deliver innovative and engaging
service concepts and experiences that offer added value. Technology design
has a key connection to the innovation of product services and business
models for our solutions.
This focuses on user-experience is also influencing our clients organizational
structure and business culture. They use design and technology to transform
how our clients operate, communicate and manage information. They look at
entire customer journey with digital product at the center of their solutions.
Ecological Environment
Today lives in Norway means enjoying a comfortable city life as well as living in
an ecosystem-centered value system. Norway is not only recognizes the risks
of climate change, but also tries to limit it. Through ecological environment,
Norwegian society expresses its deeply egalitarian and humanitarian ideas. The
government has turned this state of mind into the policy of sustainable
development ("meeting the needs of present generations without
compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs") and an idea that
encompasses almost every sectors of society.
Economical Environment
Tourism in Norway is mainly nature-based. An important contributor to the
countrys economy. Tourism is also an important tool of counter centralization,
through the creation of livelihoods in the districts.
Tourism accounts are for approximately 4 per cent of Norways GDP and
employs 7 per cent of the work force. Much of the tourism is nature-based and
there are some environmental concerns related to the consequences of tourism
for wilderness areas.
The indirect effects add 30 to 40 percent output value to the direct production
effects of tourists' spending. Total direct and indirect effects generate
approximately 10 percent of total output in each county (public services not
included), 7-9 percent in retail businesses and between 54 and 65% of output
in the hotel and restaurant sector.
Tourism in Norway is characterized by a strong fluctuation in demand that are a
consequence of seasonal concentration. This results in to number of challenges
for the Norwegian tourism industry including the ability to generate profits and
attract and retain staff at all levels.
Political Environment

Tourism is generating receipts of US$ 476 billion in 2000 and growth rates
above five per cent per annum, tourist destinations have a lot to lose if they
lose their attraction to tourists.
While Europe and Northern America are still by far the main tourist
destinations, the developing regions in the world increase their market share
rapidly.
Many of developing countries also derive a much higher share of their GDP
from tourism receipts than developed countries.
Developing country regions, in which tourism is growing fastest, have been
benefited from providing low-skilled and labor-intensive tourism services that
can provide an income stream, which is steadier than the volatile receipts from
natural resource extraction (Levantis and Gani 2000).
Tourism represents an important contribution in the economic development in
many developing countries see Sinclairs (1998) comprehensive survey.
Unfortunately in the developing country regions are also more vulnerable as
they represent the main locations of violence.
Legal Environment
The policy tools adopted for environmental evaluation of Norway are different
for the countries. Norway has adopted an administrative approach to scrutinize
environmental implications of tourism policies. The requirements are provided
in principle basis (i.e. contains the basic components / requirements for
evaluation) rather than prescriptive procedural approach.
There are twelve (i.e. Austria, Denmark, Finland, Netherlands, Norway, United
Kingdom, Australia, Canada, United States of America, China, Japan and South
Korea) out of which nineteen countries have environmental evaluation
mechanisms for tourism plans and programmers.
Norway is adopting both statutory and administrative framework while the
other countries adopted either administrative or statutory policy tools.
If a tourist, who neither live, study, work or have a spouse or children under 18
years in Norway, you may use a vehicle registered in another country during
the visit.
Ethical Environment
With the Norway being a nature tourism destination, green sustainable
products and services fit well into product development and marketing
strategies. There was increased in activity and engagement by the tourism
industry to present sustainable products and services during the review period.
Programs like Norwegian Ecotourism, a customized scheme for nature-based
travel and tourism enterprises, as well as environmental labeling programs
emerged during the review period, including Scandinavian eco-label Swan, EcoLighthouse and ISO 14001.
On other hand large chains such as travel accommodation providers were
active in eco-labeling, but smaller providers were also interested in sustainable
positioning. The Green travel products and services will represent an
opportunity to add value to products and services in a competitive environment
during the forecast period.

STEEPLED Analysis of Arunachal Pradesh Tourism


Political Factor:Arunachal Pradesh Has light of the political instability.
Arunachal Pradesh was heavily dependent on the tourism, as the sector was
the 3ed-largest revenue generator for the country. In 2013, more than 200,00
people visited Arunachal Pradesh.
According to the Ministry of Tourism, it has 244 hotels with 3,927 hotel rooms.
Politics of Arunachal Pradesh takes place in a framework of a presidential
representative democratic republic in the President of Arunachal Pradesh is
head of state with a presidentially appointed Prime Minister as the head of
government, and of a many-party system. Executive power is exercised by the
government. Legislative power is west in both the government and the National
Assembly.
Economic Factor
Arunachal Padesh has a vast tourism and ther vision and ambition is to make
Arunachal Pradesh a first class tourist destination in India.
Arunachal Pradeshs tourism sector provides employment is approximately
33thousand.
The economic outlook for tourism in Arunachal Pradesh is positive. The
donation of the travel and tourism economy (including direct and indirect
impacts) to GDP is expected to rise from 4.9% (US$523 million) in 2010 to 6.1%
(US$1,090 million) by 2020.
The donation to employment is expected to rise from 80,000 jobs in 2010, to
129,000 jobs by 2020.
Arunachal Pradesh use to get 170,000 tourists a year, and each spent on
average $100 a day.
Social factor
Arunachal Pradesh has potential as tourist destination, with its rich cultural
heritage, ancient cities and archaeological sites. Tourism remains very small
subsector of the economy.
Tourist facilities are limited. In 2012-13 some 91,00 tourists visited Mali.
Generating income of aprox.US$50 million.
Technological factor

Tecnolological factor affect of Arunachal Pradesh tourism


The government has launched programs to develop tourism.
Arunachal Pradesh transportation facility is poor so not more tourist attact.
Arunachal Pradesh in internat facility are costly & not mor educational pertion
so also affect tourist.
Environmental & Legal Factor
The International Tourism number of arrivals in Arunachal Pradesh was last
reported at 16900 in
2012, according to World Bank report published in 2012. International inbound
tourists are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in
which they have their usual residence, but outside of usual environment, for a
period not exceeding 1 year and whose main purpose in visiting is other than
an activity remunerated from within the country visited.
When data of tourists are not available, the many of visitors, which includes
tourists, per day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown
instead. Sources or collection methods of arrival differ across countries. In
many case data are from border statistics. In all cases data are from tourism
accommodation establishments.

SWOT Analysis of Norway Tourism


Strengths
Ongoing projects on electronic information towards tourists who have arrived in
Norway. A project with the goal to provide tourists with information and through
this lead tourists to visit attractions ect. in Norway (the project is called
"Villmarksriketviservei"). This information will be provided by information-points
(with internett), info.signs, electronic maps, and by directing the information to
the tourists mobile phones.
All tourist-enterprises have internet-access, their own web-site, and
reasonable skills in the use. Close to all tourist-enterprises in Norway, even the
small ones, have internet-access, some basic skills in the use of computers (the
younger quite well thorough their basic education in Norway). Most enterprises
also have their own website with some information, and many also have a
booking-function. There are however highly variable quality of the websites,
many of them are for example only in Norwegian.
Weaknesses

Lack of competence and consciousness in the tourist-enterprises in distribution


of booking/sale. Although all enterprises have a sufficient infrastructure and
competence, there seems to be a lack of both enough knowledge and
consciousness concerning the importance of getting their enterprise distributed
through the right electronic channels so that it can lead to electronic .
Lack of coordination between different within the tourism sector. There is a
wide diversity in what kind of software and technical platforms that are used
within the tourism industry.
Weak links and electronic coordination between the transport sector and the
other parts of the tourist industry.
Missing coordination of electronic information between the culture and sports
sector and the tourism industry.
Threats
Lack of competence/interest in the national tourism sector to develop
distribution and booking within the Norwegian tourism industry.
Missing links between regional policy areas relevant in the tourism sector. The
regional policy level has several policy areas that concern many of the same
issues.
Difficult to compete with other industries to attract key personnel/staff. There is
a possibility that there will be a problem of attracting key staff (with both
competences on tourism) to parts of the tourism industry in Norway.
New competition from other countries. Several other European countries make
big efforts to develop and market tourism products that will directly compete
with the key attractions of Norway (nature-based experiences/activities and
skiing).
Opportunities
The existence of significant niche markets for the nature based tourismproducts in Norway. Most of the tourist-products in
Norway , could be
described as niche products, directed at certain segments of the market (who
is interested in Nordic nature-based experiences). Internationally these
segments are of significant sizes, but the tourism industry in Norway has so far
not sufficiently oriented its marketing efforts towards these segments and the
electronic distribution channels that are directed at these segments.
Development of international standardized ICT systems for tourism enterprises.
Within few years there will probably be developed professional, cheap and
standardized ICT system for tourism enterprises, by international ICT
companies.

SWOT Analysis of Indian Tourism

Strength
The campaign highlights not only the tourist places in India, but also its cultural
and historical heritage.
The campaign managed to make a powerful visual impact on the viewers.
The campaign was featured sufficiently through print and TV media and hence
had a good reach.
The Incredible India campaign along with the complementary campaign of
AtithiDevoBhava managed to gain popularity.
Weakness
Some critics believed that the campaign was meant to appeal only to the
affluent tourist and could not appeal to the average tourist.
The campaign was found to be uni-dimensional by some people.
Since India is a geographically and culturally diverse country, the campaign
could not manage to cover all the aspects.
Opportunity
The tourism industry is India is flourishing at a rapid rate and the Incredible
India campaign has a lot of potential to attract tourists.
Government spending on the tourism industry are increasing gradually.
A wider campaign can be planned leveraging the diversity in India.
Threats
Every campaign has its shelf life and so does the Incredible India campaign.
If the campaign fails to innovate it will lose its appeal.
The neighboring South-East Asian countries are investing a lot in the tourism
industry which can be a threat.
So from the above the topic were coverted in our Global Country Study Report
on Tourism Industry of Norway Business Opportunities for Arunachal Pradesh
which gave us the idea about tourism industry in both Norway and in Arunachal
Pradesh.

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NORWAY TOURISM & ARUNACHAL


PRADESH TOURISM

Norway
It is a well-known tourist destination for visitors from all over the world. The
Land of the Midnight Sun has much to offer both on land and at sea, with its
high mountains, deep fjords, long summer days and crisp snowy winters.
Currently, the hospitality sector in Norway is experiencing increasing activity in
many areas, but in others less due to the financial crisis.

The demand for staff is increasing as the Norwegian tourism industry grows
stronger. Currently there are about 150 000 persons employed in this industry
and it is one of Norways fastest growing sectors. The demand for workers in
the tourist industry varies on the seasons and on the geography of Norway.
There is a lot of staff turnover as a direct consequence of seasonal variations.
In general, the summer season can be said to start in May and run through
August-September; the winter season usually starts in November and ends in
March-April.
Another interesting phenomenon of this sector has been the emphasis by the
industry itself to develop so-called adventure tourism, a niche thought
suitable for the Norwegian climate and landscape and a way for Norway to
stand out as an interesting destination. Its strongly encouraged also by
governmental initiatives and support systems to be developed further.
Examples are: whale safari, hiking, snow scooter safari, ice hotels, kiting on the
beaches of the west coast, rock climbing, sky diving, hunting and fishing,
rafting, dog sledging and riding. Tourism in arctic and exotic places like
Svalbard, Lofoten and Finnmark is very popular and attract tourists looking for
something extraordinary.

Arunachal Pradesh
Arunachal finds mention in the literature of Kalika Purana and Mahabharata.
This place issupposed to be the Prabhu Mountains of the Puranas. It was here
that sage Parashuram washed away his sin, sage Vyasa meditated, King
Bhishmaka founded his kingdom and Lord Krishna married his consort Rukmini.

The widely scattered archeological remains at different places in Arunachal


bears testimony to its rich cultural heritage. Arunachal Pradesh, a serene land
tucked into the North Eastern tip of India, invites you to relax in its picturesque
hills and valleys, enjoy its salubrious climate and meet its simple and
hospitable people, with their glorious heritage of arts and crafts and colourful
festivals that reflect their ancient faith in the inexorable power of nature.
The visitor has a wide variety of options to pick from. There are places of
worship and piligrimage such as Parasuramkund and 400 years old Tawang
Monastery, or the sites of archeological excavations like Malinithan and
Itanagar, the serene beauty of lakes such as Ganga lake or Sela lake or the
numerous variations of scenic beauty of the snowclad silver mountain peaks
and lush green meadows where thousands of species of flora and fauna
prosper. In addition, the state provides abundant scope for angling, boating,
rafting, trekking and hiking. Besides, there are a number of wild life sanctuaries
and national parks where rare animals, birds and plants will fascinate the
visitor.
Nature has provided the people with a deep sense of beauty which finds
delightful expression in their songs, dances and crafts. The climate varies from
hot and humid to heavy rainfall in the Shivalik range. It becomes progressively
cold as one moves northwards to higher altitudes. Trees of great size, plentiful
climbers and abundance of cane and bamboo make Arunachal evergreen.
Arunachal Pradesh is considered to be the nature's treasure trove and home to
orchids, known for their exquisitely beautiful blooms, from one of the dominant
taxa with more than six hundred species, occurring in varying elevations and
climatic conditions throughout the state.

Tourism industry of Norway & Arunachal Pradesh is differing


in followings sectors.

1. Demographic sector:-

a. a. Arrival of touristThe International tourism; number of arrivals in Norway was last reported at
4767000 in 2010, according to the World Bank report published in 2012.
International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists
who travel to a country other than, that in which they have their usual
residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period of not exceeding
12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity
remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists
are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day
visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown. Sources and
collection methods for arrivals differ from country to country. In some cases
data are from border statistics (police, immigration, etc) and supplemented by
border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation
establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by
air, for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of
nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should be used in
comparing arrivals across all countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to
the number of arrivals but not to the number of people traveling. Thus, a
person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted
each time as a new arrival.
WORLD BANK INDICATORS NORWAY

TRAVEL

&

TOURISM

Previous
International tourism number of arrivals 4377000.0
International tourism ; number of 3395000.0
departure
International

tourism

receipt(US 510200000

dollars)
0.0
International tourism ; percent of total 2.9
exports

Last
4347000.0

585700000
0.0
2.7

International

tourism

receipts

for 735000000.

passenger transport items(US dollars)


0
International tourism ; expenditure for 669000000.

105000000
0.0

passenger transport items(US dollars)


0
International tourism ; receipts for travel 436700000.

480700000.

items(US dollars)
0
International tourism ; expenditure for 118230000

0
142280000

travel items(US dollars)

00.0

00.0

International tourism ; expenditure (US 124920000

142280000

dollars)
00.0
International tourism ; percentage of 10.6

00.0
10.8

total imports
(Source: www.norwayemb.org.in)

TABLE SHOWING THE DETAILS OF TOURIST VISITED GUJARAT DURING THE YEAR
2013-14
Total

Total

Total

Growth

Growth

Month

internati

domesti

tourists

in

in

(2013-

onal

internati

domesti

2014)

tourist

tourists

onal

c tourist

36,858

1,608,38

tourist
1,645,241 33.3%

32,203

3
1,457,39

1,489,601 51.8%

20.5%

30,878

8
1,515,87

1,546,756 57.7%

18.2%

33,507

8
1,487,89

1,521,399 65.7%

14.8%

June

28,641

2
1,543,48

1,572,125 81.3%

24.2%

July

27,186

4
1,438,19

1,465,385 77.5%

23.5%

August

25,200

9
1,485,90

1,511,100 54.5%

15.1%

Feb
Mar
April
May

31.3%

Sept

26,524

1,625,61

1,652,139 58.3%

(Source: Government Tourism report of Arunachal Pradesh)

2. PLACES MOST VISITED-

NORWAY:

20.6%

Eastern Norway
Velmunden
Femundsmarka
Southern Norway

Tovdal to Araksbo
Jomfruland island
Telemark canal
Hardangervidda plateau

Fjord Norway

Stadtlandetandvagsoy
Alfotbreenglacier and Nordfjord
Intermost in the sognefjord
The solundarchipelago and vaerlandet
The hardangerfjord
Hardangervidda
skudeneshavn

Central Norway
Nidaroscatheradal
Roros and the surrounding area
Northen Norway

Gjesvaer fishing village


Hamnisenja
Traena and Myken Islands
The Vistenfjord

Arunachal Pradesh

Tawang-

If you want to have a look at the historical sites set on an emerald green
meadow, Tawang is the ideal place for you. The entire Tawang region is
nestled amidst Gudpi and Chong Chugmi ranges and bathed by the water of
Tawang Chu River. Tawang Monastery is an around 113 feet long and 80 feet
wide edifice which is a famous Buddhist temple. The interior of the building
is stunningly beautiful and a 28 feet high golden statue of Lord Buddha is
worshipped here. Indo-China border is another significant spot in Tawang.
Jaswant Garh, Tawang War Memorial, Tawang Craft Centre, Brahma-dungchung Ani Gompa, Urgelling Gompa are some of the important sightseeing
places. Madhuri Lake and Pangateng Tso Lake exude enchanting view.

Bomdila-

Bomdila is an attractive summer vacation getaway in Arunachal Pradesh. This


wonderful getaway is located at a height of 8000 ft above sea level. Idyllic
destination for family outing, this quiet place will indulge you to get closer with
your loved ones. Stroll across the land to have a glimpse of the snow packed
Himalayan peaks and clearer views of Kangto and Gorichen Peaks. If you are
adventurous enough you can trek through the hills of different levels or simply
stroll through the long quiet trails of the luxurious slopes. The most important
sightseeing spot is Bomdila Monastery which is rich in art and craft.

Itanagar

One of the most popular tourist destinations in Arunachal Pradesh, Itanagar is


the state capital and a well connected city. The township is situated at an
altitude of 350 m above sea level. Apart from the state administrative
headquarters, the city presents a number of rich architectural wonders. The
historical Ita Fort is made of special bricks and is significant from a sociocultural point. For a simple holidaymaker to an archeologist, this place can be
of great value to be explored. The legendary Ganga Lake (Gyakar Sinwi) is a
famous picnic spot in Itanagar which is 6 km from the heart of the city.
Jawaharlal Nehru Museum is a wonderful repository of indigenous tribal culture
of Arunachal. Gompa Buddha Vihar is an astounding yellow roofed shrine. One
can have a glimpse of the surrounding countryside from the gompa premise.

Pasighat

Pasighat is at a distance of 270km from Itanagar and known to be the oldest


town of Arunachal Pradesh. It is the headquarter of East Siang District and
situated at a height of 152m. Siang River, the main tributary of Brahmaputra
flows by Pasighat. The snowcapped mountain peaks, rock-strewn mountains
and a variety of flora and fauna present abundant options to explore natural
wonders. Pasighat-Jengging-Yingkiong-Tuting Tourist Circuit is the best option to

have a look at the main attractions of Arunachal Pradesh. Siang River is a


prime destination to enjoy water sports, especially river rafting. This expedition
is quite challenging and begins at Tuting in Upper Siang. Do not miss to visit
the Daying Ering Wild Life Sanctuary which is a popular sightseeing spot in
Pasighat. It is also the confluence point of Dihang and Lohit rivers with the
Brahmaputra.

Roing

Whether you are planning for a tour with your better half or with your buddies,
the diverse land of Roing will present you ultimate satisfaction. This
picturesque valley is situated on the bank of Dibang River. Geographically this
tranquil tourist spot is located in the Dibang Valley District of Arunachal
Pradesh. Nehru Van Udyan is a breath-taking forest park set on the riverbank at
Deopani. While going from Roing to Bismaknagar, you can see the vibrant
orange orchards.

Namdapha National Park

Being the largest protected area in the Eastern Himalayan sub-region,


Namdapha National Park is the largest national park in India in terms of area.
The park covers an area of 1,985 sq km of which 177 sq km is in buffer zone
and 1808 sq km in the core area. The park is bordered by Dapha Bum Range,
Patakai Range and an important tiger reserve forest. It is set on different levels
of altitudes perched with unique varieties of flora. From subtropical
broadleaved forest to alpine meadows covers the area with lush green carpet.
The wildlife repository is rich in rare species of animals like Asiatic Small Bears,
Eurasian Otters, Wolves, Clouded Leopards, Dholes, Red Foxes, Tigers, Red
Pandas, Musk Deer and Fishing Cats. For birders, it is a paradise, as more than
500 species of birds are available here.

Dirang

Located at a distance of 42km from Bomdila, Dirang is an attractive hill station


in Arunachal Pradesh. An ideal place to spend quality time in the lap of

Goddess Nature, Dirang has enormous options to explore vividly. The region is
located at an elevation of 4910 ft above sea level and on a picturesque valley
in between two major getaways- Bomdilla and Tawang. The land of kiwi and
apple orchards is cooled by the freezing river air. It is the base camp of trekking
and bird watching at Mandla. There is a historical fort atop the hill and the
remnants of the fort bears evidence of the glorious past of this area. Other than
its own attractions the neighboring areas of Dirang are also famous in terms of
their natural view. Visit the Regional Apple Nursery and Kiwi Firm. Sangty Valley
is 7km away from Dirang where black-necked crane comes from Siberia to
breed.

Parasuram Kund

If you are heading to the mystic land of Arunachal Pradesh in January,


remember to participate in the Makar Sankranti Mela at the site of Parasuram
Kund. A famous Hindu pilgrimage known for its magnetic natural ambience,
Parasuram Kund is located 13 miles north-east of Tezu. Well connected by road
from Tinsukia and Dibrugarh this holy place should be visited during November
to February for witnessing the best views. Take a dip in the holy water of
Brahma Kund for attaining penance.

Daporijo

327km from Itangar and 160km from Ziro, Daporijo is one of the unexplored
getaways of Arunachal Pradesh. The main attraction of the city is its rich
variety of flora and fauna and its ethnic diversity. Calm and cool environ and
pleasant weather makes it an ideal retreat for each city dweller. This splendid
town is the District Headquarter of Upper Subansiri District and located at an
elevation of 600 meters above sea level. This location has a numbers of
astounding trekking trails and nature walks. The Subansiri River which is close
to the city is ideal for rafting and angling. The Meghna Cave Temple of Lord
Shiva is a quiet spot to feel the freshness of nature. There are certain hill caves
and attractive hamlets close to the town which are ideal for one day trip.

Mechuka

One of the most famous getaways in Arunachal Pradesh, Mechuka is an


administrative township near the Indo-China border. Located at an altitude of

1829 m above sea level, it is a perfect getaway for unlimited enjoyment. The
Siyom River runs through the valley adding serenity to its scenic view. A series
of unexpected events welcome tourists once they reach at Mechuka.
Enchanting Buddhist Gumpas set amidst the open meadows enrich the glow of
diverse landscape. Mainly inhabited by the people of Memba Tribe, this is a
wonderful hill station which has both historical and religious significance. 400
years old Samten Yongcha monastery is located on a hill top overlooking the
undulating terrains. One can witness a few age old statues which are well
preserved till date. If you are visiting the place in February, try to be here
during Losar Festival, a five days New Year celebration. Mopin Festival starts
from the 5th day of April and continues for 5 days. Spend your holidays on any
of the luxurious accommodation. Just you need to book them in advance before
your arrival to the city. Enjoy rafting and angling in Siyom. Different levels of
trekking and hiking can be experienced here. If you are enthusiasts enough, try
camping in the forests of Mechuka.
Changlang

The land of bio-diversity, Changlang is a gorgeous hill town which exhibits


varying altitudes ranging from 200 meters to 4500 meters. There are a number
of rivers in this region like Noa-Dehing, Namchik, Tirap, Namphuk, Dapha, etc
which serve as the water resources of the region. The Cemetery of World War is
the great way to look back to the past. Lake of No Returns is a mystic water
body which offers a stunning view. Other sightseeing spots are Tibetan Refugee
Settlement Camp, Namdapha National Park, Moti Jheel, and Miao Reserve
Forest etc.

3. Cultural sector:-

Norway:-

The companies in the tourist sector usually require good knowledge of


Norwegian or another Scandinavian language especially for staff having
close contact with customers, such as receptionists, waiters etc. The reason
for these language requirements is that most guests in Norway are
Norwegian or Scandinavian.

In spite of this, the tourist sector has a much higher percentage of nonnative staff than other sectors. It is an international work place with
employees of international background and experience. Some employers
use English as a common working language, so it would be useful if you
have a basic understanding of this language. The easiest positions to get for
non-Norwegian speaking staff are within cooking and cleaning. Some of the
larger hotels have translated their working instructions for cleaning
personnel into other languages.
Wherever tourists are in Norway, they feel close to nature. The landscapes
themselves are inspiring, the combination of outstanding scenery and fresh
air can work wonders for a group itinerary. From snowy winters to the
northern lights, to soaring fjords and the midnight sun, Norway's natural
charms are legendary.
Although service standards are high, day-to-day life in Norway is laid-back.
The cities have more relaxed atmosphere than many of their continental
cousins, making Norway the perfect place to recharge your batteries, while
meeting business objectives.

Arunachal Pradesh

Broadly the people may be divided into three cultural groups on the basis of
their socio-religious affinities. The Monpas and Sherdukpens of Tawang and
West Kameng districts follow the lamaistic tradition of Mahayana Buddhism.
Noted for their religious fervour, the villages of these communities have
richly decorated Buddhist temples, locally called 'Gompas'. Though largely
agriculturists practising terrace cultivation, many of these people are also
pastoral and breed herds of yak and mountains sheep. Culturally similar to
them are Membas and Khambas who live in the high mountains along the
northern borders. Khamptis and Singphos inhabiting the eastern part of the
State are Buddhists of Hinayana sect. They are said to have migrated from
Thailand and Burma long ago and still using ancient scripts derived from
their original homeland.
The second group of the people are Adis, Akas, Apatanis, Bangnis, Nishis,
Mishmis, Mijis, Thongsas etc., who worship Sun and Moon God namely,
Donyi-Polo and Abo-Tani, the original ancestors for most of these tribes.
Their religious rituals, largely coincide with phases of agricultural cycles.
They invoke nature deities and make animal scarifices. They traditionally
practice jhumming or shifting cultivation. Adis and Apatanis extensively
practice wet rice cultivation and have a considerable agricultural economy.
Apatanis are also famous for their paddy-cum-pisciculture. They are

specialised over centuries in harvesting two crops of fish along with each
crop of the paddy.
The third group comprises Noctes and Wanchos,adjoining Nagaland in the
Tirap District. These are hardy people known for their strictly structured
village society in which hereditary village chief still plays a vital role. The
Noctes also practise elementary form of Vaishnavism.

a. GDP growthNorway:
Travel & Tourism Total Contribution to GDP ( % share) as follows:

Year

Value

Change (%)

2013

6.2

0.00

2012

6.2

-3.13

2011

6.4

-1.54

2010

6.5

-10.96

2009

7.3

7.35

2008

6.8

-4.23

2007

7.1

-1.39

(Source: www.Norwayemb.org.in)
The Travel &Tourism spend on employment in the equivalent economy-wide
concept in the published national income accounts or labor market statistics.
Visitors exports are compared with exports of all goods and services Domestic
Travel & Tourism spending is compared with GDP Government individual Travel
& Tourism spending is compared with total government spending Internal Travel
& Tourism consumption is compared with total internal consumption (i.e. total
domestic spending plus total export) Leisure Travel & Tourism contribution to
GDP is compared with total GDP Business Travel & Tourism contribution to GDP

is compared with total GDP Travel & Tourism capital investment spending is
compared with all fixed investment spending.

Arunachal Pradesh:The current world tourism contribution to GDP is 11%.


The current Indian tourism contribution to GDP is 1.8% and it is targeted to
reach 6% in the next decade. If this can be re-targeted to reach 10% an
additional 1.2 crore jobs can be created.
This untapped resource can be motivated to become prospective tourists and
investors in this sector and the GDP level can be improved considerably

Present Trade Relationship of India and Norway

India-Norway Relations
India and Norway have had cordial and friendly relations. The two countries
respect each other for commonly shared values such as democracy, human
rights and rule of law. In recent years, both countries have been increasingly
tapping bilateral economic and technical complementarities. There have been
regular exchanges of high level visits between the two countries. Visits from

the Norwegian side during the last three years have included those of Prime
Minister Jens Stoltenberg in early February 2010 for the Delhi Sustainable
Development Summit (DSDS); Minister of Agriculture and Food Lars PederBrekk
in February, 2010;
There have been several Ministerial level India-Norway Joint Commission
sessions are held on a regular basis under the chairmanship of the respective
Foreign Ministers, the last session having been held in New Delhi on March 2,
2010. The next session of the Joint Commission is likely to be held in Delhi
during the proposed visit of Norwegian Foreign Minister to India, tentatively
planned for in early 2014. Foreign Office Consultations between the two Foreign
Ministries are held on an annual basis, alternately in New Delhi and Oslo, at the
level of Secretaries. Norway has extended its support to Indias bid for a
permanent seat in the UN Security Council. It had also supported Indias
candidacy for a non-permanent seat inthe Security Council for the period 20112012.

Trade
Exports from Norway to India include electronic goods, general industrial
machinery, scientific control equipment, artificial resins, plastic materials,
non-ferrous metals, while the main items of export from India to Norway
include

transport

equipment,

apparels,

cotton

yarn

and

fabrics,

miscellaneous manufactured articles, metals, non-metal mineral items, paper


products, cashew, furniture, travel goods, leather items, coffee, tea, spices
and footwear. There has been a substantial growth in economic and
commercial relations between India and Norway in recent years especially in
areas such as oil and gas, shipping and maritime industries, renewable
energy, offshore projects and service sectors. This has given a major fillip to
bilateral trade with the total trade between India and Norway as per
Norwegian figures reaching USD 932 million in 2012 as compared with USD
791.9 million in 2010.
Investments
Around 70 Norwegian companies are engaged in India either through joint
ventures with Indian partners or through wholly owned subsidiaries. Over
100 Norwegian companies have shown interest in possible business
prospects in areas such as ship building, petroleum related services,
marine/subsea drilling equipment, hydropower, clean energy, and IT
services. ONGC and Reliance Industries have tie ups with Norwegian
companies in the petroleum and energy sector. There has also been a trend
of Norwegian IT companies to either offshore their business to India or
acquire shares in Indian companies. Indian IT majors like Tata Consultancy
Services, Infosys, ITC Infotech, Larsen & Toubro Infotech and Wipro have
increased their presence in Norway over the last few years due to the
existing potential of IT outsourcing contracts in the country. Norwegian
expertise in maritime operations, have been in demand in India and the

Norwegian shipping industry has likewise discovered the potential and


economic viability of building vessels in Indian ship yards. More than 30 ships
are in the pipeline, being built or delivered from Indian shipyards on orders
from Norwegian ship owners. Telenor, Norways largest telecom company is
the majority shareholder in the Indian mobile operator, UNINOR. After
severing its ties with Unitech Wireless, Telenor has set up a separate
company, Telewings Communications, in joint venture with M/s Lakshdeep
Investments. Telenor has announced that it is committed to invest upto Rs.
15,500 crore in India.
Another major Norwegian investment in India has been by their largest paint
manufacturer, Jotun. Indian companies have also invested in Norway over
the last few years. One of the largest investments was by Chennai-based
Aban Offshore which took over Norwegian drilling company Sinvest in early
2007, in a deal worth around $1.3 billion. Another Chennai-basedcompany,
Siva Ventures acquired the Norwegian shipping company, J.B. Ugland
Shipping AS for US $ 300 million in 2008; it also acquired a Norwegian
bottled-water company, Isklar AS, in 2010. Tata Motors have bought a 50.3%
stake in Norwegian company MiljoGrenland/Innovasjon, which specialises in
developing hi-tech batteries for electric vehicles. Norwegian investments in
India are estimated at US $ 5.611 billion as of June 2012, including equity
and fixed income investments of US $ 4.2 billion across 266 Indian stocks
made by Norges Bank (Norwegian Central Bank) as part of Norways Pension
Fund Global.
Indian investments in Norway are estimated at US $ 1.838 billion. The overall
bilateral economic engagement is estimated at over US$ 15 billion.Punjab
National Bank inaugurated its Representative office in Oslo in January 2009,
while DNBNor, the largest Norwegian Bank opened its Representative Office
in Mumbai in February 2009. With the signing of anMoU between RBI and the
Financial Services Authority of Norway for enhancing bilateral cooperation on

banking supervision in July 2012, the process is underway to upgrade PNBs


representative office in Oslo to that to branch.
Year
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009 10
2010-11 (Apr-

Trade
130.20
184.18
265.65
393.67
228.91
82.3

Export
130.20
184.18
265.65
393.67
228.91
82.3

Import
289.34
768.70
1,639.55
1,120.73
907.35
268.68

Sept)

(Amount in US Dollars Millions Source: Ministry ofcommerce)


1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0

Year
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009 10
2010-11 (AprSept)

Export
Import

Total trade
419.55
952.88
1,905.20
1,514.40
1,136.26
350.98

Total trade
2500

2000

1500
Total trade
1000

500

(Source: Ministry of Commerce)


Bilateral trade increased more than 3 times between2005-06 (US$ 419 mn)
and 2008-09 (US$ 1514 mn). It stood at 1136.26 US$ mn in 2009-10.
However, the bilateral trade balance has been unfavorable for India
throughout.

Key commodities of Indias Exports:


Norway imports different items from India in which India has a comparative
advantage. Main import items from India include articles of apparels, textile,
yarn & fabrics, misc. manufactured articles, metals, non-metal mineral
manufacture, fruit & vegetables, furniture & parts, travel goods, hand bags,
coffee, tea & spices, footwear.

Key commodities of Indias Imports: Norway being a highly developed


country offers different electronic and technological items to India. Some of
the major exports of Norway to India are: machinery, iron & steel, electronic
machinery

appliances, general

industrial machinery,

scientific

control

equipment,non-ferrous metals, telecom & equipment. The Indian importers


have also shown interest in sourcing Norwegian products and services,
especially those linked to deep off-shore, shipping, hydro-electricity,
metallurgy, telecommunications equipment and select areas of IT.

Summary ofPart 2
The Norwegian travel market 2011 was yet another year with significant
optimism and growth. Record numbers of Norwegians traveling to the U.S.
underlines that the U.S. is still Norways favorite long haul destination.
The total of 234 305 Norwegians traveled to the U.S. in 2011 (Jan-Nov), up
13%, and forecasts for 2012 are good as the trend of more Norwegians
vacation abroad than in their home country is set to continue. An extremely
favorable currency exchange rate has made particularly America more
affordable in terms of good deals on hotel rooms, car rental.
Norwegian tour operators specializing in the U.S. market report record
numbers of reservations in 2012 and this is reflected Scandinavian Airlines
reestablishing their direct scheduled service Oslo to Newark in March 2011.
Continental Airlines also has direct scheduled flights from Oslo to Newark,
opening their gateways to the rest of America for the Norwegian traveler.
2007
200

172,882
213,983

8
2009
2010
2011

193 318
221 145
234 305

(Jan-

Nov)
The people of this country are experienced and increasingly sophisticated
travelers, fluent in English, they have the time and money to travel long
haul. The average tourist stays in the U.S for 16 days and spends more than
USD 4000 on his/her trip.
With most Norwegians having 25 days of annual vacation in addition to
public holidays, it is expected to diversify Norwegian travel, spreading their
vacation days throughout the year. The summer remains the main vacation
season for Norwegians, whose custom it is to take three weeks in July. Most
Norwegians are now traveling abroad in the winter getting away from the
cold and harsh climate. Norwegian schools are closed for one week in
October and February, and for two weeks around Easter.
The vacation group with the highest growth rate is the age group over 65
years. The top five destinations for Norwegian visitors are: New York City,
Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Tampa.
The traditional fly-drive vacation in Florida and California is very popular, as
well as city breaks to New York City. Most Norwegians have close family and
cultural ties with the United States, so there is still a growing interest in
travel to Norwegian America". Trends in the Norwegian travel market
include activity vacations built around pursuits such as rafting, mountain
climbing, golf, and culture.
An independent travel has long been apparent in travel to the U.S. where the
majority of travel is either booked directly online by the traveler or organized
through a specialist travel agent, tailoring the vacation to the specific
requirements of the traveler. Increasingly, customers do a significant amount
of research on the Internet before approaching a travel agent.

The Norwegian air travel has long been characterized by a high share of
business travel.
Business travel has come under pressure as companies are being forced to
look for new, more cost efficient ways to manage their travel budgets.
Business travel suppliers in Norway such as Bennett BTI and Berg Hansen,
both are working closely with customers, streamlining travel policy for
managing business travel effectively. Men are in great majority on business
trips (75%), while women are in the majority on private journeys (57%).
Leisure travel now constitutes 56% of international scheduled air travel from
Norway.
A. Sub-Sector Best Prospects
Top based on the current trends in the Norwegian travel market, a best
prospect is certainly the niche vacation market, a vacation that offers
them something unusual. Norwegian enjoyment of nature and an outdoor
lifestyle is a vital part of the countrys national identity. Hiking, ranching
or visiting an Indian reservation, or activity vacations combining fishing
and hunting with photographic opportunities would be of interest.
The climate is an important factor in encouraging Norwegians abroad, as
it is both cold and dark for 5 months of the year. This interest particularly
appeals to the 45-79 year old segment, which is a fastest growing group
with both time and money on their hands. Golfing vacations could be
combined with other elements to make up a complete vacation
experience. Finally, there is a significant growth in the cruise market
segment, either out of Florida or New York.
B. Opportunities
The best ways to increase market exposure and sales in Norways tourism
market is to partner up with a credible and visible Norwegian player.
There are number of travel agents and wholesalers located in Norway

targeting the U.S market. The U.S. Commercial Service in Oslo can assist
in finding a suitable partner in the market.
Alternatively, consider exhibiting at the international travel and tourism
show Reiseliv, next scheduled for March 2013.

INTRODUCTION OF LIZA WORLD TRAVEL

Liza World Travels is a Government approved leading tour operator and


travel agent in North East India catering to foreign tourists and Indian
visitors. Liza World Travels is an accredited member of Indian Association of
Tour Operators (IATO), Association of Tour Operators of North East India
(ATONEI), Adventure Tour Operators Association of India (ATOAI), and
Arunachal Pradesh Tour Operators Association (APTOA).
Started as an entrepreneurial venture in 1999, Liza World Travels soon
established itself in the North East of India and has since expanded rapidly to
become a leading specialist in operating tours and is arguably the best
operator of tailor-made journeys to North East of India today.We they have
personally visited over 95% of the destinations featured in our brochures.
Our knowledge is constantly updated through frequent visits as well as
training.

Vision
To Bring You the Best of North East India

Our Team
Theirteam consists of local people from diverse fields who share a common
passion for travel. Their experience and backgrounds lend innovative
thinking in addressing design and operational issues.
They have personally visited over 95% of the destinations featured in their
brochures.Theirknowledge is constantly updated through frequent visits as
well as training. They can therefore give an immediate and considered
response to most queries. Theirfield personnel /Guides in North East are
regularly trained, so when they escort you for the tour they fully appreciate
your needs and standards.
Their offices are located in Delhi and Itanagar (Arunachal Pradesh)
coordinate your itineraries. Coupled with our wide personal contacts in the
North East, this enables us to provide the holiday experience you seek.

Destination Places

North-East Tours

Tribal
Arunachal

Tour

Explore Nagaland
Explore Tripura

of

Explore Mizoram

Rafting in River Siang

Kaziranga National Indo-Tibetan Border


Park Tour
Trekking
Bird Watching at Dibru Tawang

PRODUCT AND SERVICES LIZA WORLD TRAVELS

The leading tour operator for tailor-made journeys to Liza World Travels,
Liza World Travels was started by Mr. LaetaUmbrey (Ex-Member of
Parliament) to promote his dream destination, North East Of India, to those
wanting to experience the real India. Mr. LaetaUmbrey a multidimensional
personality, a connoisseur of Tourism Industry. As a member of the
Parliamentary Consultative Committee on Civil Aviation and Tourism he has
traveled extensively throughout the country and abroad. He has used this
experience to improve our services and smooth operation for all clients from
any corner of the world.

Arunachal Tribal Tour

PLACE OF INTEREST:

ITANAGAR: The capital city of Arunachal is a modern settlement built in the


vicinity of the ruin of the 14th century fort old capital. The capital is well
connected by a network of roads with all important cities and towns of the
neighboring states. Some of the places of interest are the state museum
known as Jawaharlal Nehru Museum; time spent here can really acquaint you
with the culture and tradition of this region.
TAWANG-BOMDILA: The land of the Monpa tribes, nestled in the lap of the
Himalayas at 12000 ft. above sea level is the Tawang Monastery. The Tawang
Monastery is around 400 years old and the second largest Monastery in Asia.
The most imposing part of the monastery is the three storied assembly hall
which houses the temple and the 28ft. high Golden Buddha. The building is
about 113 ft. long and 80 ft. wide and houses valuable antiquities. Its library
has an impressive collection of old books and manuscripts.
BOMDILA: The headquarters of West Kameng district is located at the
height of 8500 ft. above sea level from where one can see the brilliant
landscape and snow-clad mountains of the Himalayan Ranges. It has a lot of
attractions for the tourist with its cool climate, snow-capped peaks and
Buddhist Gompas.

The Buddhist monastery of Bomdila is the repository of culture. This place


has a craft centre displaying local crafts museum and a shopping centre.
Bomdila also offers a Birds eye view of Kangto and Gorichan peak (the
highest peak in the state).
BHALUKPONG-TIPI: The gate way and entry check gate for the East
Kameng, West Kameng and Tawang District of Arunachal Pradesh is a scenic
beauty surrounded by evergreen forest, located on the bank of river Kameng
provides excellent opportunity for white water rafting, angling & bird
watching.
An Orchadirum at Tipi 5km from Bhalukpong is the Botanical paradise of the
state. Govt. of Arunachal Pradesh, Department of Environment and forest has
established Orchid Research Centre at Tipi to promote orchid conservation.
Out of 1150 species distribute in various state in India, Arunachal Pradesh
alone accounts for 601 species-almost 52% of the total species known in
India, thus making Arunachal Pradesh an Orchid paradise of our country.

Mizoram Tour
Mizoram Holiday Package

PLACES OF INTEREST:

AIZWAL: Aizwal, the state capital of Mizoram is situated at a altitude of


4000ft. above sea level. The town is a political, cultural and religious center
of the Mizos. Standing on a high ridge surrounded on the east by the deep
green valley of river Tuirial and on the west, by river Tlawng, with its lush
green deep valleys, and on the north protected by beautiful high craggy hills
of Durtlang, it stands like a huge citadel.
FALKAWN: 18 kms south of Aizawl, Falkawn is famous for its typical Mizo
Village which has been recreated as a place of interest for both tourist and
local.
REIEK: Reiek, 35 kms from Aizawl is a place that should not be missed. The
rugged landscape and virgin forests offer the perfect choice for both the
adventurous and the nature lovers. A typical Mizo village recreated is
another attraction that draws visitors.
TAMDIL (TAM LAKE): 85 kms east of Aizawl, Tam Lake is a natural beautiful
lake which lies in the midst of cool, virgin forest that offers an ideal picnic
spot for tourists. Boating facilities are available. A Drive to Tam Lake gives
you an excellent opportunity to see some of the most beautiful places of
Mizoram.
VANTAWNG WATERFALL: Located amongst dense bamboo groves and
tropical forest, Vantawng Waterfall is the highest waterfall in Mizoram having
a fall of 750ft high. It is located only 5 kms away from the idyllic beautiful
town of Thenzawl, famous for its Handloom products.
CHAMPHAI: Champhai is a beautiful place that offers plenty of tourist
attractions. It is located 192 kms from Aizawl at an elevation of 1678
mts.Champhai with its breathtaking beauty present tourists with a view of
the hills of Myanmar .
Champhai has charming patches of lush green paddy fields usually set in the
valley between two hills and Champhai is popularly known as Rice Bowl of
Mizoram.

PHAWNGPUI (BLUE MOUNTAIN): Phawngpui is the highest peak in


Mizoram having an alleviation of 2,157mts. and is rich in medicinal herbs
growing in the wild. It is located in the southern most part of Mizoram inside
Saiha District, 300 kms. fromAizawl, lying adjacent to Myanmar . It harbors

variety of wild animals, birds, orchids and the beautiful daphnia blossom
together with many wild plants and flowers.

ENTRY FORMALITIES: Permits are required for traveling to Mizoram. Indian


tourists intending to visit Mizoram require an Inner Line Permit (ILP) and
Foreign Tourists required Protected Area Permit (PAP) to visit the state which
is valid for a period of 10 days. Permits can be extended.
BEST TIME TO VlSlT: Mid September to mid March is considered the best
time for traveling to Mizoram.

Sikkim Tour
Explore Sikkim

NJP-Bagdogra Darjeeling: Arrive NJP Rlw Station / Bagdogra airport,


Transfer to Darjeeling, Enroute Visit Mirick Lake &Nepal Border, o/n stay at
Darjeeling.
Darjeeling: After breakfast at hotel, depart for the sight seeing Full Day city
tour of Darjeeling. Parmesan Nadia Himalayan Zoological park, Himalayan
Mountaineering Institute ( Closed on Thursday), Ropeway, Tensing -- Gumbo
Rock, Tibetan Refugee Self Help Center ( Closed on Sunday),Tea Estate,
Lebong Race Course , Peace Pagoda. & Rock Garden Gangamaya Park.o/n
at Darjeeling.

Darjeeling Gangtok: Darjeeling Early Morning Excursion to Tiger Hill,


Ghoom Monastery &Batasia Loop. After breakfast at hotel, transfer to
Gangtok& Same Day Half day city tour of Gangtok Directorate of Handicrafts
and Handlooms, Enchey Monastery, Research Institute of Tibetology, Chorten
( Stupa ), Orchid Sanctuary, Rumtek Monastery, o/n at Gangtok.
Gangtok: After breakfast at hotel, depart for the sight seeing full day tour of
Thshangu Lake & Baba Mander. o/n at Gangtok.
Gangtok - NJP/Bagdogra: After breakfast at hotel, transfer to the NJP Rlw
Station / Bagdogra airport for your journey.

Assam Tour Package


Assam Wildlife Tour

PLACE OF INTEREST:
GUWAHATI: The gateway of northeast is on the banks of the mighty
Brahmapurta River and is the largest city in the Northeast. It is a fast
growing premier city a good place to start tours to other northeast
destinations.
SRIMANTA SANKARDEVA KALAKSHETRA:
complex at Panjabari named after the

A huge modern cultural


great Vaishnavite saint

MohapuruxhSrimantaSankardeva of the 15th century is located about 10 km


away from the city-hart towards the south. This has been established with
the purpose of preservation and promotion of the rich socio-cultural heritage
of the peoples of Assam. It is open for visitors on all days except Monday.
KAMAKHYA MANDIR: It is situated on Nilachal hill, eight km east of the city.
This temple honour the mother Goddess Kamakhya, the essence of female
energy. It is one of the 108 Shakti Peethas of Goddess Durga. The temple
was rebuilt in 1665 after being destroyed by Muslim invaders, but its origins
are much older than that. It was probably an ancient Khasi sacrificial site,
sacrifices are still very much part of worshiping here. Group of devotees
arrive each morning with goats to offer to Shakti.
NAVAGRAHA TEMPLE: On another hill called Chitrachal hill, in northeast of
Guwahati is the Navagraha (Nine Planets) temple believed to the mark the
site of the ancient city of Pragjiyotishpur, Guwahatis earliest name, which
was famous as a centre of astronomy. Beneath its red beehive-shaped dome
is a dark and eerie chamber that has nine lingas representing the nine
planets.
UMANANDA TEMPLE: Enchantingly located on the lush green peacock
island in the middle of the Brahmaputra this 16th Century temple is also
dedicated to Shivas wife. The island, swarming with friendly Langur
monkeys, is an excellent place to stand and watch the river; deceptively slow
on the surface but with swift undercurrents. The temple is reached by ferry
from UmanandaGhat north of the railway station.
SUALKUCHI: , 32 km (20 miles) south of Guwahati, is a major weaving
center for Assams famous golden-hued Muga silk. Several houses here have
women working at their looms, and they are happy to welcome visitors
interested in their craft.
MAJULI ISLAND: It is the worlds largest river island (886 sq km) and is
famous for its 22 ancient Vaishnavaite Hindu monasteries or Satras, which
also serve as centers for the preservation of Assamese arts. The institution of
the Satra was founded in the 15th century by the great Assamese poet,
composer and philosopher Sankardeva. The most pleasant way to see the
satras is on foot
JORHAT/SIBSAGAR: Jorhat is the gateway to Upper Assam and idea for
people who love to see tea gardens and tea processing. Sibsangar, the
capital of Ahom dynasty, which ruled Assam for over 600 years. A number of

ancient Shiva temples other ruined palaces of Ahom dynasty exhibits Ahom
history.

Manipur Touring Package


Explore Manipur

PLACE OF INTEREST:
IMPHAL: The capital city of Manipur lies almost in the center of the state
and is also the hub of culture and commercial activity. It is situated at a
height of 790mt above sea level.
SHREE GOVINDAJEE TEMPLE: near the old palace is one of the most
important palaces of worship of the Meitei Hindus. It is the largest temple in
Manipur, it is a simple yet beautiful structure.
KHWAIRAMBAND BAZAR: The womens bazaar known as EmaKeithel
and located at the heart of Khwairamba and bazaar is run exclusively by
women. It is a place worth visiting.
WAR CEMETRIES: Commemorating the memories of the British and Indian
soldiers who died during the Second World War, these cemeteries are
managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Serene and well
maintained, the graves carry little stone markers and bronze plaques
recording the sacrifice of those gallant soldiers.
MOIRANG: The town is one of the main centers of early Meities folk culture
with the ancient temple of the pre-Hindu deity Lord Thangjing, situated here.
In the month of May, men and women, dressed in colourful traditional
customs sing and dance in honour of the Lord at the Moirang Lai Haraoba
which is a ritual dance festival held every year.

LOKTAK LAKE: It is a beautiful and also the largest lake in north east of
India. Two tiny islets add much to its beauty. It is a paradise for the tourists
and holiday makers.
KEIBUL LAMJAO: it is a national park with an area of 45 sq. km of floating
mass of reeds and dry Land. Here the brown antlered deers live in their
natural habitat.
BEST TIME TO VlSlT: Mid September to mid March is considered the best
time for traveling to Manipur.

Tripura Holiday Package


Explore Tripura

PLACES OF INTEREST:

UJJAYANTA PALACE: This Royal House which stands in the capital city
Agartala covering one sq. km area was built by Maharaja Radha Kishore
Manikya in 1901 in extravagant Indo-Saracenic style. Legislature, the
palaces opulent interior includes a tiled Chinese room with a magnificent

ceiling crafted by artisans brought from China. It is open to visitors when the
Assembly is not in session.
NEERMAHAL: Neermahal Water Place, 55 km south of Agartala, on an island
in Rudrasagar Lake was the summer home of the former maharajas of
Tripura. Built in white marble and red sand stone. This fairy-tale palace has a
profusion of pavilions, balconies, turrets and bridges. It is only lake palace in
Eastern India.
KAMALASAGAR KAIL TEMPLE: This temple was built on a hill-top by
Maharaja DhanyaManikya in the late 15th century. It is situated just beside
the Bangladesh border and at distance of 30km from Agartala. The lake in
front of this temple rightly enhances its beauty.
TRIPURA SUNDARI TEMPLE: This temple is at distance of 56km from
Agartala and located on a hill-top at Udaipur. It is regarded as one of the 51
pithas of Hindu pilgrims, built by Maharaja DhanyaManikya in 1501 A.D. It
consists of a square type sanctum of the typical Bengali hut tupe. The lake in
front of the temple added to its beauty.
BHUBANSEWARI TEMPLE: Temple is situated on the bank of the Gomati
river at Udaipur, which is 55 km from Agartala. This temple is immortalized in
Tagore plays-namely Rajarsheee and Visarjan.
JAMPUI HILLS: The permanent seat of eternal spring is situated at an
altitude of 3000 ft. above sea level and is at a distance of 250 km from
Agartala. Jampui is famous for its charming landscape and bracing climate.
Which make ideal hill destination for the tourist. Village tourism is being
promoted here.
BEST TIME TO VISIT: September to March.
ENTRY FORMALITIES: Restricted Area Permit system has been lifted in
1995. No entry fee is required for visiting Tripura.

Nagaland Holiday Package


Explore Nagaland

PLACE OF INTEREST:

KOHIMA: Situated at an altitude of 1495 m above sea level is the capital


of Nagaland. Kohima hosts the five days Hornbill Festival, which
showcases the cultures of all of Naga tribes from December 1-5 every
year. The State Museum has a rare collection of artifacts of the different
tribes which inhabit the state. A must see for getting an idea of the
peoples lives.
WAR CEMETERY: The well maintained War Cemetery was constructed in
memory of the officers and men who made supreme sacrifices during
World War II. On each grave there are beautiful epitaphs engraved in
bronze.
KHONOMA VILLAGE: This Angami village, which lies 20 km west of
Kohima was known for its fighting prowess in the past. It is also known for
the fallow management of its alder trees, which balances nature in the
surrounding areas. The beautiful terraces that are carved out of the hill
slopes surrounding the village are a sight to behold. These terraces grow
over 20 types of paddy at different elevations.

DIMAPUR is situated at an altitude of 900ft. above sea level. It is the


getway district of Nagaland. This first developing town is the commercial
centre of state. Dimapur was the capital of ancient Kachari kingdom and it
has one of the important sites of megalithic culture. Most of the ruins
appear to be contemporaries with the Kachari civilization, established
before the Ahom invasion in the 13th century A.D.
TUOPHEMA VILLAGE: This village which is 41 km from Kohima is a
model village for common AngamiSekrenyi festival which is celebrated
during February 25-27 every year. Sekrenyi is a festival of purification and
revolves round rituals and ceremonies of cleansing the village well.
MON: The headquarters and home of the Konyaks, old Konyak men often
have elaborate facial tattoos and wear adornments made from boar teeth
and animals horns. Konyaks are ruled by hereditary chiefs known as
Anghs and the institution of Anghship is only prevalent among the
Konyaks. The most colourful festival of the Konyaks is AolingMonyu
which is celebrated in the month of April (1- 6) every year.
LONGWA VILLAGE: The village straddles the international boundary line,
falls within the Indian Territory and the other half lies in Myanmar.
However the whole village is controlled by the Angh and the village
council chairman.

KIPHIRE: Home to the Sangtams, Yimchungers and Sumis. It is situated


at an altitude of 896.42 meters above sea level and is 254 km from state
capital Kohima. Saramati the highest peak of Nagaland at 3, 841 meters
is situated in this district.
TUENSANG: It is mini Nagaland, home to six different tribes. The tribes
inhabiting the district are rich in cultural heritage and their dresses are

very colourful. Their dances are rhythmic and songs are heartwarming.
This area is also known for its handicrafts and handloom products.
KHONOMA VILLAGE: This Angami village, which lies 20 km west of
Kohima was known for its fighting prowess in the past. It is also known for
the fallow management of its alder trees, which balances nature in the
surrounding areas. The beautiful terraces that are carved out of the hill
slopes surrounding the village are a sight to behold. These terraces grow
over 20 types of paddy at different elevations.
DIMAPUR is situated at an altitude of 900ft. above sea level. It is the
getway district of Nagaland. This first developing town is the commercial
centre of state. Dimapur was the capital of ancient Kachari kingdom and it
has one of the important sites of megalithic culture. Most of the ruins
appear to be contemporaries with the Kachari civilization, established
before the Ahom invasion in the 13th century A.D.
TUOPHEMA VILLAGE: This village which is 41 km from Kohima is a
model village for common AngamiSekrenyi festival which is celebrated
during February 25-27 every year. Sekrenyi is a festival of purification and
revolves round rituals and ceremonies of cleansing the village well.

SWOT Analysis of Liza Travels

Strengths:

Liza travel provides the facilities like festival touring which means
when there is any festival time for Arunachal Pradesh it Liza travels
organize the travel service to its customer so the people from all over
the world can the culture and of Arunchal Pradesh.
Liza travel provides services like booking of hotels booking, holiday
packages, transportation vehicles to their customer which done
according to their budget.
Liza travels organize the trekking expedition to those customer who
like the thrill in there traveling like Siang Valley Trekking Expedition
is trekking circuit, trek along the Tsangpo river in (Tibet) known as
Siang in Pasighat district of Arunachal Pradesh, later which joined and
known as Brahmaputra river in the state of Assam, This trek covering
visit of Adi (Minyong, Pasi, Padam) tribe of Arunachal Pradesh.
There are many wildlife in Arunchal Pradesh like Namdhapa National
Park, Pakhui Sanctuary, Itanagar Sanctuary, DayingEring Sanctuary,
MehaoSancuary, Kane Sanctaury, Eagle's Nest Sanctuary, Kamlang
Sanctuary, Dibang Sanctuary, Sessa Orchid Sanctuary And Mouling
National Park shelters many herbivores and have aided in preserving
the many imperiled species of flora and fauna. To name some are
Capped Langur, Red panda, Takin, Musk deer, Tiger, Leopard, Snow-

leopard, Clouded leopard, Barking Deer, Serow, Honger, Small cats,


Black Bear and rare birds. So the Liza tavel organize the special tour
for the tourist to visit these palaces.
Liza travels have made the website where the detail description is give
about the places there schemes etc which is easy for the tourist.
Liza travels provides the online enquiry service facility to their
customers where the customer can book their tickets of travelling,
hotel booking, holiday packages etc.

Weakness:
In Liza travels there is lack of proper marketing and advertisements
seen as compared with other tourism industry like make my tirp,
yatra.com.
There is lack of adequate infrastructure support in Arunachal Pradesh
this affects the customer and its result is decrease in tourist and that
affect to the Liza travels.
Liza travels have inadequacy of transport facilities which means those
vehicles are used in hilly or in mountain region are less.

Opportunities:
The concept of holidaying is gaining popularity in India among various
classes of people which a great opportunity for the Liza travel.
Trough tourism industry Liza travels can increased its disposable
incomes of the Indian middle class.

With the innovative adventure sports and trekking Liza travel can
easily attract the adventure and trekking lover tourist.
Arunachal Pradesh contains many unexplored regions which great
opportunity for Liza travels to explore that regions to the tourists who
are visiting Arunachal Pradesh.

Threats:
Many more travel agencies or industry arebeing opened up and could
divert a large portion of tourists to itself which affects the tourism
business of Liza travels.
Services of Liza travels are only at North-east of India but now various
other places in India are which providing stiff competition so the
service also.

Market Opportunity of Liza Travels in Norway

Market Opportunity is A potentially favorable condition in which a business


can capitalize on a changing trend or an increasing demand for a product by
a demographic group that has yet to be recognized by its competitors. For a
market opportunity to exist, a company must be able to identify who its
potential customers are, the specific needs that need to be met, the size of
the market, and its capacity to capture market share.
Many new entrepreneurs believe their service or product will have wide
market appeal. As a result they overestimate their market opportunity and
accordingly their companys potential for growth. So you need to ask
yourself: whats my market opportunity really!?
Its important to keep in mind that your business cant be all things to all
people. No matter how broad you consider the appeal of your product or
service, not everyone will be interested in it. Thats why you should be able
to identify the appropriate niche for your businessyour sweet spot. In
others words, who is your ideal customer? Defining your niche helps you
establish what your real market opportunity is, and will prevent you from
making costly mistakes.
Once you have the broad picture, try to establish how much of the overall
market you might be able to capture. Your target market or sweet spot
consists of the customers you believe are most likely to buy your particular
product or service. For example, your ideal customer or client may be a dualincome family with a household income of over $100,000, two children, and
either one or two pets. Utilizing census bureau information or other reference
material, you should be able to estimate the number of families in your area
that fit that description. That becomes your market opportunity.
The following are some Market Opportunities for Liza World Travels

1. Seasonal strategies.
To

develop

counter-seasonal

strategies,

it

is

useful

to

have

an

understanding of the seasonal concentration of demand for tourism and


the relative marginal effect of different markets. A former identifies
patterns of seasonal concentration and can be used to measure any yearon-year changes. This can be used to benchmark seasonal concentration
in one geographical area against that of other areas. The latter provides
opportunities to target markets that reduce (or at least minimize growth
in) seasonal concentration.
International markets increase seasonal concentration with a relative
marginal effect of 14.2% of the international markets, German and Dutch
markets increase seasonal concentration with relative marginal effects of
6.8 %and 3.8 %respectively. Danish, Swedish, British, Polish and
Lithuanian markets reduce seasonality although their relative marginal
effects are fairly small.

2. Resource utilization.
There are many destination management bodies in Norway. Roles,
responsibilities and tasks need to be clearly allocated between these
organizations. Increasing the effectiveness of the efforts being made, the
use of private and public sector resources requires clarification of who
should do what, and who should finance the various activities.

Every year Innovation in Norway contacts more than 1,000 international


tour operators who sell Norway to establish and to maintain good
relations. Activities involve in making sales visits, training tour operator
staff, local workshops and the organizations flagship event, the
Norwegian Travel Workshop.
Staged

annually,

the Norwegian

Travel

Workshop

brings

together

Norwegian tourism companies and foreign tour operators, and is an


example of how Innovation Norway creates arenas for the sale of
Norwegian tourism products abroad.

3. Marketing strategy.
Online solutions have made this far easier to sell experiences direct to the
consumer. Therefore use of online solutions is a natural part of any such
sales plan. Building relations with tour operators and travel agencies is
important. Today, these account for the sale of a considerable volume of
holiday experiences in Norway.
For tour operators to recommend Norway to their customers they must
know about Norway as well as Norwegian tourism products. Most people
have pointed to a short distance between product information and the
buy button for the same product as a success factor in triggering sales.
Good electronic solutions for booking, payment are therefore vital
elements in maintaining and increasing customer motivation to choose
Norwegian

destinations.

The

booking

solution

was

launched

on

visitnorway.com in 2011 represents an important milestone in the effort to


make Norwegian tourism products easier to buy. This is important that
this solution issued and further developed in the time ahead. This

is of

particular importance that more and more tourism service providers make
their products available for booking through this site. Sales as well as

marketing are also about giving customers the information they need,
when they need it.

4. Norways official tourism.


Visitnorway.com is

available in 14 languages, has partnership

agreements with around 90 % of Norways destinations and tourist


information offices. The portal is constantly developed in terms of both
content and technology with Book Norway being integrated as late as
2011.

The use of social media has been integrated into the online

concept. Visitnorway.com had 9.5million visitors in 2010, and rising to


11.9 million in 2011. The complete overview of the measures the
government is proposing in this area is presented below.
Continue the collaboration between the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and
Innovation Norway to strengthen its international reputation.
The use design elements to reinforce the presentation of destinations
as unified entities.
To develop versions of the Book Norway booking solution in all the
same relevant languages thatvisitnorway.com is available in.
To expand Book Norways contents to include more products and
services, including comprehensive packages.
To make better use of tourism-related awards and Norways other
natural and cultural advantages in international marketing activities.
Strengthen the distribution of the comprehensive product packages
that are available, promote the development of additional packages.
In conjunction with the industry develop an action plan to improve
coordination between the sales, distribution side and activities to
market Norway as a tourism destination.
Include incoming operators in the development of the new action plan.
Evaluate Innovation its marketing activities.
Ensure the impact on sales of the marketing effort is evaluated at
regular intervals.

The use of industrys own experience in the development of marketing


strategies

5. Organizational structure.
Based on the input received in connection with the work to revise the
tourism strategy, three areas in particular must be examined in more
detail before the organizational model for future tourism industry can be
drawn up. We must:
a. Define which organizational structures are desirable, possible and
appropriate.
b. Allocate roles and responsibilities more clearly.
c. Come up with a robust and long-term funding model for the new
organizational solution.
6. Involvement of the cultural sector.
The Norwegian governments culture program is aide-ranging effort in
the field of culture and the arts, whose goal is for one per cent of the
national budget tube allocated to cultural purposes by 2014. The
extensive investment in culture helps to provide content for the effort
to boost tourism. Ibsen, Bjornson, Munch, folk music, black metal,
Rackham and the Opera House, and a rich cultural history are among
the elements the cultural sector can contribute to make Norway more
widely known and attractive as travel destination.
7. Star rating for providers of overnight Accommodation.
During the first half of 2012, this scheme for providers of overnight
accommodation in Norway will be launched. Norwegian Accreditation
has been commissioned by the Ministry of Trade and Industry to
administer the scheme, where hotels are awarded stars on the basis of
a set of quality indicators.

The standardized system for customer

evaluations will be included in the star-rating scheme. In addition to


this scheme, additional performance criteria covering the environment,
universal access and type of market segment the hotel is operating in
will also be adopted. The criteria may lead to supplementary labeling
as eco-friendly, accessible in accordance with NS 11010, and
designation as conference hotel, business hotel or holiday hotel.

Import and Export opportunities in Norway


1. Norways exports include the following:
Oil and gas
Shipping
Wood Products
Industrial Machinery
Transport Equipment
Hydroelectricity
Fish Farming
Food Processing
Seafood
Timber
Forests
Chemicals
Metals, particularly semi-finished steels, ferro-alloys and aluminium
Unwrought Metals

2. Norways imports include the following:


Capital Goods
Fuels
Industrial Supplies
Machinery
Transportation
Food Items
Metals
Chemicals
3. List of some of the goods available from Norway for export to

India :
Fresh frozen herring and fish and canned fish.
Cheese , ice cream powder
Medical and industrial cod-liver oil
Sperm oil
Vitamin concentrate including vitamin A and D gelatins capsules,
Iaminaria pins, other medicines and antibiotics
Beer
Calcium Carbide
Auxiliaries for tanneries, textile and washing agents industry such

as fatty alcohols and products from sperm oil of permissible types


Alginates for textile and other alginates (permissible types)
Planed wood boards
Mechanical and chemical plup
Newsprint (permissible types) and paper of all sorts, cardboard and

pasteboard
Porous insulation boards, semi-bard and hard bard and oil-tempered
boards
Staple fiber
Envelops
Rose nails

3.

list of some of the goods available from Norway for

export to India :
Tea ,Coffee, raw
Cashew kernels

Fruit preserves , jams


Tobacco
Cigarettes
Groundnut oil
Castor oil
Hydrogenated oil
Linseed oil
Cotton textiles
Silk fabrics
Rayon fabrics
Jute goods
Raw wall and woolen manufactures including carpets and rugs
Proofed and unroofed canvas
Coir & coir products
Ropes and cordage
Silk waste
Flax linen
Cotton waste
Rubber goods including gum goods
Linoleum
Leather manufacture
Leather -tanned hides and skins
Raw goatskins
Sports goods
Drugs and medicines

INVESTMENT POTENTIAL FOR LIZA WORLD TRAVELS

Norway is a small, but highly developed nation, Norway is among the biggest
in the world in several economic sectors. A wide range of opportunities,
combined with a good economic framework and a stable political
environment should make Norway an interesting long term investment case.
Norway offers great possibilities both for the individual and adventureoriented tourist and for the experienced and comfort-seeking business
traveller. An abundance of comfortable accommodation alternatives with
well-developed meeting and conference infrastructure make Norway an ideal
destination for all kinds of business tourism powered by nature.
There are a number of important factors when choosing a place for a major
event, and Norway has proven time and time again that it provides the best
in locations, logistics, creativity, infrastructure and results.
In a recent edition of National Geographic Adventure magazine much
attention is given to the typical Norwegian notion of friluftsliv, literally
translated to open-air life. The idea of friluftsliv, National Geographic
writes, has come to signify a simple commune with nature, a responsibility
to be outside, and to do so with humility. And it is fundamental to being
Norwegian. Rewarding and unforgettable experiences in connection to
unspoiled and dramatic Norwegian nature are at the heart of the Norwegian
tourism product.

Communication, cooperation, and professionalism is at the core of this


consistent performance with factors that include alliances between the
venue, hotels and the city infrastructure; the best facilities and their
operative environment; the optimal location for sponsors to promote their
corporate activities through advertising and hospitality events; direct support
of the event by PCOs (professional congress organizers); and not in the
least,
top notch creative event development, accommodation,
transportation, security, food service, and a myriad of other activities.
Visitors to Norway come from all parts of the globe, with a great many from
Germany, the Netherlands, Great Britain, USA and France especially. The
majority of tourists, however, are Norwegian or from other Scandinavian
countries, usually travelling on business. These business tourists constitute
an important part of the total number of overnight stays; many of the larger
hotels therefore base their activities on conference rooms and restaurant
facilities.

The tourism industry in Norway is characterized by strong fluctuations in


demand, as it is highly
seasonal. Geography and climate play important roles in the demand for
labour in the tourism sector. For example, mountain resorts may have a quiet
period in early autumn and late spring, depending on weather conditions
suitable for hiking and skiing. More urban areas may have slightly less tourist
activity in January after the Christmas season and before winter and Easter
holidays begin, and again in May before the summer season starts up again.
Norwegian government and tourist sector are promoting adventure tourism
as one of the strategic industries of Norwegian economy. According to the
organisation Destination Norway, Norway needs to enhance what it offers
especially moving to the following directions related to adventure
tourism : from nature alone to nature & culture; from passive observation to
active participation; from remote and isolated to inhabited approachable and
accessible.
The idea listed in Norwegian National strategy for tourism is aimed at
connecting various small medium enterprise and increase their management
quality, adding new sports and adventure experiences to the current offer,
profiling and marketing them along with destinations. There will be a strong
focus also on tourism in arctic and exotic places like Svalbard, Lofoten and
Finnmark which attract tourists looking for something extraordinary related
to nature and adventure. Together with these activities Norway aims to
transform itself from a strong winter destination into a year-round destination
focusing on sustainable development in the areas of nature and the
environment, infrastructure and competence.
The Government is also positive towards initiatives that can lead to
educational courses being established for guides and tour guides within
fields such as outdoor activities, nature guiding and cultural guiding. One of
the main strategies of Norwegian government addressed to adventure
tourism is also related to quality and leadership in ecotourism and
sustainable tourism.

Attraction

Travel Agencies

Accommodations

Business
Potential in
Norway
Tourism

Transportation

Tour Operators

Guide Service

Attraction
In Norway there are many tourist attractive places such as Osolofjort, Viking
ship museum, Femundsmarka, Hafrsfjord, Telemark Canal, lfotbreen glacier
and Nordfjord, Sognefjord and many more are the tourist attraction place.
TransportationTravelling by bus, train or air, are cheaper minipris tickets; theyre usually
available boats, hitching, cars, and motorcycle etc are the different option
which are been available to the tourist according to the money want to pay.
These transpiration facilities but take time for getting it with our business
strategy we can start its booking at time they wanted.

Travel Agencies-

There are many travel agencies in Norway which are providing travelling
package but at the same time the charger higher fess in exchange of the
tavel packages. So to start the travel business liza Travels has to provide
attractive and affordable packages to the touristers.
AccommodationsThere are many hotels, guesthouse are available to the touristers but they
are much cost as the customer have on the spot booking. But Liza travels
can make package for their customer that customers can book there hotel in
their budget.
Tour OperatorLiza travels typically combines tour and travel components to create a
holiday. They prepare itinerary. The most common example of a tour
operator's product would be a flight on a charter airline plus a transfer from
the airport to a hotel and the services of a local representative, all for one
price. Niche tour operators may specialise in destinations.
Guide ServicesLiza travel can appoint some person how have complete knowledge about
the Norways tourist attraction plays and along with that they should have
history about all the places.
So from the above all the aspect there is a great investment potential seen
for Liza Travels to start its travel industry in Norway.

BUSINESS PLAN FOR LIZA WORLD TRAVELS

A business plan is a formal statement of business goals, reasons they are


attainable, and plans for reaching them. It may also contain background
information about the organization or team attempting to reach those goals.
Business plans may target changes in perception and branding by the
customer, client, taxpayer, or larger community. When the existing business
is to assume a major change or when planning a new venture, a 3 to 5 year
business plan is required, since investors will look for their annual return in
that timeframe
Liza World Travels will begin operations in Norway and provide
luxuries,Adventure and sport/travel packages to tourist who want to visit
Norway. An opportunity for Liza World Travel success exists because the
national tourism and travel industry is growing at 4%, and adventure travel
at 10% annually. Further, the Norways travel market is growing at least 12%
annually. Liza World Travel is poised to take advantage of this growth and
lack of competition with an experienced staff, excellent location, and
effective management and marketing.

The company's goals over the next three years are:

Sales of $650,000 by year three.


Maintain margins of 10% on all airline travel.
Achieve 15% of sales from the Internet.
Develop strategic alliances with service
internationally, and in the Woodville area.

providers

nationally,

In order to achieve these goals Liza World Travels needs to focus on


the three key areas of:
Effective segmentation and targeting of adventure travelers within the
larger travel market.
Successfully position ourselves as travel specialists.
Communicate the differentiation and quality of our offering through
personal interaction, media, and regional marketing.
Develop a repeat-business base of loyal customers in order to create
sufficient sales.

Liza World Travels total start-up capital requirement is approximately


6410350INR (approx). Start-up will be financed through the owner's personal
investment and a long-term note of 5315900INR (approx) secured from the
banks.
The travel agency market is competitive, and technology, namely the
Internet and Computerized Reservation Systems (CRS), has changed the way
travel agencies operate. The Internet gives agencies and individuals the
ability to perform travel related research. Discount airfare brokers have taken
advantage of the Internet by offering tickets online at discounted rates. This
has increased price competition. Computerized Reservation Systems have
increased the speed and efficiency of the agency-to-customer transaction.
They have also increased the start-up costs for travel agencies who wish to
be competitive. One notable trend in the travel industry is increased
deregulation. Deregulation has increased the need for differentiation and
has, in many cases, lowered the prices of airfare and other travel-related
services. Additional trends include caps on agency commissions by many of
the larger airlines, increases in adventure travel, and reduction of profit
margins.

Liza World Travels is researching the market to identify potential


opportunities for future sales in this rapidly changing environment. Liza
World Travel's long-term goal is to establish itself as an internationally
recognized provider of top-of-the-line adventure travel.
Liza World Travel target customers are health-conscious couples and
individuals, with median household incomes of approximately $50,000. They
are interested in popular adventure activities such as skiing, whitewater
sports, and mountain biking. Liza World Travel's most important target
customers, however, will be married couples, ages 25-35, with children and
household incomes over $50,000.
The company will also pursue an aggressive marketing campaign. During
Liza World Travel's first year of operation it will hold a grand opening and will
organize and sponsor several athletic events. All Liza World Travels
employees promote its services to local tourist places.
The company does not expect any problems with expenses or cash flow
within the next three years. Annual cash flow for the first year of operation
becomes positive in the second quarter of operation.

Objectives:

Sales of $650,000 by year three.


Maintain margins of 10% on all airline travel.
Achieve 15% of sales from the Internet.
Develop strategic alliances with service
international

providers

nationally,

Keys to Success: Effectively segment and target adventure travelers within the larger
travel market.
Successfully position ourselves as adventure travel specialists.
Communicate the differentiation and quality of our offering through
personal interaction and media.

THE TOURISM INDUSTRY- LIZA WORLD TRAVELS


1. Introduction of Liza World Travels
Liza World Travels is a Government approved leading tour operator and
travel agent in North East India catering to foreign tourists and Indian
visitors. Liza World Travels is an accredited member of Indian Association of
Tour Operators (IATO), Association of Tour Operators of North East India
(ATONEI), Adventure Tour Operators Association of India (ATOAI), and
Arunachal Pradesh Tour Operators Association (APTOA).
Started as an entrepreneurial venture in 1999, Liza World Travels soon
established itself in the North East of India and has since expanded rapidly to
become a leading specialist in operating tours and is arguably the best
operator of tailor-made journeys to North East of India today.We they have
personally visited over 95% of the destinations featured in our brochures.
Our knowledge is constantly updated through frequent visits as well as
training.
Vision

To Bring You the Best of North East India

Our Team
Their team consists of local people from diverse fields who share a common
passion for travel. Their experience and backgrounds lend innovative
thinking in addressing design and operational issues.
They have personally visited over 95% of the destinations featured in their
brochures.Theirknowledge is constantly updated through frequent visits as
well as training. They can therefore give an immediate and considered
response to most queries. Theirfield personnel /Guides in North East are
regularly trained, so when they escort you for the tour they fully appreciate
your needs and standards.
Their offices are located in Delhi and Itanagar (Arunachal Pradesh)
coordinate your itineraries. Coupled with our wide personal contacts in the
North East, this enables us to provide the holiday experience you seek.

2. SWOT Analysis of Liza Travels


SWOT Analysis of Liza World Travel in Norway

Strengths
1. Liza World Travel is working ongoing projects on electronic information
towards tourists who have arrived in Norway. A project with the goal to
provide tourists with information and through this lead tourists to visit
attractions in Norway (the project is called "Villmarksriket viser vei"). This
information will be provided by information-points (with internett), info.signs,
electronic maps, and by directing the information to the tourists mobile
phones.
2. Liza World Travel have internet-access, their own web-site, and reasonable
skills in the use. It also have their own website with some information, and
many also have a booking-function. There are however highly variable
quality of the websites, many of them are for example only in Norwegian.

3. The website of Liza World Travels is connected to national and


international databases and web-sites for general marketing/information.
Information on the most important tourist-products in Norway is collected
and arranged in a database, and this database is quite well connected to
important national (several other regions) and international information
channels.
4. In Norway Liza World Travels have developed several applications that
could contribute to improve attractions in the tourism sector.
5. A strong partnership, governmental support towards tourism, and
Destination Management Organization in Norway Governmental (at regional
and local policy and administrative level) and private actors are working
quite well together to develop the Liza World Travels, and there is substantial
governmental financial support. This partnership has been labeled "the blue
model". This is very important in Norway, as many of the most important
attractions are public (nature), are important also for inhabitants, second
home owners and potential immigrants, and that have to be developed and
managed in cooperation between public and commercial interests.
6. The development of a national electronic database for booking. Public and
private actors in Norway are developing a national database for booking of
tourism-products in Norway.

Weaknesses
1. Lack of competence and consciousness in the tourist-enterprises in
distribution of booking/sale. Although all enterprises have a sufficient
infrastructure and competence, there seems to be a lack of both enough
knowledge and consciousness concerning the importance of getting their
enterprise distributed through the right electronic channels so that it can
lead to electronic sales (this concerns the many small-4 scale enterprises).
This includes lack of competence in pricing their products. This means that
most of the enterprises are not present in the national and international
electronic sales channels on the internet (like hotels.com and expedia.com).
2. Lack of coordination between different within the tourism sector. There is a
wide diversity in what kind of software and technical platforms that are used

within the Liza World Travels. This makes coordination and development of
common systems difficult.
3. Weak links and electronic coordination between the transport sector and
the other parts of the tourist industry. In Norway, as in Norway in general,
there are low coordination between transport and the other parts of the
tourist industry, both concerning products (packages) and electronic
distribution and booking. This weakens the competitive position of Norway
towards competing destinations.
4. Missing coordination of electronic information between the culture and
sports sector and the tourism industry. Culture and sports are important part
of the experiences both for tourists, inhabitants, second home owners and
potential immigrants. There are however a lack of collection of information
on culture and sports events, and a lack of coordination of information of
these events with other attractions/experiences.
5. There are already established travels agency in the Norway so there is the
large no. of completion for the Liza World Travels.

Threats
1. Lack of competence/interest in the national for Liza World Travels and to
develop distribution and booking within the Norwegian tourism industry.
Within outbound tourism traffic from Norway there are several companies
(tour-operators, travel agencies etc) with high competence in electronic
distribution and sale, and which possesses of high qualities. These
companies also help foreign tourism enterprises (hotels, restaurants etc) to
get their products distributed to the Norwegian market. These kind of
companies are however mostly absent on incoming tourism to Norway (from
both the domestic and 5 international markets). This leads to a lack of
commercial and professional distribution channels, which would be
interested in supporting the small scale tourism companies in Norway.

2. Missing links between regional policy areas relevant in the tourism sector.
The regional policy level has several policy areas that concern many of the
same issues. This concerns policies for attracting immigrants (place
marketing), to enhance the living standard for inhabitants, and to attract
tourists and second home owners. It could be used more professionally to
provide information to all these groups, and the same information is relevant
for all groups (for example on events and activities). There are thus a
potential in more coordination of these policy areas, both concerning
resources and practical implementation of measures.
3. Difficult to compete with other industries to attract key personnel/staff.
There is a possibility that there will be a problem of attracting key staff (with
both competences on tourism) to parts of the Liza World Travels in Norway.
Several other industries in Norway have the possibilities to offer better terms
than the tourism sector.
4. High levels of costs and prices, both in data roaming costs for Liza World
Travel. Norway generally have a high cost and price level. This is also a
problem on the both the domestic and international markets, where other
countries are more competitive on prices. The economic downturn the last
two years have highlighted the problem, in a situation where there are
smaller parts of the international markets that can afford to travel to Norway.

Opportunities
1. The existence of significant niche markets for the nature based tourismproducts in Norway. Most of the tourist-products in
Norway , could be
described as niche products, directed at certain segments of the market
(who is interested in Nordic nature-based experiences). Internationally these
segments are of significant sizes, but the tourism industry in Norway has so
far not sufficiently oriented its marketing efforts towards these segments and
the electronic distribution channels that are directed at these segments.

There is also a lack of enough attractive tourism-products within the naturebased tourism in Norway.
2. Strengthen Destination Management Organizations (DMOs) in Norway.
With its many small tourism enterprises, and simultaneously an increased,
there could be an opportunity to transfer some functions (for example web,
marketing, distribution) from the individual enterprises to the DMOs. This
would increase the professionalism, and make it easier to attract highly
skilled persons to the tourism industry.
3. Location close to large domestic markets and an international airport.
Hedmark is located close to the largest domestic market in Norway
(Oslofjord-area) and to Gardermoen (the largest international airport in
Norway). This makes Hedmark easy accessible (in terms of distance) for
large markets.

4. A strong domestic market. In Norway there is also a growth of the elderly


population (where many have high spending power, are in good health, and
have increasing capabilities in using electronic information, including mobile
devices), as in other European countries. At the same time the birth rate is
relatively high. Together with a strong national economy, this constitutes a
strong domestic market today and probably also in the next decades. An
important part of this domestic market is the many owners of second homes
in Norway. They makes up a stable and attractive market that so far have
been too little utilized by the tourism industry in Norway.

3. Products & Services of Liza World Travel

The leading tour operator for tailor-made journeys to Liza World Travels,
Liza World Travels was started by Mr. Laeta Umbrey (Ex-Member of

Parliament) to promote his dream destination, North East Of India, to those


wanting to experience the real India. Mr. Laeta Umbrey a multidimensional
personality, a connoisseur of Tourism Industry. As a member of the
Parliamentary Consultative Committee on Civil Aviation and Tourism he has
traveled extensively throughout the country and abroad. He has used this
experience to improve our services and smooth operation for all clients from
any corner of the world.

In the Norway Liza World Travels is going to have to provides services


according to the tourist places.
As the Liza Worlds Travels is the newly start up tourism industry in Norway it
has to provides the attractive packages to the tourist.
Norway is best known for its magnificent fjords. Our Norway tours will bring
you to the most dramatic and easy to reach fjord destinations. The
Sognefjord and the Hardangerfjord which are located near Bergen, and the
Geirangerfjord, which can be reached easily by a Hurtigruten cruise up the
west coast from Bergen. One of the best Norway tours is the famous Norway
in a Nutshell Tour. It has many versions and options so you can see the best
of the Norway fjords. Leave from Oslo or Bergen and try the Norway in a
Nutshell Tour as a great way to experience the Sognefjord. Stay overnight in
the fjords and feel the natural beauty of the fjords surround you. Norways
coastline stretches for some 1,865 miles between the northerly Svalbard
archipelago and the sunny southerly beach resorts. Along the way you can
find rich green forests, ancient glaciers for hiking, mountains to climb,
icefields and even Arctic tundra. Oslo is the vibrant and modern Capital city,
boasting many museums and historical sites, plus the Royal familys city
palace. Bergen is the most popular small city to visit in Norway, with many
fjords and cultural sites nearby. Other exciting places to visit include
Trondheim, Alesund, Kristiansand, plus the Lofoten Islands, and Kirkenes up
above the Arctic Circle.
With the very beautiful places Liza world Travel has designed some product
and services for establishing its travel business in Norway.
Here are some product and services of Liza World Travels in Norway

Lets start with the products which are be designed by the Liza
World Travels

Products:-

Oslo Getaway:Oslo is taken the natural beauty of this Norwegian city and it will be a travel
experience you will not soon forget! The Oslo Fjord serves as the backdrop
for many of the historical landmarks, museums, shops and outdoor activities
for which Oslo is so famous.
In the Oslo Gateway we have the different tourist attraction. The following
are the to tourist places which are been included in the Oslo Gateway.

1. National Gallery:-

National Gallery is s a gallery in Oslo, Norway. Since 2003 it is


administratively a part of the National Museum of Art, Architecture and
Design.

2. Holmenkollen Ski Museum & Tower

Holmenkollen Ski Museum (Norwegian: Skimuseet i Holmenkollen), located at


the base of the Holmenkollen ski jump in Oslo, Norway, is the world's oldest
ski museum, being founded in 1923.

3.The Norwegian National Opera & Ballet

The Oslo Opera House is the home of The Norwegian National Opera and
Ballet, and the national opera theatre in Norway. The building is situated in
the Bjrvika neighborhood of central Oslo, at the head of the Oslofjord.

4. Viking Ship Museum

he world's two best-preserved Viking ships from the 9th century are on
display at the Viking Ship Museum on the Bygdy peninsula, which also
shows Viking tools, sledges, a horse cart and wood carvings

5. Akershus Fortress
Oslo's rich history is on display in the grand buildings and museums at this
13th-century fortress in the city centre. The fortress is also a popular
recreational area with great harbour views.

6. Vigelandsparken Sculpture Park


The 80-acre Vigelandsparken Sculpture Park in western Oslo features 212
sculptures by Gustav Vigeland. Every year over one million locals and
tourists visit the park, which is open around the clock daily.

Snowboard Park:It the tourist attraction places which is been done in the winter season and
the places are very attractive. The Norwegian Snowboard Association
recommends the top 10 snowboard parks in Norway. Oslo Winter Park is
among their favorites.
The following are the tourist attraction places in Snowboard Park.

a.Vierli
Vierli was voted "resort of the year" at the Norwegian Snowboard Awards in
2010, and nominated again in 2011. Vierli snowboard park boasts Norway's
fastest and best snowboard lift, a 750-metre long slopestyle run, junior and
kids' runs, a big jump run, a 750-metre long rail run with 20 rails of varying
sizes, and plenty of other elements. Located in the county of Telemark in
Eastern Norway, Vierli hosted the Norwegian Snowboard Championship in
2012.

b. Ringkollen
This was the winner of the "resort of the year" award at the Norwegian
Snowboard Awards in 2011. A tiny resort with big ambitions, Ringkollen, 60
kilometres northwest of Oslo off the E16, has taken onboard feedback from
young snowboarders and incorporated it in its development plan with great
success. Here you will find funboxes, big jumps, five different rails, a
"nosepress-box" and jumps of all sizes.

c. Oslo Winter Park


Easily reached from Oslo centre by public transport (Metro line no. 1 towards
Frognerseteren, exit at Voksenkollen Station), Oslo Winter Park has recently
undergone extensive development. The Tryvann/Wyller arena hosted the
World Snowboarding Championship (WSC) in 2012, and now boasts Norway's
first Olympic standard superpipe, as well as some 30 elements and a half-

pipe. Oslo Winter Park Tryvann was named "resort of the year" at the
Norwegian Snowboard Awards in 2012.

d. Hafjell
The terrain park at Hafjell was designed by some of the world's foremost
experts in the field, and offers much for snowboard enthusiasts. Choices
include the little half-pipe, several quarter-pipes, glides, a big jump and
numerous kickers. Altogether the park offers nine jumps, a step-up jump, a
corner, four fun boxes, seven rails, a five-metre flat box, a C box, kink box,
butter box, and eight-metre flat, three-metre flat and a 15-metre tube. Hafjell
is located 15 kilometres north of Lillehammer in Eastern Norway.

e. Trysil
Norway's largest resort, 210 kilometres northeast of Oslo, has a big terrain
park and a good ski school. The TTR 3 star competition Sweet Rumble is held
in Trysil every year and attracts a great amount of talent. There are three
snowboarding areas for snowboarders of various abilities in Trysil: a green
park for children and beginners with small jumps, simple rails and boxes, a
blue park for intermediate snowboarders with simple jumps, rails and boxes,
and a red/black park with everything from medium big to expert jumps and
rails.

f. Hemsedal
Once voted "the best terrain park in the world" by the international
snowboard press, Hemsedal's park might have lost some of its edge in recent
years, but is still a good alternative. Off-piste skiing is particularly good here
too. Halfway between Oslo and Bergen, Hemsedal boasts five parks, of which
Hemsedalsparken, with two half-pipes, jumps, quarter-pipes and rails, is the
largest.

g. Norefjell

The terrain park, located in the centre of the resort, contains several rails,
big jumps and other challenges. Only 100 kilometres from Oslo, Norefjell is
easily within reach from the capital.

h. Geilo
One of Norway's oldest ski resorts, with almost 40 slopes and four terrain
parks, Geilo is recognised as a world-class area for snowkiting. It is also a
family-friendly resort with plenty of activities on offer for children.
Snowboarders at the Norwegian College of Elite Sports (Norges
Toppidrettsgymnas) use the Geilo park for training purposes daily throughout
the winter. Jump lines, rails and various other elements are all featured. Geilo
is located halfway between Oslo and Bergen and is easily accessible by train.

i. Oppdal
Here you will find two terrain parks with a total of three jump-lines and over
20 jibs and rails. Oppdal is also good for off-piste skiing, and you can find
untouched powder snow for several days after a snowfall. Only about 130
kilometres south of Trondheim, Oppdal is less than two hours away by car.

j. Kongsberg
Just over an hour's drive from Oslo, Kongsberg is a modern ski resort popular
with Norwegians. A new snowcross area offers half-pipe, fun boxes, quarterpipes and big jumps.

Midnight Sun Experience:Norways most popular astronomer, Knut Jrgen Red degaard shares his
best midnight sun travel tips and some rather peculiar, interesting facts.
The Earth's axis in relation to its orbit around the sun is the reason for this
unusual phenomenon. At the actual poles, the sun only sets and rises one
day every year. The midnight sun is also known as the polar day. It can be
compared to a twilight or sunset. The brightness is reddish-yellow with a
brilliant soft, low radiance in the sky. The season for experiencing the
midnight sun varies depending upon how close to the Arctic Circle you are.
June and July are the peak periods, but if you voyage further north you can
experience the midnight sun from May to August.

a. The North Cape-The midnight sun is spectacular here. Whilst the view
from the coast can sometimes be foggy in summer, the view of the horizon is
panoramic and sets the perfect stage for a lightshow on a clear day. North of
the Arctic Circle means the sun can be seen around the clock during the
summer months. To get the most out of a visit here, plan on staying a few
days and explore the untamed nature. Travel inward, away from the coast,
and there is less chance of fog in the summer. The wild and unique
landscape of the North Cape might just mesmerize you.

b. The Svalbard Islands- On this archipelago the sun does not set between
late April and late August. Despite its isolated position in the Arctic Sea,
Svalbard is getting more and more popular with tourists due to its dramatic
nature. A hike in the Svalbard mountains can also include encounters with

local polar bears, so make sure you are accompanied by a tour guide. Glacier
walks and dog sledging are also bookable modes of travel under the
midnight sun. There are few roads, and most are clustered around the
airport. Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen is the most popular place to start,
since the Svalbard airport is here.

c. Bod -Bod is a seaside city of about 50 000 inhabitants, where you can
experience the night light around midsummer; typically between 2 June and
10 July. Warning: tourists searching for an early night, may find it hard to get
to sleep. Since your body is used to being awake when the sun is up, the
continuous light is definitely sufficient to make it very interesting for your
senses. Fortunately, most tourists experience that they need less sleep and
get an extra energy boost from the light in Bod.
d. Troms- A compact city of 60 000 people that offers urban attractions,
from restaurants, hotels, spa, university, a brewery and lots of charming
architecture. You will not miss Polaria if you head towards the waterfront, it is
just five minutes from the town centre and the building resembles huge
white ice blocks that have collided into the shoreline. They house an arctic
aquarium and large screen cinema where you can watch movies about the
Northern Lights. You can book guided midnight sun tours from downtown
Troms. Don't expect it to get dark enough to see any stars.

e. The Lofoten Islands-This picturesque group of islands off the coast


offers an amazing taste of the Norwegian fjords. Island hopping is an ideal
way to experience the dramatic surroundings.You can visit Lofoten by car or
bus and there are bridges and ferries connecting the small, traditional fishing
islands with each other. Why not play a round of golf at Lofoten Golf Links at
midnight without artificial lighting? Or night hike up a local mountain and
enjoy the clean spring water to be found at the peak? The midnight sun is
visible at Lofoten between the end of May and the middle of July.

f. Hammerfest- If you make it this far north, congratulations! The journey


was worth it and the midnight sun shines throughout the summer months.
Actually the sun almost never sets during this time. It is because of the sun's
flat trajectory across the horizon that we get 20+ hours of sunlight during a
24-hour period. With a car or bus you can travel locally and experience the

arctic nature. It is quite different from the southern parts of Scandinavia and
complements the midnight sun experience. The contrast between reindeer
wandering in the wilds of Finnmark and the nearby city of Hammerfest make
this a worthwhile destination.

g. Hurtigruten- Passengers traveling with Norway's most famous coastal


cruise through the dramatic Norwegian fjords are almost guaranteed a
midnight sun experience. You can take the entire cruise or hop on and off like
the locals between coastal stops on your journey further north. Aim for the
more northern ports to make sure you see the northerly sun lighting up the
fjords, mountains and coastal cities. Leave the Hurtigruten ship for a few
hours and visit Kirkenes.

h. Andenes-The town of Andenes on Andya Island, the most northerly of


the Vesterlen islands, offers a convenient vantage point for experiencing
the light at night. The cape of Vesterlen has sandy beaches where you can
take a dip in the ocean, providing you can handle bracing temperatures that
will get your blood racing. Andenes is the home for Norway's rocket
launching community at their Space Centre.

i. Polar nights and northern lights- Just a final word about polar night.
Just as summer brings long days, so the winter months in the north of
Norway bring a beautiful blue and grey arctic twilight, where each night has
its own shade, making for a magical experience which will linger in the
memory. In Svalbard, between late February and early April, the sun remains
the entire period close to the horizon, bathing the archipelago in a special,
soft light during this time of the year.Polar nights are also the ideal time to
experience the northern lights.

Waterfalls in Norway
Walk behind a thundering waterfall near Bergen, or visit some of the tallest
in Europe as you experience Norway's unique and spectacular waterfalls.With
water thundering down the cliff face with a deafening roar, the air white with
mist, one of Norway's many waterfalls can be a humbling experience.

a. Mardalsfossen

An impressive two-step free-falling waterfall, Mardalsfossen is sometimes


wrongly referred to as having Norway's highest single fall. Between 20 June
and 20 August water is diverted from the hydroelectric turbines to the falls.
There is a viewing area and parking by the lake, and from there the waterfall
itself is only a 30-45 minutes easy walk up the hill.

b. Steinsdalsfossen
In 1699 the river changed course, and the Steinsdalsfossen waterfall was
born. Its fall height is only 20 metres or so, and it has a path that leads
underneath and behind the fall itself. Please note that the spray will freeze to
ice in the winter, which will make the path slippery and potentially
dangerous, so please take care.

c. De syv sstrene ("The Seven Sisters")


De syv sstrene ("The Seven Sisters") is so named because its falls may look
like the hair of seven women. The waterfall is located half-way into the
famous Geirangerfjord, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is best viwed from a
fjord cruise or other boat, or from the deserted mountain farm Skagefl, on
the opposite side of the fjord. If you take a sightseeing cruise with MS
"Geirangerfjord", the mountain farm is only a 25 minute walk away from one

of its stops, but you can also hike there from Geiranger in about three hours.
Alternatively, try paddling there in a kayak.

d. Friaren ("The Suitor")


According to legend, Friaren ("The Suitor") is unsuccessfully wooing the
seven sisters at the other side of the Geirangerfjord. He is said to have grown
morose from waiting in vain, and so has taken to drink, hence the waterfall's
bottle shape.

e. Storseterfossen
In later years, the trail to Storseterfossen has been significantly upgraded.
The fall, sometimes also known as Storsterfossen, is one of the few that
you can actually walk behind and under in safety. Take care in winter though,
as the spray will freeze on the ground and making it easy to lose your
footing.

f.Vringsfossen
One of Norway's most spectacular waterfalls, Vringsfossen was Norway's
most popular tourist attraction in 2006. It is one of the recommended
viewpoints along the Hardanger National Tourist Route.

Mountain hikes in Norway

The Norwegian Trekking Association presents 10 favourite iconic mountain


hikes in Norway. Besseggen and Preikestolen are among their
recommendations.
The former general secretary of the Norwegian Trekking Association (DNT),
Kristin Krohn Devold, has picked her 10 favourite iconic hikes in Norway.

a.Preikestolen (Pulpit Rock), the Lysefjord

Preikestolen is a mountain formed like a huge pulpit towering over the


Lysefjord in Rogaland, Fjord Norway. There is a well prepared track from
Preikestolen Mountain Lodge to the top of the 604-metre-high mountain
plateau. Expect to spend four-five hours hiking from the lodge to the top of
the Preikestolen and back down, and allow an hour or two to spend on the
plateau.

b. Besseggen, Jotunheimen
Besseggen is located in Oppland in Eastern Norway. This is perhaps the most
popular of all mountain hikes amongst Norwegians, and was mentioned by
National Geographic in 2014 as one of the world's best hikes and thrilling
trails. Steep paths and airy surroundings, with views of the Jotunheimen
National Park, give you a feeling of mastering the mountains. Looking down,
you have a blue lake on one side and a green one on the other. The walk
takes approximately seven to eight hours.

c.Gaustatoppen, Telemark
On a clear day, you can see one sixth of Norway from the top of
Gaustatoppen. Located in the county of Telemark in Southern Norway,
Gaustatoppen is easily accessible. From the parking lot at Stavro, between
Rjukan and Tuddal, you will spend about three hours to get to the top, and
two to walk back down again - a five hour hike in total. Just before your reach
the summit, there is a lodge where you can have a meal or spend the night.
It is necessary to book in advance. The altitude difference is 700 metres, and
the hike is fairly easy. Hiking boots are recommended.

d.Galdhpiggen, Jotunheimen
Galdhpiggen is Norway's highest mountain, 2,469 metres above sea level.
The view of the Jotunheimen National Park does not get better than from this
summit. The mountain is easily accessible from the Spiterstulen and
Juvasshytta mountain lodges. Starting from Juvasshytta is the easiest route,
suitable also for children who are used to hiking. Galdhpiggen is located in
the county of Oppland.
e. The Aurlandsdalen Valley, Fjord Norway

The inland mountains meet Fjord Norway in the Aurlandsdalen Valley. The
terrain is varied, from rocky peaks to lush valleys. You will pass rumbling
waterfalls and abandoned mountain farms. The hike crosses, for example,

the yard of the Sinjarheim Farm, dating back to medieval times. The hike
starts at the Geiteryggshytta Mountain Lodge (or at sterb Mountain Lodge
for a shorter hike), and ends in Vassbygdi.

f. Slogen, Fjord Norway


Slogen is perhaps the most scenic and dramatic hike in the Sunnmre Alps in
the northern part of Fjord Norway. The surrounding summits really do
resemble the Alps. The hike to the top is steep, and the last part requires
some easy climbing. The hike goes 1,500 metres straight up from the
Hjrundfjord to the summit, and takes about five hours. Back down is a little
less. There is a shorter version where you start from the Patchellhytta
Mountain Lodge. This takes about half the time. Hotel Union ye is located
by the fjord. This is an old and classic wooden hotel from the 1800s.
Accommodation must be booked in advance.

g.The Triangle Route, Rondane


The classic triangle hike in the Rondane National Park takes four to five days.
The hike, which is a good choice for beginners, will take you around the
largest mountains in Rondane. The glaciers left a lot of rocks, so good
mountain boots are highly recommended. Start the hike at Rondvassbu,
Bjrnhollia or Drlseter mountain lodges. Rondane is a mountain area in
Eastern Norway.

h. Romsdalseggen, Fjord Norway


Romsdalseggen is located near Molde, in the northern parts of Fjord Norway.
The hike takes you over mountains, overlooking fjords, summits and
waterfalls. The hike starts in the Vengedalen Valley, and you can choose
among three routes, with different levels of difficulty. The most extreme
route requires climbing equipment. The hike takes between six and nine
hours, depending on the route you choose. You will get a view of the
Romsdalsfjord and the ocean, and the mountains of Trolltindene and
Romsdalshorn.

Services provided by the Liza World Travel are as following:-

Services
Liza World Travel aim is to assist people throughout the world exploring the
beauty of Norway. Each year we have the pleasure of working with very nice
customers.
Liza World Travels are proud of being agents for the famous Norwegian
Coastal Voyage or Hurtigruten as we call it in Norway.
They are cooperating with the very best hotels in Norway, and we always try
to find quality hotels with convenient locations for our tours.
The following are services provided by Liza World Travels in Norway.:-

a. Ticketing Services- Liza World Travel help in booking the air and the rail
tickets well in advance for your tour to any part of the country. International
travel agencies or tour operators can book your air tickets to any part of the
Norway and India.

b. Hotel Reservation and Booking- Liza World Travels help you find
accommodation facilities while touring. They coordinate with the hotel
authorities and book your hotel room in advance.

c. Tour Packages- Interest, budget and comfort are the 3 types of tour
packages offered by Liza World Travels. You can choose the one that suits
you. Interest tour packages may include the tourist interest places like
monuments and sculptures. Budget refers to the economic tour package.
Whereas, comfort tour packages refers to the luxurious and costly tour
packages.

d. Local Transportation- Liza World Travels arrange for local transportation


like car and bus in the city where you go.

e. Passport and Visa- The travel documentation facilitation unit in a travel


agency takes care of procuring your visas, passports, and other documents.
They also deliver travel documents, as per your convenience, at your
doorstep.

f. Insurance Coverage- Liza World Travel will help you in Insurance


coverage. For example for senior citizens, loss of baggage and passport etc.

g. Travel Guides and Timetables- Liza World Travels will provide you with
trained guides who will help you travel to popular places. These guides will
assist you in your trip and provide you necessary information about the
places you visit. You can get the timetable of rail and air services from the
travel agents.
There services also include reconfirmation of airline tickets, touring
arrangements, rescheduling of flights as per your convenience.

To start Liza World Travels we have to follow some steps to start up our
tourism business in Norway.
The following are some steps which is required to start business in Norway:

Legal
Structure Of
Business

Registration
of Business &
Name

Registration for
VAT

Accounting &
Audit for
Business

Legal Structure of Business:Norway has a predictable business climate, high productivity rates and an
open economy with good access to major markets. Oil, gas and seafood are
important exports, and the availability of hydropower resources has enabled
Norway to develop a significant process industry. Our longstanding
experience of oil and gas production has made Norway a technological
leader in the field, and more recently we have also developed a dynamic ICT
industry.

The choice of legal structure will be one of the first questions to come up
when you want to start your own business. In Norway, you can choose
between various legal structures.
A sole trader (Norwegian: ENK) is a business where the owner bears
the full financial liability for the debts of the enterprise.
A partnership (ANS or DA) is an enterprise with one or more
shareholders (owners) who each assume personal liability for the debts
of the business.
A limited company (AS) differs from the first two legal structures in
that the owner(s) do not bear personal liability for the company's
commitments. The owner(s) must put up share capital of at least
NOK100000. They can normally only lose their initial stake in the
company.
A public limited company (ASA) has much in common with an AS
but, among other things, it has to have share capital of at least
NOK1million.
A Norwegian branch of a foreign company (NUF): Here, the foreign
company is liable for the business of the Norwegian branch. The
branch will normally be liable for tax and other deductions in Norway,
and must otherwise comply with Norwegian regulations just like any
other Norwegian company. There are no capital requirements for an
NUF.
A cooperative (SA) is an independent grouping which must have at
least two owners, none of whom bear any personal liability for the
commitments of the enterprise. This legal structure is user-owned and
managed.
A foundation is formed when an asset is independently provided by
way of a will, bequest or other legal arrangement for a specific purpose
of a non-profit, humanitarian, social, educational, economic or other
nature. Commercial foundations must have minimum paid-up capital of
NOK200000.
Here to step up our tourism business in Norway we would have selected the
sole trader as Liza World Travel already well settled business in North- East of
India and now wants to expand so for that reason the Liza World Travel is
going to start in Norway.

Registration of Business & Name

The following way the registration of business is been done:-

1. Initial registration:In order to run a business enterprise you have to be registered in the Central
Coordinating Register for Legal Entities (CCRLE). Following registration, you
will receive a nine-digit organization number used in business documents
and in your information exchange with the authorities. Unless you have a
valid organization number, you cannot open a bank account on behalf of the
enterprise. Furthermore, you cannot engage employees nor register in the
Value Added Tax (VAT) Register.
The initial registration of business is done by electronic way by filling up of
the form which is given below:

At a later stage you will use the same form for announcing changes related
to the business. All the co-operating bodies will have their records corrected
when you have notified one office.
The following registers are associated with the CCRLE:

The employee section of the Employer/Employee Register


The Register of Business Enterprises
The Foundation Register
The Value Added Tax Register
The Statistics Norway's Register of Companies and Business
Enterprises
The Norwegian Directorate of Taxes' Register of limited companies

This considered as the first step to start a business in Norway


2.Register of Business Enterprises
The Business Enterprise Registra-tion Act7 lists a number of different types of
organizations that have to register. Generally, the registering in the Register
of Business Enterprises is mandatory for all who conduct business activities
and all enterprises with limited liability.
The register serves different purposes. And an important one is to maintain a
correct record of people that may be held responsible for actions in the name
of the company.
Foreign entities are obliged to register in the Register of Business Enterprises
if they conduct business activities in Norway or on the Norwegian continental
shelf
Registration in the Register of Business Enterprises ensures the following to a
business enterprise:
The right to operate a business enterprise.
Legal protection of the business name.
A certificate of registration as identification for lenders, legal
registration authorities, and customs and excise authorities.
A business enterprise organization number as important
identification to authorities and for coordinating private and public
business registers.
Identification of the executives of a business enterprise
The Central Coordinating Register for Legal Entities - foreign
entities
For foreign entities, the Central Coordinating Register for Legal Entities and
the Register of Business Enterprises shall comprise the following information:
1. Name, type of organization and business address of the foreign entity.
2. Owner, participants with full liability or fully liable partners or the board of
directors; their names, dates of birth, addresses and the relevant signature
authorisations.

3. Share capital if the entity is a limited company and how much is paid up. If
the share capital is not fully subscribed, only the sub-scribed capital can be
stated as share capital.
4. The memorandum of association and the articles of association of the
main business enterprise.
5. The state by whose legislation the entity is bound. Whether the entity is
registered in a public register of business enterprises in its home country,
and if so, the name and address of this register and the registration number.
6. Name and address of any business premises or permanent establish-ment
in Norway or on the Norwegian continental shelf.
7. The type of business activities that will be conducted.
8. The board and general manager if elected or employed specifically for the
activities, and if so, whether they are entitled to bind the entity by signature
or per procurationem8
3. D-number:All persons holding positions identified by the Coordinated register
notification, e.g. the general manager and those authorized to sign for the
company, shall be identified by a personal identity number/D
number/organization number, personal name/name of enterprise and
address. Foreign citizens without a Norwegian personal identity number must
state their D-number (11 figures). If a D-number has not been allocated, the
Central Coordinating Register for Legal Entities will requisition one from the
Norwegian National Census Register (Personregisteret Skattnord). Use the
form "Request for assignment of D-number" and attach a signed copy of the
foreign person's passport.
The form can be downloaded from the Brnnysund Register Centre (Dnumber form). Personal identification numbers and D-numbers are
confidential and will not be disclosed to unauthorised persons.

4. The name of your enterprise :The name of a company is regulated by the Business Name Act6. The
minimum requirement is a name consisting of at least three Norwe-gian
letters, numbers, orthographic signs and possibly the abbreviation
identifying the type of company. Thus, ABC AS and 2BIAS DA are legal
names. The name cannot be identical to names already Regis-tered in the
Register of Business Enterprises. The term identical should be understood
quite literally, taking into account all letters, spaces, numbers and signs.
However, the letters identifying the type of company are not included.
Consequently, the names KARI AS and KARI ANS are considered identical.
Note also that the assessment of identical enterprise names is independent
of municipality (location of the business) and business sector
For sole proprietorships (self-employed) businesses, the rules differ
somewhat. The family name of the owner must be included, e.g. HANSENS
BAKERY and CAR REPAIR OLE OLSEN. The family name may be used alone,
meaning that HANSEN, MOER and VREGRD may be registered. If only the
family name is used, there is no check for or prohibiting of identical names.
Foreign companies registering a branch in Norway may use the
same name as in the country of origin, even if the name consists of
less than three letters and/or is identical to the name of a
municipality, a county or a country. One restriction though, the

name cannot include letters or signs that are not identified as


accepted letters/signs in the Register of Business Enterprises.
So in our case Liza World Travels has to change name of our company.
Liza verden reiser is the new name of ie. which is to be convert it for
starting a business in Norway (The name of your enterprise The name of
a company is regulated by the Business Name Act6. The minimum
requirement is a name consisting of at least three Norwe-gian letters,
numbers, orthographic signs and possibly the abbreviation identifying the
type of company.)
Registration for VAT
The Tax Office maintains records of businesses that are obliged to pay
VAT (the VAT Register), and is responsible for the administration and
control of VAT.
The part 2 of the Coordinated register notification is dedicated to
companies that are affected by the VAT regulations.
All people running businesses that sell goods or VAT eligible services
are obliged to register in the VAT register when the turnover exceeds
NOK 50 000 over a period of 12 months.
If you are registered in the VAT register, you are allowed to deduct VAT
from the cost of the goods and services used in your own VAT eligible
business.
For charity and public institutions and organizations, the registration
limit is NOK 140 000.
a. VAT rates
The standard rate of VAT is 25 per cent. The rate of VAT on the sales of
foodstuff is 15 per cent. The rate on public transport, on letting of rooms in
hotels, motels and tourist cabins etc., and the hiring out of camping areas,
cabins, and holiday flats is 8 per cent.
b. Registration in the VAT Register
Both foreign and Norwegian businesses supplying goods and services in
Norway, shall register in the VAT register when their sales or withdrawals of
such goods and services exceed NOK 50 000 over a period of 12 months. A
written notice of the business activities shall be sent to The Central
Coordinating Register for Legal Entities (CCRLE) or to the Tax Office where
the foreigner (or his representative) has his place of business/residence. The
written notice shall be given by filling in the registration form "Coordinated
register notification" part 1 and 2. If the business is already registered in

CCRLE and has given all the necessary information to this register, only part
2 of the registration form shall be filled in.
c. Legal Basis
Accounting and bookkeeping obligations are determined by two separate
acts, the Accounting Act and the Bookkeeping Act. In simple terms the
former states the types of business entities that are required to produce
annual accounts and the obligatory contents of these accounts. The latter
states the bookkeeping duties and records.

Accounting & Audit for Business


The financial year follows the calendar year. Based on the recorded
transactions as described and the stock counting, the enterprise shall
produce an annual report consisting of profit and loss statement, balance
sheet and cash flow statement.
Auditing - You are obliged to appoint a Norwegian auditor if the operating
income from your business entity's overall activities in Norway exceed NOK 5
million

INDIA MARKET SEGMENTATION


Demography
Age

Middle aged(3050)

Young working and


college students(<30)

Retired people(>60)

Income

Wealthy(>Rs.
1,500,000)

Middle class(Rs.
500,000-1,500,000)

working students(<Rs.
500,000)

Travel Party
Composition

Family visits(3-6
people)

Adult Group of 5-6

couples

Geography

Location

Foreign tourists

Domestic tourist

Nights of
stay(number)*

<2

2-4

>4

Motivation

Scenic beauty,
Exotica

Adventurous activities

Peace, Spiritual visits

Psychographics

TARGET MARKET
Wealthy traveler
They plan to stay for a week or long and purpose of their visit is new experience, relaxation and
exotic beautiful scenery.
Young traveler
young single working or a college student who prefers to travel in group of 5-6 friends. They
love adventurous activities.
Family person
They are a small family with 4-5 members. They are visiting alone or with 2-3 families of
relatives. They plan to explore various places and activities in 4-5 days. They will generally

spend one night at each place and then move on. They have a healthy mix of visiting heritage
sites, spiritual places as well as try out a few safe for family adventure activities.
POSITIONING
Psychographic Positioning
India as a country is a conglomerate of myriad geographies, races, ethnicities, cultures and
traditions. For the tourist with leisure/ recreation motive, the positioning happens from the
individual or collective conscience, 'self-enlightenment', 'discovering one's own heritage' or
connecting with the spirit of national integrity.
Experiential Positioning
Audio-visual stimulation is a key aspect in this regard, as it not only forms the quickest cognitive
connect, but also plays a key role in defining the state's tourist image.

NORWAY MARKET SEGMENTATION

There are eight motivational segments in the Cencydiam model. Each


has their own core motivations and preferences while on holiday. Based
on the size of the segments, Norways and its competitors perceptual fit
with the segments, Norways best prospect is to target the exploration
and broadening your horizon segments.

NORWAY TARGET MARKET


Active explorers:

This group tends to favour physical active experiences in nature such as hiking,
cycling, fishing etc. They are usually found in markets closer to Norway.
Curious explorers:
This group seeks more cultural content in addition to nature experiences and
favour sightseeing, roundtrips and city trips. They look to increase their cultural
capital.

POSITIONING

4. Market Analysis of Norway

The travel and tourism sector in Norway has strengthened after a slowdown
in 2009 due to the global financial crisis. The country has recorded an
increase in the number of visitors, both domestic and international, and
expenditure by tourists. The relatively stable state of the economy,
promotional activities by the tourism authority and the hosting of
international events supported this growth. Tourism has a significant role to
play in the Norwegian economy in terms of contributions to GDP and
employment. According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, tourism
contributed 6.2% to Norways total GDP and accounted for 8.4% of total
employment in 2012.
The tourism industry in Norway is characterized by strong fluctuations in
demand, as it is highly seasonal. This creates a number of challenges such as
those related to the recruitment of competent staff and the ability to develop
a profitable industry. Combating seasonality and prolonging the tourism
season is often viewed as being important for reducing the challenges
associated with seasonal demand for tourism but in order to develop
counter-seasonal strategies, it is necessary to have an understanding of the
seasonal concentration of demand for tourism and the relative marginal
effect of different markets.
The market analysis of the Norway Tourism which can ne done through the
marketing mix are as following:-

Product-

The product is the collection of services that have features and benefits.
Standard features and benefits include the normal amenities of a hotel room,
for example. Good marketing adds special features, such as free breakfasts
or free Internet.
Here Liza World Travel provides the online booking services to their customer
according to their budget and their choice which they want in the traveling.
Product is the combination of tangible and intangible elements. The tourism
product, which is mainly the destination, can only be experienced. The views
of the location travel to the destination, the accommodation and facility as
well as the entertainment at the destination all form the tourism
product.Thus it is a composite product combination of attraction, facilities
and transportation.
Here

Liza World Travel provides the wide rand of product to their customers
Government tourism departments,
Immigration and customs services,
travel agencies,
airlines,
tour operators,
hotels
And many associated service industries such as airline catering or
laundry services, Guides, Interpreters, Tourism promotion and sales
etc.

Price:-

Pricing in tourism is a complex process. Pricing includes the prices of other


services like Air travel, Bus, Railways, Hotels, etc. All are included in tourism
package. Pricing also depends on the Geographic location of the destination.
Pricing also depends on Seasonality. Seasonality is the most important factor
in pricing. To match demand and supply tourist managers try to get either
discount. E.g. Taj is the tourist attraction in India. Pricing is also based on
competitors pricing. Pricing is also subject to government regulations. E.g.
Air price changes tourism package also changes, if Hotel charges change
then also tourism package changes.
Pricing of the tourist product is a complex matter because of its composite
nature. Geographical location of the destination affects the pricing decision.
At the same time, seasonality factor and varying demand cannot be
overruled. The objective of pricing in any other firms is to fetch a target
market share, to prevent competition, and to take care of the price elasticity
of demand.
Different distribution strategies may be selected to reflect the companys
overall objectives. The middleman may be tour operators, who buy tourism
products in bulk and make them available to travel agents who are retailers.
The range of tourist products, which are bought by the tour operators are
airline seats, hotel accommodation, bus for local sightseeing, etc. they may
also sell directly to customers. The latest mode of reaching the tourist is
through Internet. Ticket booking can also be done through the Internet and
payment is made with credit card.
The price has to match the product, but good marketing makes the price
seem more attractive. The operator can either add features to the product
and keep the price the same or give a discount for the same features

Price is what the business charges for its tourism product as defined by the
interacting forces of supply and demand.

At a practical level, tourism enterprises can determine their prices


by analyzing:

The
The
The
The

cost of running the business;


willingness to pay by the demand;
prices of the competition;
commission to be provided to resellers.

In tourism, two prices are often used: rack rates, which are the prices
published in promotional materials without discounts, and net prices (or net
rates), which is the rack rate less the commission offered to resellers (tour
operators or other intermediaries).
It may also be advantageous to differentiate rates for seniors, children, offseason, etc.

People:-

It plays a most important part in tourism. In people local people are very
important, that how they treat tourist. The travel agents, guides, staff of
travel companies, sales staff, etc they are the people. Travel Company also
like Railways, Air, etc. is included in people. Normally a tourist assures a
tourism quality like hotels, Travel Company.

The personnel who attend to the needs of the tourists form an essential
ingredient in tourism marketing. The sales personnel are responsible for
dealing with the customer behind the counter. The airline and transportation
crew interact with customers while traveling. The resort or hotel
representatives enter to the needs of the tourist when they reach the
destination.
The tourist guides, who interact with the customers at the tourist location, all
form the people element in tourism marketing. These contract persons must
be trained on interpersonal skills as well as knowledge of the product. In the
tourism industry the travel agents and the travel guides are the two most
important people who speak a lot about the industry. Hence it is imperative
that they have to be at their best at all times. Travel guides especially, are
expected to have a lot of patience, good sense of humor, tact to transform
the occasional tourists into habitual ones, thorough knowledge of the places,
linguistic skills etc.
Since the product is a collection of services, the people who provide the
services are a key to the success of the transaction. Operators must have
top-level service to initially complete the sale and to encourage repeat
customers.
Any person coming into contact with customers can have an impact on
overall satisfaction. In tourism, people are particularly important because, in
the customers eyes, they are generally inseparable from total service.
In tourism, the human component is very important, so the attitude, skills
and appearance of all people involved in the travelers experience needs to
be first class. Some ways in which people add value to an experience, as part
of the marketing mix, are training and service.

Process:The operation process of the tourism firm will depend on the size of the
tourism firm. The sequential steps involved in the delivery of the tourist
products are:
Provision of travel information: The information regarding the travel is
provided at a convenient location where the potential tourist seeks
clarification about his proposed tour.
Preparation of itinerates: It is a composition of series of operations that
are required to plan a tour.
Liaison with providers of services: Before any form of travel is sold over
the counter to a customer; contracts have to be entered with the

providers of various services including transportation companies, hotel


accommodation, coaches for local sightseeing etc.
Planning and costing tours: Once the contracts and arrangements are
entered into, then the task of planning and costing the tour, this will
depend on the tour selected as well as individual requirements.
Ticketing: The computerized reservation system has in recent years
revolutionized the reservation system for both rail and air travel.
Provision of foreign currency and insurance: In case of foreign travel
the final task provide foreign currency as well as insurance
Processes should do more than just make life easier for the business they
must help customers get what they want.
One way to add value to the standard product and to distinguish a particular
offering from competitors is to offer exclusive programming. Customers will
purchase a product that caters to their particular interests. Special
programming can address such preferences and draw in additional
customers.
For instance, for booking a flight on the internet the process begins with the
customer visiting an airlines website. The customer enters details of the
flights and books them. The customers ticket/booking references arrive by
email (or, less and less, by post). The customer catches his flight on time and
he arrives refreshed at his destination. The coming together of all the
mentioned stages constitutes a marketing process.

Promotion:The promotion gives details of the product and the price. The
characteristics of the promotion are the method of communicating
information, the content of the promotion and the cost to the operator.
promotion has a target market, and the method and content of
promotion has to appeal to the people who it reaches. The price

key
the
The
the
the

members of the target market are willing to pay has to cover the cost of the
promotion.
Nowadays, promotion is replaced by communications, which represents a
broader focus. Communications can include advertising, public relations,
personal selling, viral advertising, and any form of communication between
the organization and the consumer.
Creation of awareness has a far-reaching impact. The tourist organizations
bear the responsibility of informing, persuading and sensing the potential
tourists in a right fashion. The marketers need to use the various
components of promotion optimally so that they succeed in increasing the
number of habitual users. Promotion helps in maximizing the duration of
stay, frequency of visit by offering new tourist products in the same country
to areas, which have remained untapped or partially tapped. The various
dimensions of tourism promotion are as follows:
Advertising: Advertisement gives important information to the actual
and potential tourists. Its coverage is wide. Advertising is aimed at the
public to create awareness of the travel offers available on a resort and
its attractions to influence their business decisions. Intangibility can be
compensated with the help of visual exposure of scenes and events.
We can project hotel bedrooms, well-arranged restaurants and
cafeterias, swimming pools etc.
Publicity: It focuses attention on strengthening the public relations
measures by developing a rapport with media people and getting their
personalized support in publicizing the business. It helps in projecting
the positive image of tourist organizations since the prospects trust on
the news items publicized by the media people. The publicity program
include regular publicity stories and photographs to the newspapers,
travel editors, contact with magazines on stories etc. advertising is a
part of publicity.
Sales promotions: Sales promotion measures are the short-term
activities seeking to boost sales at peak demand periods to ensure that
the firms obtain its market share and are used to help launch a new
product or support an ailing or modified one. The tool of sales
promotions is designed to appeal particularly to those customers who
are price-sensitive. There are a number of techniques to promote sale
and the tourist professional need to use them in the face of their
requirements vis- -vis the emerging trends in the business. Eg. In the
tourism industry, a travel company offers give-aways to their clients,
such as flight bags, wallets for tickets, Foreign Exchange (Forex) and

covers of passport. The hotels offer a number of facilities like shoe


shine clothes, first aid sewing kits, shower caps and shampoo. Further,
the VIP clients also get fruits and flowers in their rooms.
Word-of-mouth Promotion: Most communication about tourism takes
place by word-of-mouth information, which in a true sense is word-ofrecommendation. In the tourism industry it is found that the word-ofmouth promoters play the role of a hidden sales force, which help the
process of selling. The high magnitude of effectiveness of this tool of
promotion is due to high credibility of the channel, especially in the
eyes of the potential tourists. The sensitivity of this tool makes it clear
that tourist organizations need to concentrate on the quality of
services they promise and offer. The marketers or the tourist
organizations need to keep their eyes open, identify the vocal persons
or the opinion leaders and take a special care of them so that they
keep on moving the process of stimulating and creating demand.
Personal Selling: Personal Selling is based on the personal skill of an
individual. The travel and hotel business depend considerably on the
personal selling. The development of travel and tourism has been
possible due to well-educated and trained sales personnel. The
development of tourism business has been influenced by the services
rendered by the travel agents and travel guides since they work as
information carriers. Personal selling is the personal presentation of a
tangible product or intangible services or ideas to the customers. It is
important to mention that in the tourism industry, the personnel who
attend tourists form an essential ingredient of the product, such as
sales personnel are found responsible for dealing with customers
behind the counter, the resort representatives cater to the need of
tourists when they reach the destination etc. all of them play a vital
role in ensuring that the tourism products satisfy the tourists. The
phrase- the customer is always right applies specifically to the tourism
industry. No reduction in price would compensate for impolite and
indecent travel guide, a solvent waiter and a surly or a haughty coach
driver. These facts are testimony to the proposition that the travel
business is linked with the performance and behavior of sales
personnel or travel staff.
Telemarketing: It is a method of selling in which a professionally sound
telemarketer markets the business. The quality of technology and the
communicative ability of the telemarketers determine the magnitude
of success of this component. In tourism, the travel agents, offices of
airways, receptionist, and secretaries work efficiently if the telephonic

services are not up to the mark. Also recruiting a person considered to


be professionally sound, personally-committed sales personnel having
an in-built creativity, innovation and imagination is very important.
Exhibitions: The participants include state and national tourism
promotion boards, travel agents and tour operators, airlines, car
rentals, cruise liners, holiday financiers, technology providers, hotels
and resorts, education institutions in the field of hospitality and
tourism. Over the years the participation of foreign tourism promotion
boards like the Dubai Tourism and the Mauritius Tourism, etc has
increased in order to aggressively promote their respective countries.

Physical Evidence:Physical evidence that the customer experienced the particular tourism
product can help sales. Providing professional photographs of the customers
at key events or the supply of branded products are effective strategies for
promoting tourism products.
The tourist attraction, which is an expensive for the customer must be
tangibilised with the help of tangible items like, comfortable seats while
traveling, layout, and design of the resort, natural service scope, etc. the
sign posts that indicate directions, route maps, information regarding rules
and regulations of the tourist spot and the sign regarding the public utilities
like toilets, telephone booth also form a part of the physical evidence.
Printed matters such as brochures also play an important role in the
development of tourism. As the product, in tourism is intangible. There is a

need to describe fully the product, which is done by providing an elaborate


brochure, which shows how different elements of the programmes are
carefully planned to include all necessary information to make holiday
establishes expectation of quality value for money, product image and
status, which must be matched when the product is delivered.
Makes the customers perceive how the services would be like. Unlike a
physical product, a service cannot be experienced before it is delivered,
which makes it intangible. This, therefore, means that potential customers
could perceive greater risk when deciding whether or not to use a service. To
reduce the feeling of risk, thus improving the chance for success, it is vital
for potential customers to see what a product would be like. This is done by
providing physical evidence displayed in photographs (of your facilities,
etc.) or testimonials (what tourists write about their own previous
experience).

The following are the marketing mix for the Indian Tourism:-

Product:Tourism product in marketing is referred to as any product or service related


to tourism like transportation, accommodation, restaurants, attractions,
shops, landscapes and etc. Sometimes in tourism, products are free of cost
as compared to other fields as natural beauty of one's country , friendliness
of local peoples and participation in the local festivals are free of cost for
tourists. 4 A's
plays an important role in explaining the product -1.
attractions 2. accommodation 3. amenity 4. accessibility. Attractions are the
most important tool in tourism as these are only attractions by which tourists
travel to particular destinations.
Destination places must have their own historic monuments, museums,
gardens, landscapes, carnivals, cultural events, national parks and forests
and all activities which are carried out by tourists in those particular
destinations which differentiate the destination from other destinations.

Accessibility is another important factor in tourism as if tourist places/


product is not easily accessible people generally are not interested in
traveling to those places. This requires good transportation system and
availability of restaurants and other facilities near to tourist attractions.
Amenities are another significant factor describing the easy availability of
services on the tourist places like public toilets, restaurants and cafes, retail
shops, telecoms and other necessary facilities and the last and important
one is accommodation.

Price:In tourism price is defined as the combination of monetary and non


monetary prices. Monetary prices are the prices for entrance to destinations,
donations for local and environment causes and etc while on the other hand
non monetary costs are costs other than money example how much time it
was taken to reach that destination, risks during the journey, future benefits
etc. Main objectives of price setting are survival, target return on
investments, increase market share, price and profit stabilization, profit
maximization and maintaining the image of the organization. While setting
the prices it should be kept in mind that product pricing is highly influenced
by internal and external factors. Internal factors influencing price are
organizational costs, marketing mix, product differentiation, product costs,
product life cycle and functional positioning. External factors influencing
price are product demand, competition, economic conditions and the buyer
behavior.

Place:Place is the important marketing mix element as before traveling to other


destinations tourists perceive the image of the destinations in their minds.
The main variables of place are transportation, merchandising and channels
of distribution. Transportation is important in particular destinations so that
tourists can easily travel from one part of attraction to another. There should
be proper, economical, rapid and dependable mode of transportation for
them. Rails, roads, motor trucks, inland water ways, railway express and
airways should be developed according to easily mobility from one tourist
place to another. Easily allocation of shopping malls, restaurants and cafes
should be located near to tourism attractions to fulfill the needs of tourists. It
should be kept in mind that when people travel from one place to another
they have certain perceptions about that places in their minds.

Promotion:The Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, as part of its on-going


activities, releases media campaigns in the print, electronic, online and
outdoor media campaigns in the international and domestic markets, under
the Incredible India brand-line, to promote various tourism destinations and
products of the country.
The International media campaigns have been released globally in important
and potential tourist generating markets, covering the Americas, Europe,
Africa and Asia Pacific regions. This information was given by the Minister of
State for Tourism, Shri Sultan Ahmed in a written reply in Rajya Sabha today.
People:People in tourism refers to all people and workers whom tourists interact
during their visit to
particular destinations. When tourists travel any
destination the first thing upon arriving there is their interaction with local
people. Behavior of local people has directly influence on the minds of
tourists. The way they were treated and served during their journey's plays
important role in shaping the particular destination's image.
Tourists generally share their experiences about their visits and their services
and how they were being treated by local people during their journeys.
Suppose tourists went to restaurant and if waiter/waitress behave with them
rudely or if nobody cares about them often tourists don't visit those places
and this is the negative point for destinations. Tourists while traveling to
other countries must remember that in each country people have their own
different type traditions and cultures so they must respect those traditions
rather making fun of local people activities.

Process:In tourism, businesses offer services. Process in tourism means to implement


such strategies to make the life of any business easier so that people can get
what they want in easy manner. For example - if person want to purchase
holiday vacation to any destination. First people will search online websites
offering holidays to particular destinations. After from those websites they
will choose only one website offering best and easy services. After they will
look for offerings and tour packages to their choice of destinations. After
choosing tour packages they book that tour and air tickets and get ready for
tour. This is the example of process in tourism marketing.

Tour operators help them in finding destinations according to their choices


and help them in everything from their pick up from airports to
accommodation at destinations. In tourism process is the mean of conveying
messages, services and information to customers in a easy manner so that
customers can easily access those particular products.
Physical evidence:In tourism as tourism products are intangible as before purchasing any
service, people can't touch, feel and see those destinations. They perceive
the image of services and products in their minds before traveling to any
destinations before travelling.
They perceive regarding their accommodations, hotels, restaurants,
appearance of vehicles and its people. Before purchasing any services
normally people are not sure about whether they will like particular
destination or not.
Physical evidence is the environment or facilities and services which they
experience upon reaching the destinations. Physical evidence is the
environment in which normally sales takes place and where product is
consumed by customers.
Physical evidence is related to other important factors like physical
environment around the product/service, Ambiance, Spatial layout and
corporate branding. Physical environment is the environment surrounded
where services are consumed by people.
For example if someone goes to restaurant apart from having meals physical
environment also plays important role in repeat visits.

5. PORTERS FIVE FORCE MODEL IN TOURISM INDUSTRY

PORTERS FIVE FORCES MODEL OF NORWAY TOURISM INDUSTRY:

Bargaining power of Buyers

The tourists' average age is relatively high. The oldest are holiday and leisure
travellers from Germany, followed by 'Other country in Asia' and
Scandinavia. Foreign business travellers in Norway are the youngest group.
The main adventure attractions of which Norway invests are the landscapes
that extend across the Arctic Circle together with mountains, ski resorts,
lakes and woods. Much of the nature of Norway remains unspoiled, and thus
attracts numerous hikers and skiers. Many Norwegian companies are offering
tourism activities both summer and winter seasons: these include the
mountain regions of Norway, especially the counties of Buskerud (Hallingdal
region) and Oppland , and Hedmark as well as Telemark.
Visitors to Norway come from all parts of the globe, with a great many from
Germany, the Netherlands, Great Britain, USA and France especially. The
majority of tourists, however, are Norwegian or from other Scandinavian
countries, usually travelling on business. These business tourists constitute
an important part of the total number of overnight stays; many of the larger
hotels therefore base their activities on conference rooms and restaurant
facilities. The tourism industry in Norway is characterized by strong
fluctuations in demand, as it is highly seasonal.
Geography and climate play important roles in the demand for labour in the
tourism sector. For example, mountain resorts may have a quiet period in
early autumn and late spring, depending on weather conditions suitable for
hiking and skiing.
More urban areas may have slightly less tourist activity in January after the
Christmas season and before winter and Easter holidays begin, and again in
May before the summer season starts up again.
Combating seasonality and prolonging the tourism season is often viewed as
being important for reducing the challenges associated with seasonal
demand for tourism but in order to develop counter-seasonal strategies, it is
necessary to have an understanding of the seasonal concentration of
demand for tourism and the relative marginal effect of different markets.
Also for this reason the hospitality sector in Norway is experiencing
challenges in several areas. The economic situation in Europe and the
uncertainty it is causing makes tourists hesitate. The industry is expecting
fewer bookings in advance and more impulsivity, which will make it more
difficult to predict and plan ahead.

Main Tourism Offer


Winter Sports
Business Tourism
Adventure Tourism
Natural Tourism
Ecotourism
Cruising

The main attraction in Norway is the country itself, landscapes and nature.
Norway has an abundance of fjords, islands, coastline, forest, lakes,
mountains and waterfalls. The main attractions of Norway are the varied
landscapes that extend across the Arctic Circle. It is famous for its fjordindented coastline and its mountains, ski resorts, lakes and woods. The main
tourist cities in Norway are Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, Trondheim and Troms.
Much of the nature of Norway remains unspoiled, and thus attracts numerous
hikers and skiers. The fjords, mountains and waterfalls in Western and
Northern Norway attract several hundred thousand foreign tourists each
year. In the cities, cultural idiosyncrasies such as the Holmenkollen ski jump
attract many visitors, as well as historic and cultural buildings and areas
such as Bryggen in Bergen and the Vigeland Sculpture Park in Oslo. Norway
is a very popular attraction for winter sports. Two of the most popular skiing
resorts are:

Hemsedal

Trysil

Bargaining power of suppliers


Norway's restaurants are expensive particularly for foreign visitors.
Supermarkets offer good products for more reasonable prices. Budget
supermarkets such as Kiwi, Rema and Prix can be found most places. Many

places also have bakeries that offer freshly baked breads, cakes, salty
pastries, and sandwiches usually more value for money that at
restaurants. Pizzerias are very common, although of varying quality these
are often the least expensive place "to fill up" (often 120-150 NOK for a
pizza). In comparison to a restaurant where a main course is anywhere
between 160 - 290 NOK.
Norway is one of the richest countries in the world and many things are
accordingly expensive (particularly personal service, such as restaurants and
taxis, as well as some food items). Note that service and taxes (VAT)
is always included in the price offered, nothing is added to the bill. Air
transport is relatively cheap if the traveller are flexible with regard to time
and date. However, the most important things are free of charge: everyone
has right of access to wilderness (including beaches) even if privatly owned.
Some state institutions (such as the national gallery) has no admission fee.
Accommodation services for visitors and accommodation associated with all
types of vacation home ownership, food and beverage serving industry,
railway passenger transport, road passenger transport, water passenger
transport, air passenger transport, transport equipment rental, travel
agencies and other reservation services industry, cultural service industry,
sports and entertainment/recreational services industry
The Norwegian rail network is also connected to the Swedish network. Oslo
Airport, Gardermoen is the most important airport in Norway, with 19 million
passengers in 2007. Most cities and towns have nearby airports, and some of
the
largest
also
have
international
flights.
The
cruise
ferry Hurtigruten connects the cities on the coast between Bergen
and Kirkenes. In the summer, the coastal cities are visited by numerous
foreign cruise ships, Bergen being the main cruise port.
Nature-based tourism development in Norway can only be realized through
active handling of decisive nature and tourism management authorities,
while developing holistic, long term, tailored tourism strategies in a
cooperative way and fitting within wider nature management and economic
policies.
Improvement of trails, signposting, facilities, transportation services,
accommodation, hospitality and other infrastructure is needed to overcome

the lower threshold of development under which development strategies


and goals remain nothing more than a dream.

Adoption of the internet among travel companies boosts further


sales
A high penetration rate of the internet in Norway has changed consumers
habits as to where they search for and buy travel and tourism services. More
travel and tourism companies are offering online platforms to allow
consumers to book easily, to decrease operational costs and to offer more
options to consumers when booking. Companies in car rental, travel
accommodation, transportation and health and wellness tourism offer
consumers the option to book online or offline. Some companies, particularly
in the transportation industry, have launched mobile applications for
consumers to book on mobile devices. Travel and tourism companies are also
investing in promoting and marketing their products on social media to
increase consumer loyalty to companies and brands and to keep consumers
updated with new services.

Travel retail companies diversify their travel packages


Strong competition among several travel retail companies has pushed them
to launch unique travel packages to exotic destinations and to compete in
terms of uniqueness, exclusivity and originality. Companies are offering tours
in different countries with themed travel programmes, such as culinary,
sports, adventure, eco-travel, health and wellness and wild nature. They are
also focusing on offering packages to specific group segments such as adults
only, families, mothers with children, adolescents or retired consumers. The
main reason for this is that consumers are demanding more tailor-made
travel packages to suit their specific needs.

Weakness in the Norwegian krone offers opportunities and threats


The weakness of the Norwegian krone in 2013 offered good opportunities for
the hotels industry and tourist attractions as prices were cheaper for
travellers coming to Norway. Hotel companies were able to promote their
services at more attractive prices in 2013. On the other hand, the weakness
of the Norwegian krone in 2013 made it more expensive for Norwegians to
travel overseas. This situation negatively affected travel to expensive

destinations while cheaper destinations saw an increase in trips among


Norwegians in 2013.

Norway aims to transform itself from a strong winter destination into a yearround destination focusing on sustainable development in the areas of
nature and the environment, infrastructure and competence. The
Government is also positive towards initiatives that can lead to educational
courses being established for guides and tour guides within fields such as
outdoor activities, nature guiding and cultural guiding. One of the main
strategies of Norwegian government addressed to adventure tourism is also
related to quality and leadership in ecotourism and sustainable tourism.

Norwegian government and tourist sector are promoting adventure tourism


as one of the strategic industries of Norwegian economy. According to the
organisation Destination Norway, Norway needs to enhance what it offers
especially moving to the following directions related to adventure tourism :
from nature alone to nature & culture; from passive observation to active
participation; from remote and isolated to inhabited approachable and
accessible. The idea listed in Norwegian National strategy for tourism is
aimed at connecting various small medium enterprise and increase their
management quality, adding new sports and adventure experiences to the
current offer, profiling and marketing them along with destinations. There will
be a strong focus also on tourism in arctic and exotic places like Svalbard,
Lofoten and Finnmark which attract tourists looking for something
extraordinary related to nature and adventure. Together with these activities

INDUSTRY RIVALRY
Norway is the westernmost, northernmost and in fact the easternmostof
the three Scandinavian countries. Best known for the complex and deep
fjords along its west coast which stretches from the North Sea near Denmark
and Scotland into the Arctic Ocean and has borders with Finland, Sweden and
the northwestern tip of Russia .Still it faces competition from other European

countries like Germany, Spain, Italy, France United kingdom, Russia ,Greece
etc.
Norways unique selling points: - Spectacular fjords, coast and natural
phenomena - Fresh seafood and coastal specialties - Nature-based activities Thriving coastal culture
In an increasingly competitive market, Norway also needs a clear brand
position that distinguishes it from its key competitors.
By enhancing the brand, creating a clear competitive position and effectively
communicating this, we will reduce the impact of the main barrier to
choosing Norway, i.e. cost.
By enhancing the brand, creating a clear competitive position and effectively
communicating this, we will reduce the impact of the main barrier to
choosing Norway, i.e. cost. "NORWAY POWERED BY NATURE"

THREAT OF SUBSITUTES
Visitors to Norway come from all parts of the globe, with a great many from
Germany, the Netherlands, Great Britain, USA and France especially. The
majority of tourists, however, are Norwegian or from other Scandinavian
countries, usually travelling on business. These business tourists constitute
an important part of the total number of overnight stays, many of the larger
hotels therefore base their activities on conference rooms and restaurant
facilities.
With the growth of globalization and availability of the state of the art
technology business tours are being replaced by video conferencing
virtual websites on the internet
Due to economic crisis in Euroupe countries such as Spain and Italy
decreased the number of visits to Norway. Germany was another
country which opted for other destination

Italy accounted for the highest decrease in number of trips with 8% in


2014 while Spain decreased by 7%

Outbound departures boosted by low cost carriers and cheaper


destinations
Tourism flows outbound increased most in 2013, out of all categories of
tourism flows. A bad summer season in Norway in 2013 positively affected
departures to warmer countries in closer destinations such as those in the
south of Europe. However, new routes and more departures with low cost
carriers with good promotional campaigns also increased outbound
departures, particularly to closer destinations such as Spain, Sweden or the
UK. The European financial crisis in some countries has made it more
attractive for Norwegians to travel abroad and stay for longer periods of
time.

THREAT OF NEW ENTRANTS


Each countries is trying to for more tourist in the age of rapidly increasing
disposable incomes. countries within the European region like Denmark,
Finland ,Sweden, Spain And Greece are aggressively promoting tourism as
represented by these slogans
Denmark - Denmark is often marketed as a "fairytale country".
Finland- The brand has four main dimensions beginning with letter C:
Cool, Contrasts, Credible, Creative.
Greece- The new logo's slogan is "Greece, the true experience", which
shows that the marketing campaign is nowadays directed towards
experience seekers and not just mass tourism
Spain - Visit Sweden is a guide is about the brand of Sweden as a
destination. Visit Sweden worked hard on developing core values for
their overall digital marketing strategy.

PORTERS FIVE FORCES OF INDIAN TOURISM INDUSTYRY

Threat of new entrants:


The threat of new entrants is basically from other countries to India. Other
countries like United Arab Emirates, China and Vietnam are estimated to be
the major tourist destination in next five years. As such there is no barrier to

entry but still the major consideration for any country would be its
Infrastructure, Language, security and ease of access. The major barrier to
entry is put by the government itself.
Threat of substitutes:
On an average it is seen that a family spends 10% of its total annual income
on its travel. Seeing this in mind it can be easily found out that there are
various substitutes available for Travel and Tourism. Starting right from
generic competition to specific competition. The biggest competitor would be
theme parks, entertainment cities. This is the greatest threat to the Travel
and Tourism Industry. People now avoid going outside rather spend time at
such places with the family. Other substitutes can be internet and video
games for the children.

Bargaining power of Buyers:


Customers play an important role in this industry as they only make or break
such industry. The tourists have a greater say in such industry in terms of the
facilities they demand from the country. Tourists are more informed and are
more knowledgeable. The information is easily available to them from
anywhere and they can be good bargainers. Countries also give incentives to
the customers as well as the tour operators for attracting tourists in the
country. The tourist can bargain easily over the infrastructural factors and
safety-security factors in a country like India.

Bargaining power of Suppliers:


The efficiency and attractiveness totally depends upon the performance of
the supplier of the service. Suppliers can have a greater amount of
bargaining power, if they are providing a good and satisfying service to the
customers. In such an industry, the bargaining power of suppliers is more
than that of the customers. Here the providers of the Travel and Tourism
industry are: 1. Airlines Industry 2. Railways 3. Travel Agents 4. Hotel
Industry 5. Government All of these industries have their own bargaining
power in their hands and they can bargain to the extent of quality of service
provided by them to the customers.

Industry Rivalry:
In India within the travel and tourism industry itself a good and healthy
competition can be seen. Countries like India not only have international
competitors but it is also competing locally. There is always a stiff
competition within the hill stations, coastal areas, religious destinations and
cultural centers. Not only has this but stated like Himachal Pradesh, Gujrat,
MP, Kerala, Rajasthan and AP take initiatives with the locals and try to
provide a flavor of their culture and tradition. They have their own
campaigns to attract local as well as international tourists. The industry also
seeks stiff competition within the tour operators; this has also benefitted the
end customers as now better services are provided at competitive price.

Import/ Export Policies & Procedures

Export Financing.
The objective of the policy is to ensure a robust and competitive export
financing scheme for Norwegian industry.
According to the policy, Export Credit Norway will provide loans for
export financing in the form of state-subsidies commercial interest
reference rate loans and CIRR-qualified market loans on commercial
terms.
These loans are loans granted to borrowers on terms compliant with
the OECD "Arrangement on Officially Supported Export Credits". CIRRqualified market loans are loans priced on market terms in compliance
with state aid rules of the EEA-agreement.

Labour Market and Migration


According to the this policy ,in 2004 of the European Economic Area
(EEA) to new member states of the European Union, labour
immigration to Norway has increased steadily.
According to one survey, in 2011 immigration to Norway corresponded
to a net immigration rate of 1% of the population. Employed resident
immigrants and workers on short term stay (shorter than six months)
accounted for 14% of total employment in Norway in the 4th quarter of
2011.

As there is high demand for labour and a gradual opening up of the


labour market through changes in the immigration regulations has led
to an increase in the number of non-EEA nationals working in Norway.
According to the new Immigration Act and Immigration Regulations
that went into force 1 January 2010, non-European nationals who

intend to establish business in Norway must hold a residence permit.


This act includes provisions that are intended to ease the labour
recruitment process.
There are three groups of workers may commence work before the
permit is issued: employees of international companies, specialists and
skilled workers.
The working conditions of Norway are generally characterized by high
standards. As this country is becoming increasingly integrated with the
larger European labour market where salary levels and working
conditions vary considerably between countries, challenges related to
questionable practices and social dumping are increasing in certain
sectors.

Trade policy development.


According to the one survey, the prices of Norwegian export products
have developed more favorably than export volumes so far, resulting
in an increase in the export value of exports in 2010 and 2011.
Imports shrank in 2009, now rebounded to approximately the same
level as before the financial crisis.
Total Norwegian merchandise trade (imports + exports) in 2011 ended
almost 4% below the levels reached prior to the financial crisis in 2008.
As it is a proportion of GDP, trade contracted from 57.4% in 2008 to
48.8% in 2009 before expanding to 49.5% in 2010 and 52.0% in 2011.
During 2008-11, exports is60% of total trade.
The trade surplus in Norway is amounted to US$66 billion in 2011
(compared to US$78 billion in 2008). Crude petroleum and natural gas
are Norways most important export products; both this products
contributed49.1% of exports in 2011, compared to 52.0% in 2008.

The food sector of Norway contributed5.9% of export revenues,


whereas agricultural exports are minimal.

The share of exports of

manufactures in total exports was 24.1% in 2011.


The main manufacturing exports products are aluminum, machinery
and transport equipment followed by chemicals in Norway.
Norway's imports were 85% of manufactured goods in 2011, which
represents a small decline with respect to 2008.Norway's main trading
partners are still the members of the European Communities (EC27),
which contributed to 81% of exports and 61% of imports in 2011.
In 2008 Norwegian service exports have grown faster than service
imports measured at current prices, strengthening the balance of trade
in services from NKr 2 billion in 2008 to 13 billion in 2011.

Trade Policy.
As the demands of the Norwegian population and businesses for a
diverse supply of goods and services be met, as a result of this more
than 40% of gross domestic product is exported, sufficient to allow for
imports corresponding to around 30% of GDP.
The Norwegian firms to benefit from economies of scale, this country
must participate in international markets.

An open trading system

allows by Norwegian government to better exploit its comparative


advantage.
The important Governments key priorities are to strengthen the
international

competitiveness

of

Norwegian

goods

and

service

producers by ensuring that Norway's business environment remains


conducive to innovation, investment and growth.
The global aspect of major Norwegian exports and imports implies that
the well-being of the Norwegian economy is directly linked to the
overall health of the world economy.
Trade openness and access to global value chains, both are crucial to
the smooth running of the Norwegian economy.

The main focus of Norwegian trade policy is the multilateral trading


system embodied in the World Trade Organization.
Given the current impasse,
Norwegian government is prepared to
explore different avenues and options, always keeping in mind the
overall

goals

of

maintaining,

improving

and

strengthening

the

multilateral trading system and ensuring the integration into the


system of emerging economies and other developing countries.
This trade policy continues to enjoy broad political support.

Free Trade Agreements.


Norway and its partners in the European Free Trade Association
(Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland) has established an extensive
network of free trade agreements in the 1990.
Norway has signed agreements with Albania, Canada, Colombia, Gulf
Cooperation Council -Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman,
Qatar and Saudi Arabia- and Hong Kong, China, as well as Montenegro,
Peru, Serbia and Ukraine.
IN May 2012, the European Free Trade Associations network consists
of 24 free trade agreements with 33 countries and four declarations on
co-operation.

This association is currently negotiating with Algeria,

Bosnia and Herzegovina, India, Indonesia, Central America (Costa Rica,


Guatemala, Honduras and Panama), Russia/Belarus/Kazakhstan and
Thailand.
In addition, China and Norway started bilateral negotiations on a free
trade agreement in the autumn of 2008.This agreement cover trade in
industrial

products,

fish

and

marine

products

and

processed

agricultural products.
In addition, each EFTA country has concluded bilateral agricultural
protocols which are important parts of EFTA's free trade agreements

with each of the partners.

This agreements incorporate in varying

degrees provisions on a number of other trade issues such as


competition, protection of intellectual property, services, investments,
sustainable development and government procurement.
The EFTA ministerial meeting in 2010, include a chapter on sustainable
development in on-going and future negotiations of European Free
Trade Association of free trade agreements.

The model chapter

includes provisions on the environment and labor standards. The aim


of this is to secure a high level of protection for the environment and
for employees.
According to this agreement, trading Parties should recognize that
economic development, social development and protection of the
environment are interdependent and supportive elements in securing
sustainable development.
Parties should promote trade which is environmentally friendly and
which supports sustainable development and committing to not
reducing levels of environmental or labor protection in order to secure
a competitive advantage over trade partners or to attract investments.
EFTA's free trade agreements with developing countries take into
account the different level of economic development in the partner
countries by providing for an asymmetrical approach.
In free trade agreements, the EFTA grants free trade from the date the
agreement enters into force, while the partner countries have
transitional periods of tariff is not for certain sensitive products. This
gives the partner country benefit of time to adapt their economy to
open trading conditions.
Through EFTA-agreements, Norwegian government participates in the
Pan-Euro-Mediterranean system of commutation of origin.

It is a

network of Free Trade Agreements which has identical rules of origin


thereby allowing for diagonal commutations of origin among the
members and has been a main step to facilitate trade in the region.

Generalized System of Preferences.


The Norwegian governments Generalized System of Preferences (GSP)
was established in 1971 with the objective to stimulate imports from
developing countries. Duty-free and quota-free market access, both are
for all products from Least Developed Countries (LDC) was introduced
in 2002.
In 2008 the Duty Free &Quota Free scheme was extended to include
Low Income Countries (LIC) with less than 75 million inhabitants,
bringing the total number of countries eligible for the Duty Free and
Quota Free scheme to 64 million.
In 2011, the Norwegian government commissioned an independent
study on the effects of the changes to the Generalized System of
Preferences that took effect from 2008. One of the major findings of
the study was that imports from LDCs and other Low Income Countries
remain marginal, despite significant tariff preferences.
Aid for Trade
Norway is committed to co-operate with developing countries in their
efforts to achieve economic growth and poverty reduction through
increased participation in global trade. Market access and other
improvements in the terms of trade are important in this regard.
Market access is not sufficient for the less developed and low income
countries. Therefore, enabling countries to take advantage of market

access opportunities has a high priority in Norwegian Development


Corporation.
For many years Norway has been a major contributor to the
multilateral funds for trade-related technical assistance
Norway donated NKr 15 million to the Doha Development Agenda
Global Trust Fund in 2012. Norway is one of the main old contributors
to this Fund since its initiation in 2002.

Norway has also made

substantial contributions to other World Trade Organization-related


activities, such as travel support and the Trade Facilitation Needs
Assessment Trust Fund.
Norway has also supported work related to trade and climate.
In 2007, the Action Plan for trade related development co-operation
(Aid for Trade) was launched by the Norwegian Government. The Action
Plan focuses on three thematic areas which are as follows:
a. Good governance and the fight against corruption trade,
b. women and trade,
c. Regional trade.
d. Priority is given to Africa and the less developed countries,
and the funds are channeled primarily through multilateral
organizations recommended by the WTO task force on aid for
trade.
e. An Action Plan is currently undergoing a revision based on
experiences gained since the plan was launched.

Policies and Norms of India for Import or export.

Zero Duty Export Promotion Capital Goods (EPCG) Scheme.


The foreign trade policy gives emphasis on two variants under this
scheme:
1. Zero Duty EPCG for few sectors and
2. 3% Duty EPCG for all sectors.

On the request of all stakeholders, Government has decided to


harmonize Zero Duty EPCG and 3% EPCG Scheme into one scheme
which will be a Zero Duty EPCG Scheme covering all sectors.
The salient features of the Zero Duty EPCG Scheme: Authorization holders will have export obligation of 6 times the duty
saved amount. It has to be completed in a period of 6 years.
The import period under the Scheme would be 18 months.
Export obligation discharge by export of alternate products and
accounting of exports of group companies will not be allowed.
The exporters who get benefit under Technology Up gradation Fund
Scheme (TUFS) administered by Ministry of Textiles, can also get the
benefit of Zero duty EPCG Scheme.

Reduced export obligation for Domestic Sourcing of Capital Goods


In the case of domestic sourcing of capital goods under this scheme
has

been

reduced

by

10%.

This

would

promote

domestic

manufacturing of capital goods.


Widening of Interest Subvention Scheme
2% interest subvention scheme is available to certain specific sectors
like

Handicrafts,

Handlooms,

Carpets,

Readymade

Garments,

Processed Agricultural Products, Sports Goods and Toys.


The scheme had been included 134 sub-sectors of engineering.
According to the Government, the benefit of this scheme of 2% interest
subvention could be available up to 31.03.2014.
Government has decided that the scheme includes items covered
under Chapter 63 of ITC (HS) (other made 5 up textile articles, sets,
rags).

Additional specified tariff lines of engineering sector items under the


scheme. These sectors would be able to get benefit under this scheme
during the period from 01.05.2013 to 31.03.2014.
Market and Product Diversification.
Norway has been added under Focus Market Scheme and Venezuela
has been added under Special Focus Market Scheme. The total
number of countries under both the scheme is respectively 125 and
50.
According to this scheme 126 new products included. The products
are from engineering,electronics, chemicals and textile sector.This
scheme included 47 items in Market Focus Product scheme.
Duty Free Import Authorization Scheme (DFIA).
According to, this scheme Anti-Dumping Duty and Safeguard Duty was
exempted. Exemption from payment of Anti-Dumping Duty as well as
Safeguard Duty shall henceforth not be available after endorsement of
transferability of such authorizations.
Technological Up gradation.
The technological up gradation of Indian export sector, EPCG (EXPORT
PROMOTION CAPITAL GOODS) Scheme at Zero Duty has been
introduced. This Scheme will be available for engineering & electronic
products, basic chemicals & pharmaceuticals, apparels & textiles,
plastics, handicrafts, chemicals etc.
It is subject to exclusions of current beneficiaries under Technological
Up gradation Fund Schemes (TUFS), administered by Ministry of
Textiles and beneficiaries of Status Holder Incentive Scheme in that
particular year.
Jaipur, Srinagar and Anantnag have been recognized as Towns of
Export Excellence for handicrafts; Kanpur, Dewas and Ambur have

been recognized as Towns of Export Excellence for leather products;


and Malihabad for horticultural products.
Sector wise policies.

Marine sector
Fisheries sectors which are exempted from maintenance of average
EO under EPCG Scheme, subject to the condition that Fishing Trawlers,
boats, ships and other similar items shall not be allowed to be
imported under this provision.
Gems & Jewellery Sector
To neutralize duty incidence on gold Jewellery exports, the
Government has now been decided to allow Duty Drawback on
such exports.
To make India a diamond international trading hub, this policy
planned to establish Diamond Bourse (s).
A new facility to allow import on consignment basis of cut &
polished diamonds for the purpose of grading/certification purposes
has been introduced.
To promote export of Gems & Jewellery products, the government
grant the value limits of personal carriage have been increased
from US$ 2 million to US$ 5 million in case of participation in
overseas exhibitions.
According to the policy, the limit in case of personal carriage, as
samples, for export promotion tours, has also been increased from
US$ 0.1 million to US$ 1 million.
Agriculture Sector

To reduce transaction and handling costs, a new system introduce by


government I.e.

Single window system to facilitate export of

perishable agricultural produce has been introduced.


Handloom Sector
To simplify claims under Focus product scheme, requirement of
Handloom Mark for getting benefits under FPS has been removed.
Thrust to Value Added Manufacturing
To encourage Value Added Manufactured export, according to Advance
Authorization Scheme minimum 15% value addition on imported inputs
has now been prescribed.

DEPB (Duty Entitlement Passbook Scheme)


DEPB rate shall include factoring of custom duty component on fuel
where the fuel is allowed as a consumable in Standard Input-Output
Norms.
Flexibility provided to exporters
According to nee Foreign Trade Policy of India, the payment of customs
duty for Export Obligation (EO) shortfall under Advance Authorization /
DFIA / EPCG Authorization has been allowed by way of debit of Duty
Credit scrip. Earlier the payment was allowed in cash only.
Time limit for re-import of exported gems and Jewellery items, for
participation in exhibitions has been extended from 60 days to 90 days
in case of USA.
Transit loss claims

received

from

private

approved

insurance

companies in India will be allowed for the purpose of Export Obligation


fulfillment under Export Promotion schemes. At present, the facility has
been limited to public sector general insurance companies only.

Simplification of Procedures
The Government simplify some procedures to facilitate duty free
import of samples by exporters, number of samples/pieces has been
increased from the existing 15 to 50. Customs clearance of such
samples shall be based on declarations given by the importers with
regard to the limit of value and quantity of samples.
In this policy the exemption for up to two stages from payment of
excise duty in lieu of refund, in case of supply to an advance
authorization holder (against invalidation letter) by the domestic
intermediate manufacturer. This would allow exemption for supplies
made to a manufacturer, if such manufacturer in turn supplies the
products to an ultimate exporter.
The government permitted Greater flexibility to allow conversion of
Shipping Bills from one Export Promotion scheme to other scheme.
Customs shall now permit this conversion within three months, instead
of the present limited period of only one month.
In this new trade policy, the duty free imported goods could be taken
only to the manufacturing unit of the authorization holder or its
supporting manufacturer.
Disposal of manufacturing wastes / scrap will be allowed after payment
of applicable excise duty, even before fulfillment of export obligation
under Advance Authorization and Export Promotion Capital Goods
Scheme.
According to the policy, the procedure for issue of Free Sale Certificate
has been simplified and the validity of the Certificate has been
increased from 1 year to 2 years. This will solve the problems faced by
the medical devices industry.
Acceding to the demand of trade & industry, the application and
redemption forms under Export Promotion Capital Goods scheme have
been simplified.
Reduction of Transaction Costs

For other license applications, maximum applicable fee is being


reduced to Rs. 100,000 from Rs 1, 50,000 (for manual applications)
and Rs. 50,000 to the Rs.75, 000 (for EDI applications).
To encourage EDI initiatives, Export Promotion Councils/Commodity
Boards have been advised to issue RCMC through a web based online
system. It is expected that issuance of RCMC would become EDI
enabled before the end of 2009.
For EDI ports, with effect from December 09, double verification of
shipping bills by customs for any of the Director General for Foreign
Trade schemes shall be dispensed with.
According to this new policy, the application fee for the new
authorization subject to payment of minimum fee of Rs. 200.
According to an updated compilation of Standard Input Output Norms
(SION) and ITC (HS) Classification of Export and Import Items has been
published.

Directorate of Trade Remedy Measures


To support to Indian industry and exporters, especially the MSMEs, in
getting their rights through trade remedy instruments, a Directorate of
Trade Remedy Measures shall be set up by the government.
Licensing system in Norway

Opening of new areas for exploration


Areas not opened for exploration (NPD)
Geological and geophysical data acquisition by NPD
Scientific data acquisition
Areas opened for reconnaissance (oil companies, contractors)
Seismic data, sea bed samples etc.
Impact assessment (MPE)
Environment, trade and industry, risk of pollution, economic and
social effects
Ministry proposes opening of areas for licensing
Overall consideration of resource potential and impact on society
White paper to the Parliament

India and Norway Sign an Agreement on Double Taxation Avoidance and


Prevention of Fiscal Evasion.

Problems faced by Liza World Travels for starting the


company.

Short, limited seasons.:Norways tourism is characterized by strong fluctuations in demand that are
a consequence of seasonal concentration. The results in a number of
challenges for the Norwegian tourism industry including the ability to
generate profits and attract and retain staff at all levels. Reduction seasonal
concentration of demand for tourism is therefore a priority (e.g. see
Norwegian Ministry of Trade and Industry 2005).
To develop counter-seasonal strategies, it is useful to have an understanding
of the seasonal concentration of demand for tourism and the relative
marginal effect of different markets. The former identifies patterns of

seasonal concentration and can be used to measure any year-on-year


changes. This can also be used to benchmark seasonal concentration in one
geographical area

against that of

other

areas. The

latter provides

opportunities to target markets that reduce seasonal concentration. The


physical and socio-cultural factors causing seasonality might be different in
the generating areas compared to the receiving areas for tourism

Numerous small units with limited resources:The many of the countrys local authorities wish to go for tourism. That such
a high proportion of local authorities wish to develop tourism products is
good, but in a national industrial policy perspective it is main to take into
account that not all investments in local tourism activities may be profitable.
This must be considered, for e.g.: when the development of year-round jobs
is being discussed.
Tourists demand is a complete experience, with the possibility of combining
products

from

various

segments

of

the

tourism

industry

into

comprehensive package.
The

development

of

all-inclusive

tourism

products

and

Norwegian

destinations requires separate entities coordinate their efforts. This will allow
the tourism industry of Norway

to strengthen its position in the more

intense international competition to attract tourists. The new collaborative


constellations between entities that already define themselves as belonging
to the tourism industry should be stimulated. It is also important to include
other business sectors so that investments made in these areas can be
exploited for the purposes of tourism also .Destination management bodies
should play

a key role in co-coordinatingthe industry and the tourism

activities being undertaken at local as well as regional level.

Fragmented sales and marketing work.:The tourism products of Norway

compete with a vast array of foreign

tourism products. But before a customer can select a Norwegian service


provider and Norwegian experiences, they have to know what is available.
Therefore marketing is fundamental to customers acquiring any interest at
all in considering Norway as a travel destination. Marketing is carried out at
several levels and through a variety of channels. Use of public funds to
market Norway as a tourism destination has increased during the past
decade. International regulations govern the kind of marketing that may be
financed through public funds. The marketing collaboration that exists
between the tourism industry and the public administration is built on these
regulations.

Unorganized structure:The tourism industry requires an organizational model that utilizes both
public and private resources more effectively. The purpose of adjusting the
destination management structure is to make the tourism industry more
efficient and get more out of the public funds allocated to the sector. This is
also intended to enable the local authorities to more meet the tourism
industrys

need

in

the

development

of

all-inclusive

and

attractive

destinations.
Cultural problem:Norway has active cultural sector .But its correct utilization is not yet been
plan which can help to provide content for tourism products in different
ways.

Strategy to solve the problem.

Seasonal strategies.

To

develop

counter-seasonal

strategies,

it

is

useful

to

have

an

understanding of the seasonal concentration of demand for tourism and


the relative marginal effect of different markets. A former identifies
patterns of seasonal concentration and can be used to measure any yearon-year changes. This can be used to benchmark seasonal concentration
in one geographical area against that of other areas. The latter provides
opportunities to target markets that reduce (or at least minimize growth
in) seasonal concentration.
International markets increase seasonal concentration with a relative
marginal effect of 14.2% of the international markets, German and Dutch
markets increase seasonal concentration with relative marginal effects of
6.8 %and 3.8 %respectively. Danish, Swedish, British, Polish and
Lithuanian markets reduce seasonality although their relative marginal
effects are fairly small.

Resource utilization.
There are many destination management bodies in Norway. Roles,
responsibilities and tasks need to be clearly allocated between these
organizations. Increasing the effectiveness of the efforts being made, the
use of private and public sector resources requires clarification of who
should do what, and who should finance the various activities.
Every year Innovation in Norway contacts more than 1,000 international
tour operators who sell Norway to establish and to maintain good
relations. Activities involve in making sales visits, training tour operator
staff, local workshops and the organizations flagship event, the
Norwegian Travel Workshop.

Staged

annually,

the Norwegian

Travel

Workshop

brings

together

Norwegian tourism companies and foreign tour operators, and is an


example of how Innovation Norway creates arenas for the sale of
Norwegian tourism products abroad.

Marketing strategy.
Online solutions have made this far easier to sell experiences direct to the
consumer. Therefore use of online solutions is a natural part of any such
sales plan. Building relations with tour operators and travel agencies is
important. Today, these account for the sale of a considerable volume of
holiday experiences in Norway.
For tour operators to recommend Norway to their customers they must
know about Norway as well as Norwegian tourism products. Most people
have pointed to a short distance between product information and the
buy button for the same product as a success factor in triggering sales.
Good electronic solutions for booking, payment are therefore vital
elements in maintaining and increasing customer motivation to choose
Norwegian

destinations.

The

booking

solution

was

launched

on

visitnorway.com in 2011 represents an important milestone in the effort to


make Norwegian tourism products easier to buy. This is important that
this solution issued and further developed in the time ahead. This

is of

particular importance that more and more tourism service providers make
their products available for booking through this site. Sales as well as
marketing are also about giving customers the information they need,
when they need it.

Norways official tourism.

Visitnorway.com is

available in 14 languages, has partnership agreements

with around 90 % of Norways destinations and tourist information offices.


The portal is constantly developed in terms of both content and technology
with Book Norway being integrated as late as 2011. The use of social media
has been integrated into the online concept. Visitnorway.com had 9.5million
visitors in 2010, andrising to 11.9 million in 2011. The complete overview of
the measures the government is proposing in this area is presented below.
Continue the collaboration between the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and
Innovation Norway tostrengthenits international reputation.
The use design elements to reinforce the presentation of destinations
as unified entities.
To develop versions of the Book Norway booking solution in all the
same relevant languages thatvisitnorway.com is available in.
To expand Book Norways contents to include more products and
services, including comprehensive packages.
To make better use of tourism-related awards and Norways other
natural and cultural advantages in international marketing activities.
Strengthen the distribution of the comprehensive product packages
that are available, promote the development of additional packages.
In conjunction with the industry develop an action plan to improve
coordination between the sales, distribution side and activities to
market Norway as a tourism destination.
Include incoming operators in the development of the new action plan.
Evaluate Innovation its marketing activities.
Ensure the impact on sales of the marketing effort is evaluated at
regular intervals.
The use of industrys own experience in the development of marketing
strategies

Organizational structure.
Based on the input received in connection with the work to revise the
tourism strategy, three areas in particular must be examined in more detail
before the organizational model for future tourism industry can be drawn up.
We must:
d. Define which organizational structures are desirable, possible and
appropriate.
e. Allocate roles and responsibilities more clearly.
f. Come up with a robust and long-term funding model for the new
organizational solution.

Involvement of the cultural sector.


The Norwegian governments culture program is aide-ranging effort in
the field of culture and the arts, whose goal is for one per cent of the
national budget tube allocated to cultural purposes by 2014. The
extensive investment in culture helps to provide content for the effort
to boost tourism. Ibsen, Bjornson, Munch, folk music, black metal,
Rackham and the Opera House, and a rich cultural history are among
the elements the cultural sector can contribute to make Norway more
widely known and attractive as travel destination.

Star rating for providers of overnightAccommodation.


During the first half of 2012, this scheme for providers of overnight
accommodation in Norway will be launched. Norwegian Accreditation has
been commissioned by the Ministry of Trade and Industry to administer the
scheme, where hotels are awarded stars on the basis of a set of quality

indicators.
The standardized system for customer evaluations will be
included in the star-rating scheme. In addition to this scheme, additional
performance criteria covering the environment, universal access and type of
market segment the hotel is operating in will also be adopted. The criteria
may lead to supplementary labeling as eco-friendly, accessible in accordance
with NS 11010, and designation as conference hotel, business hotel or
holiday hotel

Resources needed for winning strategy.

There are various resources required to setting up Liza World Travels Travels
in Norway.

A. Financial resources.
Small business financing can involve several types of financing including
short-term debt, long-term debt and equity financing. Alternate sources of
financing including leasing, advance payments from customers, and supplier
financing through extended payment terms.
For most International tourism businesses, the primary season is either
winter or summer. Many do not operate year-round. Spring and fall are
generally considered low season for most tourism businesses.
These peaks and valleys must be taken into account in your financial
planning.
If all your annual revenue comes during a six month period, you need to plan
your revenues and expenditures for the whole year to ensure that you can
sustain the business through the other six months of low cash-flow. This can
get challenging, especially since the low time for cash flow is often the same
time that you need to invest in marketing and promotion for the upcoming
season. Therefore, you will likely need to establish a line of credit with a bank
to carry you through the cash-flow valleys. This is in addition to having upfront working capital to start your business.

B. Human Resources.
Organizations exist for people. The people make them of people and their
effectiveness depends on the behavior and performance of the people
constituting them.
Interestingly, people are considered as resources and as asset rather than a
liability.
Today, there is a growing awareness of the importance of the human side of
organizations as a vital factor in overall progress. There is no doubt that the
people, science & technology, will determine the future of Liza World Travels
in Norway.
Though Liza World Travels is owner-operated, it almost all needs employees
to support the operation of the business. Before you hire anyone, there are
many things to consider, including:

How to recruit the right people for your business;


Compensation and salary levels;
Insurance and benefits;
Managing your staff;
Staff training;
How to retain good workers.

The following figure details the profile of persons employed in Liza World
Travels at Norway.
Graduate/Masters,
with
over
8 years of experience
Branch
Operations
Messenger/
T
Sales
eam
ravelLeader/Deputy
Leader
Manager
Executive
Counsellors
Manager
Manager
Sales
Manager

Graduate/Masters/Basic/Advance certification course in Ticketing, with over 5 years of experience

Graduate/Basic certification course in Ticketing, with 3-4 years of experience

Marketing Resources.:Once you are ready to take your product to market, the big question is,
'How?' Do you promote your product directly to the consumer? Do you sell
your product through tourism trade partners? Or do you do both?
To answer these questions and develop your marketing plan, it all comes
back to research. You need to understand your target market - how and when
your potential clients book their vacations, and where they get their travel
information.
You then need to identify the best resources to assist you with marketing
your product to your target markets.
You also need to understand the buying cycle of clients in your target
market, in order to prepare effective marketing materials and identify the
sales activities you will need to undertake.
Marketing materials and sales activities
Print and online advertising

Brochures
Website
Media releases
Quality images of your product and destination
Personal attendance at marketplaces as well as trade and consumer

shows
Sales calls
Direct mail
Membership in tourism associations or sector associations

Marketing Resources Include:

Product Development & Packaging.


Once you have researched your markets it is time to develop your product.
Use the results of your market research to help guide development,
marketing, and pricing. You will need to take into account the activities that
appeal to your target market. If it is an accommodation business, you need
to identify your guests' duration of stay. And you will need to decide on the
appropriate

price

to

charge.

The

research

you

conducted

on

your

competitors should tell you what the competition is offering. This will allow
you to be competitive with your pricing, while creating a product or package
that is unique in the market.
Destination Marketing Organizations (DMOs).
Destination Marketing Organizations (DMOs) can be important marketing
resources for tourism businesses. DMOs are responsible for developing and
delivering marketing programs that increase tourism visitation to a particular
place. DMOs represent a wide variety of destinations from a national level
down to a region, city, community, or specific resort.
Business Operations Resources.
After you have completed your business registration, and obtained the
necessary financing and insurance, it is time to set up your business
operations. Regardless of the type of tourism business you are starting, the
following steps are essential to establish your business on a solid foundation.
Secure a phone and fax number for your business.
Select and register a domain name for your website -optional, but
recommended.
Open a bank account and secure a line of credit and/or working capital.
Set up your record-keeping and accounting system.

Secure office space.


Set up your office. Lease or purchase the necessary office equipment.
Develop contracts, liability waivers and any other legal tools you will
need to conduct your business.
Establish a management and staffing plan.

FINANCIAL DATA
Financial Data means the process of reviewing and evaluating a company's
financial statements (such as the balance sheet or profit and loss statement),
thereby gaining an understanding of the financial health of the company and
enabling more effective decision making. Financial statements record
financial data; however, this information must be evaluated through financial
statement analysis to become more useful to investors, shareholders,
managers and other interested parties.
Financial statement analysis is an evaluative method of determining the
past, current and projected performance of a company. Several techniques
are commonly used as part of financial statement analysis including
horizontal analysis, which compares two or more years of financial data in
both dollar and percentage form; vertical analysis, where each category of
accounts on the balance sheet is shown as a percentage of the total account;
and ratio analysis, which calculates statistical relationships between data.
The following are the projected some financial data for Liza World Travels:-

1. Income Statement

A financial statement that measures a Liza World Travel's financial


performance over a specific accounting period. Financial performance is
assessed by giving a summary of how the business incurs its revenues and
expenses through both operating and non-operating activities. It also shows
the net profit or loss incurred over a specific accounting period, typically over
a fiscal quarter or year .Also known as the "profit and loss statement" or
"statement of revenue and expense."
The income statement is the one of the three major financial statements.
The other two are the balance sheet and the statement of cash flows. The
income statement is divided into two parts: the operating and non-operating
sections.
Here is the estimated Income statement of the Liza World Travels

PERIOD ENDING

31/3/2015

31/3/2016

31/3/2017

Total Revenue

78,08,208

1,23,11,029

1,43,28,833

Cost of Revenue

39,85,825

67,88,884

88,07,941

Gross Profit

38,22,920

55,20,292

66,60,220

Sales, general,admin.

34,49,079

50,96,579

6,416,921

other operating items

1,19,666

1,74,709

2,35,012

Operating income

2,54,321

6,29,881

11,30,681

Add.income/expense items

1,00,285

1,24,448

2,62,794

EBIT

3,54,679

3,71,148

3,97,573

Operating expenses

Interest expense

2,20,798

3,10,407

4,86,933

EBT

1,33,881

2,59,080

3,83,799

3,02,454

4,41,345

6,29,205

Net Income

2. Balance Sheet

A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities and


shareholders' equity at a specific point in time. These three balance sheet
segments give investors an idea as to what the company owns and owes, as
well as the amount invested by the shareholders.

The balance sheet must follow the following formula:


Assets = Liabilities + Shareholders' Equity
It's called a balance sheet because the two sides balance out. This makes
sense: a company has to pay for all the things it has (assets) by either
borrowing money (liabilities) or getting it from shareholders (shareholders'
equity).
Each of the three segments of the balance sheet will have many accounts
within it that document the value of each. Accounts such as cash, inventory
and property are on the asset side of the balance sheet, while on the liability
side there are accounts such as accounts payable or long-term debt. The
exact accounts on a balance sheet will differ by company and by industry, as
there is no one set template that accurately accommodates for the
differences between different types of businesses.

Here is the estimated Balance Sheet of the Liza World Travels

PERIOD ENDING

31/3/2015

31/3/2016

31/3/2017

Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents

32,32,866

27,37,156

23,75,559

Net receivables

10,06,981

16,55,055

20,51,460

Other current assets

21,30,267

41,16,795

44,29,291

Total current assets

63,71,134

86,58,380

88,69,584

Long term investments

37,503

3,91,531

4,43,097

Fixed assets

2,35,206

4,41,535

5,75,296

Intangible assets

1,74,826

5,21,854

21,86,862

Other assets

57,879

68,630

89,944

Total assets

70,57,620

1,06,35,23
5

1,21,61,803

Accounts payable

18,55,937

29,18,625

50,39,820

other current liabilities

3,49,452

4,45,561

6,09,341

Total current liabilities

22,09,883

30,67,101

52,61,103

Long term debt

9316

11,066

17,754

Other liabilities

73,165

1,35,638

4,88,711

Total liabilities

22,92,783

32,18,989

58,35,766

Long term assets

Current liabilities

3. BREAKEVEN OF LIZA WORLD TRAVELS


DEFINITION of 'Break-Even Analysis'
An analysis to determine the point at which revenue received equals the
costs associated with receiving the revenue. Break-even analysis calculates
what is known as a margin of safety, the amount that revenues exceed the
break-even point. This is the amount that revenues can fall while still staying
above the break-even point.

200

150

100
SALES(LAKHS)

50

PROFIT(LAKHTS)

0
2015

2016

2017

2018

-50

-100

YEAR

SALES(LAKHS)

PROFIT(LAKHS)

2015

75,00,000

(-50,00,000)

2016

1,00,00,00

(-85,00,000)

2017

1,15,00,000

1,15,00,000

2018

1,40,00,000

1,20,00,000

FUTURE PROJECTION OF LIZA WORLD TRAVELS

Tourism is an important part of the Norwegian economy. In 2011, demand for


tourism in Norway contributed 29 million commercial guest nights. Over a
quarter of those guest nights were booked by foreign tourists1. Travel and
accommodation industry is one of the economic segments which had
significantly surpassed pre-downturn levels in value terms by 2012. The total
contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP (including wider effects from
investment, the supply chain and induced income impacts) was 21,9 billion
euros (6.2% of GDP) in 2012, and it is expected to rise by 2.7% to 28,9 billion
euros in 2023
Direct contribution of Norwegian tourism to GDP

(Source: WTTC, 2014)

Visitors to Norway come from all parts of the globe, with a great many from
Germany, the Netherlands, Great Britain, USA and France especially. The
majority of tourists, however, are Norwegian or from other Scandinavian
countries, usually travelling on business. These business tourists constitute
an important part of the total number of overnight stays; many of the larger
hotels therefore base their activities on conference rooms and restaurant
facilities. The tourism industry in Norway is characterized by strong
fluctuations in demand, as it is highly seasonal. Geography and climate play
important roles in the demand for labour in the tourism sector. For example,
mountain resorts may have a quiet period in early autumn and late spring,
depending on weather conditions suitable for hiking and skiing. More urban
areas may have slightly less tourist activity in January after the Christmas
season and before winter and Easter holidays begin, and again in May
The following are some future projections made for :
a. Expected No. of Tourist in Norway
b. Employment in Tourism
c. GDP.
d.Unemployment Rate.
e.Inflation Rate
f. Export Price
e.Import Price

a. Expected No. of Tourist in Norway


As the from the availability of data, in Norway the tourist visited were 20
million where as there was 25% increase seen in the tourist visited Norway in
2014.
(Sources:- SSB Statistics Norway)
So from the above data we can make the estimation for the no. of tourist will
visit Norway for next 3 years
Years

No. of tourists

2013
2014
2015
2016
2017

(in millions)
20
25
31.25
32.81
33.20

No. of tourists(thousands)
31.25

35
30
25

32.81

33.2

25
20

no. of tourists(in million)

20
15
10
5
0
2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

b. Employment in Tourism
In 2013, the total contribution of Travel & Tourism to employment, including
jobs indirectlysupported by the industry, was 8.5% of total employment
(222,000 jobs).
This is increased to by 1.2% in 2014 to 224664 jobs and it may be increased
and reached to 30% till 2024.
(Sources: - 2014 Norway ANNUAL RESEARCH: KEY FACTS)
As from above data availability we have made some execrated data for the
employment contribution in tourism sector.
Year

Employment (%)

2013

8.5

2014

9.7

2015

11.9

2016

13.1

2017

15.3

Employment (%)
18
15.3

16
14

11.9

12
10
8.5
8

13.1

9.7

Employment (%)

6
4
2
0
2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

c. GDP.
Gross domestic product is the market value of all officially recognized final
goods and services produced within a country in a year, or other given
period of time. GDP per capita is often considered an indicator of a country's
standard of living.
In 2013, the total contribution of Travel & Tourism to GDP was 1.34
This is increased to by 0.36% in 2014 which is 1.7.
(Sources: - 2014 Norway ANNUAL RESEARCH: KEY FACTS)
As from above data availability we have made some execrated data for the
GDP contribution in tourism sector.
Year

GDP

2013

1.34

2014

1.7

2015

1.8

2016

2.0

2017

2.2

2017; 2.2

2013; 1.34

2014; 1.7

2016; 2
2015; 1.8

d. Unemployment Rate.
In 2013, the total unemployment in Norway for year 2013 was 4.2% where it
decreased by 2% in 2014 and was 4.00.
(Sources:- Unemployment Data Research- 2014)
The percentage of the work force that is unemployed at any given date.

Year

Unemployment

2013
2014
2015
2016
2017

Rate
4.2
4.0
3.4
3.1
3.0

Unemployment Rate
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Unemployment Rate

e. Inflation Rate.

Inflation is defined as a sustained increase in the general level of prices


for goods and services. It is measured as an annual percentage increase.
Asinflation rises, every dollar you own buys a smaller percentage of a
good or service.

Year

Rate

2013

3.2

2014

2.30

2015 (feb)

1..91

Inflation Rate
3.5

3.2

2.3

2.5

1.91

Inflation Rate

2
1.5
1
0.5
0
2013

2014

2015 (feb)

f. Export Prices.
The Export Price Index (EPI) tracks changes in the price which firms receive
for products they export.

Increases in the EPI are typically due to strong foreign demand or higher
internal costs within the exporters country.

Year
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017

Prices
119.6
127.9
126.0
129.1
130.2

Export Prices
2017

130.2

2016

129.1

2015
2014
2013
114

Export Prices

126
127.9
119.6
116

118

120

122

124

126

128

130

132

g. Import Prices.
Index price of the goods that are imported by country.

Year

Prices

2013

111.3

2014

117.5

2015

120

2016

122

2017

125

Import Price
2013

111.3

125

2014
117.5

122
120

2015
2016
2017

In 2012, Norway generated NOK 32.3 bn in visitor exports. In 2013, this is


expected to grow by 0.6% and the country is expected to attract 5105000
international tourist arrivals.
By 2023, international tourist arrivals are forecast to total 7146000
generating expense on increase of 4.2% p.a.

FINDING AND SUGGESTIONS

Climate change have a positive effect on the overall European

potential for

tourism: up to 59 million bed nights more or some 8% of the total of 777


million nights registered for 2005 in a study on 29 countries. Additional
potential revenues could be in the order of 418 billion Euros.
However, the changes are likely to be unequally spread across Europe. The
year-round potential for tourism increases in the northern parts of Europe.
Including the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and Scandinavia, and in Austria.
In the southern countries, there is evidence for a loss of potential, although
improvements in the spring and autumn,both theseasons are likely to offset
a significant share of the deteriorations in summer. Austria and the UK enjoy
significant gains in relative terms, whereas Italy and Spain face the largest
losses.

Economic sectors.
The NORA region is a resource based economy. It is closely tied to fisheries,
an industry that serves a vital role in employment, export and wealth
creation.
The fishing industry is by far the most important economic sector in the
Faroe Islands and Greenland. It is in the process of developing a mining
industry, which is the case for Northern Norway. Iceland and Coastal Norway,
in contrast to the regions other countries, have a more diversified economy.
Fishing and energy, both are very important to the development in Coastal
Norway. The key factor in the countrys economy has been the discovery and
production of oil and gas. Although fisheries have been declining in Iceland,
it remains one of the most important economic sectors. Today, Aluminium is
Icelands biggest export good.

In the Faroese and Greenland we find strong public sector and mostly
fisheries based on private sector. Norway and Iceland, both are significantly
dependent on jobs in the public sector. In the more remote settlements,
employment in the public sector provides job opportunities for people with
specialised skills.
Greenland and the Faroe Islands have developed tourism industry in
significant ways over the past few years. However, tourism only represents a
small part of the countries economic activity. Norway and Iceland promoted
their countries as tourist destinations over a longer period of time. Iceland is
more dependent on tourism than any other NORA country. In 2009, tourism
increases countrys GDP to 5.9 %.
The GDP of Norway was NOK 2.915.354 million in 2012. In 2011, it was DKK
13.173 million in the Faeroes, while it was ISK 1.626.335 million in Iceland,
and DKK 13,060 million in Greenland.

Employment.
Employment figuresare high in the NORA region. Unemployment rates in
2012 were 5.5 % in the Faroese, 9.9 % in Greenland, 5.6 % in Iceland and 3.2
% in Norway.
Many factors contribute to the high employment rate in the region. The two
important ones are the growth in the public sector, which has given new
employment opportunities, and the other is the emigration of young people,
who leave either to study or for a job.

The problem of unemployment is mostly in sparsely populated areas. A fall of


employment in the fishing industry results in greater unemployment in the
peripheral regions. Norway is the least regional difference in unemployment.
The problem in the peripheral areas of the NORA region is the lack of
specialised labour. There is more economic activity and more jobs in the
towns, those with specialised competences tend migrate to the more urban
areas.
In

December

2013,

there

were

99 000

unemployed

persons,

corresponding to 3.6 per cent of the labour force. The unemployment


rate has varied between 3.4 and 3.6 throughout 2013

Demand for labour.


Because of the economic situation the labour demand will be somewhat
lower than first expected. A recent survey of employers has shown that the
demand for labour both within Norway and from other countries is expected
to continue to rise slightly in 2014.
In Norway, the demand for unskilled workers is not expected to rise in the
coming year, but some sectors are expected to experience a continuing
demand for highly skilled workers:

Health and care professions


Education sector
Engineers in more fields (especially petroleum and maritime sector)
Highly skilled IT personnel (most employers will require high level of

skills in the Norwegian language)


Highly skilled construction workers
Cooks and bakers
Skilled industrial workers (pipefitters, welders, CNC operators, miners)

CONCLUSION

Sustainable travel and tourism products and services can


boost sales.
As Norway being a nature tourism destination, green sustainable products
and services fit well into product development and marketing strategies.
There was increased activity and engagement by the tourism industry to
present sustainable products and services, both during the review period.
Programmes like Norwegian Ecotourism, a customised scheme for naturebased

travel

and

tourism

enterprises

and

environmental

labelling

programmes emerged during the review period, including Scandinavian ecolabel Swan, Eco-Lighthouse and ISO 14001. On one hand large chains like
travel accommodation providers were active in eco-labelling. But smaller
providers were interested in sustainable positioning. Green travel products
and services, both will represent an opportunity to add value to products and
services in a competitive environment during the forecast period.

Sales growth of travel products will be moderate during the forecast period.
Value sales of tourism products are expected to grow moderately during the
forecast period. This will be due to intense competition and discounting
taking place in many categories. Due to this development, the unit prices are
expected to face strong pressure in most categories. While transportation
and car rental, both are likely to see significant price competition, other
categories like travel accommodation and tourist attractions could see value
added by active engagement from companies through strategies like
environmental certification and labelling.
The objective of this analysis is to support suppliers in their longer-term
policy making. The trends mentioned relate to Western society and to Europe
in particular for the next five years. They are based on many analyses and
assessments made by international tourism experts.

DEMOGRAPHICS.
The number of persons in older age categories will increase. Seniors will be
healthier, will have higher disposable incomes than in the past. Most of them
will enjoy early retirement schemes.
As a result, the number of experienced senior travellers will increase faster
than the development of tourism demand in general although a gradual
downgrading of pension benefits and

trend to increase the pensionable age

may slow down development in the long run.

Consequences for the tourism sector:

The increasing demand for quality, convenience and security for easy
transportation for more relaxing entertainment facilitiesand for oneperson products.

More demand in shoulder months.


In marketing, least emphasis should be put on age and more on
comfort.
The average number of persons per household will decrease further,
which will result in higher disposable incomes and spending power.
Due to this tourism demand in general, and demand for long-haul
travel and short breaks in particular.
Consequences for the tourism sector:

The increasing demand for luxury for special products which can be
obtained on impulse; for city-breaks and other short breaks abroad in
periods that used to be least favoured.

High level of interest in winter sun holidays.

HEALTH.
Health-consciousness will increase further. Though that will not influence the
volume of demand, it will influence the decision-making with regard to
destinations and behaviour during holidays.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
Destinations that are perceived less healthy will be more quickly
avoided than in the past.
Demand for sun-holidays will continue to decrease.

Activity holidays will increase in popularity andthe demand for facilities


that correspond to the type of holiday will be increasingly preferred.
The demand for wellness products will increase that including spas
and fitness centres.

AWARENESS & EDUCATION.


The average level of education is increasing. It will result in holidaymaking in
which arts, culture and history play a more prominent role and including
more educational and spiritual holidaymaking.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
The increasing demand for special products.
The most prominent inclusion of elements of arts, culture and history in
package tours and self-organised holidays.
The need for better and more creative communication of information.
The demand for new destinations in Central and Eastern Europe will
increase.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY.
The penetration of the internet and its use for information and the
purchasing of tourism products and services will continue to increase. For
tourism, the role of the internet, including new means of visual presentation,
will increase still further, and will prove to be of utmost importance in future.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
The availability of tourist information on destinations and products and
increasingly sophisticated search engines to analyse such information

will lend itself to comparison and thus influence competition more

intensively via grazing.


The experienced tourists will increasingly put together theirown

holidays on a modular basis with direct bookings.


The role of travel agents will decrease as full package tours are
increasingly bought directly via the net.
Internet will transform the classical role of NTOS and Tourist Boards at
an increasing speed but will create a new role in e-marketing, including
the application of CRM-destination marketing.
Destination marketing will increase in importance as the source to
stimulate website visits.
An availability of in-depth information on suppliers products, either on
the destination site or accessible through links, will assume more
importance as the basic precondition for the success of websites.
A possibility of shopping via the net will stimulate later bookings.
A growing need for secure online reservations has to be stressed, in
relation to more experienced and self-assured tourists.

TRANSPORTATION.
An increasing availability of high-speed trains and low-cost carriers will
influence classical travel flows. Road traffic will face more congestion.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
Destinations will increasingly benefit from easy and affordable access
for short breaks in particular when major events are organised outside
of the main season.
An increasing availability of direct links by train and plane will
stimulate demand for international short breaks in cities and cityregions to the detriment of rural areas.

The use of high-speed trains for medium distances will take over large

proportion of the travel currently undertaken by scheduled airlines.


The road congestion will negatively influence transport by private car

in particular in the high season.


The coach trips will decrease in importance.
The barriers that result from non-adapted schedules or not well
connected intermodal transportation will have a stronger negative
influence on destinations that cannot meet the growing wish for easy

accessibility.
Cruises not only expensive cruises, but also those in budget-class
will increase in popularity, in particular for those over 50 years of age.

SUSTAINABILITY.
The environmental consciousness will continue to increase. For tourism, it
will result in more demand for sustainable destinations, in which nature and
population will play an increasingly prominent role. In order to mitigate the
costs for sustainability, the price will increasingly be passed on to the
tourists themselves.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
The regional component in destinations will increase is important.
The destination management policies need to be improved by more
coherent and consistent planning.
The preference for destinations will be more strongly connected to the
support given by the local population to welcoming increasing numbers

of visitors.
The regions which have suffered from overbuilding , particularly where
it is not in keeping with the natural landscape will increasingly be

rejected as an attractive destinations.


An eco-tourism should not be confused with sustainable tourism.

SAFETY & SECURITY.


The acts of terrorism, regional wars, pollution and other crises have
unfortunately become facts of daily life, and influence the need to feel safe
and secure. In tourism, it results in an increased need for safety and security
and in tourists avoiding destinations that are perceived as unsafe.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
The quality of water in lakes and pools, but also of tap water will gain
more importance role in the selection of the destination, along with
increased demand for better protection of water quality.
The more critical tourist will most quickly make claims if the product
offered doesnt meet up to the expected standards.
The costs for safety and security will increase rapidly.
An industry should be better prepared to meet tourism demand more
flexibly in periods of crisis.

LEISURE TIME.
The

modern society exerts increasing pressure on peoples daily lives and

stimulates the wish for more leisure time and relaxation which will limit the
increase in free disposable incomes. For tourism, this trend is thus
unfavourable and also because the increase in the number of days of paid
leave for holidaymaking has come to a halt.
Consequences for the tourism sector:
The increasing need to supply low-cost products.
The increasing need to offer relaxation.
The shortening of the longer main holiday in favour of more short ones.

TRAVEL EXPERIENCE.

The more sophisticated consumers are increasingly self-assured regarding


their needs and rights. For tourism, it

results in an increasingly critical

attitude to quality, and to the price quality ratio.


Consequences for the tourism sector:

The alternative ways of spending time and money will increasingly


compete

with

holidaymaking

and

within

holidaymaking,

the

preferences for destinations and accommodation.


The destinations that dont
meet acceptable standards will suffer
more intensely, and for longer periods of time.
The more mixed behaviour: this holiday simple, the next one luxurious

this year long-haul, next year short-haul.


A holiday preference will become more fragmented, and thus

influence repeat volumes.


The destination fidelity will continue to drop over the years.
The more experienced tourists will increasingly result in a more critical
attitude to the artificial, in favour of greater authenticity in particular
with reference to emotional satisfaction and the need to personalise;
artificial supply that does not distinguish itself from each other will

decrease in importance if it does not meet higher standards.


The experience and critical attitudes will stimulate tourists to revisit
satisfactory destinations from their travel past.
An increasing preference for mobility will stimulate rentals of cars and
motor-bikes.
The regions that offer a full, varied, totally balanced concept will be
increasingly

preferred,

and

will

demand

better

destination

management.

LIFESTYLES.
The lifestyles in Western society are changing gradually. For tourism, it
influences the tourists perception of his/her personal needs and behaviour.

Consequences for the tourism sector:


Though relevant investments may made, an interest in Bed &
Breakfast is lessening, since it is regarded as cheap.
As status is least
important than it used to be, leisure
behaviour is becoming more personalised, leading to increased
demand for smaller sized accommodation units (like smaller
authentic family hotels and tourist farms).
A shift in perception regarding life and lifestyle will result in a
decline in the demand for fully escorted tours.
The suppliers will benefit more if they are able to create
completely new products, concepts and services that distinguish
themselves by their added value.
The increasing specialisation from suppliers relating to specific
hobbies and interests will become more important, and will more
often be combined with holidaymaking.
An increased preference for solid anchors as secure holds in a
more uncertain world will stimulate the desire to possess second
homes, especially in areas near smaller regional airports.
The trend of back to basics will result in preferences for more

simple holidays from hotel to bungalow, from caravan to tent.


The increasing specialisation from suppliers relating to specific
hobbies and interests will become more important, and will more

often be combined with holidaymaking.


An increased preference for solid anchors as secure holds in a
more uncertain world will stimulate the desire to possess second
homes, especially in areas near smaller regional airports.
The trend of back to basics will result in preferences for more
simple holidays from hotel to bungalow, from caravan to tent.

BIBILOGRAPHY
http://www.grida.no/files/tourism/2010/seminar/10_Ingunn%20Sornes_Innovation
%20Norway.pdf
http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/sectors/tourism/tourism-businessportal/documents/business/internationalisation/norway_country_report.pdf
Statistics Norway: Norway's central institution for producing official statistics,
Minifacts about Norway, Tourism and transportation, 2013 2 World Travel and
tourism council: Travel & Tourism Economic impact, Norway, 2013

http://www.wttc.org/-/media/files/reports/economic%20impact%20research/country
%20reports/norway2014.pdf
http://www.inflation.eu/inflation-rates/norway/inflation-norway.aspx
http://www.lizaworldtravels.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Innovation_Norway
http://www.emb-norway.ca/services/business/Public-Agencies/InnovationNorway/#.VSpScdyUfSs
http://www.freenomads.com/blog/?p=296#sthash.XnkjKAUQ.dpbs
http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/14031/1/mpra_paper_14031.pdf

http://arunachalpradesh.gov.in/tourism.htm
http://www.transindiatravels.com/arunachal-pradesh/tourist-places-to-visit-in-arunachalpradesh